Blogs

The City of Portland has called a Special Runoff election to fill the vacancy of Comissioner, Position 2.  See details in the Multnomah County Voters Pamphlet.

Drop off your ballot by 8 pm on Tuesday, August 11. All library locations within the city of Portland (that is, all library locations except for Gresham, Fairview-Columbia and Troutdale) are accepting ballots via their book drops or 24-hour ballot boxes. There are other ballot drop site locations, too.

Need help due to a disability? Know someone who needs information in Chinese, Russian, Spanish, Somali, or Vietnamese? Get help from Multnomah County Elections online or call 503-988-VOTE. 

 

 

 

July 28, 2020

On July 7, Multnomah County Library notified its staff that it has made the difficult decision to reduce its workforce. Layoffs will be effective September 30. This is a sad turn of events for everyone at Multnomah County Library. Like other large public library systems, along with businesses, schools and other organizations, our library’s decisions are being driven by COVID-19 and its significant impact on library services and operations for the foreseeable future. 

This is a sad and frustrating decision to make, and I know it is harder for those whose jobs are impacted. We have looked at many ways this library serves the community, but given the very real impact of physical limitations on our services, the library cannot accommodate work for all of the staff it employs.

I want to share with you how we made this decision and what we will do next. In March, when library buildings closed to the public, we had little information about the virus and we hoped for the library closure to be brief. We asked staff who could do their jobs remotely to do so, and we continued to pay the salary and benefits of workers whose jobs cannot be done remotely. As COVID-19 continues to spread within communities everywhere, and state and public health guidelines place limitations on in-person interactions, it became clear we needed to plan around this scenario for a much longer period of time.

Many of the library’s 19 public locations are very small (the smallest at about 3,600 square feet). Considering building layout, exits, restrooms, shelving and furniture and maximum occupancy guidelines, any return to in-building library service must take place with stark limitations. It is reasonable to assume that those requirements will be in place for the foreseeable future. About half of library staff have jobs that require in-person work, such as physically moving library materials. There isn’t enough room inside library buildings to accommodate everyone in the current era. 

The library must honor its obligation to the public that funds the library by acting as a thoughtful and transparent steward of public resources. It’s not business-as-usual. In consultation with the Multnomah County Chair’s Office, Library District Board, and the library’s leadership team, I reached the difficult conclusion that the library cannot pay a significant portion of its workforce indefinitely for work they are not able to do during the pandemic. In this situation, there is simply no good choice at hand. 

The decision to reduce our workforce is not a reflection of the quality of work from staff across the library system, and it doesn't mean that all staff who can't work remotely will be let go. Library staff members have worked in innovative and creative ways during this pandemic. We are currently offering holds pickup by appointment, summer lunches at some locations and a wide range of services online, by phone, email and chat. Our library and its staff members have greatly expanded available resources and made some programs virtual offerings

Looking forward, the library is actively working to shift existing services and stand up new services in a virtual environment, with input from library staff, and in alignment with Multnomah County Library’s priorities. We are planning for library services that look different than they are now, like outdoor computer access and loaning of wi-fi hotspots and Chromebooks. We will look first to recall library staff members for this work wherever possible. Even when we are able to resume some in-building services, it will not be the same as before.

I am deeply grateful to the talented and dedicated workers who make libraries a treasured community asset. We are working with the library’s labor union, AFSCME Local 88, to finalize details of the reduction according to the labor agreement and will notify impacted staff members directly. Our plans involve a series of measures intended to mitigate the impact of workforce reduction on affected staff members, including health care and other benefits for the three months after separation. While such measures don’t fundamentally change the loss of a livelihood, it’s something we can do to make a bad situation a small amount better.

Multnomah County Library is focused on helping our community recover from the pandemic. The library will center race in its work and emphasize efforts that serve those who are the most deeply impacted, with health and safety at the fore. I look forward to the time when these profoundly challenging constraints no longer exist. I am confident that the library will emerge from this crisis with a sharpened focus on our mission of service, even in the most trying of times.

Vailey Oehlke, Director of Libraries
Multnomah County Library
 

Rene Denfeld is an internationally bestselling author, journalist, and death penalty investigator. Of her latest novel, Geek Love author Katherine Dunn says, "The Enchanted is unlike anything I’ve ever read...it’s a jubilant celebration that explores human darkness with a profound lyrical tenderness…" Check out Rene's selected favorites. For more reading recommendations with your tastes in mind, try the My Librarian service. 

Local libraries were my sanctuaries growing up, and in each one I left a child version of myself, roaming the aisles, pulling out titles or checking out the books where librarians had left little tags that said read this. The best ones were those little-known gems, the books that may not have hit the bestseller list but still ended up lodged in my heart.

When I was a young child, the North Portland library was my refuge. I will forever associate that beautifully carved wooden ceiling with my favorite books of childhood: Trask by Don Berry, which I must have read a hundred times, or Crazy Weather by Charles McNichols. It was from the wide selection of African-American folktales I discovered my own joy of fable in books like The Cow-Tail Switch by Harold Courlander, with its jubilant stories and unforgettable phrasing: “A man is not truly dead until he is forgotten.”

When I was in middle school my family moved to Sellwood, then a blue-collar neighborhood where fishermen still hung the catch outside the local tavern. I spent endless drowsy afternoons in the local library, and remember the books that tore the sides of the paper grocery bags I carried home: from the astonishing Hard Rain Falling by Don Carpenter to the gentle yet wise memoir, West With The Night by Beryl Markham.

By fifteen, I was on my own, and like a lot of hardscrabble kids, the downtown library was my safe place. I celebrated my birthday on the second floor of that library while rain howled outside. Just the sight of that brick and stone façade brings back memories of all the books I discovered there, including Yellowfish by John Keeble and The Curve of Time by M. Wylie Blanchet—I’m the one who dog-eared all those pages—and who could forget the warmly humorous science fiction by our late and lamented local author Robert Sheckley?

Libraries saved my life. They gave me comfort, solace, and a vision of life as limitless as the shelves. They made me the writer I am today. So when I recommend my secret treasures, what I am really recommending is my own memories, and want to caution: the best way to find your own is to wander the stacks. Feel your hand on the books—reach for them the way we reach for each other, with longing and an open heart. Then you will never be dissatisfied.

photo of children at Wizard Camp library program
For the past several years, the Hollywood Teen Council has hosted a Hogwarts Camp for 1st-3rd graders during the winter break from school. As many camps and summer programs aren’t happening this summer, they want to share some ideas so that you can create your own wizard camp at home.
 
Usually the teen council would make the gathering of supplies a big part of the first day of camp, and you can pick and choose which supplies you will want to make. During camp, they would try to expose burgeoning witches and wizards to a variety of wizard school subjects such as Potions, Care of Magical Creatures, Charms and more. At home, with more time, there are many possibilities. You can also find ideas for games and activities as well as some magical treats to make. Imagination is the key ingredient for all of these. Here is a list of supplies and activities for your DIY Wizard's Camp.

It’s lunch time at Multnomah County Library! We welcome youth to enjoy our annual summer lunch program at Gresham, Midland, and Rockwood libraries. Here’s what you need to know.

  • Lunches are served “grab-and-go” style as cold sack lunches.
  • Lunches are served outside of physical library spaces.
  • Lunches are for children ages 18 and younger, one per child.
  • Children do not need to be present for parents/guardians to pick up lunches.

Gresham Library

Midland Library

  • 12-1 pm Monday-Friday
  • Through August 28
  • Located at the front entrance to the library, next to the holds pick-up table
  • Sponsored by Wattles Boys and Girls Club

Rockwood Library

  • 12:30-1:30 pm Monday-Thursday
  • Families can pick up two sack lunches on Thursday to have one for Friday
  • Through August 13
  • Located on paved area near the south entrance to library, facing Southeast Stark Street
  • Sponsored by Reynolds School District

In addition to library site sponsors, the Summer Lunch Program is made possible thanks to partnerships with the Multnomah County Department of County Human Services and Partners for a Hunger Free Oregon.

As Carla Davis knows well, library storytime is a playful and magical experience— a time full of singing, dancing, playing, and yes— also reading stories. Storytime programs enable Carla to introduce babies and toddlers to the library, while also connecting with parents about ways to continue to support their child’s literacy and learning. 

“The library is about exploration, and I love that I get to bring that to children,” said Carla. 

Carla Davis Youth Librarian

Carla, or even “Ms. Carla” as some of her young storytime attendees often like to call her, is a Youth Librarian at Midland Library, and she organizes several storytimes each week, in addition to serving as a storytime mentor teaching other library staff how to build age appropriate storytime curriculum and connect with young patrons. Carla is also part of Multnomah County Library’s Black Cultural Library Advocates (BCLA) team which focuses on bringing culturally relevant materials, programs and services to the Black community.

Since the closure of Multnomah County libraries in mid-March due to COVID-19, librarians like Carla have continued to support the community through this crisis. Carla has been working with a team of other Youth Librarians and BCLA staff to bring their storytimes online (find Carla’s virtual Black storytimes on the MCL Youtube It’s Black Storytime playlist). In addition, she is working with the Black Cultural Library Advocates Team to provide valuable resource information online for the Black community— everything from food and health to educational resources. Carla also volunteered to support Multnomah County’s emergency shelters, working shifts at the Oregon Convention Center shelters.

“It was a valuable  opportunity for my teammates and I to serve in the shelters. It’s always rewarding to not only help, but to meet and get to know great people who reside there,” said Carla

Carla started her career with Multnomah County Library as a Clerk. She later went on to earn her Masters in Library Science from Pratt University in New York. She’s worked with various libraries such as  Atlanta Fulton Public, and Shearman and Sterling Law Library as an intern. Like many library professionals, she was drawn to a career in the library from a love of books.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, Carla was working with a team of library staff from across the county on a community engagement project with the Coalition of Communities of Color aimed at helping prepare Black children ages 0-6, and their families, for kindergarten. 

The project is supported by the Equitable Education Grant from Meyer Memorial Trust and The Library Foundation. Recently, she initiated a survey at the largest national Martin Luther King (MLK) program in Portland. It included parents of Black children ages 0-6, and their awareness of library storytimes and services.  

“It is my hope that as our Education Equity team learns more about the needs of parents and educators, that Multnomah County Library will be a major conduit through which educational gaps will be filled in even more creative ways as a result of these and other kinds of assessments.” 

Carla’s dedication and service to children and families was recently nationally recognized by the American Library Association, and awarded the 2020 Random House Penguin Young Readers Group Award and stipend for her comprehensive programming efforts at Midland Library. Beyond organizing and delivering numerous weekly storytimes, Carla hosted a teen-led Teen Talent Showcase and organized a Black History Gospel Timeline that shows how gospel music developed from the 18th century to the present day. 

“Being in a library is the best kind of ‘work,” she said. “I love to be in an environment where I can  “theoretically” read— even though in reality I’m usually busy preparing for programs, working with community organizations, and helping youth and families navigate the library.”

After more than 20 years in library service, Carla sees the library evolving as a hub for the community, especially as people look to the library for services beyond books and traditional programs. 

“As we shift in the way we serve due to the crisis, thankfully the library has always been a viable source of online information and resources, and we will continue to expand the ways we deliver to our users.”

Download Me and White Supremacy today.

Layla F. Saad's book Me and White Supremacy: A 28-Day Challenge to Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor  leads readers through a journey of understanding their

Me and White Supremacy cover
white privilege and participation in white supremacy, so that they can stop (often unconsciously) inflicting damage on Black people, Indigenous people and people of color. Wherever you are in the challenge, here are some supporting resources to help.

Getting started:

Find copies of Me and White Supremacy in the catalog. If you are able, consider supporting the author by purchasing a copy. White Supremacy and Me is designed as a 28-day workbook, so you may need to renew or place another hold if you are using the hardcopy.

Learn more:

Website: The National Museum of African American History & Culture breaks out history, bias, whiteness, antiracism and more. Includes videos and questions for self-reflection and discussion.

For parents talking to children about racism 

Podcast: Talking Race with Young Children, from NPR and Sesame Street

This 20 minute podcast shares ideas for talking about race with children, starting when they are very young.  Additional resources are included at the end.

Website: EmbraceRace

​A great place to start for webinars and more, EmbraceRace was founded by two parents (one Black, one multiracial) seeking to nurture resilience in children of color; nurture inclusive, empathetic children of all stripes; and raise kids who think critically about racial inequity.

Start with the short action guide and then dive into their many book lists, highlighting diverse titles for a wide variety of ages.

Book: Not My Idea, by Anastasia Higginbotham (for elementary school-aged children)

Not My Idea follows a young white girl who is unsatisfied when her family won’t answer her questions about the shooting of an unarmed Black person by a police officer. Higginbotham has a track record of tackling challenging topics (from divorce to death) in a way that respects young readers and gives them the honesty they deserve. Includes activities on how to stand up against injustice and highlights how white people can disrupt white supremacy.

More on talking to kids and teens about race and racism.

Next steps: If you want to engage more deeply in the work of antiracism

Website: Take a look at the offerings from Layla F. Saad's Good Ancestor Academy. A series of classes are offered, including "Allyship in the Workplace" and "Parenting and White Supremacy."

Video: How to be a Good Ally--Identity, Privilege, Resistance, by Ahsante the Artist

Guide: Let's Talk: Discussing Race, Racism and Other Difficult Topics with Students, from Teaching Tolerance

Thinking about starting a discussion group around Me and White Supremacy? Here are some tips on facilitating conversations that challenge participants or cause discomfort.

Video: "What if white people led the charge to end racism?", Dr. Nita Mosby Tyler, TedXMileHigh, Jan. 30, 2020.

What if white people led the charge to end racism? | Nita Mosby Tyler | TEDxMileHigh

The words We Must Act in white on a black square background
Over the past days and weeks, we have witnessed horrific and senseless anti-Black violence that has taken place at the hands of police and others. George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor are among the lives lost most recently, but this violence has been embedded into the fabric of our society since 1619. Outrage, pain and deep sadness are at the forefront for many of our staff, patrons and community members. 

Multnomah County Library stands in solidarity and in support of our Black community, not just in this moment of crisis but as we look forward to working collectively to end inequity and systemic racism in our community and across the country. To combat the systemic racism that has perpetuated violence and inequities in our communities of color, we must act, not just feel. Multnomah County Library is taking action and we will expand those actions.

As Director, I will:

  • Affirm and validate the harm that hundreds of years of racism and oppression causes and has caused Black, Indigenous, People of Color and other marginalized communities
  • Lead the library’s efforts with race at the fore
  • Center Black, Indigenous, People of Color and other marginalized communities in our service
  • Rethink the library’s exclusionary history and redefine the library’s legacy through action
  • Check my own biases and assumptions alongside those of the institution I lead

Finally and importantly, I want to honor library staff—and one member, in particular, Elle Budd, a Library Assistant on the Black Cultural Library Advocates team—who started something incredible in the past few days. Elle took the brave step of emailing hundreds of their colleagues to share perspective and resources around the history of violent protest in America in an effort  “. . . to cultivate a very different culture here at the library where we talk about anti blackness, whiteness, white supremacy, racism, and how we as an institution are working to uphold it.” It was the perfect step in that moment.

Others engaged, expressing support, gratitude, solidarity, acknowledgement, willingness to hear and learn and offered even more resources. I will list some of those below but—to me—this was especially resonant, Sam Cooke's incredible and inspiring A Change is Gonna Come

Here’s a portion of what library staff have shared with their peers:

And here are some additional resources from the library’s website:

This library will be part of the change that’s gonna come.

Vailey
 

Difficult conversations are happening in our country, states, cities and homes about race, racism, and anti-racism. These are not topics only for adults though. Talking with teens, tweens and younger children is important. Research has shown that children as young as six months notice race [Children Are Not Colorblind: How Young Children Learn Race by Erin N. Winkler, Ph.D. University of Wisconsi-Milwaukee, PACE Vol. 3-No. 3,  2009 HighReach Learning Inc]. 

If you are unsure how to start and continue talking with your children as they grow, there are books to share and websites with resources to help. Several of these also discuss how you can be a model since actions often talk louder than words.

Teaching Young Children About Race is a guide for parents and teachers from Teaching for Change

EmbraceRace.org has articles, webinars and action guides about how kids learn about race, seeing and talking about differences, using picture books to have meaningful conversations, and more.

Talking about Race from the National Museum of African American History & Culture shares reflection questions, videos, and links to other resources.

Teaching Tolerance was created for educators, but parents may also find it useful to discuss race and ethnicity, and rights and activiism among other topics. The home page currently features articles about Black Lives Matter and Teaching about Race, Racism and Police Violence.

Talking to Children about Racial Bias from the American Academy of Pediatrics includes how parents can confront their own racial bias and a doctor's story of his encounter with racism as a 7-year-old.

Explaining the News to Our Kids from Common Sense Media offers tips by age.

 

Exterior of Title Wave Used Book Store, new location for Albina Library
Multnomah County Library has made the difficult decision to relocate Albina Library. On July 1, 2020, it will be moved to its former home at 216 NE Knott St., a larger, historic Carnegie library building. We anticipate the new Albina Library location will offer holds pickup service sometime later this summer. 

This decision will feel like an unexpected and difficult loss for many Albina Library patrons who have shaped their lives around neighborhood amenities like the library. Relocating any neighborhood’s library is not a decision we take lightly. A variety of factors contributed to our decision, including this pandemic, which has caused us to make hard choices and think in new ways about how the library can serve the community.

The current location is the smallest branch in the Multnomah County Library system at just 3,500 square feet. It is so small that it doesn't have a public meeting room. Because of the operational constraints around physical distancing for the foreseeable future, it is unlikely that the building would be feasible for much more than sidewalk service. The Knott St. building is about 2,000 square feet larger.

The library’s lease of Albina Library expires on June 1, 2020, with an option for a three-year renewal at a cost of more than $260,000. As a steward of public resources, the library is unable to justify that expenditure, when a suitable and larger option exists nearby. The building where Albina Library is moving to currently serves as The Title Wave Used Bookstore, but it was the home of Albina Library from 1912 to 1960

The distance between the two locations is 1.1 miles, a 23-minute walk, a seven-minute bike ride, a five-minute drive or about 15 minutes by bus. The Knott St. location complements the nearby Matt Dishman Community Center, Urban League of Portland and other community-facing services and affordable housing. We are working hard to get the new location ready. We will notify Albina Library patrons about holds pickup and when sidewalk service will begin. 

The sale of retired library materials to the public will continue, with specific details also to be determined.

For information about our phased reopening plan, an FAQ and instructions for using the holds pickup service at other locations, please visit multcolib.org/covid19.

We look forward to serving you soon at the new Albina Library location.
 

en Español


letters
Do you have a child who will be 5 years old on or by September 1st? It's time to register them for kindergarten! Below are links to all Multnomah County School Districts and their kindergarten registration information.

If you're not sure which elementary school is your home school, each district has a school locator to check. If you need help identifying your district, find schools near you using your address or ZIP code, or call 2-1-1.

 

 

Centennial has registration packets available in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, Somali and Chinese. Student bus information is also available.

Corbett has a Google form available in English and Spanish to determine interest. Formal registration will follow.

David Douglas has online registration available in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese and Simplified Chinese. 

Gresham-Barlow asks that you register your child by June 1st. Select languages other than English at the top of the screen for Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian, Romanian, Hmong, Vietnamese, and Arabic. Language assistance is available to help non-English speaking families with the enrollment process and other services. 

Parkrose offers online registration for the first time this year. Information is on their website in English and Spanish.

Portland Public Schools' online registration process takes 20-30 minutes and school staff will follow up with you later in the summer. With schools closed, online registration is the easiest option. Paper registration packets are available at meal sites, May 28 through June 10.  Packets will be located at the curriculum tables and include a self-addressed, stamped envelope for easy mailing..

  • You don’t need to register if your child attends a PPS Head Start or Pre-Kindergarten program.
  • If a child has an approved transfer and the parent registers online, the parent must do so using their neighborhood school based on the home address. The Enrollment and Transfer Center will change the school location to the transfer school at a later date. 
  • Families with children who have IEPs will need to register using a paper form.

Reynolds information is available in English and Spanish. Staff will contact you to confirm your child's enrollment after you submit the registration. Families will be invited in August to a virtual or in-person Kindergarten Orientation (depending on state guidance). 

Riverdale asks parents of new students to submit a New Resident Introduction Form as soon as possible. An enrollment packet will then be shared.

Centennial

David Douglas School District

Cualquier niño que tenga cinco (5) años de edad el 1 de septiembre o antes es elegible para inscribirse en el Kindergarten en la escuela de su hogar designada.

La inscripción en línea  está disponible para la nueva inscripción de estudiantes de Kindergarten para 2020-21. Después de que se haya enviado la solicitud en línea, debe comunicarse con la escuela límite de su hijo para completar los formularios específicos de la escuela, la asignación de clase, los horarios y otra información para que la transición de su hijo sea fácil. Si se registra en línea, también puede cargar el certificado de inmunización de su hijo, el certificado de nacimiento y el comprobante de domicilio, o traerlos a la escuela.

Gresham-Barlow

línea está disponible para la inscripción de nuevos estudiantes. Una vez que se haya aceptado la solicitud en línea, la  escuela se comunicará con usted para un seguimiento adicional y puede  programar una reunión antes del primer día de su hijo. Esto es importante ya que puede recibir formularios específicos de la escuela para completar, tareas de clase, horarios y otra información para hacer que la transición de su hijo sea fácil. Si tiene preguntas, puede comunicarse con la escuela de su vecindario. Use la aplicación Localizador de escuelas para determinar en qué límite de la escuela vive.

Parkrose

Para la inscripción en el jardín de infantes en la primavera de 2020, Parkrose utilizará nuestro sistema de inscripción en línea. Padres / tutores, tenga lo siguiente listo para completar el proceso de registro: comprobante de edad, registro de vacunas, comprobante de domicilio, y nombres y números de teléfono de contactos de emergencia. Para comenzar, visite http://www.parkrose.k12.or.us/registration. Preguntas? Por favor llame al: 503-408-2100

Portland Public Schools

Si su hijo tiene 5 años de edad antes del 1º de septiembre, por favor inscríbalo en el kínder. Para inscribirse haga click en este enlace: https://www.pps.net/kinderenroll. El proceso toma de 20 a 30 minutos y el personal de la escuela se comunicará con usted a finales del verano. Mientras las escuelas permanecen cerradas, inscribirse en línea es la opción más fácil, pero los papeles de inscripción estarán disponibles muy pronto también. No es necesario inscribir a su hijo si actualmente asiste al programa escolar de PPS Head Start o Pre-kínder.

Reynolds

Si su estudiante es nuevo en el Distrito Escolar de Reynolds, regístrese para la inscripción. 

Vaya
-o-
Para solicitar que un formulario en papel se envíe por correo a su hogar, haga clic AQUÍ

The library may be closed and people are staying home, but it doesn't mean parents and caregivers are alone in trying to help young children learn and develop.  This collection of resources includes articles, videos, webinars, and activities to help parents and caregivers support their children's healthy development during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

For parents:

How to Support Children (and Yourself) During the COVID-19 Outbreak
The Center on the Developing Child offers three main activities that can help parents promote their young child’s healthy development and manage their own stress during the pandemic. PDFs are provided in both English and Spanish.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus
From PBS Kids for Parents website. A parent shares how she talked with her children about the coronavirus. Includes “four ways we can help young kids build germ-busting habits.” The article is also available in Spanish.

A support guide for parents raising babies and toddlers through the coronavirus crisis
This article from Quartz offers reassurance to parents who are concerned that their child is missing out on opportunities for growth and development during these times of uncertainty and isolation. Included are resources to help keep young children engaged and learning, ideas for parental self-care, and links to sources of information about child development.

For childcare providers:

5 ways early care and education providers can support children’s remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
From Child Trends.

Trauma and Resilience: The Role of Child Care Providers
A webinar focused on the effect of trauma on children’s learning.It addresses the role of teachers and providers using resilience building strategies to support children across the age continuum.

For anyone interested in children’s development and well-being:

Being Black Is Not A Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child
This report from the National Black Child Development Institute includes articles such as “ The Black Family: Re-Imagining Family Support and Engagement” and highlights successful programs like Great Beginnings for Black Babies, Inc.

How to Teach Children to Stay 6 Feet Apart
Tips on how to teach social distancing to children from No Time for Flashcards.

Resources for Supporting Children’s Emotional Well-being during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Guidance, recommendations, and resources provided by child trauma experts at Child Trends and the Child Trauma Training Center at the University of Massachusetts.

Resilience
A short video and an article about how children build resilience from the Center on the Developing Child.

What Is COVID-19? And How Does It Relate to Child Development?
From the Center on the Developing Child: “An infographic that explains the basics of what COVID-19 is, and what it can mean for stress levels in both children and adults… it explains how all of us can work to ensure the wellbeing of the community now and in the future”. PDFs are available in English and Spanish.

More information:

2 Ways COVID-19 is Creating Even Greater Inequities in Early Childhood Education
A brief article from The Education Trust, a national nonprofit that works to close opportunity gaps that disproportionately affect students of color and students from low-income families.

The Brain Architects Podcast: COVID-19 Special Edition: Creating Communities of Opportunity
Dr. David Williams discusses ways in which the coronavirus pandemic is particularly affecting people of color in the U.S., and what that can mean for early childhood development. 

Thinking About Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Impacts Through a Science-Informed, Early Childhood Lens
An article from the Center for the Developing Child.

Distance learning can be challenging.  If you are looking for help with schooling, here are some free tutoring resources  to consider.

Tutor.com

Who is eligible :  K-college students
Registration required : yes for some features, no for live help
Who are the tutors :  college and graduate students, teachers, working professionals
Which languages is tutoring available in : English, Spanish, Vietnamese

Other Tutor.com information : 
available with a library card
live tutoring 2-10 pm daily
essay help
worksheets
suggested websites
learning videos

Learn to Be

Who is eligible : K-12 students with a focus on underserved students
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : high school and college students, adults
Which languages is tutoring available in : English

Interns for Good

Who is eligible : Elementary and middle school students
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : high school students
Which languages is tutoring available in : English

Teens Tutor Teens

Who is eligible : Teens 13-18
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : high school students
Which languages is tutoring available in : English
 
Other Teens Tutor Teens information :
group tutoring
test prep tutoring
on-demand videos
worksheets
essay editing
 

If you are looking for extra academic support instead of live tutoring, consider these free resources:

Learning Resource Express Library has academic support resources for upper elementary school through high school. Available with your Multnomah County Library card.

Khan Academy has free video-based lessons and practice for K-12 students.

Smart Tutor offers free resources for K-8 students and support for high school math.

With the rapid changes in response to COVID-19, teens are under a great deal of stress. They are struggling with adapting to online school, being isolated from their friends, and losing out on important milestones and opportunities. As parents and caregivers are working through their own stresses and difficulties, it can be difficult to know how to support teens during this time. Here are some resources to help.

Library resources

If you don't already have a library card, you can sign up for a temporary card online.

Find great young adult audio and e-books on Overdrive Teens.

Stream movies and music, and find graphic novels and comics on Hoopla.

Even though the library isn’t recruiting Summer Reading volunteers this year, we will still have the Summer Reading Program. It starts June 15 and participants can play online or with a paper game board. The grand prize is the choice of a Technology Package or an Experience Portland Family Fun Package.

Check out more resources highlighted on our teen page.

Mental and emotional health

Teens can get peer support from YouthLine. No problem is too big or too small. Call 877.968.8491 or text 83986. YouthLine has also created a list of support resources specifically for COVID-19.

UNICEF has six strategies for how teens can cope with COVID-19.

John Krasinski of The Office launched a YouTube Channel called Some Good News to help lift spirits during quarantine.

With nearly 7.5 million followers, Yoga with Adriene is a very high quality YouTube channel. She has videos on meditation, physical fitness, and using yoga to process emotions.

Teens can help combat the spread COVID-19 in their communities by donating homemade masks to Multnomah County Joint Response. The CDC has instructions on how to make and properly use cloth face masks.

Resources for parents and caregivers

For up-to-date information and resources, check the Multnomah County page on COVID-19.

The Education Development Center has tips for Parenting an Older Teen in a COVID-19 World.

The Search Institute has a Relationships Checkup tool for parents, other caregivers and educators.

Quaranteengers: Strategies for Parenting in Close Quarters, a New York Times article, offers advice on how parents and caregivers can support teens during quarantine.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has created a helpful fact sheet for parents and caregivers. It contains a table broken down by age group that lists some common reactions children and teens might have to stress as well as ways that parents and caregivers can support youth. 

It’s also important to take care of yourself while taking care of others. Here are some resources for self-care for parents and caregivers.

National Parent Helpline, 1.855.427.2736

Mental Health and Coping with Stress from the CDC

Why Parents Need Self-Compassion During the Coronavirus Pandemic from the Chidlren's Hospital of Philadelphia

Parenting During Coronavirus: You Are Enough from PBS Parents

 

by Jane Salisbury, MCL volunteer

Clarissa Littler had volunteered since 2016 for Multnomah County Library, teaching computer skills at neighborhood libraries, and teaching programming and other skills at the Rockwood Library Makerspace, but when the COVID-19 pandemic came to Oregon early in 2020, she embarked on an entirely new venture: using 3D printers to make face shields and other protective equipment to help frontline workers all over Multnomah County. 

Clarissa’s path to this amazing project was long and full: she was a physicist and a computer science researcher who eventually began working in curriculum design, with an emphasis on programs for teens. She worked as the director of curriculum design for Pixel Arts Game Education, a non-profit whose mission is to create safe learning spaces for young people to play and design games together. When the schools closed for the year because of the pandemic, she had time on her hands.

All over the world, the need for personal protective equipment (PPE) was rising, and designers were developing plans that could be used on ordinary 3D printers. A Czech company called Prusa developed a 3D printer design for a face shield that could be used widely. Using the makerspace equipment at Rockwood Library, and working with Ben Sanford, the makerspace coordinator, Clarissa began working 10-hour days making face shields. These are being distributed through OHSU and Portland Public Schools to frontline workers. Clarissa said, “During the COVID-19 outbreak, I was so glad to be able to use the makerspace. I really wanted to do something to help. I learned so much in the actual doing of this project.” 

Beyond her wonderful dedication to the library and her work as a curriculum designer, Clarissa pursues many interests: philosophy, art, and music, including a genre called algorithmic music, a subset of electronic music, which involves using coding to compose and perform music live. She reads widely. For example, at the moment, she is reading The Affect Theory Reader, a scholarly text, and a cozy mystery involving witches, which she describes as “silly fluff.”

Asked which book has influenced her most deeply, Clarissa cited The Phenomenology of Perception, by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. She spoke of its deep implications for consciousness and its exploration of how we perceive the world.

The library is deeply important in Clarissa’s life. She’s happy to have a good stack of books that she snagged before library buildings closed to the public. But more seriously, she said, “I see libraries as the last bastion of community space...it’s something I care about. I can get academic texts through interlibrary loan that I couldn’t possibly afford otherwise. I hope to continue working in the library.”  

Before the closure, Clarissa often walked the two miles from her home to Woodstock Library to pick up her books and spend time there. And she often took the bus to different libraries, way up to St. Johns, for example, to read and code and write in the comfort and community of the library space, which she values so highly. Her remarkable dedication and love of the library is a bright light in these complex times. 

Bất kỳ đứa trẻ nào sẽ được năm (5) tuổi vào hoặc trước ngày 1 tháng 9 đều đủ điều kiện đăng ký học Mẫu giáo tại trường học tại nhà được chỉ định.

Centennial School District :  Con của bạn phải đủ 5 tuổi vào hoặc trước ngày 1 tháng 9 năm 2020 để đủ điều kiện nhập học mẫu giáo cho năm học. Vui lòng điền vào mẫu đăng ký dưới đây gửi email đến trường học tại nhà của bạn cùng với bằng chứng cư trú và bằng chứng sinh.

David Douglas School District : Đăng ký trực tuyến  có sẵn cho tuyển sinh mẫu giáo mới cho năm 2020-21. Sau khi nộp đơn trực tuyến, bạn nên liên hệ với trường biên giới của con bạn để biết các hình thức cụ thể của trường để hoàn thành, phân công lớp học, lịch trình và các thông tin khác để giúp quá trình chuyển đổi của con bạn trở nên suôn sẻ. Nếu bạn đăng ký trực tuyến, bạn cũng có thể tải lên giấy chứng nhận tiêm chủng, giấy khai sinh và bằng chứng địa chỉ của con bạn, hoặc mang chúng đến trường.

Gresham-Barlow School DistrictĐăng ký trực tuyến có sẵn để đăng ký học sinh mới. Sau khi đơn đăng ký trực tuyến được chấp nhận, nhà  trường sẽ liên lạc với bạn để theo dõi thêm và có thể  sắp xếp một cuộc họp trước ngày đầu tiên của con bạn. Điều này rất quan trọng vì bạn có thể nhận được các biểu mẫu cụ thể của trường để hoàn thành, bài tập trên lớp, lịch trình và các thông tin khác để giúp quá trình chuyển đổi của con bạn trở nên suôn sẻ. Nếu bạn có thắc mắc, bạn có thể liên hệ với trường hàng xóm của bạn. Sử dụng ứng dụng Định vị trường học để xác định ranh giới trường bạn sống.

Portland Public SchoolsNếu quý vị có một bé lên 5 tuổi vào Ngày 1 Tháng 9, xin hãy đăng ký học Mẫu Giáo!  Để đăng ký, truy cập vào trang mạng pps.net/kinderenroll. Quy trình này mất khoảng 20-30 phút và nhân viên nhà trường sẽ liên lạc với quý vị trong mùa hè này. Trong khi các trường học đóng cửa, thì đăng ký trên mạng là sự lựa chọn dễ nhất, nhưng chọn điền đơn trên giấy cũng sẽ sớm được cung cấp. Quý vị không cần phải đăng ký nếu con em quý vị đang tham gia chương trình Head Start hoặc Pre-Kindergarten/ Lớp Mầm Non ở PPS.

Любой ребенок, которому будет 1 (пять) лет 1 сентября или ранее, имеет право записаться в Детский сад в назначенной им домашней школе.

Centennial School District : Регистрационный пакет,  Добро пожаловать в детский буклет для родителей

David Douglas School District : Онлайн регистрация  доступна для новых учащихся в детский сад на 2020-21 годы. После подачи онлайн-заявки вы должны связаться с пограничной школой вашего ребенка, чтобы заполнить школьные формы, заполнить школьные задания, расписание и другую информацию, чтобы сделать переход вашего ребенка гладким. Если вы регистрируетесь в Интернете, вы также можете загрузить справку о прививках вашего ребенка, свидетельство о рождении и подтверждение адреса или принести их в школу.

Gresham-Barlow School District : доступна онлайн-регистрация. После того, как онлайн-заявка будет принята,  школа свяжется с вами для дополнительного наблюдения и может  назначить встречу до первого дня вашего ребенка. Это важно, так как вы можете получать школьные формы для заполнения, классные задания, расписание и другую информацию, чтобы сделать переход вашего ребенка гладким. Если у вас есть вопросы, вы можете обратиться в местную школу. Используйте приложение «Локатор школ», чтобы определить, в какой школе вы живете.

Portland Public Schools :  Если у вас есть ребёнок, которому к 1 сентября будет 5 лет, пожалуйста, зарегистрируйтесь в нулевой класс! Чтобы зарегистрироваться, зайдите на веб-сайт pps.net/kinderenroll. Процесс занимает 20-30 минут, и сотрудники школы свяжутся с вами позже летом. В связи с закрытием школ регистрация онлайн является самым простым вариантом, но заявления на бумаге будут доступны в ближайшее время. Вам не надо регистрироваться, если ваш ребёнок посещает программу “Head Start” или “Pre-Kindergarten” в PPS.

9月1日或之前五(5)岁的任何孩子都有资格在其指定的家庭学校就读幼儿园。

Centennial School District注册包-中文

David Douglas School District在线注册  适用于2020-21年的幼儿园新入学学生。提交在线申请后,您应联系孩子的边界学校以获取学校特定的表格,以完成,班级分配,时间表和其他信息,以使孩子顺利过渡。如果您在线注册,还可以上传孩子的免疫证明,出生证明和住址证明,或将其带到学校。

Portland Public Schools : 如果您的孩子在9月1日将满5岁,请注册幼儿园! 要注册,请访问pps.net/kinderenroll。 这过程只需20到30分钟,学校工作人员将在暑期末与您跟。 在学校关闭的情况下,在线注册是最简单的选择,但书面注册将很快推出。 如果您的孩子参加了PPS学前班(Head Start)或幼儿园预备课程,则无需注册。

Ilmo kasta oo noqon doona shan (5) sano markay tahay ama ka hor bisha Sebtember 1, wuxuu u qalmaa inuu ku qoro Kindergarten dugsiga loogu talagalay.

Centennial School District Foomka is-Qoridda Ardeyga

David Douglas School DistrictDiiwaangelinta khadka  tooska ah ayaa loo heli karaa isdiiwaangalinta ardayda cusub ee Xanaanada sanadka 2020-21. Kadib markaad gudbiso arjiga khadka tooska ah waa inaad kala xiriirtaa dugsiga xuduuda ubadkaaga si aad u buuxiso, ku meelayso fasalka, jadwalka iyo macluumaadka kale si aad uga dhigto kala guurka ilmaha mid fudud. Haddii aad isku diiwaangeliso khadka tooska ah, waxaad sidoo kale soo gelin kartaa shahaadada tallaalka ilmahaaga, shahaadada dhalashada iyo caddeynta cinwaanka, ama waxaad u keeni kartaa dugsiga.

Portland Public Schools : Haddii ilmahaaga da’diisu noqoneyso 5 sanno marka la gaaro bisha Sebtamber 1deeda, fadlan diiwaangali ilmahaaga! Haddaba si aad u diiwaangaliso ilmahaaga waxaad tegtaa pps.net/kinderenroll. Marka aad diiwaangalineysa dariiqa la marayaa wuxuu qaadanayaa qiyaastii 20-30 daqiiqo, iyada oo shaqaalaha iskuulku kula soo xiriiri doonaan ka dib xilliga xaggaaga.  Maadaama ay hadda iskuuladu xiran yihiin, habka ugu fudud waa inaad online ka diiwaangaliso ilmahaaga, laakiin habkii xaashida ahaa ee diiwaangalintu waxa uu diyaar noqon doonaa sida ugu degdeg badan. Haddii ilmahaagu wax ka baranayey  barnaamijyada Bilowga Waxbarashada(Head Start) ama Xannaanada Bilowga ah(Pre-Kindergarten) uma baahnid inaad diiwaangaliso

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