Blogs

Now that we're leaning into fall, we at the library are anticipating Wordstock: Portland’s Book Festival presented by Bank of America on November 11. What are we looking forward to the most in this confection of literary culture?

  1. Librarians love book people — not sure if that’s out there? The idea of being surrounded by thousands of people who revere reading — well, that’s just our happy place. Then plop the whole festival down in the middle of the Portland Art Museum, a place we don’t get to nearly enough, and there just aren't enough superlatives to describe this bookish perfection.
  2. Nancy Pearl, our guru of all things readers’ advisory (a fancy way of saying "talking to people about books") will be in attendance, plugging her first novel. She’s so famous in library world, there’s even an action figure of her. We hesitate to guess how many Nancy Pearl action figures live on library desks around the country — we suggest the numbers are brobdingnagian. (Oh, we like words, too.)
  3. A lot of us bike to work and have been following Elly Blue since her early days at bikeportland.org. We love what she has to say about feminism and riding, and the positive economics of biking.
  4. A few of us are moderating panels, and youth librarian Tasha says, “I am super stoked about attempting to wrestle my inner fangirl to the ground while moderating a panel of some of my favorite illustrators and authors in an attempt to not have my interaction with the panelists devolve into a repeated refrain of "I love your work, I just love your work, like, I love your work so much. So much."
  5. Everybody has 5 bucks to spend on books; but what books should you buy? With so many inspiring authors, and a bounty of small press booths, it's a difficult decision. Meet up with one of our My Librarian team and get some one-on-one advice about where to spend your Wordstock dollars — we love the effervescent exchange of good reads with book lovers (not sure if we made that clear before?).

Rainbow flag Photo Credit: Benson Kua  - Creative Commons

October 11 is National Coming Out Day.

Every coming out experience is unique. For some it’s a hesitant whisper; for others, it’s a scream when you are in that “right now” moment. Regardless of volume or location, coming out is about sharing personal identity, being proud and, most importantly, being visible. As the Human Rights Campaign says, Coming Out Day is “a reminder that one of our most basic tools is the power of coming out."

Whether you self-identify as LGBTQAA+ or know someone that does, whatever your connection is to Coming Out Day, Multnomah County Library is a welcoming place for information and book recommendations.

 

In the face of tragedy and violence, it can be hard to know what to say to kids. How do you answer your child’s questions while reassuring them that you will keep them safe? The American Psychological Association says, "It is important to remember that children look to their parents to make them feel safe. This is true no matter what age your children are, be they toddlers, adolescents or even young adults."

Here are three resources that can help parents and caregivers:

Helping your children manage distress in the aftermath of a shooting. From the American Psychological Association.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has several resources about mass violence available on their website including Talking to Children about the Shooting and Tips on Media Coverage

A Survival Guide for Parents of Teenagers: What if the next shooting is at my school? (pdf).A tip sheet for talking to your teen about school violence. From the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development.

Beginning November 1, 2017, Multnomah County Library is updating its library rules.

You can read them here.

The library is proud to be an open and inclusive institution for our community. With 19 locations across the county, we are always striving to balance a wide range of uses, needs and individual circumstances. Library rules are important to ensuring that our staff can continue to provide exceptional service and that our library remains a welcoming place for everyone.

It’s been nearly 20 years since we’ve made significant changes to our library rules, and in that time, we’ve offered countless new services and programs, grown our collection and even opened new library branches. After an extensive and thoughtful review process, we’ve included changes to library policies on food and beverages, threatening behavior, amount of personal belongings, and weapons. All of our rules ensure the protection of individual rights and necessary accommodations.

Thank you for helping make the library a wonderful and vibrant place. I hope you will visit us soon.

Vailey Oehlke

Director of Libraries

Vailey Oehlke, Director of Libraries

Readers, writers and book lovers! Mark your calendars for several of Portland's biggest book events:

Literary Arts' Wordstock: Portland's Book Festival Presented by Bank of America happens on November 11, when a literary who's who of authors will descend on us. Browse books by the authors, and visit Multnomah County Library's booth, where we can give you one-on-one advice about spending your $5.00 book coupon (included in the price of admission) on a title you'll love.

Portland Arts & Lectures author series features such luminaries as George Saunders, Jesmyn Ward and Viet Thanh Nguyen. You can also look forward to Everybody Reads in the new year, when we'll be discussing Mohsin Hamid's Exit West in preparation for the author's visit on April 5th, made possible by Literary Arts. Copies of the book will be made available in February, thanks to the support of The Library Foundation.

But let's face it - Portland's literary landscape is a field of dreams. Search the events calendar for the library’s author talks, book discussions and conversations featuring local writers. If you're a self-published writer yourself and would like library patrons to be able to read your work, check out the Library Writers Project

Happy reading!

 

Literary Arts author list image

El mes de la Herencia Hispana se celebra cada año del 15 de septiembre al 15 de octubre. Es un homenaje y una celebración de la cultura, historias y contribuciones de los hispanos y latinoamericanos en los Estados Unidos.

Inicialmente proclamada la Semana Nacional de la Herencia Hispana por el presidente Lyndon B. Johnson en 1968, el reconocimiento fue extendido a un mes por el presidente Ronald Reagan en 1988. Se inicia el 15 de septiembre por ser el aniversario de la independencia de cinco países latinoamericanos: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras y Nicaragua. México, Chile y Belice celebran su independencia el 16, 18 y 21 de septiembre, respectivamente.

Los invitamos a disfrutar en las bibliotecas la música, historias, libros, actividades y manualidades que celebran la herencia hispana y el impacto cultural a la sociedad.

  • Celebren la música latinoamericana con el grupo Mariachi Viva Mexico.

  • Vengan a viajar a través de la cultura latinoamericana, su historia y tradiciones en una forma interactiva con el famoso músico José Luis Orozco.

  • Escuchen la historia de los pilotos mexicanos del Escuadrón 201 que lucharon al lado de los Aliados durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Laura B. está disponible para ofrecerles recomendaciones de lectura personalizada de acuerdo a su interés.

The Golden Age of Islam spanned from the mid 8th to the mid 13th century A. D., although recent scholars have extended it into the 15th and 16th centuries. It encompasses the life of the prophet Mohammad and the beginnings of the Islamic religion. Islamic culture in Europe also influenced Western civilization. The Golden Age of Islamic Culture included many innovations in science, medicine, mathematics, astronomy ,Hindu-Arabic numerals, and words. It was a time of inventions and exploration by land and sea. The Golden Age ended with the siege of Baghdad in 1258 A.D. and with the rise of religious dogma, discussed here by Steven Weinberg and Neil deGrasse Tyson.

I was in Don Quixote by Cervantes so long, I lost the plot a bit.

 

 Listening to  anti-war protest songs  first  sparked my curiosity about the Vietnam War. As a 12 year old eighth grader, I thought I could learn  the world’s wisdom from the words of a song.  Songs like  The Unknown Soldier by the Doors with its realistic  gunshot sounds and tragic  imagry;  Saigon Bride by Joan Baez, Pete Seeger’s Bring Em Home,and I ain’ Marching Anymore by Phil Ochs.  Songs  about the injustice, insanity and cruelty of the Vietnam War.

 I heard adults talking about protecting Democracy by fighting Communism.  More and more the strange place word 'Vietnam' was spoken.  Then my Uncle Paul was drafted. He went to fight at that place I could hardly find on the map.

 When my Uncle came back he was silent and enclosed as if he’d been to visit the moon.  Once he told me he’d seen some pretty bad  things  there but didn’t tell me what they were.  I didn’t have to use my imagination much- it was all on the CBS news now- real soldiers, real Vietnamese people, real pain, real death.

When the war ended on April 30, 1975, I was working at the Central Library downtown.  Church bells rang and we jumped up and down and cheered.  Later though, we were quiet , remembering... still wondering- was Vietnam a ‘good’ or a ‘bad’ war?

Like myself, Ken Burns grew up wondering about the Vietnam war. He labored  ten long  years to make a documentary that might help to  make sense of the Vietnam War by bringing us “something extrordinarily powerful..”  -the stories, music and experiences of the soldiers and civilians- on both sides of the war.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

THE VIETNAM WAR is a ten-part, 18-hour documentary film series directed by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Part one airs Sunday September 17 at 9:00 on PBS.                                                                  

After watching, Ken Burn’s The Vietnam War, come to the Multnomah County Library  to learn more about it through special programs,  written material, music and more.

 

Must love books. And dogs.

Photo of Katie Patterson, library volunteer

by Sarah Binns 

Over the years writing for the Volunteer Spotlight I’ve met people who volunteer with the library because they are passionate about reading. I’ve met just as many people who volunteer because they are passionate about giving back to their community. This month, Katie Patterson became my first interviewee who is pursuing a degree in librarianship, in part because of her time volunteering at Hillsdale Library.

Katie grew up reading, but she only recently realized librarianship is in her future. After completing her undergraduate degree at Seattle University, Katie and her partner returned to Portland. Her partner then started an online Master of Library Science (MLS) program through Emporia State University. Intrigued, but wanting to explore her options, Katie decided to volunteer in both a first-grade classroom and at Hillsdale Library as their storytime assistant, facilitating their preschool storytime and book babies. “I got hooked on the library right away,” she says.

Every Monday morning Katie picks books to be read at Hillsdale’s storytime and helps the librarian oversee the event. “I love it,” she says. “It’s the highlight of my week.” She enjoys developing a relationship with the little ones and “watching them be excited about reading, it makes me hopeful.” Katie’s eyes light up when talking about Hillsdale and says she hopes to volunteer there as long as she can.

Another thing that makes her eyes light up? Talking about dogs. When not at the library Katie is a manager at Hair of the Dog, a dog grooming shop on Alberta. “I’ve worked with dogs for 12 years,” she says, “It’s my favorite thing.” She currently has too much on her plate for her own dog but hopes that will change.

As for librarianship, Katie started her MLS degree with Emporia a year ago. She’ll graduate with a youth services certificate with an eye to becoming a youth services librarian in Multnomah County. “That’s the dream,” she says with a smile. Here’s to a future full of books, babies, and dogs!


A few facts about Katie

Home library: Albina

Currently reading: She reads two YA novels a week for her YA literature class. “I’m starting Red Planet today.”

Most influential book: Heart of Darkness changed the way I think about literature. It’s so complex. The more I read, the more interesting it became.”

Favorite book from childhood: Bridge to Terabithia and Harriet the Spy.

Favorite browsing section: Picture books, when she can pick a book for storytime.

Guilty pleasure: Hunger Games.

Book that made her cry: Any book where a dog dies.

Favorite place to read: “On my balcony. The weather doesn’t always cooperate.”

 

Hispanic Heritage month takes place from September 15 - October 15. It is a recognition and celebration of the culture, histories and contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States.

Initially celebrated as Hispanic Heritage week in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson, it was expanded to a month by President Ronald Reagan. The start date of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. With Mexico, Belize and Chile celebrating their independence September 16.

Here is a small sample of events that are happening at the library during Hispanic Heritage month to celebrate the rich heritage and cultural impact that Latino Americans have had on the nation and society.

Contact the library, visit the events page or check in with your local library to learn about additional programs and events during Hispanic Heritage month.

Looking for a personalized reading list? Contact Laura B for a recommended reading list. 

 
 

Libby is a new way to read and listen to books from Overdrive, and it's available now. 

Getting startedLibby logo

  1. Go to the app store on your Android or iOS device and search for "Libby, by Overdrive Labs". Or, visit the Libby site and be directed from there;
  2. Once you've installed the app, sign in with your library card;
  3. Search, borrow, read and listen, all from within the app.
  4. Here's a handy how-to guide for Libby.

You can click on "Library" or "Shelf" to move back and forth between the collection and your check outs. Click on a title in the Libby catalog, and you'll be able to read a sample so you can decide if you want to borrow the book.

Logging in

Libby lets you to connect to OverDrive with one easy login. You can also add a library card from another library or from a family member so you can have your loans and holds all in one place.

Prefer reading on a Kindle?

You can set Libby up to default to Kindle for e-books and you can download with few clicks.

Downloading

To download books to your device, tap on the cloud icon after you've checked out, and your e-book or downloadable audiobook will be downloaded. When the download is finished, you will see a check. You don't have to figure out which format you should get—the app knows.

New features

Libby has some great features: you can download titles for offline reading or stream them to save space. Libby will bookmark your place, even if you pick up another device to resume reading. You can choose settings for reading at night, and customize your font -- there's even a font to help readers with dyslexia.  If you're happy with the OverDrive App, don't worry. You can continue to use it, or you can install both apps on your device and see which works better.

 

 

 

Oregon has an extensive geologic history, which is viewable from roadside videos as well as videos of various landforms in the state, created by geologic actions. Oregon, like other Pacific Northwestern states, has many volcanoes. Mount Hood, in Oregon, and Mount St. Helens, in Washington, are two volcanic peaks close to Portland. The geologic history of the whole Pacific Northwest was influenced by the great Missoula Floods which has left its mark on the geology of the Columbia River gorge.  The geology of Eastern Oregon also features the mammal fossil beds at John Day, which include the Painted Hills. The Pacific Northwest also faces the potential of a massive earthquake, due to the Cascadia subduction zone.

 

Headed to the Oregon Small Business Fair on Saturday, September 16? Don’t forget to stop by the library table and learn about our wonderful resources for small businesses. There is still time to register for this free event. In addition to the resource fair, where we’ll be, there are also classes on topics from tax tips to social media promotion. You won't want to miss it!

 

Need some more help with your small business? Check out the lists below or ask a librarian.

 

Read an Ebook Day

Did an e-book save you from boredom at the DMV? Were you snowed in last winter and e-books allowed you to curl up with a good read anyway? Forgot your vacation book on the plane, but were able to get an e-book right away on your phone? 

Share your love for e-books on Read an eBook Day, a celebration of the wonders of reading anytime, anywhere. Celebrate by checking out an e-book from our OverDrive collection. Might we suggest an old favorite or maybe a great book you may have missed from the past few years?

And then share what you love about e-books on social media on September 18 using the hashtag #ebooklove
 

For those of us who love classic literature, Multnomah County Library is a great resource. There are ongoing Classics Pageturners book discussion groups at Hillsdale Library and Hollywood Library, plus a Quarterly Classics group at Capitol Hill Library.  Copies of the books will be available two months in advance of the discussions.  Please call the branch to confirm.  Following that are a series of lists of Western and non-Western literature from every era.

Here are the Classics book group schedules:

Hillsdale Library Classics Pageturners,

Second Saturdays, 3-5 pm

 

September 9, 2017, Sonnets by William Shakespeare. (This is a different edition than the group will read)

 

October 14, 2017, The Nice and the Good, by Iris Murdoch

 

November 11, 2017, It Can't Happen Here, by Sinclair Lewis

 

December 9, 2017, Billy Budd and Other Stories, by Herman Melville

 

January 13, 2018, Canterbury Tales, by GeoffreyChaucer

 

February 10, 2017, Cousin Bette, by Honore de Balzac

 

March 10, 2018, The Persians, by Aeschylus

 

April 14, 2018, The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli

 

May 12, 2018, The Early History of Rome, books I-V, by Livy

 

June 9, 2018, The Trial, by Franz Kafka

Hollywood Library Classics Pageturners,

Third Sundays, 2-4 pm

 

September 17, 2017,  Ficciones, by Jorge Luis Borges

 

October 15, 2017, Iphigenia in Aulis and The Trojan Women, by Euripides. (These are different editions than the group will read)

 

November 19, 2017, The Vicar of Wakefield, by Oliver Goldsmith

 

December 17, 2017, The Captain's Daughter and Other Stories, by Alexander Pushkin

 

January 21, 2018, The Heart of the Matter, by Graham Greene

 

February 18, 2018, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, by Matsuo Basho

 

March 18, 2018, The Idiot, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

 

April 15, 2018, The Consolation of Philosophy, by Boethius

 

May 20, 2018, The Analects, by Confucius. (This is a different edition and translation than the group will read)

 

June 17, 2018, The Mill on the Floss, by George Eliot. (This is a different edition than the group will read)

Capitol Hill Library Quarterly Classics

Second Wednesdays, 1:30 pm, October 2017, January, April & July 2018

 

October 11, 2017, One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

 

January 10, 2018, Razor's Edge, by Somerset Maugham

 

April 11, 2018, The Golden Notebook, by Doris Lessing

 

July 11, 2018, Native Son, by Richard Wright

 

La siguiente información es un recurso para inmigrantes y refugiados sobre sus derechos como individuos y la aplicación de leyes migratorias. Esta lista es solamente un comienzo; si necesitas más información, por favor contacta a la biblioteca.   

La biblioteca cuenta con listas de libros que podrían ayudarte y en los que se discute la experiencia de inmigrantes para personas de todas las edades y niveles de lectura.   

La siguiente lista será actualizada con frecuencia; por favor revisa constantemente para obtener la información más reciente.

Recursos disponibles para conocer tus derechos

Las personas no ciudadanas que viven en los Estados Unidos — sin importar su situación migratoria — por lo general tienen los mismos derechos constitucionales que los ciudadanos cuando las autoridades policiales las paran, cuestionan, arrestan o buscan en sus hogares. - ACLU

Folletos informativos de ACLU:
Inglés, ruso, español         

Tarjeta informativa sobre Conociendo tus Derechos:
Inglés, somalí, vietnamita, chino, español, ruso, árabe, hmong

Conoce tus derechos – Información sobre discriminación anti-islámica:
Inglés, árabe, urdu, persaespañol

Aplicaciones móviles:
Mobile Justice: aplicación de ACLU que contiene la tarjeta informativa sobre Conociendo tus Derechos y tiene la capacidad para reportar incidentes a ACLU en tiempo real por medio de un video.
MiConsular MEX: aplicación creada por la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE) del gobierno mexicano que permite a las personas de nacionalidad mexicana encontrar el consulado más cercano a ellas y que llamen o envíen un texto en caso de emergencia.   
Cell 411: aplicación que permite a los usuarios publicar y responder a emergencias provenientes de familiares, amigos y vecinos en tiempo real.  

Aplicación de leyes migratorias:
Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas de los Estados Unidos (ICE, por sus siglas en inglés): encuentra a una persona detenida o un centro de detención, además de información de contacto.

Los testigos de actividades de ICE pueden reportarlas a la línea telefónica sobre inmigración de ACLU de Oregón por medio de un texto o llamada al 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

Para acciones alrededor de Portland, puedes contactar a la línea telefónica de la Coalición para los Derechos de Inmigrantes de Portland (PIRC, por sus siglas en inglés) al 1-888-622-1510. Información: inglésespañol Actualizada 10/4/17

Plan para Preparación de la Familia:
Inglés español

Recursos legales de bajo costo para inmigrantes provee una lista de organizaciones sin fines de lucro que pueden asistir a las personas con problemas migratorios.

Directorio de Servicios Culturales del Condado Multnomah provee una lista de organizaciones sin fines de lucro, grupos religiosos y programas del gobierno que sirven a los inmigrantes y refugiados en el área metropolitana de Portland.

Información sobre DACA/Soñadores  

Foros Comunitarios: inglés, español

ACTUALIZADA 9/5/17: inglés, español

Herramientas y Guía de Recursos de DACA: inglés, español

Hoja de información comunitaria actualizada para los beneficiarios de DACA: español, inglés

¿Qué necesitas saber si el programa DACA termina? español, inglés

Organizaciones locales

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR)
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice
1704 NE 43rd Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
503-550-3510

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Oficinas consulares

Consulado Mexicano de Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulado de El Salvador en Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Consulado Honorario Guatemalteco  
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Oficina Consular de Japón en Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

 
In response to the Eagle Creek Fire, Multnomah County Library is staffing the children's room and computer lab at the fire shelter at Mt. Hood Community College. As we mourn the devastation in our beloved Columbia River Gorge, we’re doing our best to help those affected and displaced by the fire. We're working with other helpers to provide a safe place where everyone is welcome. We have computers, books and activities for children, and the shelter offers medical and emergency services, food, emotional support, a place to sleep and space for animals.
 
We've compiled a comprehensive list of information and resources about the Eagle Creek Fire to help. If you have any additional suggestions to be included, please let us know in the comments section below.  
 
 
 
Library outreach staff helping out at the fire shelter.

The following information is a resource for immigrants and refugees on individual rights and immigration enforcement. This list is a start; if you require further information please contact the library.

The library has helpful booklists that discuss the immigrant experience for all ages and reading levels.

The following list will be updated frequently; please check back for the most current information.

Know Your Rights Resources

Non-citizens who are in the United States — no matter what their immigration status — generally have the same constitutional rights as citizens when law enforcement officers stop, question, arrest, or search them or their homes. ACLU

ACLU Information Pamphlets:
EnglishRussianSpanish

Know Your Rights Information Card:
EnglishSomaliVietnameseChineseSpanishRussianArabic, Hmong

Know Your Rights- Anti-Muslim Discrimination Information:
EnglishArabicUrduFarsiSpanish

Mobile Apps:
Mobile Justice: ACLU app with Know Your Rights Information card, ability to report incidents to the ACLU in real time with video capability.
MiConsular MEX: App created by the Mexican Government’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs (SRE) that allows Mexican nationals to locate their nearest consulate and either text or call them in an emergency.
Cell 411: App that allows the user to issue and respond to emergencies from family, friends and neighbors in real time.

Immigration Enforcement:
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): Find a detainee or detention center, and general contact information.

Witnesses to ICE activity can report it to the ACLU of Oregon's immigration hotline via text or call 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

For actions around Portland, you may contact the Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition (PIRC) hotline at
1-888-622-1510.
Information: EnglishSpanish Updated 10/4/17

Family Preparedness Plan: 
English and Spanish

Low-cost legal resources for immigrants provides a list of nonprofit organizations that can assist people with immigration issues.

Multnomah County Cultural Services Directory provides a list of nonprofits, faith groups and government programs that serve immigrants and refugees in the Portland Metro area.

DACA/Dreamers Information

End of DACA (FAQ's): English

DACA Renewal Infographic: English, Spanish

DACA Community Forums: English, Spanish

UPDATED Information 9/5/17: SpanishEnglish

DACA Tools and Resource Guide: SpanishEnglish

Updated community information sheet for DACA recipients: SpanishEnglish  

What do you need to know if the DACA program ends? Spanish, English


Local Organizations

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest 
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR) 
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice
1704 NE 43rd Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
503-550-3510

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Consular Offices

Mexican Consulate of Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulate of El Salvador in Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Guatemalan Honorary Consulate
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Consular Office of Japan in Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

Pageturners book groups will welcome several authors during the 2017-18 season. You don’t have to sign up — just read the book, then join us to discuss with the author.

 

Pamela Royes

Temperance Creek: A Memoir

North Portland Library

Monday, October 9, 6:15-7:45 pm

Sellwood-Moreland Library

Tuesday, October 10, 6:30-8 pm

 

Alexis M. SmithAlexis Smith

Marrow Island

St. Johns Library

Monday, October 9, 6:30-8 pm

Tuesday, October 10, 1-2:30 pm

 

Ruth WarinerRuth Wariner

The Sound of Gravel: A Memoir

Capitol Hill Library

Tuesday, October 10, 6:30-7:45 pm

Hollywood Library

Thursday, November 16, 6:30-7:45 pm

Hillsdale Library

Tuesday, January 9, 6:30-7:30 pm

Holgate Library

Saturday, January 20, 10:30 am-12 pm

 

Joyce Cherry CreswellJoyce Cherry Creswell

A Great Length of Time

Midland Library

Wednesday, October 18, 1-2:15 pm

 

Jenny ForresterJenny Forrester

Narrow River, Wide Sky: A Memoir

Belmont Library

Wednesday, November 8, 6:30-7:30 pm

 

Linda L. GrahamLinda Graham

Indiana Summer: From Cornfields and Lightning Bugs

Gresham Library

Thursday, December 7, 2-3 pm

 

Carter NiemeyerAuthor Carter Niemeyer

Wolf Land

Hollywood Library

Saturday, December 9, 2-3 pm

 

Molly GlossMolly Gloss

The Jump-Off Creek

Rockwood Library

Friday, February 16, 10-11:30 am

Brian K. Friesen

At the Waterline

Hollywood Library

Thursday, April 19, 6:30-7:45 pm

Patricia KullbergPatricia Kullberg

On the Ragged Edge of Medicine

Woodstock Library

Tuesday, May 15, 6:30-7:45 pm

 

Check at your library to see whether a book group copy of the book is available during the month before each meeting.

Pageturners is supported by a generous grant from the Friends of the Library.

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