Blogs

Look into the futureI have friends who are political junkies who count the days between each Presidential election. That’s four years of waiting filled with competitive yet non-athletic bluster, bloated hypocrisy, and stagnant idealism, not including the Congressional races. But I do know how they feel, because the cruel disappointment and heartbreak forced onto me by twenty-one years of loyalty to Newcastle United FC, fractured Yugoslavian teams, and U.S.A. soccer is lifted every four years with the angelic arrival of the holiest of holies in all of sport: the World Cup. Somehow, before, during, and after this soccer celebration, politics, both governmental and athletic (FIFA is no secret to controversy) always seem to pervade the social and cultural unification of the games no matter the host country. In 2014, inside the fascinating world of Brazil, this impending party-crasher will be no different.

Government corruption, political demonstrations, martial law, election scandals, destructive floods, terrorist bombings, and kidnapping. These issues are everyday and commonplace around the globe. For twenty-five days this summer, however, these same problems currently presenting hardship in nations represented within the Cup will briefly stand aside to the enthusiasm, optimism, and allegiance of the Beautiful Game. Floods and landslides in the Balkans will further motivate Croatia and first-timers Bosnia-Herzegovina. The mass kidnapping and subsequent bombings in Nigeria should emphatically inspire the Super Eagles. Russia will undoubtedly be playing harder than ever in proud fashion to prove they can adequately host the next Cup. Yet it is Brazil and it’s society’s turbulent clashes over the expenditures of hosting both the World Cup and the 2016 Olympics versus the lack of basic human social programs that face the toughest scrutiny. If ever the host country was to win it all at home, the Canarinho would be wise to do it this year. Teams representing countries in the news, especially negative news, tend to play harder with more passion and a greater sense of urgency. That’s when timeless moments occur and with one kick, an exhale or a blink, the entire conscience of an impoverished nation can be instantaneously and collectively transformed into pure hope and bliss. This is the power that gives names to snapshots such as “The Hand of God,” “Goal of the Century,” and the “Miracle of Bern.” Slayer of Lions

It seems that each day the news is consistently full of sorrow rather than smiles, but teams such as Nigeria, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and flamboyant host Brazil will all be trying to erase the crushing adversity pervading their societies (as of this post) for at least a brief ninety minutes. And every team desires as many successive ninety minute chances as possible, for each match pulls them one step closer to lifting not only the World Cup trophy, but glory for their country and symbolic spiritual triumph over the perpetual numbness of suffering. So soak it in as much as possible I say, it goes by quickly. Samba till you just can’t stand up anymore.

 

Adventure Time, a cartoon series created by Pendleton Ward on Cartoon Network, could easily be a favorite for all members of your family. Your kids might like how creative and goofy it is and you might appreciate some of the positive messages and varied references. Watch Finn, a human boy, and his shape-shifting brother/dog, Jake, save or be saved by friends in the land of Oo and other dimensions.

One of my favorite episodes,“Box Prince,” is about how Finn and Jake project their views of an ordered society onto a group of cats that appear to be living in the Box Kingdom. Who is the true Box Prince? If you look closely you might catch references to My Neighbor Totoro and the internet cat celebrity Maru. That season hasn't been released yet on DVD, but seasons one, two, and three, are ready to go.

I love the range of immature (fart) jokes to adult-ish jokes (Jake calls sweat pants "'give up on life' pants.") I can appreciate that it's a kid’s show with strong female characters and endless amounts of cute and colorful animation. Watching an episode of Adventure Time can be some of the best 11 minutes of my life.

If you’re just starting the first season, why not also read the first volume of the comic at the same time? The comic is cleverly written by Ryan North, author of Dinosaur Comics, whose humor remains true to AT style.

The DVD Adventure Time: It Came from the Nightosphere is a must watch for people who want to hear some indie pop. Sure, Finn can auto-tune like the best of them, but don’t miss out on one of Marceline the Vampire Queen’s best hits, “The Fry Song.”

If you could use a shake up, check out the graphic novel, Adventure Time with Fionna & Cake, a comic based off the episode “Fionna & Cake.” In this alternate version, all the main characters change genders and the characters are so good you wish it was a regular thing.

Whether want to share something with your kid/teen or you want to nurture your inner child, Adventure Time is worth checking out.

Attention educators! Are you tired of using the same old books with your classes every year? Attend one of our summer educator workshops in August to learn about the latest and greatest materials to use in the classroom!

 

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum

Come to this workshop to learn about new books you might integrate into your language arts, social studies, math, science and arts curriculum.

 

For K-5th grade educators:

  • Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 2-4:30 p.m. Central Library, 801 S.W. 10th Ave. in the U.S. Bank Room. Register by July 31..

 

For 6th-12th grade educators: Gotta Read This! online

  • Educators can selectively pick the subjects of greatest interest to them. We’ll notify you when online workshops are available. Register by July 31. 

 

Novel-Ties (for 4th -8th grade educators)

Discover hot, new fiction to use in book discussion groups and literature circles.

  • Thursday, August 7, 2014, 2-4:30 p.m. North Portland Library, 512 N. Killingsworth St. Register by July 31.

 

Hotwire Your Students’ Research Skills:

Connect your students with free online tutors, help them locate reliable, librarian-selected resources for their homework assignments, and find free short videos and infographics to teach information literacy skills.

  • Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 2-3:30 p.m., Central Library, 801 SW 10th Ave., in the U.S. Bank Room. Register by July 31.

 

Professional development certificates will be available for in-person and online workshops. Contact School Corps with any questions!

Oregonian Treasure HuntThe Oregonian's Rose Festival Treasure Hunt was first announced in May, 1983, with an ad in the newspaper and daily clues. This yearly custom, that fascinated many people with cryptic rhymes leading to the Medallion and a cash prize, has been revived after a long absence for this year's theme: "what's old is new again."

In the span of years since the last Treasure Hunt, the Oregonian began publishing online. This year's clues will be published online only in Oregonlive, not in print as in prior years.  You can also sign up for email delivery of clues.

The Oregonian describes the Treasure Hunts as events that "often require historical research and puzzling through long-forgotten bits of esoterica." Since figuring out the clues involves sifting through geographic and historic bits of information, the library staff in years past assembled collections of books to help people with research.

This year we revive this custom as well, with selections of Portland and Oregon history materials at the Central Library 3rd Floor Literature and History Reference Desk.

The library staff do not know the answers to the clues or the location of the Medallion, and we can't offer advice. Our goal is to assemble materials in the spirit of research. Whether you win, or not, we hope at the minimum that that you encounter new facts and entertaining lore about Portland and our region.


ONLINE WITH YOUR MULTNOMAH COUNTY LIBRARY CARD: 
Follow the links below to the library's website. Log in with your library card barcode and password:
1861-1987 The Historical Oregonian
1987- the present The Oregonian

USEFUL WEBSITES:
Historic Oregon Newspapers: from the University of Oregon Library.
Oregon Blue Book: A handbook for Oregon governmental information.
Oregon Encyclopedia: Compendium of history, environment, and biography.

BOOKS AND MAPS AT CENTRAL LIBRARY:
Reference materials from Central Library's collections. As some of these materials cannot be photocopied, we recommend bringing a camera or a notebook to keep track of information of interest.
Location:  3rd Floor Central Library Literature and History Reference Desk


We wish you well with the Rose Festival Treasure Hunt!

And Baby Makes More bookjacketSo after years of planning and dreaming, you finally have a child. Now what?! If you’re anything like me, the point of all that planning--the actual child-raising--at times can feel overwhelming. When my wife and I decided to get pregnant two years ago, I found I was so focused on the steps it took to make it happen, that once the little peanut arrived I felt at a loss over what to do next. I remember just staring at our daughter hours after she was born, thinking, I’m responsible for you! No one else is going to take care of you! Fast forward ten months and that yowling tiny newborn has turned into a sweet, curious kidlet before my eyes. I am sleeping more and--gasp!--actually have time to myself in the evenings. But even though our family has settled into a nice routine, I still feel like I am adjusting to what life with a child means for myself and for my marriage. Who am I now that I am someone’s mother? What does it mean to say goodbye to the autonomous self I used to be while becoming this new self, this mama-self?

Does This Baby Make Me Look Straight bookjacketFor queer families like mine, the post-baby adjustment can feel even more difficult due to the sometimes complicated situations that can arise from how our families are created. Right off the bat there are decisions to make. Known or anonymous sperm/egg donor? Open adoption or foster parent? And what about surrogacy? The list goes on and on. And with these decisions come even more questions. For example, if you use a known egg or sperm donor, will they be in the child’s life? What will they be called? In an open adoption, how much contact will you have with the birth mother? With her family? When using a surrogate, what happens if she disagrees with the medical care you want for your child in utero?

Luckily, there are many resources out there to help with these kinds of important questions, including parenting choices and support once the little bundle arrives. Some of my personal favorite titles are And Baby Makes More: Known Donors, Queer Parents, and Our Unexpected Families and Does this Baby Make Me Look Straight? Confessions of a Gay Dad.  I’d also recommend taking a look at our magazines Gay Parent and Hip Mama, Ariel Gore’s long-standing zine. And for book reviews and articles, the database LGBT Life can’t be beat.

What Makes a Baby bookjacketThere are also some amazing books out there for kids. One of my absolute favorites is called What Makes a Baby by Cory Silverberg. One of our friends gifted it to us before our daughter was born and I am completely in love with it. Realizing most kid’s books that explained where babies came from left many types of families out, Silverberg wrote a story that is completely all-inclusive, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or ability. Best of all, it has a section for parents to tell the child the specifics of their arrival into their family. I look forward to the day I read it to our daughter and all the learning and growing that comes with it in this messy adventure called parenthood. 

For more MCL queer parenting resources, you can always contact us! And be sure to check out the library’s booth at the Pride Festival, June 14 and 15 at Tom Mccall Waterfront Park!

Portland hill walksWe all sometimes feel like we can't escape the office, but we library folks are unique, I think, in that we get a real kick out of seeing someone enjoying a library resource when we are out and about. A few weeks ago I was walking some stairs in my neighborhood (the never ending quest for fitness continues), and I spotted a young man walking in front of me. He was wearing a backpack, walking slowly, and seemed to be studying everything around him as he walked. As I got closer, I could see that he had a book in his hands. Excited now, I said to my fitness partner, 'He's got a book! I'll bet it's a Laura Foster book!'. Laura writes very interesting books about the neighborhoods of Portland and how to explore them on foot. As we got closer, I saw that the young man was reading Portland Hill Walksand, better yet, his book had a Multnomah County Library stamp on the top! 

We chatted a bit about the book, the neighborhood, but especially the library. Having just moved to Portland, this young man was very excited to make use of our wonderful library system. And I was very excited to chat it up. In my work at the library, I don't get a chance to interact with the public as much as I used to, so I relish these chances to spread the good word about us when outside a library building. I have spotted Multnomah County library books on planes, trains, and automobiles, and they are always a catalyst to a wonderful conversation. Maybe I'll meet you out and about, and we'll talk about the library book you are carrying.

 

When the days get long and the house gets stuffy, there are lots of opportunities for you and your family to get out and be entertained without taxing your wallet. Here are some fun, free activities going on this summer in Multnomah County.

Jump, climb, ride and play. Bring your kids to some structured and supervised playground programs all over the city. Watch them scale to new heights on free rock climbing walls. Safely bike and walk the streets of Portland during Sunday Parkways. Check out parks in Portland, Gresham, Troutdale, Fairview and Wood Village.Child and father in a park.

Symphonic to Psychobilly. Enjoy live classical music performed by the Portland Festival Symphony at five different parks this summer. The Portland Parks & Recreation summer concert series gives you opportunities to experience improvisational African jazz at Ventura Park, defiant power pop at Wallace Park, vibrant Cuban music at Unthank Park, and much, much more. The Washington Park Summer Festival includes opera, taiko drums, and soul. The Historic Old Church continues their Little Ears series of concerts for young children, while Oregon Convention Center's Plaza Palooza brings the noise to Thursday evenings. And in Gresham, get down with Music Mondays and the Musicalu summer concert series.

Make a sLittle girl playing in splash pad.plash. Enjoy free open swim hours all around Portland; or cool down in some splash pads and fountains!

Pass the free popcorn. The Lego Movie for the little ones, Raising Arizona for the grown-ups, Back to the Future for everyone, not to mention The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, Gigi, Russian films, documentaries, and more; The Portland Parks & Recreation movie series has an outdoor movie for you!

All the world’s a stage. The Original Practice Shakespeare Festival will be performing Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part 1 and other plays all over town, while Portland Actors Ensemble is presenting Antony & Cleopatra and A Midsummer Night’s Dream in multiple parks.

Eat up. School is out, but that doesn’t mean kids stop being hungry. No child will be turned away from receiving free meals at locations all over the area, including the wonderful Midland and Rockwood Libraries. Find a location in your neighborhood and check out some other food assistance resources.

But wait, there's more! Check out the Portland Parks & Recreation Summer Free For All website and the Metro calendar. See what's going on at your neighborhood library (always free!). Read the library's blog entries on free art and free museums. Check out the PDX Kids Calendar and the urbanMamas calendar to see what free events are coming up in the city. And don't forget to sign up for Summer Reading to earn books, toys, or coupons for local businesses. (Grown-ups, there's a summer reading program for you, too!)

Hello. My name is Matt and I read mysteries.  

I never thought I’d be a mystery reader. It started off with the occasional Agatha Christie title to mix things up. A few years later,  I found myself reading a too cozy for comfort title involving a doughnut shop and recipes.  Things had gone too far. What kind of mystery reader was I? Was I one book away from entering the soft boiled world of J.B. Fletcher?

Luckily, the answer was right in front of me: gay detective novels.  In a literary world with limited LGBTQ characters, it’s exciting to find a likeable protagonist to identify with. Exploring the cast of gay detectives, I was surprised to find a collection of gentlemen larger than expected.

amuse bouche cover

Russell Quant is an everyman living in Saskatchewan. As a handsome rookie private detective in a small city, business can be slow. However, when it gets busy things quickly get out of hand.  His cases take him to exotic locales and always lead back to his Canadian home for a thrilling finale.  His love life is, uh, complicated and has it’s ups and downs.  A quirky cast of friends and family round out the series to keep things interesting.  Start with Amuse Bouche.

book cover rust on razorWhat do Scott, a famous baseball pitcher and Tom, a dedicated school teacher have in common? For starters, a penchant for getting in over their heads when mystery comes a calling. The heart of these books is dark, gritty, and reflective of the era in which each of them is written. The series spans twenty years of great change within the LGBTQ community and doesn’t hold back.  Are there schmaltzty moments?  Sure, but reluctant detectives need love too.  Start with “A Simple Suburban Murder” via Interlibrary loan or “Rust on the Razor” available at Multnomah County Library.

These are my favorites of the bunch, but check any of them out.  Each of these mystery series have their own feel.  It’s what makes the genre so much fun to read.  Plus you never know if the perfect pie recipe is on the next page...

It is a question you hear all the time...if you were stranded on a desert island, what book or books would you choose to bring?  And while the question rattles off the tongue easily enough, it is not such a simple answer.  I'm always torn between being practical or romantic. If I were to be practical (which I'll have you know I quite often am), I would grab something like my Auntie Carol's 1950s Girl Scout Guide, or some other survival manual of sorts.  At any rate, it would end up being a very different list indeed.  I'm going to throw practical aside for just a moment and imagine myself stranded on a desert island with the basic necessities sorted.  All I have is time, no worries, and a few favorite reads....

emily-jane on stairs with books

Emily-Jane at Central is reading Between the Woods and the Water by Patrick Leigh Fermor, and has this to say about it:

The teenaged Patrick Leigh Fermor walks across Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria in the early 1930s, on his way from Holland to Istanbul. I'm loving the awkward contrast between the international collegiality of the upper class on the one hand, and Fermor's vivid and moving descriptions of everyday Central European landscapes and life on the other.

Since the book doesn't have any maps and takes place before the Second World War, a lot of the borders and place names are unfamiliar to me—so I've also been reading Paul R. Magocsi's Historical Atlas of East Central Europe, which is helpful for armchair orienteering and historical context.

The other volumes in Fermor's walking memoir series are: #1: A Time of Gifts: On Foot to Constantinople : From the Hook of Holland to the Middle Danube and #3 (just published in 2014!): The Broken Road: From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos.

I love the Columbia River. I spend much of my free time on or near it and enjoy its beauty and grandeur. When I travel, I am reminded that most other rivers are not in its league.  The Columbia River defines this region. Without the Columbia River, Portland would not be an important port. There would be no Columbia Gorge and also no Bonneville Power Administration. These four books help to capture what the Columbia River was and now is.

Sources of the River book jacketI always like to start with history. Sources of the RIver: Tracking David Thompson Across Western North America by Jack Nisbet tells the story of David Thompson. He explored western North America from 1784 to 1812 and was the first person to chart the entire route of the Columbia River. Two hundred years ago he was one of a handful of white Europeans and Americans to explore the area which was home to many Native American tribes. He was looking for better fur trading routes and ended up helping to expand trade and settlement in the Northwest.

The Columbia River was a wild and free flowing river until the Bonneville and Grand Coulee dams were built in the 1930s. They were A River Lost book jacketthe first of fourteen dams that changed the river into the relatively tame river it is today. A River Lost: The Life and  Death of the Columbia by Blaine Harden looks at the modern river. He tries to explain what has happened to the river and how it is perceived by those who live near it and depend on it for their livelihoods.

Voyage of a Summer Sun book jacketThe book that opened my eyes to how dams change a river is Robin Cody’s Voyage of a Summer Sun: Canoeing the Columbia River. It is a journal of his trip down the entire river, from the headwaters to the ocean by canoe. His voyage is down a modern managed river whose ecology has been greatly damaged. It is a river that David Thompson would hardly recognise.

Wanting to end on a happier note, my last book is by Sam McKinney, an Oregon native and a  respected maritime historian. He has written several books about the Columbia River. Reach of Tide, Ring of History: A Columbia River Voyage is about his journey up the lower Columbia River from the mouth to Portland. He tells about the towns and places along the way and the people who lived and worked on the river. Most of the towns have faded into obscurity, but the lower Columbia being is still free flowing and is most like the river it used to be.

These books will give you much to ponder while you hike, sightsee and go boating on the Columbia River this summer. I hope you enjoy them as much as I have.

A frequent question we receive via our “Ask the Librarian” service is “How do I return my OverDrive e-books early?” Here are some helpful tips!

 

If you read OverDrive e-books in your browser, here is how to return them early:

1.       Sign in to OverDrive.

2.       Tap on the Person icon to access your Bookshelf.

3.       Tap on Return Title.

 

See below for the instructions on to return Overdrive e-books from the most popular devices:

 

Android, Nook

Returning an EPUB E-book  or OverDrive MP3 Audiobook Early:

1.       Open the OverDrive App.

2.      Tap on the + sign to the right of the book.

3.      Tap on Return and then Delete.

 

Iphone, Ipod Touch, Ipad

Returning an EPUB E-book  or OverDrive MP3 Audiobook Early:

1.       Open the OverDrive App.

2.      Tap on the + sign to the right of the book.

3.      Tap on Return/Delete

4.      Tap Return then Delete.

 

Kindle devices, Kindle app

1. Visit Manage Your Kindle on your Amazon account page.

2. Next to the book that you want to return, click Actions, and then select Return This Book.

 

If you read OverDrive e-books on your computer with Adobe Digital Editions, or use ADE to load them to your Kobo, Nook Simple Touch or Sony e-reader:

1.      On your computer, open Adobe Digital Editions (ADE).

2.      Click on the Library View icon to display your library.

3.      Under Bookshelves, choose the title you would like to return

4.      Click on the title icon, and an Item Options arrow will appear in the upper left-hand corner of the book.

5.      Click on the Item Options arrow and choose Return Borrowed Item.

6.      Click Return to verify that you want to return the e-book.

 Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons book coverAs a psychology major in the late 70's and early 80's it seemed that every textbook for every class included the story of Phineas Gage. He was the guy who had a tamping iron accidentally blasted through his cheek and out the top of his head while working on a railroad explosives crew in 1848. There were always illustrations, daguerreotypes, and a gruesome description of his injury.  (As I read the Wikipedia page about him right now, I get a little sparkly thing at the back of my eyeballs, and I'm not easily grossed out.)  As students, what always blew our disco-studded minds was that Gage lived.  Not only lived, but seemed mostly normal. However, as we all know, "normal" has a lot of gray matter near the edges. 

The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons is Kean's newest book. His first one, The Disappearing Spoon was super good, and very easy to read even if one may have gotten a C in high school chemistry. This one promises to be just as good, thanks in part to Phineas Gage. And I like brains better than the periodic table anyway. 

 

Feel like moving some paint?  Want to splatter some alcohol inks?

One of my current obsessions is learning how to do mixed media visual art.  To get started I looked at books by Seth Apter. I took classes at the local mixed media center: Collage and with Serena Barton and Chris Cozen.  I also like to follow the blogs of Pam Garrison and Mary Anne Moss for learning mixed media tips and tricks.  

To continue learning I started a mixed media club with a couple of friends. We meet monthly. We share and try new products.  Basically, we cheer each other on!  I have found the best mixed media foundation recipe from the Jenny Doh’s magazine Somerset Studio. Don’t be fooled by the lack of a cover image in our catalog - this magazine is visually stunning. Most importantly I am having fun and I wanted to share some of these resources so you can have fun too!

Officially I live in a land called the United States of America.  But much of my time is spent in the somewhat gritty, dangerous land of the BBC mystery. It is a cold place and people speak in a number of interesting and different accents. Their words are the same as mine but they mean different things. They say things like ‘have any joy?’ and ‘are you takin’ the piss out of me?’

The detectives keep their emotions to themselves, have horrible homelives or none at all. They drink too much and throw things around when they get frustrated. They repeatedly flaunt the rules, their supervisor and common sense. But they find evil wherever it is hiding and root it out. The bad guy may seem to gain speed, and bodies may turn up in unexpected places, but in the end Vera Stanope, Jane Tennison, Inspectors Morse and Lewis, Cordelia Gray and Jackson Brodie will win

They will win with grace and style, and just when I think I will go crazy if I don’t see another episode of Vera, or Prime Suspect, Inspector Morse, Cordelia Gray or Case Histories, I come back to myself here in the United States where I rush to the library website to check out books featuring these and other favorite detectives.  Maybe it will hold me over untill the next season comes out.

Check out my complete list of gritty and dangerous BBC mysteries.

Self portrait paintingBefore I became a parent, I was a painter. When my son was born, I imagined a mini easel propped up next to mine, where we would paint together. If anybody has actually made this work for longer than three minutes, I’d love to hear about it. I will also suspect you are lying through your teeth.Book Jacket: One Painting a Day by Timothy Callaghan

Now that my son is more self-sufficient, I think I’ve simply stalled out and I need an assignment to help jump start my art.  I already went back to art school in my thirties, so this time I'm taking a different and less costly approach.  My first course is One Painting a Day by Timothy Callaghan. The 42 exercises in this book center around painting ordinary things, but the examples from contributing artists are far from mundane. There is no muse more accessible than your every day surroundings and I am already looking ahead to day 11: Paint a storage still life.

Next quarter, I'm considering How to be an Explorer of the World by Keri Smith.  I bought this book for my (then) 12-year-old niece with the intention of hanging on to it until she was a little older. In theBook Jacket: How to Be An Explorer of the World by Keri Smith end, I gave it to her anyway because I’m disorganized and found myself otherwise empty-handed on her birthday. It turned out not to matter that Exploration #26: Becoming Leonard Cohen, didn’t strike a familiar chord. Her interpretations of Exploration #9: Case of Curiosities and #34 Interesting Garbage, completely blew me away.

I hope to graduate this time, with a renewed and regular art habit. Feel free to join me. Admission is open year-round and you only need to dust off your art supplies and pull out your library card to get started with your first assigment!

Flowers are very important to me. I put up a couple vases at a time in our house. One has to be on the dining room table and another on the fireplace mantle. And if I am really flower rich, I will put a couple vases in the bathroom or bedroom. I am usually flower rich when flowers are blooming in our garden. In the dead of winter I splurge for flowers on payday.
 
I mark certain times of years by which flowers are in bloom. February is all about hellebore and daphne. Because it can be dark and gloomy in Portland in the winter, seeing these plants in bloom means the sun is coming with spring on its heels.
 
So when I found the book The Flower Shop by Sally Page I was thrilled! The Flower Shop is one year in the life of a flower shop in a village in England. Each chapter is about a month of the year. Every month is marked with holidays that are celebrated with flowers. Birthdays, parties and weddings are celebrated throughout the book. Pictures and tips for flower care weave their way through the pages. If you are looking for something touching and colorful, this is the book for you. 

Pride Northwest LogoThe Pride Festival & Parade this year has extra reason to be proud, what with Judge McShane’s ruling on Monday, May 19, declaring Oregon’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

And Multnomah County Library is also extra proud, because we will be at the Pride Festival this year on Saturday, June 14 and Sunday, June 15, down at the Tom Mccall Waterfront Park from noon to 6:00 PM. Stop by and see us!

Leading up to the event we will be sharing a variety of blog posts and reading lists showcasing the resources the library offers Multnomah County’s LGBTQ community, as well as their family and friends. Books on LGBTQ history (see below), queer films, books & zines you can check out, resources for gay parents, great LGBTQ teen novels, and more.

We would love to hear your recommendations and requests for ways we can serve the LGBTQ community here in Multnomah County. Everything from a particular title we should own, to programs and workshops we should offer, to other events we should attend. Feel free to comment below.

And once again, stop by and visit the Multnomah County Library table at the Pride Festival. We’ll see you there!

What dishes could you expect at a dinner with Queen Elizabeth? What did the Emperor Nero eat after fiddle practice? What did Lewis and Clark roast over their fire? Today there are many fad diets, like the hugely popular Paleo Diet, that claim healthier eating by replicating the diets of our ancestors. Here at the library we have gathered several ways for you to explore the history of food and maybe find a “new” favorite old recipe.


www.foodtimeline.org is an exhaustive list of authoratitive information about food from early human history to modern times. This site was created and maintained by librarian Lynne Olver and includes a detailed bibliography, links to recipes throughout history, and informational biographies on our favorite foods.


http://blog.americanhistory.si.edu/osaycanyousee/food-history/ This blog from the National Museum of American History includes highlights from their collection of food throughout American History.


The Oxford Handbook of Food History edited by Jeffrey M Pilcher provides twenty seven essays that explore the history through the lens of food. These scholarly essays explore the historiography of this research and point towards avenues of continued scholarship.

Recipes tell stories. They tell stories of family gatherings, beloved traditions and good meals shared with friends. When we share a recipe with another, we aren’t just passing along our impeccable taste, we are giving another person a little taste of who we are, like our love of thyme or our obsession with the perfectly grilled steak. We hope that you will join us at the library as we support this sharing with our new recipe exchange program.

Our initial meeting will be focusing on the most versatile of foods, cookies. Sweet or savory, chewy or crisp, cookies come in all flavors and sizes. Bring your favorite cookie recipe to share, whether it be your grandmother’s fail-proof chocolate chip or a new exotic favorite. We will be featuring your recipes on this blog as well as compiling a list of recipes to share with others at the Central Library.

If you need inspiration please see the book list below. We have carefully sifted through our huge collection of cookbooks to bring you the best cookie books that Multnomah County Library has to offer.

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