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"Maybe this is why we read, and why in moments of darkness we return to books: to find words for what we already know." - Alberto Manguel

Talking with people about books is a shortcut to knowing them -- what they think, value and love. Many people are going online with their bookgroups to keep that sense of community alive. If you're participating in a virtual bookclub, the library can help. 

Here's a list of ebooks that have proven popular with book clubs and are available now, as of 3/24/20.

You can find an "Always Available" e-book collection from OverDrive, made up of some 3000 classic titles.

Here are the most popular available e-books - this link updates automatically to available titles. 

And if food is a thing for your bookgroup, check out this list of cookbooks in ebook format -- maybe you can show off your cooking skills via skype. Now if we only had smell-o-vision! 

To your health, everyone! 

 

You can access Multnomah County Library’s electronic resources from home with a new library card today!

Library cards are free to residents of Multnomah County and many nearby areas.

To register for a new Multnomah County Library card online, go to Sign up for a library card on our website and fill out the form with your current information. Read the responsibilities, then click send. 

You will receive an email shortly after with your temporary library card number. This number can be used to instantly access e-books, streaming media, and more.

The library is currently closed due to the COVID-19 virus. When the library reopens, please come into the library to finish your registration and get your permanent library card. Your temporary library card will expire in 6 months.

If you have any questions or issues, please contact us by email or chat. 

Schools are closed, the library’s closed, and playdates are cancelled. How will you keep your children active, engaged and learning? How can you find a way among all the websites and social media ideas? Fortunately, Multnomah County Library has you covered with books, databases, and streaming audio and video available beyond our walls. Youth services staff also found and selected other resources  to help parents and students.

Learning resources

Connect to our learning resources list for links to access e-books, tutoring help, language learning, digital magazines, and educational videos available through Multnomah County Library. 

Activity ideas

Need activity ideas? Overdrive Kids has e-books for kitchen science, learning to knit, folding paper airplanes, Lego creations, and a few joke books to help you from hearing the same joke again and again.

Unlimited movies and shows

Visit Kanopy and click on Kanopy Kids on the right of the top bar for a curated collection of movies and shows for preschoolers to middle schoolers. Kanopy Kids provides unlimited plays so your kids are free to explore educational and entertaining content.

Comics and  graphic novels

For your comics and graphic novel reader, Hoopla has a kids mode with Garfield, Nate the Great, Phoebe and Her Unicorn, and graphic novel adaptions of titles such as Anne of Green Gables and The Graveyard Book. Hoopla also has music and movies for the whole family.

Home learning

For links to homeschooling information, virtual field trips, reading, art and science, check out our Home Learning & Engagement website suggestions. If you’re curious what Multnomah County educators are sharing, we put together a list with school district links

 

The library buildings may be closed, but your library is much more than a building and we are here to help.

The library may be closed and people are staying home, but it doesn't mean parents are alone in trying to keep their children feeling safe and keeping anxiety at bay. There are several resources to help parents navigate talking with their children about the coronavirus, school closures, and no playdates. The Child Mind Institute, a national nonprofit whose focus includes children and families struggling with mental health, has suggestions to help.

  • Don’t avoid talking about the coronavirus since most children will already have heard something about it.
  • Share developmentally appropriate information and take your cue from your child. What does your child know, what questions do they have, how are they feeling.
  • If you're anxious, it's not the right time to talk with your child. What can you do to alleviate your own worries?
  • Be reassuring.
  • Routine is important. 
  • Keep talking.

Visit Talking to Kids about the Coronavirus for more in depth suggestions as well as their Supporting Families during COVID-19 page with other tips such as how to make home feel safe and how to avoid passing anxiety on to your kids. Information is also available in Spanish.

Here are other resources to help you talk with your child.

Coronavirus: A book for children by Elizabeth Jenner, Kate Wilson and Nia Roberts, illustrated by Axel Scheffler and with Professor Graham Medley, Professor of Infectious Disease Modelling, serving as consultant. The book is aimed at elementary school children.

Talking to Children about the Coronavirus: A Parent Resource. From the National Association of School Psychologists; available in multiple languages

Coronavirus video from BrainPOP. An entertaining, basic explanation of COVID-19 and needed precautions for elementary age children and young teens.

Comic from NPR. Basic information for youth in a graphic format that can be read in the Blog or downloaded and folded into a zine.

COVID-19 Time Capsule. Created by artist Natalie Long to help families with children during this time. Children can record how they're spending this time as well as how they are feeling. 

Oregon YouthLine. Teens helping teens. Resources on their website as well as open daily from 4p-10p via text, chat, or call. 

Coronavirus: What Kids Can Do. Kids Health has information on COVID-19 for children in English and Spanish and available in audio.  Other sections of their website have information for parents.

Coronavirus Social Story. Little Puddins Blog has a nice, English language "Coronavirus Social Story."

Multnomah County Library has digital resources for you and your child. Below are stories about worrying and resources about practicing mindfulness that may help during this time. For more, check out our E-books and more page.

While the doors are closed to our physical buildings, the library is still here for you. We are communicating with publishers and digital platforms to increase your access to online resources and content however we can. 

On March 17, Macmillan Publishers announced it is ending its library e-book embargo. Multnomah County Library (MCL) joins the American Library Association and other libraries in welcoming this decision. Equitable service to our community is critical, especially during these times.

Effective immediately, MCL will resume purchasing Macmillan e-book titles. The library is also purchasing additional copies of other titles to help reduce your wait time for e-books and audiobooks. 

Thank you to everyone who expressed their support of MCL’s previous decision to boycott Macmillan. It is because of your support, and collective action from libraries around the country, that we can continue to provide #ebooksforall. 

Login with your library card and get free access to thousands of digital titles. If you don’t have a library card, you can sign up for OverDrive access with your mobile phone number. 

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

All Multnomah County libraries are closed until further notice due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Do not return library materials. Book returns are closed.
  • You will not be charged for late returns. 
  • Your holds will stay on the shelf.
  • No new holds can be placed on physical items while the library is closed.
  • We encourage patrons to use digital library resources during the closure.
  • We are adding more services as we are able. We are not able to mail books right now.

The library is acting under direction and guidance from the Multnomah County Health Department, the Oregon Health Authority, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and the real threat to the health and safety of our families, friends and neighbors requires swift and dramatic action. Sadly, the action we must take to help stop the spread means that people will lose access to library spaces until public health officials advise that it’s safe for the public and library staff to resume our work." — Vailey Oehlke, director of libraries

Multnomah County Library will continue to monitor the guidance of public health authorities and provide support to those efforts in every way possible. The library will post any updates to this site.

Please check Multnomah County's COVID-19 page for updated information and resources.

by Sarah Binns, MCL volunteer

By the time Title Wave volunteer Diane Hogan and I finish our meeting we’ve talked about everything: From politics to cats, from the #metoo movement to how societal gender roles have changed over the past fifty years. I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface of the very interesting life of another one of Multnomah County Library’s fantastic volunteers.

Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Diane and her family moved to Corvallis when she was a pre-teen. She later attended Oregon State University, graduating “with a degree that no longer exists: secretarial studies.” She also got a bachelor’s degree in graphic design at PSU, but long before computer programs were the design method. “I’m not sure I could do it now,” she laughs.

Diane worked for a time as a civil service secretary with organizations like civil defense and the Worker’s Compensation Board. After marrying, she and her husband moved to Portland’s Alberta Street area in the early 1980s. Adventure arrived when her husband got a six month contract to teach in the Czech Republic. Diane laughed remembering their communal living arrangements there, especially being woken late at night by drunken people wandering the halls. She ended up teaching English to students, too: “Their teenagers are a lot more mature than ours!” she recalls.   

Diane started working at Title Wave in 1998, first organizing books in the back room and then becoming a cashier. She says she most appreciates “the great atmosphere and good coworkers. And you know,” she adds, “most volunteers, when they leave for the day, they take a book home.” Besides her time at Title Wave, Diane also volunteers at the cattery at the Oregon Humane Society three days a week and enjoys going out to eat with friends in her Alberta neighborhood. As we parted ways we exchanged cat photos (naturally) and I realized the next time I need a book I might bypass my library—and head to Title Wave to talk to Diane instead!


A few facts about Diane

Home library: Thanks to the wealth of books at Title Wave, “I haven’t been to the library in years!”

Currently reading: Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane. “It’s all about caves!”  

Most influential book: A twenty-volume encyclopedia set called The Book of Knowledge that originally belonged to her grandfather. “It had everything from French lessons to handwriting lessons…”

Favorite book from childhood: Mr. Bear Squash-You-All-Flat by Morrell Gipson. “A few years ago I bought a brand new edition.” 

Favorite place to read: On the couch or on her exercise bike. 

E-reader or paper: “I don’t read e-books!”

 

When you respond to the 2020 census, our community benefits. 

Respond to the 2020 census here.

Look for mail from the United States Census Bureau delivered to your street address in early to mid-March. This is your invitation to answer the 2020 census. You can respond using a computer, tablet, smartphone, telephone, or via the paper form.

Will you need help answering the census? 

The Census Bureau has prepared Information about the census and how to respond in 60 languages, including English, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Somali

This 10-minute video (available in English and Spanish) describes the census and will walk you through the process of responding to the census online.

English: Video Guide to Completing the 2020 Census Online

Why answer the census?

An accurate count of Oregon’s residents will ensure:

  • We will have representation in Congress that reflects our population. 
  • Oregon will receive its fair share of federal funds. These funds support programs that affect nearly all of us (education, health care, housing, infrastructure, small business).

Is it safe to answer?

It is illegal for any government organization to use the answers you provide on the census against you. Census employees take a lifetime oath to protect any personal information you share with them. Your responses are only used to provide statistics. There is more information on privacy and security at the census 2020 website.

If you want to learn more about the census, take a look at the resource list below.

Photo of a camera
You need a photo or an image for a project you’re working on. You need it fast. You don’t want to pay anything or get sued for copyright violation. Luckily, there are lots of sources on the Web for finding free-to-use images!

Some of these websites include images which are in the public domain (public domain = nobody owns the copyright). Others include images where the creator is giving up some of their copyright protection and allowing you to use their photos and artwork. However, the creator or website may have usage rules: for example, they might require you to tell people where the image came from and who made it. Before you copy or use any image, it’s a good idea to check for usage or licensing rules. 

ImageQuest - https://multcolib.org/resource/imagequest: ImageQuest is a library resource created by the Encyclopædia Britannica. It has millions of images that you can use for non-commercial purposes. The collection includes photos and clip art, and it allows you to sort results by shape (horizontal or vertical rectangle, or square). Information about creator and rights is provided for each image.

Creative Commons logo
Creative Commons Search - https://search.creativecommons.org: Creative Commons is an organization that helps people share content on the Web (photos, videos, writing, anything!) This webpage lets you search for images which have Creative Commons licenses. The licenses are like permission statements: they tell you what you are allowed to do with the image. 

Smithsonian Open Access - https://www.si.edu/openaccess/: The Smithsonian has created this site to provide access to millions of images from their museums, libraries, archives and the National Zoo. Every image is Creative Commons Zero (CC0), meaning that the Smithsonian has waived all of their rights under copyright. There is also a Smithsonian Learning Lab with information about the Open Access collection and ideas for how to use it.

Children reading a wireless newspaper
The Commons - https://www.flickr.com/commons: The Commons is a section of the photo-sharing website Flickr which provides access to images from public photography archives at museums and libraries around the world. It’s a great place to find historic photos, and everyone (including you!) is encouraged to add comments and tags to the images. The photos on this site have “no known copyright restrictions.”

Photo of a flower
Morgue File - https://morguefile.com/: A morgue file is a collection of past materials to use for future projects. In this particular online morgue file, you can find many high resolution stock photos.

Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/en/: Pixabay offers over 1.7 million royalty free stock photos and videos. 

Unsplashhttps://unsplash.com/: Over 1 million free, high-resolution photos shared by a huge online community of photographers. The Unsplash license gives you wide permission to use the images.

Scissors illustration

Are websites not your thing? Do you prefer books? The library has many books of illustrations and prints you can use, on all sorts of topics. To find them, just do a subject search in the library catalog for “clip art.” You’ll find books with images of Victorian women’s fashion, birds, children’s book illustrations, fairies and much more. At the end of this post is a book list showing examples of the types of clip art books that the library owns.

If you have trouble finding the images that you want, or if you have more questions about any of this, ask us for help! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.

Images included in this post:

Here are the library’s most popular computer classes for adults - you can find the complete list, including classes in other languages, at https://multcolib.org/tech-classes. Click on each class to find out more, including how to sign up.

Note to Welcome to Computers participants: Tech Help, Computer Help, Experience Virtual Reality @ the Library and E-Books and Audiobooks: Hands-on Help are not eligible for the tracking card program. 

Starting out with Computers

Career & Business Skills

Create and Explore

Library Tools and Resources

 

Pages

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