Blogs

I've been overwhelmed and saddened by recent news. It's hard enough talking through it with other adults. I can't imagine having to explain to young children. How do you talk with kids and teens about violence and hatred? Children, even young children, are likely to be aware but not fully understand what has happened. Adults may not be comfortable, but “when it comes to talking to children, experts say diversity and discrimination are subjects that shouldn’t be ignored.” [The American Psychological Association]

Here are a few outside resources that may be helpful for parents and caregivers, along with two booklists.

From the American Psychological Association, Talking to kids about discrimination and Building resilience to manage indirect exposure to terror.

From the Anti-Defamation League, Empowering young people in the aftermath of hate

From Common Sense Media, Explaining the news to our kids

From Fred Rogers Company, Tragic events

The following information is a resource for immigrants and refugees on individual rights and immigration enforcement. This list is a start, if you require further information please contact the library.

The library has helpful booklists that discuss the immigrant experience for all ages and reading levels.

The following list will be updated frequently, please check back for the most current information.

Know your Rights Resources

Non-citizens who are in the United States—no matter what their immigration status—generally have the same constitutional rights as citizens when law enforcement officers stop, question, arrest, or search them or their homes.- ACLU

ACLU Information Pamphlets:
EnglishRussianSpanish

Know Your Rights Information Card:
EnglishSomaliVietnameseChineseSpanishRussianArabic

Know Your Rights- Anti-Muslim Discrimination Information:
EnglishArabicUrduFarsiSpanish

Mobile Apps
Mobile Justice - ACLU app with Know Your Rights Information card, ability to report incidents to the ACLU in real time with video capability.
MiConsular MEX - App created by the Mexican Government’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs (SRE) that allows Mexican nationals to locate their nearest consulate and either text or call them in an emergency.
Cell 411 - App that allows the user to issue and respond to emergencies from family, friends and neighbors in real time.

Immigration Enforcement:
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
Find a detainee, detention center and general contact information. ICE Contact Information

Witnesses to ICE activity can report it to the ACLU of Oregon's immigration hotline via text or call 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

For actions around Portland, you may contact the Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition (PIRC) hotline at
1-888-622-1510.
Information: EnglishSpanish

Family Preparedness Plan 
English and Spanish

DACA/Dreamers Information
DACA Tools and Resource Guide: English

Updated community information sheet for DACA recipients: SpanishEnglish

Low-cost legal resources for immigrants provides a list of nonprofit organizations that can assist people with immigration issues.

Multnomah County Cultural Services Directory provides a list of nonprofits, faith groups and government programs that serve immigrants and refugees in the Portland Metro area.

Local Organizations

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest 
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR) 
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Consular Offices

Mexican Consulate of Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulate of El Salvador in Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Guatemalan Honorary Consulate
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Consular Office of Japan in Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

Archivist, Librarian, Editor, Writer, VolunteerVolunteer Kris Ashley

by Donna Childs

One of the first things Kris Ashley did upon moving to Portland was get a library card.  A booklover at heart, she has an MLS (masters degree in library science), as well as experience working in bookstores and in publishing.  While looking for a full-time library position, Kris has taken on two volunteer jobs at Multnomah County Library: on Wednesdays, she is responsible for sorting, pricing, shelving, and organizing the large-print materials at Title Wave Used Bookstore, and on Thursdays, she is one of three volunteers who scan and index items from the library’s Special Collections for The Gallery.

More than 100 years ago, civic leader, merchant, and philanthropist John Wilson bequeathed his collection of more than 8000 books to what would later become the John Wilson Special Collections at the Multnomah County Library.  Although books form the majority of the collection, “Special Collections are more than books,” according to Kris.  Among the items they have scanned are photos, letters, papers, art and craft items, Lewis and Clark Centennial memorabilia, and WPA creations (many of which are at Timberline Lodge). Kris and her fellow volunteers then turn the scans into PDF files to be put on the web.

Kris is well-qualified to do this work: her MLS studies included courses in archival preservation (which she loved), and while living in San Francisco, she created and organized an archive for the Mechanics Institute’s library.  Since moving to Portland, in addition to volunteering at the library, Kris has done editing and photo research for writers, and some freelance grant writing. Fascinated by archives, Kris says her dream job would combine archival and library work with photo research, finding the most appropriate photos for writers to accompany their texts. Although the library may lose an especially knowledgeable, talented, and responsible volunteer when she finds that full-time job, someone will be getting a great employee.


A few facts about Kris

Home library:  Gregory Heights

Currently reading:  War for the Oaks by Emma Bull, An Acceptable Time by Madeleine L’Engle, and The Sin-Eaters Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

Favorite book from childhood:  Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl

A book that made you laugh or cry:  The Story of Owen by E.K. Johnston

Favorite section of the library:  641 - Cookbooks!

E-reader or paper book:  "Paper, definitely. I want the feel and smell of a book."

Favorite place to read:  "In an armchair, with my cat on my lap."

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Retail outlets selling newly legal marijuana are enjoying brisk business.  Anyone over 21 can buy and use marijuana for recreational purposes, a loosening of the previous Oregon law that allowed marijuana as a treatment for certain medical conditions.  Of course, federally marijuana remains a schedule 1 controlled substance, the same class as heroin, meth, and cocaine, with potentially the same penalties for growing, possessing, and selling.  So consuming your sticky icky could still be tricky.  But as more states pass laws legalizing pot the federal laws may change.

Kitschy image of man with a marijuana joint captioned "Marijuana!  At least it's not crack!" by  Juha Ristolainen on flickr

So if adults can, does that mean they should? The next challenge is examining the health effects of marijuana and communicating that to the public in a convincing way.  In September, 2015, on the eve of full retail sales, the Multnomah County Health Department released a report on public health and marijuana.  The ten-page report offers data on how many and what age people use marijuana right now, confirmed and potential effects of marijuana on adults and youth, and recommendations for further research and policy directions.   The extensive reference section will also offer you plenty of sources to consult for your debate or persuasive argument paper.

T ake a look at some of  the pros and cons of legalizing marijuana. Also look at Librarian Joanna’s June, 2015 post on deciphering the nitty gritty of Measure 91.

Gun rights and gun control are topics that come up often these days. It can be hard to find good resources that present multiple viewpoints on issues like this, and provide quotable sources.

An excellent electronic resource is Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center in Context. It provides links to articles, videos and audio files from multiple viewpoints (you will need a library card # and PIN in order to access this electronic resource from outside of the library).

 LawBrain covers the legal history of gun control back to the U.S. Constitution. Another good listing is Infoplease’s Milestones in Federal Gun Control Legislation  which covers laws up until 2013.

L.A.R.G.O. Lawful and Responsible Gun Owners and the N.R.A. National Rifle Association both support gun ownership in America. The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and The Violence Policy Center both work to reduce gun violence. The Violence Policy Center is also a good resource if you’re looking for statistics related to gun violence (including drive by shootings and suicide).

This Guardian article compares gun crime in individual states and About.com lists Oregon Gun Rights. FactCheck looks at statistics in the media after the Newton shootings, and reports on Gun Rhetoric vs. Gun Facts.  Looking towards changes in the law, gun control is supported by more women than men, and that may have an effect on future legislation.  But right now,  despite repeated pleas for change after every mass shooting, nothing seems to change. 

Need some specific gun facts or laws we haven’t covered? Contact a librarian and we’ll be glad to help

Logo for the Intellectual Freedom Issues in Oregon database

Curious about censorship or banned books in Oregon?  Need to know what's been published in the local news?  The Intellectual Freedom Issues in Oregon: A News Database, may have what you need.  The database is the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse's news clipping files, and is updated twice a year. The database includes news articles and editorials about intellectual freedom issues printed in Oregon newspapers over the past 65 years. The database can be searched by article title, newspaper name, date, city/location, name of challenged book or material, and organizations or individuals involved. After you have found what you want to read, contact the coordinator of the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse, Katie Anderson, 503-378-2528 to request a complete text of the articles or editorials.  And if you have any trouble, don't forget to Ask a Librarian!

There are three basic types of rocks found on Earth. 

igneous rock

 Igneous rocks are created when liquid or molten stone, called magma or lava depending on if it's above or below ground,  cools and hardens. Igneous rocks are often formed by volcanic actions. An example of Igneous rocks in the Pacific Northwest are those found on the slope of Mt. St. Helens in Washington. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sedimentary rock

 Sedimentary rock is formed by many layers of sand and silt (or sediment), hardening into rock.  Often sedimentary rocks are formed from ancient sea floors, lake or river beds or shorelines, where sediment piles up over a long time.  Fossils are often found in sedimentary rock. Sedimentary rock make up many of the layers or stripes of rock in the Grand Canyon

 

 

 

 

 

metamorphic rockMetamorphic rocks are other rocks that are changed by heat and pressure into a new kind of rock. For example, shale transforms into the metamorphic rock slateThese rocks are often found in mountain ranges like the Rocky Mountains or the Appalachian Mountains, which used to be very large, but are now just the remaining metamorphic rocks that formed their core. 

In the great outdoor laboratory that most of us know as The Planet Earth people are working all the time to determine how mountains and canyons were formed, lakes are made and why volcanoes erupt the way they do.

 They are studying geology. They also examine small and not so small changes that might help to predict the future.  Geologists  also study the Earth's resources, like minerals, gems, oil and coal, to help figure out where they are and how we can use them. 

The National Geographic Society calls on all of us to recognize the importance of Geo-literacy.

Maybe you're a rockhound, and love collecting cool pebbles. Or maybe you're interested in how prehistoric life is recorded in fossils

In addition to great books about geology the Multnomah County Library has a couple of electronic encyclopedias that can answer many of your questions about the Earth Sciences. You will need to use your library card number and PIN to login to the New Book of Popular Science or Kids Infobits.

illustration of a geologist

If you love rocks, fossil hunting or trying to read the Earth's history from it's landforms,  you might want to be a Geologist.

 

 

 

 

Cover of From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. FrankweilerI have two paperbacks which I read so much as a kid they fell apart. One is A Wrinkle in Time with its spine now duct taped and the other is From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

I wasn't exactly fond of visiting museums as a kid but I loved the idea of hiding in a museum. Now that I'm an adult, I love visiting museums. Sometimes I wonder what it was like to wear a suit of armor or sit for hours for a portrait painting. I definitely relish the idea of having a museum gallery to myself, having time to look, no one blocking my view, maybe being able to touch. Claudia and Jamie had the thrill of exploring the Metropolitan Museum of Art after hours--sleeping in a canopied bed, bathing in the fountain, and going behind roped off areas--and found a mystery and eventually Mrs. Frankweiler's files.

Claudia and Jamie only spent a week in the museum, but their story has captivated readers for 50 years! To think it all began with a piece of popcorn on a chair behind a roped-off area in one of the museum's period rooms. That piece of popcorn and curiousity about how it got there inspired E.L. Konigsburg. What public space would you like to have all to yourself?

Headed to the Pan African Festival on Saturday, August 12 at Pioneer Courthouse Square? Make sure to stop by the library table, where we’ll be signing people up for library cards, giving out free books for kids, and promoting some of of our fun events! (You may also run into us in line at the delicious food booths or in the audience for the fashion show!)

Below you’ll find just a few of our favorite books about the African and African American experiences. Want to find more? Ask a librarian!

 

On car trips, my husband and I used to pretend that there was a noise-proof window between the front seat and the back. One of us would hit an imaginary button on the dashboard, and-- in our minds-- the window would close, so we couldn’t hear our little darlings squabbling and shrieking in the back seat at all-- except that sadly, we could still hear them, due to the unfortunate imaginary nature of the window.

I wish that we’d discovered audiobooks for the car ages ago! A whole lot of library users have apparently wised up to their usefulness in the past few years;  I've been asked frequently lately for audiobook suggestions for family car trips. So I’ve made some lists of great audiobooks that can be enjoyed by listeners of various ages, one in CD format and one in downloadable. You might also consider consulting two excellent lists a  colleague of mine made: this list of classics on audio and this one for very young listeners.

It’s amazing how much kids will settle down when they’re involved in a story. I tried to find audiobooks that would be interesting and involving for the adults in the car, as well. So go ahead-- plan a summer getaway. Just don’t forget the audiobooks.

Or the barf bags. (But that’s another story.)

Almost 100,000 preschoolers, kids and teens are registered in the Summer Reading Program! We spread prizes out a little this summer and July 30 is the first day for your reader to get a Summer Reading t-shirt, coupons for Oaks Park, Oregon Ballet Theatre and Oregon Children’s Theatre, and enter the grand prize drawing. Don’t worry though if you’re not ready for a t-shirt yet.  Everyone has until August 31 to pick up prizes for any level and finish the game.Group of Summer Reading Volunteers

If your family has done Summer Reading for a few years, you probably noticed changes this summer. High school students have challenge cards and their own prize options. The high school game offers teens the choice of traditional reading along with opportunities to use reading to accomplish, create, and engage in the world in their own way.

For babies to 8th graders, we introduced a calendar to track reading, to stretch the game out for the ravenous readers as well as help reluctant readers be successful. We also hope this has helped families make reading a daily habit. As in previous years, we want this to work for you so hopefully you’ve adapted the guidelines to fit your family. If your child spends four hours reading voraciously, two calendar days could be marked off. Likewise, if your child is reluctant and is willing to spend only ten minutes with a book, that’s okay too and a day can be marked.

We welcome suggestions and feedback about the Summer Reading Program. Pick up a yellow Summer Reading comment card at your local library, comment below, or send us an email.

Please note: the library is out of free eclipse glasses. 

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. The places where the moon will completely cover the sun — creating a total solar eclipse — are on what's called the path of totality. That path includes a swath of Oregon.

The total solar eclipse will touch down between Lincoln City and Newport at 10:15 am, then cross places like Madras, John Day and Baker City before leaving the state at 10:27 am.   

Outside the path of totality, viewers will see a partial solar eclipse. In Portland, for example, 99 percent of the sun will be covered by the moon. 

We've got everything you need to make the most of the eclipse, including the official live stream, path maps, library events and all the best reads. (Below, click "Eclipse 2017" to see everything.)  

 

 

 

Scale representation judicial justiceOn July 19, 2017, the Supreme Court rejected an attempt by President Donald Trump to include grandparents and other relatives of U.S. residents in his travel ban on people from six countries. But the judges also gave the government the right to enforce a separate ban on refugees, pending a government appeal against a U.S. District Court of Hawaii order.

On July 13, 2017, Judge Derrick K. Watson of the U.S. District Court of Hawaii ruled that grandparents, grandchildren, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins of persons in the United States cannot be included in Trump's travel ban, and that assurances from a resettlement agency were adequate to protect people from the refugee ban. See page 26 of the ruling for the order.  It was appealed to the Ninth Circuit Court on July 14.

On June 26, 2017, the Supreme Court partly and temporarily reinstated President Trump's travel and refugee ban. They will consider it in full in October. The Supreme Court said in Monday's decision: "that [the executive order] may not be enforced against foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a relationship with a person or entity in the United States. All other foreign nationals are subject to the provisions of [the executive order]." The order is on pages 9-13.

On June 12, 2017, the Ninth Circuit Cort of Appeals upheld the Hawaii court decision blocking Trump's revised travel ban on people from six mainly Muslim nations.

On May 25, 2017, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals left in place the freeze on Trump’s revised travel ban. The majority opinion is on pages 12-79. 

See earlier library blog posts:

Court ruling stops President Trump from withholding funds from sanctuary cities

Court challenges to the second travel ban

Resources for immigrants, refugees and travelers affected by President Trump's first travel ban

Mayor Charlie Hales at National Night Out - City of Portland photo

In early August for the last 30 years, communities and neighborhoods have been getting together to meet, celebrate and have fun at National Night Out celebrations. These events were started to promote safe neighborhoods and crime prevention initiatives by solidifying partnerships between law enforcement and communities. National Night Out events are generally free and family-friendly. 

The official date of National Night Out is the first Tuesday in August, but there are so many parties happening in Multnomah County, they can't all take place on the same day. The City of Portland compiles a list of parties submitted to them for publicizing. In Gresham, call 503.618.2567 to find out where there's a party near you, and in Troutdale call 503.665.6129. Learn more about Fairview's party on its National Night Out page.

Thinking of planning your own party? The Office of Neighborhood Involvement in Portland has a variety of National Night Out party planning resources to help you plan anything from a small potluck picnic with chalk out for the kids to a big bash with a live band that shuts down the street. There is also a brief National Night Out page for Gresham. The message from the experts is to start early — it's not too early to plan for next year! 

A continuing feature of local celebrations is that groups can request to have police officers and firefighters show up at their party. And who knows, your neighborhood could throw a party and maybe even the mayor will show up!

To get you planning your party, meeting your neighbors and thinking about community, we've compiled a list of reading suggestions.

Below are the parties where you can connect with your neighborhood library this summer. We can't hit all the parties (we'd be so tired!), but where you see us, you can guarantee that we'll be talking about great books, services and resources. Come say hi!

 
North Portland Library
Tuesday, August 1, Peninsula Park, 700 N Roda Parks Ave., Portland
 
Hillsdale Library
Tuesday, August 1, Dewitt Park, 1805 SW Dewitt St., Portland
 
Fairview-Columbia Library
Tuesday, August 1, Fairview Community Park, 21600 NE Park Lane, Fairview
Friday, July 21, Wood Village Baptist Church, 23601 NE Arata Rd., Wood Village
 
Midland Library
Tuesday August 1, Mill Park, SE 117th St. and Stephens Ave., Portland
 
Holgate Library
Tuesday, August 1, Kern Park, SE 67th Ave. and Center St., Portland
 
Capitol Hill Library
Tuesday, August 1, Capitol Hill Library, 10723 SW Capitol Hwy., Portland
 
Kenton Library
Tuesday, August 1, McCoy Park, N Trenton St. & Newman Ave., Portland
 
Central Library
Friday, August 4, Portland State University Park Blocks, between SW Harrison St. and Montgomery St., Portland
 
Gresham Library and Rockwood Library
Friday, August 4, The Rosewood Initiative, 16126 SE Stark St., Portland 
 

 

The comedian Steven Wright said, "everywhere is walking distance if you have the time." The line makes me smile, but it makes me wistful too. If only I had the time.

Walking folds the walker into the pace of the world, while providing respite from the cares attached to our home or workplace. Baudelaire used the word "flaneur" to describe the walking explorer: "For the perfect flâneur, for the passionate spectator, it is an immense joy to set up house in the heart of the multitude, amid the ebb and flow of movement, in the midst of the fugitive and the infinite. To be away from home and yet to feel oneself everywhere at home; to see the world, to be at the centre of the world, and yet to remain hidden from the world." 

If you're hankering for a long walk but have no time, here are some titles to try, and a longer list, to boot.  :-)

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry is the story of a man plagued by the sense that he has made nothing of his life. One day he receives a letter from an old friend who is dying, thanking him for a past kindness. Harold writes a letter of condolence, but when he goes to mail it, he's struck with the sense that he must deliver the letter by hand. And so he sets off on a journey of several hundred miles, with only the clothes on his back. As he walks he reflects on the events that shaped his life.

Walking memoirs abound, with a resurrgence tied to Cheryl Strayed's Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail. But don't miss the earlier A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail by Bill Bryson. Relax into the rhytm of Robert Macfarlane's The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot, by Robert Macfarlane details the author's effort to become more intimately acquainted with his country by starting at his home in Cambridge, England and following the old roads and ancient tracks that crisscross his country. I'm looking forward in particular to Lauren Elkin’s Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London for a female perspective on Baudelaire's phenomenon.

Happy reading, and happy trails.

If you've admired the satisfyingly compact and elegantly designed Field Notes, then you're an Aaron Draplin fan. The author, graphic designer and founder of the Draplin Design Co. has createdAaron Draplin; photo: Michael Poehlman projects for the likes of Timberline Lodge, Woolrich, Patagonia, Nike, and Sasquatch Festival. You can see the range of his work in the eye-candy book, Draplin Design Co.: Pretty much everything.  He is passionate about design and has talked about it on Marc Maron's WTF Podcast. Here's what he has to say about his favorite music for summer:
 
I hide in the summers. I stay out of the sun and avoid the heat as much as I can. Oddly enough, my workload always swells. Each year I say I’m going to take a break in June and July here in Portland. That never happens. And this summer’s been nuts. Like it always is. Up early and down to the shop, watching the sun come up over Mt. Hood. Working late to beat the traffic back up Sandy Blvd to the house. My summer cycle. And there’s always a handful of records that rise to the top of what’s on rotation in the shop. A special category for me: My “Summer Records.” I can look back at each summer and remember the couple records that really got me. And in a lot of ways, helped me get through the warm months. 
 
In my list, I start with “morning records” and work towards "mid-day records” — as things pick up in the shop, the jams get more upbeat. As the day winds down, you get into the darker stuff. Those are the “late night records.”
 
August is still coming up, and I’ll be back home with Mom in Michigan. I’m always adding a couple records a week to my revolving list and am always excited to see what’s coming next to get into the mix. Maybe it’s a gnarly Bob Seger kick, being up in all that Michigan? We’d be down with that!
 
01. Jonathan Wilson, Gentle Spirit
When you look him up, everything talks about some “Laurel Canyon” resurgence. Los Angeles freaks me out, so I’m not tapping too much into any of that. This sounds like something I would’ve heard on the radio in 1979, sitting in the backseat with my little sister, on the way to the beach or something.
 
02. Mark Kozelek, Night Talks EP
As a long-time Red House Painters fan going back to 1993, I have a weird allegiance for Mark Kozelek. Although, he’s a trying artist to keep up with. I just don’t read articles about him, and stick to digging the records.
 
03. Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives, Way Out West
Just country enough to not make you squirm. Dreamy stuff.
 
04. John Moreland, Big Bad Luv
We love John Moreland. Our buddy. He’s come to the shop a for a couple visits and I’ve seen him play 5-6 times. Such a nice guy, with a big, big voice. I love his records so much. Thank you, John. 
 
More songs about drug deals gone bad, leaving cities and coming back to cities. And I love it. I’d like to meet this guy. 
 
06. Thundercat, Drunk
This stuff is weird! In the best ways. And funny. And really fun. Lots of little things to listen for. And laugh with. This is my favorite record cover of the year!
 
07. Son Volt, Notes of Blue
The first song on this one … that classic Son Volt. That one was enough for me. Over and over again. Rolling, warm and soothing.
 
08. Chavez, Cockfighters
Arithmetic! Math! Long division! Calculus! ‘90s math-y, rock-y heavy hitters, still hit as hard as they did in 1995. Turn it up!
 
09. The Afghan Whigs, In Spades
Dark, brooding, sinister and dark again. I used to associate them with Cincinnati. Now it’s New Orleans. I met the band a couple years back at Greg Dulli’s bar in the French Quarter. This record fits the mystery of that place perfectly, in a new way.
 
10. Mount Eerie, A Crow Looked at Me
Tread lightly here. This is a challenging record to listen to. As beautiful as it is, it’s like going to a funeral. Brave, dark, sad … oddly uplifting stuff.

 

For those of us who love classic literature, Multnomah County Library is a great resource. There are Classics Pageturners book discussion groups at Hillsdale Library and Hollywood Library.  Copies of the books will be available two months in advance of the discussions.  Please call the branch to confirm.  Following that are a series of lists of Western and non-Western literature from every era.

Here are the Classics Pageturners schedules:

Hillsdale Library Classics Pageturners,

second Saturdays, 3-5 pm

 

September 9, 2017, Sonnets by William Shakespeare. (This is a different edition than the group will read)

 

October 14, 2017, The Nice and the Good, by Iris Murdoch

 

November 11, 2017, It Can't Happen Here, by Sinclair Lewis

 

December 9, 2017, Billy Budd and Other Stories, by Herman Melville

 

January 13, 2018, Canterbury Tales, by GeoffreyChaucer

 

February 10, 2017, Cousin Bette, by Honore de Balzac

 

March 10, 2018, The Persians, by Aeschylus

 

April 14, 2018, The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli

 

May 12, 2018, The Early History of Rome, books I-V, by Livy

 

June 9, 2018, The Trial, by Franz Kafka

Hollywood Library Classics Pageturners,

third Sundays, 2-4 pm

 

September 17, 2017,  Ficciones, by Jorge Luis Borges

 

October 15, 2017, Iphigenia in Aulis and The Trojan Women, by Euripides. (These are different editions than the group will read)

 

November 19, 2017, The Vicar of Wakefield, by Oliver Goldsmith

 

December 17, 2017, The Captain's Daughter and Other Stories, by Alexander Pushkin

 

January 21, 2018, The Heart of the Matter, by Graham Greene

 

February 18, 2018, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, by Matsuo Basho

 

March 18, 2018, The Idiot, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

 

April 15, 2018, The Consolation of Philosophy, by Boethius

 

May 20, 2018, The Analects, by Confucius. (This is a different edition and translation than the group will read)

 

June 17, 2018, The Mill on the Floss, by George Eliot. (This is a different edition than the group will read)

 

He Volunteers Anywhere He Can FindVolunteer Ruben Arciniega

by Sarah Binns

The first thing that struck me about Ruben Arciniega was a sense of maturity that far exceeds his years. A long-time member of the Troutdale Library Teen Council, the 16-year-old is already enrolled at Mt. Hood Community College through his high school, achieving high school and college credit for his classes. Pair his challenging coursework with an active volunteering schedule and you have a smart, confident, compassionate young man who is destined to go far--both in the Portland community and beyond.

Ruben initially got involved in the Summer Reading program and the teen council to gain volunteer hours for school. But then, he says, “I started doing more volunteering and realized I really liked it. On Troutdale’s teen council one of Ruben’s roles is to “make everyone feel comfortable,” which led him to create a fun icebreaker to put his peers at ease. He helps the council plan monthly youth-centric events that include everything from an annual Batman party to a visiting game truck, which gives kids who don’t have the resources for video games a chance to play to their heart’s content. “We also do a cyber-bullying event to provide awareness and help for people,” he says. “It’s very fun and rewarding to see how many people are positively affected by what we do.”

Ruben also frequently volunteers at Cherry Park Plaza, an elder care facility, and “anywhere else that I can find,” he says. His community is as impressed with Ruben’s service as I am, and in late June he was honored with a 2017 Volunteer Award from Multnomah County for his involvement in the library.

When I ask what Ruben is interested in pursuing as a career he says he’s undecided, but he finds criminal justice “very intriguing.” For the time-being he has his hands full: “It’s a tough schedule,” he says. “School, volunteering, and trying to find a job. When I do find time to myself I just relax. In the summer I have a lot more time to actually be a kid.” As a fantastic “kid” or an adult, I am confident we will see more of Ruben on the Portland community stage in the future.


A few facts about Ruben:

Home library:  Troutdale

Currently reading:  The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka. “I was told it would be a good book for me because it’s kind of weird. It’s definitely interesting.”

Most influential book:  “I’ve read a couple of books for my literature class that were interesting and changed my perspective. The Prince by Machiavelli is one. It definitely changed my perspective on leadership.”  

Favorite book from childhood:  The Hungry Little Caterpillar. “It successfully enhanced my creativity as a kid.”

Favorite browsing section:  “Usually if I’m thinking about a certain subject, I’ll just look for that book in the database. I’ll just go in the library and ask where are the books on cooking.”

E-reader or paper:  “Paper, definitely. It feels right.”

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

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