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Teens need resumes too! It can be challenging to create your first resume but the library can help. First, start thinking about all of your experiences. Even if you’ve never had a job you probably have a lot of great skills and work experience. Check out this blog post to help you think about your experience.

The library can help you create your resume. We have librarians who can sit down with you and help you create your resume from scratch. We also have community professionals who will review your resume when it’s ready and help you make it even better. 

To schedule an appointment, contact us at workplace@multcolib.org

Here is a handy template to help you get started. Download the PDF document and open it in Google Docs or another word processor to edit it. 

Are you a teen thinking about getting a job but you don’t have any work experience? You probably have more experience than you think. 

Think about your hobbies, interests, and volunteer work. These can be things you do at home, school, community center, or place of worship. 

Think about all the things you know how to do. Can you type? Use a computer and different kinds of software? Do you help do certain things around the house? Speak or understand a language besides English? These are all great things to add to a resume. 

LinkedIn Learning for Libraries is a free online resource you can use with your library card. It has tons of video courses to help you learn new skills. You can even earn badges to add to your resume or online profiles. 

To help you brainstorm more about all the things you could add to a resume, we’ve created this handy worksheet to help get you started! Download the PDF document and open it in Google Docs or another word processor to edit it.

For more information on job searching for teens, check out this video from indeed.com.

If you’ve checked out a copy of George by Alex Gino recently, you might have noticed some changes to the cover. Many of the covers have been altered to change the title from George to Melissa’s Story. This was done in response to a blog post from the author encouraging readers to engage in #SharpieActivism. That is, to alter the covers of their book to the title Melissa’s Story to reflect the gender identity of the main character. In the post, Gino (who uses they/them pronouns) talks about the importance of using a person’s preferred name and that they regret using Melissa’s birth name as the title. They go on to share their experience of growing up nonbinary and the message that something as small as a book title can send.

Over the past several months, the Online Teen Council set to work on the library collection. Equipped with washi tape and colored Sharpies, the teens altered approximately 60 copies of the book in English, Spanish, and Books on CD. The results were rich and varied. Some were as simple as crossing out the old title and adding the new. Others were ornate. Some of the titles had been altered even before the project began. The teens brought their individuality to the project, as I’m sure Gino intended.

Covers of book Melissa's Story

On October 22nd, 2021, Scholastic announced that they have changed the title of the book to Melissa. The book will be printed with the new name starting in April 2022. In the meantime, you can visit Alex Gino’s blog for printable covers and to order stickers. Or else you can engage in your own #SharpieActivism.

Resources:
The Trevor Project
It Gets Better Project
Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Resource Center (SMYRC)
Oregon Youth Line (call, text, chat, or email)

For Families and Allies:
PFLAG
GLAAD
TransFamilies

¡La biblioteca te ayuda a prepararte para el fin de cursos!

Recibe ayuda para completar tus trabajos escolares con Live Homework Help from Tutor.com. Los tutores pueden revisar y editar tus escritos y ayudarte a resolver problemas matemáticos. Tutor.com también ofrece prácticas para exámenes como PSAT, SAT, ACT y Clases Avanzadas (AP). Los tutores están disponibles todos los días de 2 a 10 pm; y pueden ayudarte en español, inglés y vietnamita. 

Tenemos varios libros electrónicos y guías de estudio para ayudarte con las matemáticas, ciencias y escritura de ensayos; así como prepararte para los exámenes de Clases Avanzadas. Otro sitio para practicar los exámenes del SAT y ACT es LearningExpres Library. ¿Indeciso si tomar el SAT o el ACT?

Para usar los recursos en línea, solo necesitas una tarjeta de la biblioteca o tu número de Library Connect, que es como una tarjeta de biblioteca. Para usar Library Connect, revisa estos pasos. Si necesitas una contraseña, llámanos por teléfono, correo electrónico o chat entre las 9 am y 5 pm.

 

El terminar la preparatoria es emocionante, pero también puede ser preocupante. He aquí algunos Recursos para la Vida Después de la Preparatoria

Entra al colegio de dos años o a la universidad de cuatro años

Muchos estudiantes deciden continuar sus estudios superiores en una universidad o colegio. La biblioteca te ofrece varios recursos para elegir la universidad o colegio y solicitar ayuda financiera. 

Información adicional que puede ayudarte a decidir:

Algunas ideas

Continúa una carrera universitaria

Aprovecha el tiempo en la universidad

Ideas para padres para ayudar a su adolescente

Aprende algún oficio

Con el alto costo de las universidades, muchos estudiantes buscan alternativas. Los colegios comunitarios y escuelas que ofrecen carreras técnicas, pueden ser una opción. Los programas de escuelas vocacionales como Benson Polytechnic, pueden abrirte la puerta directamente a una práctica de aprendizaje. Girls Build ofrece campamentos después de la escuela para animar a las chicas a entrar al trabajo de construcción.

Si ya te graduaste de la universidad o colegio, Oregon Tradewomen ofrece clases y carreras de oficios como el primer paso para aprender acerca de los trabajos en construcción y entrar a una práctica de aprendizaje pagada.   

Si estás interesado en el trabajo y servicio comunitario, AmeriCorps tiene muchas posiciones para ayudarte a desarrollar y mejorar tus habilidades y hacer una diferencia en la comunidad. 

Si tienes alguna discapacidad, puedes trabajar con Vocational Rehabilitation Youth Services desde los 14 años de edad para empezar a desarrollar habilidades, explorar intereses y opciones, y aprender acerca de los recursos que pueden ayudarte a encontrar un trabajo y mantenerte empleado. Una vez que entres al tercer año de preparatoria (junior), puedes empezar a trabajar con el equipo de apoyo de tu escuela para conocer las opciones y obtener tu diploma de preparatoria. También puedes empezar el plan de transición para tus años después de la escuela preparatoria.

Haz una práctica o voluntariado en el área de tu interés

La experiencia en un campo puede ayudarte a determinar si esa carrera es para ti. ¿Te interesa la medicina? Inscríbete como voluntario en OHSU.  ¿Te interesa la tecnología? Prueba Free Geek. ¿Estás interesado en un trabajo social? Prueba el  Banco de Comida de Oregón.  Si estás interesado en la construcción, prueba The Rebuilding Center. ¿Te gustan los animales o deseas estudiar para ser veterinario? Prueba el Zoológico, la Audubon Society o la Humane Society. ¿Te gusta la biblioteca? ¡Conviértete en voluntario con nosotros!  

De acuerdo a la ley de Oregón, todos los distritos escolares ofrecen Programas de Educación Profesional y Carreras Técnicas: Portland Public Schools, Gresham, Centennial, Parkrose, Reynolds y David Douglas. Estos programas incluyen una amplia variedad de oportunidades de aprendizaje práctico en clase y en la comunidad.

¿Deseas más ideas de qué hacer después de la preparatoria? Con gusto te ayudamos, comunícate con nosotros a aprendiendo@multcolib.org

Graduating student in cap and gown taking selfie with Elder.
The whole wide world is open to you after high school. You can be anything you want! But what choices do you want to make out of the millions available to you? 

There’s an infinite variety of work out there. What matters most to you? Which skills and talents do you already have and which do you want to build? What Color Is Your Parachute for Teens helps narrow down those infinite choices into some concrete steps.  

The Occupational Outlook Handbook is an online database that outlines the skills and education needed for hundreds of careers in a wide variety of fields. It identifies which fields and jobs are growing or shrinking and which jobs are related and how. 

By Oregon law, every school district offers Career and Technical Education programs - Portland Public Schools, Gresham, Centennial, Parkrose, Reynolds, and David Douglas. These include a wide variety of hands-on learning opportunities in class and in the community.  

Hands-on experience in a field can help you figure out if that’s the career for you. Interested in a medical career? Volunteer at OHSU. Interested in Information Technology? Try Free Geek. Interested in social work? Try Oregon Food Bank. Interested in construction? Try The Rebuilding Center. Interested in a career with animals? Try the Zoo or the Audubon Society or the Humane Society. Love the library? Volunteer for us!

If you’re thinking about a business career, De la Salle North Catholic High School offers a work-study program where you can work in a corporate partner office one day a week to pay for your private high school tuition and learn job skills.

If you’re interested in being an entrepreneur, you can start now. Moziah Bridges started making and selling bow ties at age nine and wrote a guide to starting a business at age 17. Mikaila Ulmer started her lemonade stand as a kid and grew it into a multi-million dollar foundation to help save bees by age 15. If those stories inspire you, The Young Adult Library of Small Business and Finance ebook series takes you through making a plan, finding funding, and marketing your business. Librarian Tara wrote a blog post about library resources to use when starting a business.

Many students from all sorts of backgrounds and with all sorts of goals choose to go to college after high school. The library has collected sources of information on financial aid, choosing a college, college admissions, and studying abroad on our College help for teens page.

But with the high cost of college, many people are looking at alternatives. In a survey, more than half of teens said they were not interested in a four-year degree. They’d rather have shorter, job-focused training. And many of those going to college are looking for apprenticeship or internship opportunities.

Many skilled construction trades offer interesting and challenging work with good pay and benefits. Vocational high school programs, like Benson Polytechnic, can get you directly into an apprenticeship. Girls Build offers camps and afterschool programs to encourage girls to enter the building trades.

For those who have already graduated, Oregon Tradewomen offers a Trades and Apprenticeship Careers Class as a first step to learn about construction trades and enter into a paid apprenticeship.  

Portland Youth Builders has two programs: Youth Build combines work toward a high school diploma or GED with vocational training in construction or technology. Or if you’ve already earned a high school diploma or GED, you can enter the nine-week Bridge program that prepares you for a paid apprenticeship and includes career counseling and leadership development.

If you have a disability, you can work with state Vocational Rehabilitation Youth Services as early as age 14 to start building skills, exploring interests, and learning about the supports that can help you find and keep a job. Once you enter your junior year, you’ll start working with your school team to learn about your diploma options and plan your transition into your next steps after high school.

The number of students taking a gap year is up* thanks to the pandemic. For many, a gap year offers time to rest, explore and mature before settling on a major and career. There are pros and cons to a gap year. Some people engage with a gap year program, but many young people take an independent gap year, working full or part time, living away from home for the first time, volunteering at home or abroad, or traveling.

For those with an interest in community service, AmeriCorps has many positions to grow your skills and make a difference. AmeriCorps members serve part time or full time for year-long positions, such as helping run after school programs, teaching cooking classes at the food bank, or helping veterans find affordable housing. The National Civilian Conservation Corps division of AmeriCorps works on hands-on conservation and climate change mitigation projects. Members in either program get a modest monthly stipend and an education award at the end of the year that can go for tuition or paying off student loans.

Still daunted? That’s okay! You’ve got your whole life and a lot to explore. Failing and recovering are part of what makes a great life after high school as much as your successes and achievements. So try something new, muck around, change your mind, and have fun!

*You will need a library card number to access these library databases. You will also need one to place holds on library books and/or check them out. Thankfully, Multnomah County Library has partnered with public school districts to provide students with automatic library accounts. See Library Connect for more information. 

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Baby playing with number magnets on a table
It’s good to know that we, as caregivers, don’t need to have a background in statistics, geometry or calculus in order to give our kids a head start in math skills. But you may be asking yourself, does math even matter in the early childhood years?

It does. A child’s math knowledge at the start of kindergarten predicts later academic achievement. Fortunately, young children are born curious and are very tuned-in to the world around them. They notice how things have different sizes, shapes and colors. How things move fast or slow, or go up and down. They notice when someone has more gold fish crackers on the plate than they have.

They learn to recite numbers early on and that is important, but math is much more than counting and numbers. Think of how a child might line up all their stuffed animals against a wall from the shortest to the tallest (measurement). They may put the collection of leaves they gathered during their walk into groups of the same color (classification) or place pretend plates and spoons on the table for a make-believe picnic (representation).  

Young children practice spatial sense, geometry and problem-solving when building with a variety of blocks. They notice and create patterns when drawing or doing crafty art. They experiment with weight and density when noticing what will float and what will sink in the bath or pool.

There are many opportunities during the day to explore math. Adults can assist by being enthusiastic explorers with their child. It’s helpful for a child to hear the vocabulary of math and science during their play or when cooking with the family. When they get to school, words like experiment, estimate, organize, predict will already be familiar to them. Math talk enriches everyday learning experiences for young kids and helps build their self-confidence as future learners.

Here are some more great ideas for you to help your child develop early math skills at home.

Have babies or toddlers? Check out Math in the Bath. (Added bonus, they’ll be squeaky clean at the end of the lesson!)

Have a range of ages in your family? Try these lists of excellent books for all ages.

Have a kid in grades K-5? Check out this cooking class for kids, where we'll talk about measuring, counting and shapes while making delicious snacks!

And in honor of March MATHness, the library is celebrating math with lots of fun booklists:

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

 

“I need help finding grants for my small business”

“Are any grants available for low income people and/or veterans for home repair?”

“I want to find grants to buy a home or for real estate investment”

We get questions like this in the library every week, and we are happy to help!  But the first thing to know about many financial assistance programs is that most of them are not grants in the traditional sense, and that searching grants databases will not get you the information you want.

This post sorts through some of the myths about grants, and to point to sources of funding that might help for the types of questions we typically get at the library. And yes, we’ll cover actual grants, too!

Who gets grants?

Most grants are awarded to:

  • nonprofits like charities, schools, and arts and community organizations,
  • state & local government agencies,
  • federally-recognized tribes,
  • and public safety agencies like hospitals, police and fire departments

Most grants are for specific projects that will benefit many people, such as to produce a museum exhibit, to fund science or technology advances, or infrastructure projects (like installing broadband in a rural community). Grants are not generally given to individuals.  Grants are almost never available to businesses to hire staff, for ongoing expenses, or to expand. 

Applying for grants is a very involved process: you need to explain how you will spend the money, how it will benefit the targeted audience, and how you will document all of this. There’s a reason that “grant writer” is a full-time job held by people at places like non-profits and museums! 

Yep, that sounds like me and/or my organization! So how do I get a grant?

Grants.gov 
 “Despite what the late-night infomercials want you to believe, the federal government does not provide grants for business expansion and growth. There is no ‘free’ money for you to start or grow a business.”  Grants.gov is the source to find and apply for federal grants. It is a central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant programs and provides access to approximately $500 billion in annual awards. Grants.gov does not provide personal financial assistance; it’s more like a directory. In order to find grants, go to the grants.gov web site and click on “Search Grants”  On the left hand side you can narrow eligibility to categories like 501(c)(3) nonprofits, state governments, independent school districts, etc. You can also narrow by category, or at least un-check the areas you don’t qualify in. They also have a mobile app.

SAM.gov Assistance listings  (formerly known as Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, or CFDA)
Sort of a companion to Grants.gov, and you may see some overlap. Covers assistance to both individuals and groups, especially state agencies, city governments, school districts, and Indigenous tribal governments and agencies. Some assistance listed here is administered by a state or county agency, which may have application requirements beyond those listed here.

Foundation Directory Online Professional
Library resource. Find potential grant-makers for your nonprofit by geographic area, type of organization, or population to be served. You can also see what kinds of projects a particular grantmaker has funded. Applicants must be a registered 501(c)(3) organization or an international NGO. This database must be used at a library location (no remote access).

Foundation Grants to Individuals Online
Library resource.  Similar to Foundation Directory Online Professional, this is easy to search. You can narrow by people served and geographic location served. It must be used at a library location (no remote access) 

Getting Your Share of the Pie : The Complete Guide to Finding Grants
E-book you can read online with a library card. One important thing it points out in the section on grants to individuals is that “Grant opportunities for individuals are very few in number” and “The vast majority of grants available in this category come in the form of scholarships or fellowships.” 

Candid's knowledge base
The company behind the Foundation Directory has answers to lots of common questions for grant seekers of all stripes, including artists and information on topics like fiscal sponsorship, crowdfunding, and corporate sponsorship. They also publish Philanthropy News Digest, which includes news and RFPs.

Okay, so it sounds like I’m not actually looking for a grant. What other kind of financial help is out there?

Here are some typical areas where individuals can get financial help for a specific purpose. Note that most of these have lots of restrictions, and not everyone will qualify.

Buying a home

Help is available in the form of down payment assistance or government-backed loans. Here are a few in the Portland area. To qualify for any of these programs, you’ll need to meet specific criteria:

Portland Housing Center down payment assistance
Down payment assistance is restricted to Portland Housing Center registered homebuyers.

Proud Ground
For first time homebuyers who meet income requirements.

Habitat for Humanity
Habitat homebuyers help build their own homes and purchase them with affordable mortgages. Homebuyers complete a total of 200 sweat equity hours. Sweat equity refers to the actual hands-on involvement of Habitat homebuyers in the construction of their own homes, as well as participation in other Habitat and community activities. All sweat equity hours must be completed before pre-approved homebuyers purchase their home. Additional program requirements include homeownership education classes and community engagement events.

NeighborhoodLIFT and other bank programs
Banks sometimes have programs where a loan is forgiven after you live in the home for 5-10 years, such as NeighborhoodLIFT : “The NeighborhoodLIFT down payment assistance program provides a forgivable, zero-interest down payment loan with no required payments. Eligible homebuyers use the money from this loan for the down payment and closing costs of a home mortgage loan.”

Home Purchase Assistance Program 
Assistance with own payment and closing costs for first and non-first-time homebuyers looking to purchase a home within Portland city limits. (Currently unavailable, December 2022)

Portland Community Reinvestment Initiatives (PCRI)
Offers a Homebuyer Education and Counseling program and Individual Development Account savings plan.

African American Alliance for Home Ownership
Programs include HAPP (The Homeownership Asset Preservation Program), a service for qualifying homeowners to protect homeownership and transfer wealth between generations,  pre-purchase counseling, and foreclosure prevention help.

Camino A Casa (thru Hacienda CDC)
Provides coaching for the homebuying process and help with down payments and closing costs through programs like a 3:1 match savings plan (the Individual Development Account) to larger down payment assistance loans.

NAYA
Provides culturally-specific homeownership coaching and assistance for Indigenous people, as well as repair grants

Home repair

Weatherization and Repair from Community Energy Project
Free weatherization and safety repairs for hundreds of low-income households, seniors, and people with disabilities in Portland.

Water leak repair program  
Free water leak repair services for income-qualified homeowners in Portland. Through this program, they can arrange to repair leaking toilets, faucets, or underground water pipes. Sewer repairs are not eligible.

Oregon Energy Trust
Multiple programs, including Savings Within Reach, for help with home energy upgrades for income-qualified households and utility bill payment assistance and help with weatherization improvements for low-income households

Rent and utility assistance for people impacted by COVID-19 (or other emergencies):

Multnomah County Emergency Rent Assistance
Local rent relief for tenant households with incomes at or below 80% area median income who have experienced financial hardship due to COVID-19. 

Afloat: Utility Debt Relief
A limited-time program to give bill credits for overdue sewer/stormwater/water bills to low-income households with debt related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The deadline to apply for a bill credit  is April 11, 2022.

211
211 is a good place to look for other social service or crisis/ emergency needs.

Aunt Bertha/Findhelp.org
Type in your ZIP code, then click “money” icon and “Help pay for housing”

Small Business help

Small Business Association (federal government) 
Multiple programs for small businesses, including grants and loans

Business Oregon (State government) : Access to Capital- Loans, Loan Guarantees, and Bond Programs
Provides direct loans, and other programs to fund your business.

Oregon Association of Minority Entrepreneurs Credit Corporation (OAMECC)
Helps minority small businesses to overcome the specific problems that limit their success and growth through technical assistance and loans.

Mercy Corps Northwest
Provides financing, mentorship and education to small business owners. This includes loans ranging from $500-$50,000 to startups and existing small businesses and matching contributions to  an Individual Development Account (IDA). They also run Oregon Women's Business Center (open to everyone, despite the name), a training and coaching service for small business owners.

Micro Enterprise Services of Oregon (MESO)
Provides loans up to $250,000 to small businesses and matching contributions to an Individual Development Account (IDA), a matched savings account that helps people with modest means to save towards the purchase of assets.

SCORE
Not a funding source, but a great resource for entrepreneurial questions. "SCORE is a nationwide nonprofit organization dedicated to the formation, growth and success of small businesses. The Portland Chapter is run by about 70 volunteers who have in depth, practical experience running and managing businesses." SCORE also runs a mentorship program. 

Livelihood NW (formerly known as the PSU Business Outreach Program) 
Non-profit organization that provides free and low cost professional business support to underserved entrepreneurs and small business owners in Portland, OR and throughout the Pacific NW.

Grants and Scholarships for College

Please begin by reading this Planning and Paying for College resource list from MCL’s home learning team.

Oregon Goes to College
Need-based grants, such as Pell Grants, the Oregon Opportunity Grant (OOG) and Oregon Promise Grants

Foundation Grants to Individuals Online 
Library resource.  Similar to Foundation Directory Online Professional, this is easy to search. It must be used at a library location (no remote access)  Grants and scholarships for higher education, generally restricted to a particular course of study/degree program and/or to people meeting specific criteria. Some examples of scholarships listed in this database:

  • Need-based Scholarships for dependents of those killed or permanently disabled as a result of the September 11, 2001 attacks 
  • Scholarships to graduating high school seniors of Walla Walla County, WA 
  • Scholarships for WA and OR residents of Danish descent who have shown exceptional involvement in the Danish community
     

Scholarship America
Free website listing scholarship opportunities with links to sponsoring organizations. These also tend to be for specific courses of study, for people with residency or demographic matches, or students who have demonstrated leadership or ability in certain areas.

And of course, contact the financial aid and scholarship office at your college or university for more ideas!

Everything Else

SAM.gov Assistance listings (formerly known as Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, or CFDA)
Sort of a companion to Grants.gov, and you may see some overlap. Covers assistance to both individuals and groups, especially state agencies, city governments, school districts, and Indigenous tribal governments and agencies. Some assistance listed here is administered by a state or county agency, which may have application requirements beyond those listed here.

Some examples of assistance for individuals listed here are  grants intended to help very low-income owner-occupants in rural areas repair their properties, scholarships for American Indians and Alaska Natives studying health professions who commit to serving in the Indian Health Service for two years ,and financial assistance to organic producers and handlers for certification programs.

Benefits.gov
A list, searchable by state and subcategory (Living assistance, Insurance, etc) of state and federal government-funded programs, from Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to Crop Insurance to State Crime Victims Compensation. Includes links to apply for assistance or get more information about eligibility.

Black Resilience Fund
An emergency fund dedicated to healing and resilience by providing immediate resources to Black Portlanders.

Oregon IDA
Individual Development Accounts, or IDAs, are matched savings accounts that build the financial management skills of qualifying Oregonians with lower incomes while they save towards a defined goal. Oregonians who qualify can save for goals including homeownership or home repair, small business start-up or expansion, post-secondary education or job training, employment-related adaptive equipment, vehicle purchase, and more.

 

Have more questions? Contact us if you have other questions about grants or financial assistance, or if there's a resource we should add.

Students looking at grammar workbook together, outside
As the end of the school year comes closer, students start thinking about spring finals and Advanced Placement exams, or looking ahead to the PSAT, SAT or ACT for colleges. The library is here to help with print and online resources and live tutoring help, along with some study tips.

Your student can get started with study guides and learn how to organize and stop putting off their homework and studying. The library has books to help with math, science, essay writing, and AP exams. The library can help with college entrance exams too!

Be sure to also check out our online resources. Students of all ages can get live help in English, Spanish and Vietnamese, 2-10 pm daily, with Live Homework Help from Tutor.com. Tutors can proofread papers and work through math problems with students. Tutor.com also has practice tests, PSAT study guides, AP exam tips, flashcards and more.

High school students can find more AP practice tests, flashcards, study guides and practice college entrance exams in Learning Express Library. They can also find resources for their math, science, language arts, social studies, and technology classes.

All this is free and available with a library card number. Chances are your child has one with Library Connect, our partnership with public school districts. If they know their student ID number, check for your district code to begin using the resources. If password help is needed, the quickest way is by phone. You can also use email or chat between 9 am and 5 pm to reach one of our staff members.

Now that your student is ready to use and borrow library resources, the next step is studying. Teachers and school counselors have tips to help:

  • Plan ahead. Create a schedule of when each test is and how much time to study for each. Avoid stress and worry by spacing out study time rather than cramming.
  • Find a place where your child can concentrate and be comfortable. The library can be a great place! It’s free and there are computers to use for those online resources mentioned above.
  • Have study supplies ready--notes, textbooks, highlighter, pen or pencil, paper. If using a tablet or laptop, make sure it’s charged or that the charger and an outlet are handy.
  • People learn in different ways. What does your child need: a fidget to occupy hands and focus their mind? space to move? ability to listen to a video or audio recording or to read aloud?
  • Remind your student about silencing or using the ‘do not disturb’ feature on their cell phone if they have one. Remind them to close any apps and tabs on their laptop that aren’t for studying.
  • Set an alarm so your child gives their mind and body a short break every hour or so. Suggest to your child that they take a walk, get some food and/or talk to family or friends before returning to study.
  • Ask a couple classmates if they’re interested in forming a study group to support each other.
  • Know what can be taken into the test. If notes are okay, organize them. Only #2 pencils allowed? Have a couple extra ready. Check calculator batteries.
  • Get a good night’s sleep.

Most important is remembering that it’s okay to ask for help, especially if they have feelings of anxiety. Worrying about tests is common. If your child has anxiety about test taking or school in general, we have recommended resources for parents, children and teens that may help.

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Child with pirate face paint at Día de los Niños at St Johns Library, 2019
Día de los Niños y Día de los Libros, conocido como Día, es una celebración de la niñez, el alfabetismo bilingüe y la diversidad en nuestra cultura con un enfoque en la inclusión. Para celebrar este día especial, los niños pueden venir a la biblioteca para recibir un paquete de actividades encantador y un libro de su gusto completamente gratis. Los paquetes y libros estarán disponibles en nuestras 19 bibliotecas desde el 25 de abril; y serán regalados hasta agotar existencias. No es necesario inscribirse.

En asociación con organizaciones comunitarias, la biblioteca será anfitriona de celebraciones del Día de los Niños en la comunidad. Síganos en nuestra página de Facebook o nuestro sitio multcolib.org/es para más información y conocer los últimos detalles.

El día de los niños/El día de los libros es posible en parte gracias a La Fundación de la Biblioteca con apoyo de The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation.

Día de los Niños / Día de los libros (Children's Day / Book Day), commonly known as Día, is a celebration of childhood, bilingual literacy and multiculturalism with a focus on inclusion. To celebrate this special day, children can come to the library to receive a free activity kit and a book of their choice starting April 25th, until supplies last. Kits will be available at all 19 Multnomah County Library locations. No registration necessary.

In partnership with community organizations, the library is also planning on hosting Día celebrations out in the community.  Follow us on our Facebook page and multcolib.org for updates. 

Children's Day/Book Day is made possible in part by The Library Foundation with support from The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation.

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Hằng năm vào mùa khai thuế, thư viện chuẩn bị sẵn sàng để hỗ trợ — hoặc là sách, buổi hướng dẫn, giới thiệu dịch vụ trợ giúp khai thuế, hay in ra các biểu mẫu khi quý vị cần. Chúng tôi ở đây là vì quý vị! Hãy tìm kiếm những hoạt động trợ giúp sắp diễn ra, chương trình, và bài Blog đăng trên trang mạng của chúng tôi để có những thông tin mới nhất.

Hạn chót để nộp tờ khai thuế liên bang và tiểu bang là thứ Hai, ngày 18 tháng 4, 2022. Mặc dù dịch bệnh COVID-19 đã gây khó khăn cho việc giúp đỡ trực tiếp, quý vị vẫn có thể nhận được sự trợ giúp và hỗ trợ khai thuế theo những cách sau.

Bản sao các biểu mẫu hoặc tập sách hướng dẫn

Hỗ trợ chuẩn bị khai thuế

Các hỗ trợ khác về thuế

Khai thuế miễn phí qua mạng

Quý vị còn có câu hỏi?

Gọi thư viện số 503.988.5123, gửi mẫu thư, hoặc trò chuyện với chúng tôi. Nhân viên thư viện không thể giúp chuẩn bị hồ sơ khai thuế, tư vấn cho những vấn đề thuế, hoặc giải thích luật thuế.

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Todos los años, durante la temporada de declaración de impuestos, la biblioteca está lista para ayudar, ya sea con libros, talleres, referencias para ayuda con los impuestos o para imprimir los formularios que necesita, ¡estamos aquí para ayudarle! Busque los próximos eventos, programas y publicaciones de blog en nuestro sitio web para obtener la información más actualizada.

La fecha límite para presentar declaraciones de impuestos federales y estatales es el lunes, 18 de abril de 2022. Aunque la pandemia de COVID-19 ha dificultado la obtención de ayuda en persona, aún puede obtener asistencia y apoyo para la preparación de impuestos de las siguientes maneras:

Copias en papel de formularios o instrucciones de impuestos

Asistencia para la preparación de las declaraciones de impuestos

Otra asistencia fiscal

Declare sus impuestos en línea gratis

¿Todavía tienes preguntas?

Llame a la biblioteca al 503.988.5123, envíenos un correo electrónico o chatee con nosotros. El personal de la biblioteca no puede preparar declaraciones de impuestos, asesorar sobre asuntos fiscales o interpretar la ley fiscal.

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Каждый год во время сезона подачи налоговых деклараций библиотека готова помочь с предоставлением необходимой литературы, семинаров, распечаткой необходимых вам форм и информации об организациях, где можно получить индивидуальную помощь. Мы всегда готовы вам помочь! Чтобы получить самую свежую информацию следите за сообщениями в блогах, новостями о предстоящих событиях и программах на нашем сайте.

Крайний срок подачи федеральных и государственных налоговых деклараций — понедельник, 18 апреля 2022 г. Пандемия COVID-19 осложняет получение непосредственной помощи, но вы все равно можете получить поддержку в подготовке налоговых деклараций следующими способами:

Бумажные копии налоговых форм или инструкций

  • Загрузите и распечатайте формы и инструкции для федеральных налогов с страницы Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Forms & Instructions, а для штата Орегон с страницы Oregon Department of Revenue Forms and Publications. Если у вас нет возможности распечатать формы и инструкции дома, то вы можете их отправить на принтеры библиотеки практически с любого устройства или из любого места, где есть подключение к Интернету.
  • Получите формы по почте. Чтобы получить федеральные налоговые формы по почте, следуйте инструкциям на веб-сайте IRS  или позвоните по телефону 800.829.3676. Чтобы получить налоговые формы штата Орегон по почте, заполните форму онлайн-заказа или позвоните по телефону 503.378.4988 или 800.356.4222 (бесплатно).
  • Обратитесь в библиотеку. Ограниченное количество федеральных налоговых форм доступно в библиотеках. Чтобы узнать, что конкретно имеется в ближайшей к вам библиотеке, позвоните по телефону 503.988.5123 или свяжитесь с нами, отправив электронное сообщение.
  • Налоговое управление штата Орегон больше не отправляет налоговые формы и инструкции в библиотеки, поэтому у нас не будет в наличии никаких бумажных форм штата Орегон. Однако мы можем распечатать многие из необходимых вам форм. Свяжитесь с нами или спросите сотрудников в любом отделении библиотеки.

Помощь в оформлении налоговой декларации

  • Волонтеры, прошедшие сертификацию IRS, будут оказывать виртуальную помощь в заполнении налоговых деклараций начиная с 29 января. Необходима предварительная запись. Позвоните по телефону 503.966.7942, чтобы узнать, соответствуете ли вы требованиям, и записаться на прием. Доступны услуги переводчика. Вы можете найти дополнительную информацию и получить пакеты документов онлайн с веб-сайта организации Metropolitan Family Service и CASH Oregon в рамках программы IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA).
  • Другие общественные группы организуют очные и виртуальные программы налоговой помощи IRS (VITA)  для налогоплательщиков, отвечающим определенным требованиям; проверьте сайт бесплатной подготовки налоговой декларации  IRS Free tax return preparation для партнеров, предоставляющих эту услугу в вашем регионе.
  • CASH Oregon также может помочь с заявкой и продлением индивидуального идентификационного номера налогоплательщика (ITIN). Звоните 503.874.6075 для получения дополнительной информации.
  • Служба налоговой помощи фонда AARP предлагает налоговую помощь онлайн. Есть обширный раздел самопомощи. Вы также можете отправить им по электронной почте свои вопросы о федеральном подоходном налоге. Чтобы получить индивидуальную налоговую помощь от организации AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, используйте их сайт, чтобы найти ближайшее к вам местонахождение.
  • Если вы являетесь самозанятым водителем, то Roadmap to Rideshare Taxes может помочь вам сориентироваться в том, как работают налоги на самозанятость, как подсчитывать свой доход от вождения, как отслеживать налоговые вычеты и как платить ориентировочно-предполагаемые налоги.
  • Получите помощь от IRS онлайн или по телефону 800.829.1040.
  • Получите помощь в Налоговом управлении штата Орегон онлайн отправив электронное письмо по адресу question.dor@oregon.gov или позвоните по телефонам 503-378-4988 или 800-356-4222. Рабочие часы - с 7:30 до 17:00 с понедельника по пятницу. Телефонные линии закрыты с 9:00 до 11:00 по четвергам и в праздничные дни.
  • Дополнительную информацию о подоходном налоге на Portland Arts Education и Access Income Tax можно получить на веб-сайте Portland Revenue Online или по телефону 503-865-4278.

Другая налоговая помощь

  • На веб-сайте IRS вы также можете узнать о налоговых льготах (Coronavirus Tax Relief ) и проверить статус ваших выплат за экономические последствия (Economic Impact Payment) в связи с коронавирусом.
  • Если вам нужна помощь с налоговым вопросом, выходящим за рамки обычной налоговой декларации, возможно вам сможет помочь Low Income Taxpayer Clinic юридической школы Lewis & Clark. Они обеспечивают бесплатное юридическое представительство по вопросам федерального налогообложения, специализируясь на спорах клиентов с IRS. Свяжитесь с ними по электронной почте sarahlora@lclark.edu или заполните онлайн-форму.
  • У вас есть вопросы об административных постановлениях и позициях IRS? Хотите прочитать анализ последнего налогового законодательства или информационный бюллетень налоговых брифингов CCH Tax Briefings? VitalLaw (ранее CCH Cheetah) - это ресурс, предназначенный главным образом для налоговых юристов и профессиональных налоговых специалистов, который может помочь в нестандартных налоговых ситуациях. Он доступен в любом из 19 наших библиотек (без удаленного доступа).

Подайте налоговую декларацию онлайн бесплатно

MyFreeTaxes от United Way помогает правомочным налогоплательщикам бесплатно подготовить и подать в электронном виде свои федеральные налоговые декларации и налоговые декларации штата, а также предлагает различные способы получения поддержки.

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每年在报税季节,图书馆随时准备提供帮助——无论是书籍、研讨会、转介税务辅助,还是打印您需要的表格,我们都在这里为您服务!

请在我们的网站上查看即将举行的活动、节目和博客文章,以获取最新信息。

2022年4月18日是提交联邦和州府报税表的截止日期。虽然 COVID-19 新冠疫情使现场的报税辅助变得很困难,但是您仍然可以通过以下方式获得准备报税方面的帮助和支持。

报税表或说明书

报税辅助

其他税务协助

  • 您可以在 IRS 网站上找到有关新冠疫情报税纾困查询如何获取补助金的信息。
  • 如果您需要在常规报税准备之外的其他帮助,请联系 Lewis & Clark Law School 的低收入纳税人服务处,他们或许能帮助您。他们提供联邦税务方面依据民众基本需求而定的免费法律协助,专门处理纳税人与 IRS 的争议。请发送电邮至sarahlora@lclark.edu在网上填写表格与其联系。
  • 您是否有关于 IRS 的行政裁决与立场方面的问题? 或是想阅读近期税法分析或 CCH 税务简报(时事通讯)?VitalLaw (前身为 CCH Cheetah) 主要是提供税务律师和专业报税员所用,参考这个资料库或许有助于处理某些特殊税务情况,我们所有19个图书馆都备有 VitalLaw 资料库 (无法远端使用)。

免费网上报税 

  • CASH Oregon 列出了免费上网报税的选项,如果您符合条件便可免费使用。
  • IRS Free File 网站有免费的网上准备和提交联邦所得税服务供您使用。
  • Oregon Department of Revenue 列出了免费的认证报税软件,如果您符合资格便可免费使用。了解更多有关俄勒冈州税电子申报信息
  • 从2022年1月24日开始,使用 IRS free fillable forms 网上免费可填写表格,俄勒冈州不再提供免费可填写表格。
  • MyFreeTaxes (United Way) 免费协助符合条件的纳税人准备以及电子提交联邦与州税申报表,协助并包括其他数种支援方式。

仍然有问题吗?

请致电 503.988.5123 或发电邮与我们连络。图书馆工作人员无法为您准备报税表、就税务问题提供建议、或解释税法。

 

In celebration of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8), Multnomah County Library is highlighting renegade women authors who challenge the status quo with their innovative and groundbreaking work.

#BreakTheBias and discover women authors past and present that have been writing about changes in society, what they hope to see, and how we can get there. 

Svetlana Alexievich (1948 - present)
Journalist, poet, and Nobel Prize laureate Svetlana Alexievich writes in Russian, and currently lives in Germany. Her father was Belarusian, her mother Ukrainian, and she was born in Ukraine. Her first book The Unwomanly Face of War received strong criticism and praise for adding over 500 perspectives of women in war, as both victims and soldiers. Her books have sparked conversation and broken barriers. She has spoken out about the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster, the children of World War II, and the fall of the Soviet Union. Alexievich’s novel Secondhand Time was the 2015 winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. It is an oral history of the collapse of the USSR, focusing on the voices of women and men whose stories may have been lost. Alexievich has channeled her works in sharing stories of war and turmoil, while humanizing those most impacted. Find books by Svetlana Alexievich

Renegade author Svetlana Alexievich
 
Octavia Butler (1947 - 2006)
Science fiction author and winner of the MacArthur “Genius” Grant, Octavia Butler wrote dystopian novels about women’s rights, Black injustice, and the climate crisis. Butler’s novel Parable of the Sower centers on an African American woman in 2025, suffering from a hereditary trait where she feels other people's pains as her own.  Her novels focused on the points of view of characters that had not been written about before and brought their experiences to light with empathy and integrity. Butler won awards for best science fiction or fantasy, including several Nebula and Hugo Awards. She also won the PEN West Lifetime Achievement Award. Find books by Octavia Butler.

Renegade author Octavia Butler
 
Laura Kate Dale (1991 - present)
Laura Kate Dale is an activist, author, and video game journalist. She is most well known for writing about and for the transgender and autism communities. Her second book Uncomfortable Labels: My Life as a Gay Autistic Trans Woman is an autobiographical account of her life. Dale’s third book Gender Euphoria: Stories of Joy from Trans, Non Binary and Intersex Writers is a joyful set of essays about the happiness of living out your true identity. Dale constantly pushes back on the narrative of gender dysphoria and struggles of being transgender through true gender euphoria. Find books by Laura Kate Dale.

Renegade author Laura Kate Dale
 
Joy Harjo (1951 - present)
Performer, author, and Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo has written poetry books, plays, memoirs and children’s books. An American Sunrise is a collection of poems about the Mvskoke people who were forcibly removed from their original land. Harjo intertwines her personal story and journey with tribal history. She is the first Native American to serve as Poet Laureate for the United States, and is on her third term. Harjo has received many accolades and awards for her work. In the last decade, she won the Lilly Prize for poetry and music (2017), the Griffin Poetry Prize (2016), and the Wallace Stevens Award by the Academy of American Poets (2015). Find books by Joy Harjo.

Renegade author Joy Harjo

bell hooks (1952 - 2021)
Renowned author bell hooks, also known as Gloria Jean Watkins, was a feminist, activist and cultural critic. Ms. hooks, who intentionally did not capitalize her name so as to place more attention on her work than herself, wrote more than 30 books exploring racism, gender, class, sexism, intersectionality, and history. She is most well-known for Ain't I a woman? Black Women and Feminism and the Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center. She was critical of the feminist movement for centering whiteness and rallied people to consider a new wave of feminism where race and class where interwoven. Her books ranged in genre including children’s fiction, poetry, education, and memoirs. Central to conversations about race, sex, and feminism, hooks' literature has won numerous awards. Find books by bell hooks.

Renegade author bell hooks

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929 - 2018)
Ursula K. Le Guin was an essayist who wrote short stories, poetry, science fiction and fantasy. Her novel, The Dispossessed, won her a Nebula Award, and made her the first woman to win the Hugo Award. This book also made her the first person to win two distinguished awards in science fiction at the same time. Her 1969 novel, The Left Hand of Darkness, pushed discussion about gender and sex roles. Set in a world where people are androgynous or ambisexual, she challenged ideas on human connection and expectations. She fought against the digitization of books by Google and was critical of Amazon’s treatment of authors. In 2014, Le Guin was awarded the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She won several Nebula, Hugo, Jupiter, and Locus awards throughout her lifetime. Le Guin was active in the Portland and Oregon literary community. She was a member of both the Literary Arts and Multnomah County Library advisory boards. Find books by Ursula K. Le Guin.

Renegade author Ursula LeGuin

Gabby Rivera (1982 - present)
Gabby Rivera is a queer Puerto Rican woman from the Bronx, and an LGBTQ+ youth advocate. She is also the first Latin woman to write for Marvel Comics, in a series titled America. In America, Rivera features Chavez as the first Latina lesbian teen superhero of the comic. Rivera focuses on centering joy in the narratives about LGBTQ+, Latinx and people of color. In her 2016 young adult novel Juliet Takes a Breath, Rivera’s character makes the move to Portland, Oregon, after coming out to her family. This book won her the 2017 Silver IPPY Award for Best LGBTQ Fiction, and was re-published by Penguin Random House in 2019. Rivera is a public speaker, writer, activist, and youth mentor. Find books by Gabby Rivera.

Renegade author Gabby Rivera

Jenny Zhang (1983 - present)
Jenny Zhang is a writer, poet and essayist. Her books touch on different perspectives for current and sensitive topics including extreme poverty, sexual assault, the immigrant experience and identity. In her 2017 novel, Sour Heart, Zhang writes a collection of short stories about the complex relationships between Chinese-American families. In 2018, she won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction). This same year, Zhang won the PEN/ Robert W. Bingham Prize for Sour Heart, an award specifically for debut work in fiction, where the collection of stories showcase great literary achievement. Throughout her career, Zhang has written numerous essays and poetry. In Dear Jenny, We Are All Find, Zhang writes poems that vary in structure and style. She covers racism, sexism, and objectification, with the outcome of self discovery. Find books by Jenny Zhang.

Renegade author Jenny Zhang

Discover more women breaking the bias with these My Librarian book recommendations.
 

Zines are a crucial piece of the social justice movement, publications that prompt conversations of race, sexuality, and activism. A zine can be anything, about anyone, made with any items available. They are self-published, or by a small publisher, and usually printed in small numbers. 

Cover of Erase This! with scissors and glue stick

In definition, “zines are any DIY publication that could include text, or not, illustrations, or not, and collages, or not,” said Marissa Yang Bertucci (pictured), a queer, mixed-race femme writer, counselor, and community educator. “Growing up in an immigrant family, we relied on my mother to share stories of her land and her family in North and South Korea,” says Marissa. “There was something about oral storytelling that made me afraid to forget the stories told to me. Journaling, collaging, and developing zines were a way for me to remember stories told to me - not just in a written way, but visual too.”

Marissa Yang Bertucci, author of Erase This!

Zines have been around since the 1930s as a response to sci-fi stories, where readers wanted to imagine more. In the 60s, zines grew in popularity. By the 80s, they were a form of art separate from the mainstream media and part of both the punk and feminist movements. 

“A lot of zines are just papers folded or stapled together,” said Marissa. “There is no strict format, they are easily reproducible, and either free or low-cost.”

This year’s Everybody Reads book, Good Talk by Mira Jacob, is a graphic novel, and will be the inspiration for the zine workshop hosted by Marissa in partnership with the library. 

In Good Talk, Mira Jacob has similar base illustrations for the characters that she modifies throughout the whole novel. Jacob lays images on top of others, adds speech bubbles, or photos of artists and places them near each other to convey locations, sentiments and moments in time. Good Talk is an example of the difficult topics and themes that can be discussed in a visual way.

“For folks of color, queer people, disabled people, punks, artists, nerds, and any community that has ever felt like they wanted more, zines have been a way to do this,” said Marissa. “It is about dreaming and saying that here and now are not enough, and staying connected to all possibilities for expression.”

Marissa’s current and former students use art as a form of self-expression, and as a way to build empathy in the community. Creating and sharing art has helped students and families feel safe and elevate what students are going through. 

In her upcoming workshop, Marissa will guide conversations on personal values, the purpose of art, and self-expression. There is no filter, and no censoring. 

“When you think about zines, social justice and race, we can see how a text can be used to carry a conversation, and an illustration to capture a moment.There are more ways of engaging with social change than just changing laws and protesting. One way can be to imagine change and get your message out there with art,” said Marissa. 

Teens are invited to register for ERASE THIS!, a free workshop on Sunday, March 6 from 2-4 pm. The event will discuss scenes from zines—  what’s working well and what could be adapted. Event registration includes a DIY art kit, with limited stock for attendees. Registration closes March 5.

All ages are welcome to try creating their own zine by picking up a free copy available at all library locations while supplies last.
 

Image of adult male showing adult female how to cut wood on a table saw
Apprenticeship can be a great path to a career. Apprenticeships are usually programs that train you in a trade or craft while doing the job. There are many ways to get started and learn more about apprenticeships.

Oregon Apprenticeship is a group of organizations working to connect you to Registered Apprenticeship. They can help you explore careers, learn about application guidelines and search job openings.

The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) can help you find a program and answer your questions about apprenticeship programs.

Oregon Career Information Systems has lots of information about different careers and the education and skills required, including apprenticeships. A library card is needed to sign in.

Portland Workforce Alliance can help connect students to apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeships to improve students’ career readiness.

Portland Community College and Mount Hood Community College both offer several different apprenticeship programs and can help you learn more about them.

The Workplace Team can help you do research about apprenticeships and other career paths. Contact us to ask questions or book a One-on-One appointment.

Almost every week parents come to the reference desk at my library asking for children’s books about new babies. They want picture books to start getting expectant siblings ready for the world-overturning event that is to come. It always gives me a moment of pause, though, because so many new sibling books lead with the problems. While there might be problems, you don’t want to present books to toddlers or preschoolers that talk about how tired and distracted their parents will be, or that the new tiny humans will need so much attention that there won’t be any of it left for them. A new baby is a miracle. The first books that you give the big brother- or sister-to-be should be about how miraculous it is to have a new little person joining their family. They should expect to celebrate!

 

So I made this list of celebratory picture books. And later, if there are problems to work out? Definitely come see us at the reference desk. We can help with those, too. But in the meantime, congratulations!

 

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate influential people, events and actions contributing to Black History in the United States. Each year, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History selects a theme for Black History Month to focus the attention on one specific aspect of the Black experience. In 2022, the theme is “Black Health and Wellness.”

“I absolutely love the theme and focus on health and wellness,” said Lana Sweeting (pictured), Black Cultural Library Advocate (BCLA) at Rockwood Library. “It’s a topic that often gets swept under the rug, but to take this time to bring attention to self-care, and taking a step back when we can, is perfect.”

Lana Sweeting, BCLA at Rockwood Library

Each library location is finding their own way to celebrate Black History Month and connect with their local communities, offering book recommendations, activities, library displays and more, around the theme of Health and Wellness. 

At Hollywood Library, BCLA team members Tamara Stigler and Kariisa Allen are highlighting lesser-known African-Americans who made a large impact for the civil rights movement. Some examples include Diane Nash and Dorothy Height, women in the civil rights movement who were behind the scenes fighting along other more well known civil rights leaders. As part of her display, Tamara is sharing information about the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and how to visit the museum virtually. 

Tamara Stigler and Kariisa Allen, BCLAs at Hollywood Library

The Black Cultural Library Advocates team “creates programs and services that, from the foundation, are by and for the community,” said Sonja Ervin, Multnomah County Library Equity and Inclusion Manager. “This gives folks the opportunity to know that the library is a space for them, and this is why the BCLA position is so vital in connecting with the community.” 

The library has intentionally and rapidly expanded the team over the past few years, with an increase of 33 BCLA positions between 2019-2021. The total number of BCLA staff is 38. Currently, 14 libraries have dedicated Black cultural staff positions: North Portland, St. Johns, Kenton, Hollywood, Albina, Midland, Central, Capitol Hill, Hillsdale, Sellwood, Gregory Heights, Gresham, Fairview-Columbia and Rockwood libraries. 

“There is so much knowledge and resources that should be afforded to everyone, and representation matters," said Tamara. "I am a native Portlander, and I remember going to the school library, but I don’t recall going to the local library. When I had my son, we encouraged him to go. The library opened up so many doors for him to explore and to learn, and in part because of these experiences he is now a Computer Engineer.”

The BCLA team has a mission to “leverage Multnomah County Library’s platform and resources to preserve and strengthen Black communities.” Part of this is through displays, programing, book selections, storytimes, and community outreach.

“This year we are adding a display of children’s books for Black Children’s Week that are just stories of kids being kids,” said Melanie Boyd (pictured), BCLA at Kenton Library. “There are so many books out there that focus on how people of color are different from white people. These stories show Black children as worthy of love and fun.”

Melanie Boyd, BCLA at Kenton Library

Kenton Library’s Black History Month selections range from stories of Afro-Latino families, to culturally sensitive and relatable children’s books:

  •  Just Like Mama, focusing on relationships between a caregiver and child.
  • Time For Bed, Old House, about a boy who is afraid to go to sleep at his grandpa's house because of the noises made. But once his grandfather goes to sleep, he knows it is okay and he is safe there.
  • Sharing a Smile, a relevant and timely children’s book of a girl who is worried she cant see people’s smiles because of masks. 

Many library locations will have a Black History Month display, Black Resource Book List and Black History Month giveaways - including free books to take home!

Take a look at these events and more to celebrate Black History Month:

The BCLA team's work brings our larger community together so that we can continue to include materials, programs and services that match what the community wants and needs. “We want to create spaces where people can ask questions,” said Lana. “With this dedicated role, we are able to find ways to connect people with resources, and make the library a safe space.” 

Check out other reading recommendations from the Black Cultural Library Advocates:

The national theme for Black History Month 2022 is Health and Wellness for the Black Community

Join these virtual programs

It’s Black Storytime Live
Wednesdays at 5:15 pm • February 2, 9, 16 and 23

Peace of Mind: Navigating, stress, anxiety, school & COVID
with ZaDora Williamsz
Tuesday, February 8 • 6–7:30 pm
For teens

Stones, Bones and Black Eyed Peas
with Chefs Michelle Guinn and Sable Askew
Thursday, February 10 • 6–7:30 pm
Live event with recipe cards

Music and Movement for Children
with Nikki Brown Clown
Saturday, February 19 • 10–10:45 am

What’s Going On? A barber shop talk series
with James McKenzie, Nick Herrick and Cary Pratt Jr.
Wednesday, February 23 • 7–8 pm

Mental Wellness for the African American Community: Trauma-informed care
with Javelin Hardy
Tuesday, March 1 • 6–8 pm

Explore these related collections

We Had Jazz Exhibition
February–March 2022 • Collins Gallery, Central Library, 801 SW 10th Ave.
Highlights Albina and North Portland community’s jazz scene – 30 photos

National Museum of African American History and Culture — Searchable Museum
A place to explore history and culture through an African American lens.

For more information, visit library events or call 503.988.5123

All abilities are welcome. For disability accommodations, call 503.988.5123 or email help@multcolib.org 2-3 days before a program.

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