Blogs

Every week, new books  are added to my ever growing "to be read" pile.  While it’s a pleasant hazard of the library profession, the looming tower of unread tomes has grown a bit too tall for comfort. However, after a recent search through the new titles joining the collection, I think there's some room left. Here are a few I'm excited about.

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America's Test Kitchen breaks down the cast iron pan in their signature style. They did the work, you reap the delicious meals!

 

 

 

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Urban Horror that'll keep you up at night long after you close the book.

 

 

 

 

 

curse of jacob tracy cover

 

St. Louis in 1880 is full of ghosts, and Jacob Tracy can see them all...

 

 

 

 

 

Check out the whole list here!

Sailing Alone Around the World book jacketThe end of the nineteenth century saw new kinds of travelers, traveling on their own and driven by a sense of adventure instead of as part of an expedition with an official purpose. One of these adventurers was Joshua Slocum. He was the first person to sail a small boat around the world and  he did it alone in a little over three years. This would be a remarkable feat today, but in 1895 without radio, GPS or an autopilot and with limited charts this was amazing.

Slocum wrote a book about his adventure Sailing Alone Around the World. It has remained in print and it continues to find new readers.  I have enjoyed reading about his trip and imagining myself sailing off on an adventure, especially going through Tierra del Fuego. What an incredible place to see from your boat!The Hard Way Around book jacket

I hope I have gotten you interested in Joshua Slocum. Here are some ways to learn more about him:

You can watch a 30 minute documentary DVD: The Extraordinary Life and Epic Journey of Joshua Slocum.

A good recent biography, The Hard Way Around, by Geoffrey Wolff will help you to understand his life and travels.

For kids and teAround the World book jacketens:

Born in the Breezes, the Seafaring Life of Joshua Slocum by Kathryn Lasky. Lasky, who has sailed across oceans herself, wrote this picture book of Slocum’s life.

Around the World, by Matt Phelan is a graphic novel about three circumnavigators. Joshua Slocum, Thomas Stevens who bicycled around the world, and Nellie Bly who traveled by ship, train and burro beating Jules Verne’s fictional Phileas Fogg by making it around the world in 72 and a half days.

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

Naturalization ceremony at the Grand Canyon, 24 September 2010.The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) states that an average of 710,000 people have become new U.S. citizens each year since 2010. Even with that remarkable figure, there are still 22.1 million immigrants in the U.S. that are not naturalized citizens. These 22.1 million include permanent residents legally in the U.S., unauthorized immigrants, and legal residents with temporary visas. In Oregon, less than 40% of the  more than 390,000 immigrants are naturalized citizens. Why is that? While no single answer applies to everyone, for many the process can be overwhelming and complicated. Multnomah County Library can help with language learning opportunities and citizenship classes. Staff can also direct you to resources that help immigrants become naturalized citizens.   

Local Resources

There are many organizations throughout the Portland metro area that offer resources to aid those seeking citizenship:

Legal AssistanceDohes Elias Haney's naturalization certificate, 1917

Those seeking citizenship often require legal assistance, especially with the USCIS N-400 form. Most citizenship classes do not focus on paperwork requirements but there are organizations that can provide that type of help. There may be a fee for legal services:

USCIS Citizenship Resources

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Service provides many resources online for those seeking to become naturalized American citizens.

If you still have questions about becoming a citizen contact a librarian to get personalized assistance. We're always happy to help!

 

Pyramid photoAncient Egypt is fascinating! You can learn about how the pyramids were built (and about the treasures found inside), how mummies were made, and how to write in hieroglyphics. The ancient Egyptians also made numerous advances in science and architecture.

Did you know that the Ancient Egyptian civilization lasted for over 3000 years? Learn more about the pharaohs, or about the daily life of the average Egyptian.

Here are four sites which have information on many topics related to Ancient Egypt:

The British Museum has an extensive website that covers subjects such as geography, gods and goddesses, trades, and Egyptian life.  You can read the stories to find out more or participate in challenge activities.Image of sarcophagus

Click on a map of ancient Egypt to find out about topics like farming, temples, and warriors at the DK Find Out website.

The History Channel has several videos to watch, as well as a written history of ancient Egypt.

The Children’s University of Manchester Ancient Egypt site is great for younger kids and includes online activities.

Enjoy your exploration of Ancient Egypt, and don’t forget to contact a librarian if you need more help.

Bryan Kidd became the Unipiper after combining two of his hobbies, unicycling and playing bagpipes. Now he has become a fixture in a city that embraces weird.

The Unipiper is a manifestation of my life's greatest passions, including music, popular culture, and a flair for the absurd. I consider myself very lucky to have found an audience that is genuinely excited to share these passiThe Unipiperons with me. Over the years as The Unipiper has become intertwined with the "Keep Portland Weird" movement, I have repeatedly found myself at the center of an idea that is far bigger than simply riding a unicycle while playing bagpipes. Suddenly I have become part of the unique cultural identity of the city in which I live. This has forced me to confront questions like, what drives me to be who I am, what is weird, and am I weird? It has been fun turning back to the source waters of my inspiration in search of answers. Here are my picks:

Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music

Haunting. Beautiful. Beyond classification. Music that is as foreign as it is familiar. The sounds on this collection are at once both revenants of a forgotten past and completely timeless. They come from a place famed rock critic Greil Marcus dubbed "the Old, Weird America," and they resonate deeply, as if awakening some shared history from a common cultural past life. Little is known about many of the artists appearing on the set, leaving our imaginations to fill in the blanks. Listening to this set for the first time after college was the kick in the pants that would send me on the road in search of the places where these sounds might still exist. Was it out there, on some back road or unmarked highway, just waiting to be discovered? This prospect intrigued me to the point where I left my home in Virginia and started driving. I don't know that I found that Old Weird America, but I did ultimately end up in Portland — which I suppose could be called the New Weird America. And I’ve been here ever since.

Resurrect Dead: The Mystery of the Toynbee Tiles, directed by Jon Foy

On the surface, this documentary profiles one man’s search for those responsible for mysterious tiles cropping up across the US. The end result is so much more -- the richest of character studies, a genuinely compelling mystery/thriller that borders on the supernatural, and an examination of the nature of obsession that is guaranteed to stick with you long after the credits roll. Even though the movie leaves many questions unanswered, it all wraps up with a surprisingly satisfying conclusion. This film will either ignite the spark of your passion project or have you hanging it up under lock and key. Watching it, I found renewed confidence in my performances and a wealth of inspiration for new material. Your mileage may vary.

Pieces of Portland: An Inside Look at America's Weirdest City  by Marie Deatherage

Old Weird America is still alive, right here in Portland, and this book has the proof. Did you ever want to learn more about the city but didn’t know where to start? This book is your answer. Part travel guide, part history lesson, part love letter, part critical examination, not only does Pieces of Portland do an amazing job telling the stories — it holds your hand as you come to understand Portland. Everything that is most interesting about Portland is represented, from mysterious backyard caves and a fascination with toy ponies to nonprofit breweries and tiny houses. The story of Portland is far from over and ever since reading this I have been on a quest to connect with others that share my vision for a weirder tomorrow. The story told in Pieces of Portland has given me with a sense of pride and wonder for the city like I have never before known. It fills me with a sense of urgency to get out and become a larger part of that story. The praises of Portland are worth singing and this book helped me find my voice.

A college degree is one of the most expensive items you will ever buy. It can leave you in debt for years, so you want to be as smart as you can about your education. When you attend college, you are "buying" a college degree, much as you purchase other big-ticket items. So, you want to make sure you get your money's worth.

Barnard College

Figuring out what college is going to cost

The U.S. Department of Education has a useful website called College Scorecard. You supply information about the type of degree you are looking for and locations or regions that you are interested in, and you'll receive results that show the average annual cost of tuition and fees at each matching institution, the graduation rate, and the annual average salary of their graduates. It's a great website for getting an overview and comparing what different colleges cost.

Another great place to research college pricing and student aid is at The College Board website. There is a wide variety in prices charged by institutions of different types and in different parts of the country, so it can really pay to do your research.

Looking at online colleges? They can sometimes offer you more flexibility and easier access than traditional colleges. Check out Affordable Colleges Online to see, by state or by subject, which colleges offer affordable options. 

Be sure to add in what your room and board costs will be, including your meal plan, books and supplies, and other personal expenses

Your Personal Resources

Before you apply for student aid or scholarships, you'll need to figure out the amount of money that you and perhaps your parents can afford. Some parents choose to contribute and others believe that it is the student's responsibility to pay for college.

If you are saving for college, the State of Oregon offers the Oregon College Savings Plan which provides tax advantages. 

Federal Student Aid

If you plan to apply for aid, check and double-check the application deadlines. State and college aid may have earlier deadlines than federal aid. When you apply, you want to be in the first stack of applicants, not the last. You can check the federal and state application deadlines at www.fafsa.gov.

The first step to apply is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. Financial aid experts recommend that all students fill out the FAFSA because it is used by colleges and grant-makers to figure out financial need. 

The fastest way to fill out the FAFSA is online at www.fafsa.ed.gov, but you can also get paper forms at all our public library branches: Just ask at a reference desk. Give yourself plenty of time to fill out the form. You'll need to have information about your financial situation and you or your parents' federal tax forms from the previous year at hand.

Using the information that you supply on the FAFSA, the financial aid office at your college will determine that amount of aid you may receive.

Have you ever stayed awake late because you went to a show that was so inspiring you couldn’t sleep? I have. I love that feeling that something just hit the mark whether it’s a movie, concert, performance art or a reading. It feels like a feast of art. It’s the stuff of life. It’s our reason for being: sharing art.

I lie awake thinking about all the wonderful things I’ve heard or seen. Recently, I stayed awake because I was reading a fantastic graphic novel. I was so excited to read something smart, funny, innovative, and visually beautiful. I lay there thinking Jillian Tamaki is brilliant! I can’t wait to tell everyone that SuperMutant Magic Academy is my favorite graphic novel of the year. I love the magic academy setting with witches as teachers, uniforms and spell casting classes. I love that the art sometimes reminds me of Craig Thompson or Charles Schulz but is unique all on its own. I am in awe by the humor because it's so smart and laugh out loud funny. I can’t get enough of the characters Marsha, Frances, Everlasting Boy, and the new kid. I didn’t want to return it so I’ll have to buy my own.

You can find SuperMutant Magic Academy on my new staff favorites list.

Come say hello to the library at the 29th annual Fix It Fair!  The last fair is this Saturday , 2/20 at George Middle School from 9:30am-3:00pm.  Want to learn more about the Fix It Fair?  Check out their website including the brochure for Saturday's event. With workshops on Health, Home Repair and Utilities, Finances and Gardening there is something for everyone. This Fix It Fair also includes classes in Spanish, too!

We'll have library resources for you to check out (Gardening Projects for Kids, DIY Solar Projects, Making Healthy Food Taste Great and much, much more), information about library programs and library staff experts ready to answer your questions.  See you there!

Book Partners, Volunteer Partners

by Sarah BinnsVolunteers Carole and Emily

Library patrons know the volunteers they see face-to-face, such as those who teach computer classes or work with the Summer Reading program, but what they don't see are the volunteers who devote their time to getting library books into the hands of the right patron every day. Two who work behind the scenes are Carole Parkinson and Emily Hollingsworth. Carole began volunteering at Gregory Heights Library in 2010 and Emily in 2011.

Together Carole and Emily work every Monday morning on the paging list, a daily document listing around 200 items placed on hold by patrons throughout the system. After finding these items, some of which are in the wrong place or missing, Carole and Emily send them off to the right branch.  “Carole takes the last page of the paging list and I go process the yellow crates,” says Emily. Towers of yellow crates full of books greet Emily. These are books from other libraries that patrons at Gregory Heights have placed on hold. As soon as Emily checks in an item, a patron receives that delightful email notification that their hold is available and the item is shelved on the pickup shelf. Carole's paging list shift is about two hours; Emily spends as much as four hours.

Carole and Emily are lifelong book-lovers and met in 2009 through Pageturners, an MCL-sponsored book group, before they began their complementary volunteer shifts. “I've always worked with Carole at the library,” says Emily. “She was my go-to when I started on the paging list and didn't know where anything was!”

Both came to library volunteering almost immediately upon retirement several years ago. In their spare time, Carole enjoys knitting and Emily gardens, but both remain passionate about books and recommend checking out the Lucky Day section (where patrons can find popular new selections without waiting for a hold).

While patrons don't always see the work that Carole and Emily do, anyone who places a hold at Gregory Heights has reaped the rewards of their efforts. Says staff member Andres Chavelas, “Their contribution to the work flow on Monday mornings is unparalleled.” After five years on the job, neither woman shows signs of stopping. “I love doing the paging list,” says Carole. “I'd hate to miss it!”


A Few Facts About Carole and Emily

 
Home library: Gregory Heights for Carole; Midland for Emily.
 
Currently reading: Carole is reading The Amateur Marriage by Anne Tyler and Emily is reading The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey by Rinker Buck.
 
Favorite book from childhood: Carole’s favorites were horse books such as My Friend, Flicka and Thunderhead.  Emily liked the Cherry Ames nurse books, which she buys when she sees them at estate sales.
 
Favorite section of the library: Cookbooks and knitting books for Carole; Lucky Day books for Emily.
 
Most influential book: For Carole, The Island at the Center of the Earth by Russell Shorto; for Emily, The Wright Brothers, David McCullough's latest biography.
 
E-reader or paper? Both, says Carole, who enjoys the ease of looking up words on her Kindle. Emily prefers paper, although she uses her Kindle when she travels.
 
Favorite place to read: In bed where she can concentrate, says Carole; somewhere comfortable like a bed or a couch, says Emily.

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

The Outsiders book coverDo you have an all time favorite book? That one book that you come back to and read over and over again? That one book that you might be a little bit obsessed with? For my daughter that book is S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders. She loves this book! So much so that when she first read it in the 5th grade she put the worn coverless copy her dad handed down to her it in my hands and insisted that I read it too. When she was in middle school we painted the outside of her locker gold and wrote the words from Robert Frost’s poem “Nothing Gold Can Stay” in black Sharpie. And earlier this year when we brought home our first canine friend, she named him Soda Pop. It's probably better if she tells you about her love for The Outsiders in her own words.
 
Guest teen blogger Téa on her love for the Outsiders:
 
I think I must've been about 10 when I first read The Outsiders. Keyword, first. I wouldn't be exaggerating if I said I have probably read that book about twenty times. I can still remember tearing through the entire book in a day, falling in love with the characters and subsequently getting my heart broken. A lot of books have affected me, but none quite like that. It was odd. I almost felt like instead of reading the book, I was part of the book. And that wasn't too far off base. As a child I never really fit in no matter how hard I tried, and a book about people who were treated differently was more relatable than I could've imagined.
 
There's a stigma around people who read YA books as adults — or even as teenagers — and it needs to stop. A lot of YA books, from The Outsiders to Perks of Being a Wallflower, deal with themes such as not fitting in, trauma and feeling hopeless, which are all topics that people, regardless of age, can relate to. I can proudly say that my favorite book is the same as it was when I was 10, and there's nothing wrong with that. As I have gotten older I have found new messages and things in The Outsiders that I identify with, while a lot of the old messages hold strong.

 

Tiny Beautiful Things bookjacketI’m sort of in love with Cheryl Strayed. I’ve read and listened to her books. I watched the movie based on her book, Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail and now I listen to the Dear Sugar podcast she does with Steve Almond every single week.I think that the best way to experience Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar is on audiobook, read by Strayed herself. This book is a compilation of letters and and her answers when she was the advice columnist at The Rumpus. The advice to her letter-writers and the personal stories she shares are simply beautiful when you can hear them in her voice.

I like her so much because she truly knows how to get to the heart of an issue but she does it with so much compassion and with the understanding that humans have oh so many foibles. We’re just not perfect creatures that make the best decisions sometimes. We don’t always have the perspective to look at our issues. Cheryl has made her share of mistakes (see Wild) but she also knows how to help us figure out better ways of being in the world.

Brave Enough bookjacketHer latest book, Brave Enough, is a collection of her wise words. It’s inspiring. Cheryl has gathered up some of her most thoughtful and insightful words and packaged them all up in a lovely volume. I think it will make a splendid gift book both for yourself and for your loved ones - though when I give it to my friends and family, I’ll pair it with Tiny Beautiful Things and Wild.

I now have something more Cheryl Strayed-like to look forward to - Reese Witherspoon and Laura Dern are collaborating on an HBO-sponsored project to produce a series based on Tiny Beautiful Things. Cheryl Strayed’s husband, Brian Lindstrom (a hugely talented filmmaker-if you haven’t seen his documentary, Alien Boy: The Life and Death of James Chasse, please watch it soon.) will be doing the TV adaptation. The series will “explore love, loss, lust and life through the eyes of a Portland family who live by the mantra that the truth will never kill you.” I can’t wait!

November is Native American History month, and one way you can celebrate American Indians this month, and throughout the year, is by diversifying your reading and research. Did your teacher assign you an author biography? Why not select a Native author for your report, and read one of their books while you are gathering facts about their life. Here are five great authors to get you started:

  • Sherman Alexie is Spokane/Coeur d'Alene and was Multnomah County Library’s 2013 Everybody Reads author. If you type his name in the search box on the library's homepage you will find both facts about him and booklists featuring his work. Alexie writes for both adult and young adult readers.

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  • Tim Tingle is Choctaw and writes children’s and young adult books. Many of his books for children are folk tales because Tingle is also a storyteller. In this interview he speaks about the historical perspective of Native American storytelling.

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  • Cynthia Leitich Smith is Muscogee Creek. She is the author of fiction for children and young adults, and her work includes thevery popular supernatural series Tantalize. She is also an avid blogger interviewing other authors, reviewing new books, and giving away advanced review copies!

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  • Joseph Bruchac is Abenaki and is the author of short stories, novels, and poetry. He is a prolific author, writing for all ages across many genres.

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If you are looking for more Native authors or book titles that properly represent the Native Nations in the United States visit American Indians in Children’s Literature . This great resource is written and curated by Debbie Reese, teacher, who is tribally enrolled at Nambe Pueblo in northern New Mexico.


Still need more information? Ask a librarian

My love of football began early in high school when my then favorite team, the Pittsburgh Steelers, were rivals of the Dallas Cowboys who were my friend, Cheri’s, main football squeeze.  I won’t date myself by mentioning who the quarterbacks were, but they both were really good!  I also enjoyed going to high school football games.  Although I attended an all-girls school, our brother school had a team, and my friends and I knew some of the players and cheerleaders.  Don’t ask me if they were any good – it was mostly a social event where the action was as much in the stands as on the field! 

Not only do I like watching football, but my enjoyment of the sport extends to books as well. There are plenty of them out there that feature teens, and here are a couple I’ve read in the past month.

I love a goMuckers book jacketod underdog story, and the Muckers in Sandra Neil Wallace’s novel sure fit that description. It’s 1950 and the mines in Hatley, Arizona are running out of ore.  Layoffs are happening right and left and, as a result, the high school is closing down. This is the Hatley Muckers’ final opportunity to win the Northern title, go to the state championship and bring football glory back to the town.  Quarterback Red O’Sullivan and wingback Cruz Villaneuva are going to work their guts out to make it happen.Dairy Queen book jacket

Because I’m a female who likes football, I was really pleased when Dairy Queen came out a number of years ago.  I’ve been meaning to read it forever and finally got around to it in October.  D.J. is a girl in a family of boys – a family that loves, loves, loves football and has produced some darn good players.  Things are in a bit of an upheaval though, and D.J. is left to manage the family’s dairy farm one summer when her father is injured.  When Brian, the quarterback from the rival high school shows up to help out, D.J. is  miffed. Brian seems lazy and cocky and much more trouble than he’s worth. It turns out that Brian needs her help as much as she needs his though – help in the form of training for the next football season.  And exactly how is THAT going to work?

For more stories of teens on the gridiron, check out this list.

Mt Hood Winding home on the north bound #12, just at sunset, the bus is topping the viaduct before the 4900 block stop, when it happens... the Willamette Valley opens up all the way to the Cascades foothills, the river throws back glints of gold, and like a blueberry on top, majestic Mt. Hood, blue and white in the receding light, dominates the scene. I hope I never fail to stop and look at this sight. It hits me then, this is home. I am a Portlandian.

I may not be one of your exalted (and rarely seen) ones: born, bred, never left, and never will. I am but one of thousands who through curiosity, family ties or sheer dumb luck ended up on the western edge of U.S. civilization. So it is time to bid a fond farewell to the southwest of desert dirt and endless sky which nurtured me. Time to embrace gray days, craft beer, thrifting and the new holy trinity: coffee shop next to sushi bar next to Thai restaurant as my new reality. Goodbye dust, oh no wait, dusty furniture is as much a fixture of NW life as it is in New Mexico. Go figure with all this rain.

Here, however is a list with no mystery. All but the first three are Southwest Books of the year award winners. The books run the whole gamut of what makes New Mexico a fascinating place to be and to be from. Native American art, the spirit life of the land, the kooks who find shelter in this forbidding and fascinating landscape will absorb you, astound you, but never bore you.

Adios! The Land of Enchantment. 

 

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett takes only a couple of hours to read, but what a pleasure! The premise is that the Queen, in wrangling her incorrigible corgis, discovers that the local library’s book mobile makes a regular stop by the kitchens at Windsor Palace. Stepping in to apologize for the ruckus, she thinks it only polite to borrow a book.

“She had still not solved her problem, knowing that if she left without a book it would seem to Mr Hutchings that the library was somehow lacking. Then on a shelf of rather worn-looking volumes she saw a name she remembered. ‘Ivy Compton-Burnett! I can read that.’ She took the book out and gave it to Mr. Hutchings to stamp.

‘What a treat!’ she hugged it unconvincingly before opening it. ‘Oh. The last time it was taken out was in 1989.’

‘She’s not a popular author, ma’am.’

‘Why, I wonder? I made her a dame.’

Mr Hutchings refrained from saying that this wasn’t necessarily the road to the public’s heart."

And so begins a love affair with books that will change forever her sense of duty and her relations with the politicians, servants and celebrities that people her life.

Bennett is a charming writer and there were many laugh out loud moments. And through it all he confirms what all librarians know: if only people would read, they would be better, smarter, more sensitive and wiser, though not necessarily more content. The Queen begins by turning her focus inward, but more and more finds her perception of things is sharpened by her reading. This leads to a stunning denouement, about which I will say no more.

Bennett is also the author of The Clothes they Stood Up In and of the screenplay The History Boys, a movie I can heartily recommend. All in all, this is a thoroughly enjoyable read.

 

A room full of excited elementary school-age kids got a sneak peak at Multnomah County Library’s new Discovery Kits on Tuesday, Oct. 20, at Troutdale Library.

These hands-on projects are geared toward K-5 kids and their families, with interactive building projects that explore science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) ideas. “My son really wants to figure out how things work” so these kits are a perfect fit, said Sadie, whose twin 5-year-old boys were immersed in building robots.

The new Programming and Coding kit helps kids learn the basics of coding by drawing paths with markers that a programmable robot will follow. At Tuesday’s Science Squad, the kids wasted no time figuring out the patterns and colors needed to make a working path. And when the robot stopped moving, problem-solving kicked in organically, and the kids adjusted their “coding” by drawing thicker lines — all without a computer.

Building on success

The Discovery Kits project is made possible by gifts to The Library Foundation, a local nonprofit dedicated to our library's leadership, innovation and reach through private support. And now the project is expanding from a successful pilot in 2013 that brought 30 kits to Troutdale, Hollywood and Midland libraries. With the addition of five new kit themes, the project is growing to North Portland, Rockwood and Belmont libraries, with a total of 120 kits in circulation.

The most exciting thing about the new kits? “They have circuitry and little robots!” said librarian Violeta Garza, who led the Science Squad meeting. “It’s not something you normally find at a library” And with support from The Library Foundation, Violeta added, the project has support to engage more young people in STEM learning.

Science for everyone

Each kit contains games, hands-on activities, books and suggestions for school-age families to bring STEM concepts into home learning and play. No special science background or equipment is required. Many of the materials include instructions in Spanish, other languages and pictures. And the kits aren’t just for use at the library. As of Nov. 6, the Discovery Kits can be checked out and placed on hold at any Multnomah County Library location.

Multnomah County Library offers STEM programs for all ages, from nature-themed storytimes to activities at Rockwood Library makerspace to adult computer classes and more.

Science Squad next meets Nov. 17 at Troutdale Library. Registration is required.



 

The Bridge Over the River Kwai book jacketI often hear people say, “Oh, you should read the book. It’s so much better than the movie.” Is that always true? Filmmakers often Bridge on the River Kwai dvd coveradapt novels, but what they do with them, well; let’s just say the results can be mixed. It’s understandable. A novel is usually a singular effort that essentially has unlimited space and time whereas a movie is a collaboration with many limitations such as budget and run-time. Compromises are often the result and, if you love a book, the film may seem hollow.  I found myself pondering this question recently and thought I would revisit some of my favorite war movies based on novels. I experienced a revelation about the difference between text and film—namely that there is no definitive answer. I chose war movies because they are often broad is scope, very dramatic, but also lend themselves well to the visual medium of film. So, here’s some of what I discovered in my little personal exploration:

The Bridge Over the River Kwai: This is the perfect example of the movie far exceeding the book. The novel by Pierre Boulle is significantly different from the film. Honestly, the book feels dated in its Eurocentrism and writing style whereas the movie possesses superb performances by the leads, especially Alec Guinness who won an Oscar. You can safely skip this book and just enjoy the movie.


The Bridges at Toko-Ri: James Michener writes about an American pilot during the Korean War who weighs his sense of duty against his devotion to his family during a war largely unknown at home. The film follows the novel very closely so the difference comes down to taste. The book is exciting and well-written, whereas the movie, made with the cooperation of the U.S. Navy, possesses some thrilling flying scenes and solid performances. Both are worth your time.


Catch-22: Joseph Heller’s classic novel is a complex, scathing satire of war. The movie tries to capture that anti-war sentiment. I love this book, so maybe it colors my perception, but I found the film unsatisfying. There are many funny moments, strong performances and seeing all those airplanes satisfies my personal aviation obsession, but in their effort to capture as much of the book as possible, the filmmakers give us a hodgepodge of scenes and characters that are not fully developed. Unless you’ve read the book, a lot of the movie may not make much sense. In this case, at least read the book first. You don’t need to see the movie. 


There are plenty of war films based on novels out there. Here is a modest list you can explore and answer the question for yourself, “Is the book really better than the movie?”

We could sit and analyze it for a long time -- we could get really microscopic about it--but let's just admit that little, teeny tiny things are infinitely engrossing, and often adorable. Teeny-tiny dogs...so cute! Teeny-tiny kittens...awww! Minature houses, miniature cupcakes...perfection! Eensy weensy characters having adventures? Bring it on!

For whatever reason, stories about microscopic worlds have always been appealing to kids. Maybe you were a fan of The Littles back in the day. Or maybe you go back, back to the days of The Borrowers. Would kids today love those stories? Yes, I think they would. If you have a beginning reader you'd like to introduce to the world of all things small, you might start with James to the Rescue, by Elise Broach, the story of a beetle family living in a house.

What does a beetle family like best of all? Going collecting! But collecting is dangerous work in a world that is so much bigger than you. When Uncle Albert gets hurt on a hunting expedition, it's up to Marvin, boy beetle, to enlist his human friend James to come to the rescue. Kids who are just getting started with longer chapter books will enjoy this story of suspense, resourcefulness and friendship.

If your young reader enjoys James to the Rescue, here's a very small door (in the form of a list ) into the world of all things small.

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