MCL Blogs

You might be keeping safe at home but enjoy these live online performances from some amazing library children’s performers.

Resources for older adults

Are you looking for resources and activities for older adults? Check out these great ideas from Library Outreach Services:

Scrabble pieces spelling "support"

 

Resources for caregivers of older adults

Are you a caregiver for an older adult? Find support and resources from these organizations:

  • Timeslips.org has free stories, images and audio to spark meaningful engagement with family members who have dementia. 
  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection is providing multilingual local support for caregivers and older adults. You can call or email ADRC at 503.988.3646 or adrc@multco.us  for 24-hour information and assistance to seniors, people with disabilities, and caregivers.
  • The Alzheimer's Association 24/7 help line (800.272.3900) is providing specialists and master’s-level clinicians to give confidential support and information to people living with Alzheimer’s, caregivers, families and the public.

This is a challenging time, whether it is being physically distanced from our friends and peers, lack of routine, not getting to do our regular activities, or being home with others that don’t understand us. This can be a challenge to our mental health and well being. We have gathered some resources aimed at teens for coping and that help foster mental health.

If you need to talk to someone, the Oregon Youth Line is in service, and is staffed by teens. You can call (877-968-8491), text “teen2teen” to 839863, or use their chat option. This is a great service if you just need to talk to someone outside your home, and/or if you are in crisis.

Available through the library, Teen Health and Wellness is inviting teens to share their stories to help connect with other teens about similar fears and concerns. Also on the site are resources for mind, mood and emotions and more.

Be sure to be taking breaks for self-care. Here are some suggestions:

If you have 2 minutes:

  • Take a few deep breaths or stretch
  • Doodle, daydream, or look at a photo of a loved one
  • Let someone know that you may need some time to talk later
  • Enjoy a peppermint stick of gum
  • Think of three things that you are grateful for
  • Acknowledge an accomplishment
  • Massage your forehead or hands

If  you have 5 minutes:

  • Listen to music and sing out loud
  • Jot down your dreams or goals
  • Run in place, do some jumping jacks, or walk up and down the stairs
  • Have a cleansing cry
  • Note a strength or quality you value in someone else and tell them
  • Send an email or text that had been nagging you
  • Play with your pet
  • Clean a portion of your bedroom
  • Enjoy a snack and/or cozy beverage

If you have 10 minutes:

  • Write in your journal
  • Call a friend you haven’t had a chance to talk to or see in a while
  • Take some quiet time to reflect on what you need from others in your life and how you can ask for help
  • Surf the web for inspiring quotes
  • Take a brisk walk or dance to music you enjoy
  • Find some things to add to your room or desk that will make you smile - photos, inspiring or funny quotes, or a souvenir from a meaningful event
  • Find a quiet place to meditate

If you have 30 minutes:

  • Find a writing prompt online, or pick a book at random, write the first line, and write your own story from there
  • Play a game with someone online or in your house
  • Cook, bake, or craft
  • Exercise or do yoga
  • Take a hot bath
  • Finish a project you started, but never got back to

How can you hold a family book discussion that will work for grandparents, parents and kids alike? Take a look at this list of suggested titles in ebook or downloadable audio. Some, like Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz's An Indigenous People's History of the United States come in both adult, and young reader editions. Others, like Kafka's Metamorphosis and Angie Sage's Maximillian Fly share similar themes, so you can talk about the book you've read and pose general questions for everyone to discuss. Are you going to give it a try? Send us a note to tell us how it worked, or make suggestions for titles that have worked for your family.

Unprecedented. Troubled. Or just plain scary. That's how these times are being described. It’s important to keep up with the news, but sometimes you need a break. You need fiction so absorbing that the world will drop away completely. The e-books on this list I made for you are not all entirely happy and feel-good, but what they have in common is they will make the world go away so that you can forget for a while and live in these characters’ reality. Many of these novels will make you laugh, and they all have well-developed characters. There are older titles on this list that might be available immediately, but there are also some new ones you'll have to place a hold on, because who knows how long this might last? Be well, dear readers. Know that the people who work at your local library miss you as much as you miss your library. What with sanitizing things, homeschooling your children, and trying to find stores that stock toilet paper and hand sanitizer, I know you’re busy. Carry on, but find time to read. Your soul needs a lot of things, but one of those things might be a good book.

computer with person in background
Looking to learn new skills while at home? Or wanting to watch a music or dance performance? Local chefs, fitness teachers, musicians and performers are offering online classes and performances. Check out some of these cool offerings:

Gabriel Rucker from restaurants Le Pigeon and Carnard is offering live cooking classes via Instagram. He posts the recipes on his Instagram stories ahead of time. 

While it isn’t live, the New York Times has some 6, 7, and 9 minute full body workouts to get you moving without needing any equipment at home. 

Artslandia, Portland’s performing arts magazine, is hosting a live happy hour, Standing By, with music on Facebook at 5pm each night. 

Not live, but you can watch Lewis and Clark College’s orchestra play music on their Vimeo channel and various music from the University of Oregon on their YouTube as well. 

Live Music Project Seattle is offering a calendar of live music events you can join via your computer. 

New York Times bestselling Illustrator Wendy MacNaughton of Salt Acid Fat Heat is offering drawing classes via her Instagram stories Monday through Friday at 10am. 

Join one of our amazing performers, Micah and Me, for a live ukelele party on Facebook Live Saturdays at 11am and Mondays at 4:30pm. 

Fun for all-ages, join the Oregon Zoo as they Facebook Live with some of their animals everyday at 9:30am. 

OMSI is hosting a virtual science pub about the dynamic Geological History of the Columbia Gorge: Tale of Two Floods with Scott Burns, PhD, Professor of Geology at Portland State University on March 31st from 6:30 to 8:30pm on Facebook Live. 

Is there anything better for hard times than singing? Choir Choir Choir is holding online singalongs on Facebook.

IRS 1040 form with pen

Update: COVID-19 Tax Relief Options

As of March 18, 2020, the Federal Government is allowing all individual and other non-corporate filers to defer up to $1 million in federal income tax payments until July 15, 2020. As of March 25, 2020, under Governor Brown's direction, the state of Oregon will be following the federal government's extension for state taxes, as well. You can check for more information on the "COVID-19 Tax Relief Options" page of the state government website.

Since library locations are currently closed, we recommend you print state and federal tax forms and instruction booklets online as they become available. We can still help refer you to tax professionals. Some tax preparers are able to work with you online or in another way that doesn't require an in-person visit.

Federal Hard Copy Forms

While libraries are closed, you can download and print federal tax items from the IRS Forms & Publications page. You can also direct questions to the IRS offices in Oregon. Of special note, neither the 1099 and 1096 forms nor any of the W series (W-2, W-4, etc.) are available for download. You can contact the IRS directly to have those mailed to you.

State Hard Copy Forms

Public libraries are no longer a distribution center for state tax forms and booklets. If you need Oregon forms or booklets, you can print them from the Oregon Department of Revenue page. If you want forms mailed to you, then you can contact the Oregon Department of Revenue via:

Other States

You can go to the Federation of Tax Administrators State Tax Forms & Filing Options, which provides links to tax forms for each state.

Dusty adding machine keys
Online Filing

Once the tax season officially opens, both the IRS and Oregon Department of Revenue will have listings for online filing services. Remember, with the COVID-19 Tax Relief, most state and federal taxes can be submitted by July 15th without penalty. Take a look at the state of Oregon's page on COVID-19 tax relief for up-to-date details.

You can find tax preparation assistance through the AARP's Tax-Aide Locator, CASH Oregon and the IRS's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. Some of these programs may be offering virtual help or have rescheduled their appointment availability while others may not have specific information at this time. 

 

Bored? Tired of being home? Try a scavenger hunt to explore the library website and catalog. Discover some new resouces and learn a bit about the library. How many languages does TumbleBooks offer books in? What app can you use to learn a language? When did your neighborhood library open? Try all or some of the questions. Click here for the questions and, when you're ready, here are answers and how to find them.

"Maybe this is why we read, and why in moments of darkness we return to books: to find words for what we already know." - Alberto Manguel

Talking with people about books is a shortcut to knowing them -- what they think, value and love. Many people are going online with their bookgroups to keep that sense of community alive. If you're participating in a virtual bookclub, the library can help. 

Here's a list of ebooks that have proven popular with book clubs and are available now, as of 3/24/20.

You can find an "Always Available" e-book collection from OverDrive, made up of some 3000 classic titles.

Here are the most popular available e-books - this link updates automatically to available titles. 

And if food is a thing for your bookgroup, check out this list of cookbooks in ebook format -- maybe you can show off your cooking skills via skype. Now if we only had smell-o-vision! 

To your health, everyone! 

 

You can access Multnomah County Library’s electronic resources from home with a new library card today!

Library cards are free to residents of Multnomah County and many nearby areas.

To register for a new Multnomah County Library card online, go to Sign up for a library card on our website and fill out the form with your current information. Read the responsibilities, then click send. 

You will receive an email shortly after with your temporary library card number. This number can be used to instantly access e-books, streaming media, and more.

The library is currently closed due to the COVID-19 virus. When the library reopens, please come into the library to finish your registration and get your permanent library card. Your temporary library card will expire in 6 months.

If you have any questions or issues, please contact us by email or chat. 

The COVID-19 pandemic is having profound economic impacts on people in our community. These resources may help.   

The information in this post was last updated 3/30/20 at 10 am. 

Common questions

Am I eligible for unemployment benefits if my job ended due to COVID-19?
You may be.

Where can I get help with food?
Meal resources for families
Guide to food resources

I’m not able to pay my utility bills. Is there help?
Many utilities are suspending disconnection or termination of service and there are other resources available

I’m worried about getting behind on rent and being evicted. Is there help?
Local leaders announced a moratorium (OregonLive) on residential evictions in Multnomah County and in public housing

I’m concerned that my business won’t stay open. Is there help?
Yes. Get business planning, counseling, financial assistance and more. Also, Prosper Portland is offering $150,000 in grants to affected businesses in the Jade District and Old Town/Chinatown. The Portland Small Business Relief Fund will provide grants and no interest loans to support Portland small businesses experiencing hardships related to COVID-19.

I can’t afford a computer or internet service. Is there help?
Yes. Here's a tool to find low-cost internet and affordable computers in your area. Also, Xfinity wi-fi public hotspots are now available to everyone until further notice.

Ask us for help

Library staff are standing by to help in any way we can. Email us

Related news and information

Federal

This week Congress passed and the president signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, to fund testing, paid sick leave, unemployment help, and food resources. The federal income tax filing deadline has been postponed to July 15. Additional federal legislative proposals are under consideration.

State

Oregon Governor Kate Brown has announced a series of measures and resources to combat the spread, including new support for people out of work and employers. She also announced the formation of a task force to increase focus and support for Oregon business ideas.

Local

Multnomah County’s official coronavirus resource site provides news, guidance, resources and factual information.

The Community Services Network is tracking changes to services including food, shelter, health care, transportation and more.

Schools are closed, the library’s closed, and playdates are cancelled. How will you keep your children active, engaged and learning? How can you find a way among all the websites and social media ideas? Fortunately, Multnomah County Library has you covered with books, databases, and streaming audio and video available beyond our walls. Youth services staff also found and selected other resources  to help parents and students.

Learning resources

Connect to our learning resources list for links to access e-books, tutoring help, language learning, digital magazines, and educational videos available through Multnomah County Library. 

Activity ideas

Need activity ideas? Overdrive Kids has e-books for kitchen science, learning to knit, folding paper airplanes, Lego creations, and a few joke books to help you from hearing the same joke again and again.

Unlimited movies and shows

Visit Kanopy and click on Kanopy Kids on the right of the top bar for a curated collection of movies and shows for preschoolers to middle schoolers. Kanopy Kids provides unlimited plays so your kids are free to explore educational and entertaining content.

Comics and  graphic novels

For your comics and graphic novel reader, Hoopla has a kids mode with Garfield, Nate the Great, Phoebe and Her Unicorn, and graphic novel adaptions of titles such as Anne of Green Gables and The Graveyard Book. Hoopla also has music and movies for the whole family.

Home learning

For links to homeschooling information, virtual field trips, reading, art and science, check out our Home Learning & Engagement website suggestions. If you’re curious what Multnomah County educators are sharing, we put together a list with school district links

 

The library buildings may be closed, but your library is much more than a building and we are here to help.

The library may be closed and people are staying home, but it doesn't mean parents are alone in trying to keep their children feeling safe and keeping anxiety at bay. There are several resources to help parents navigate talking with their children about the coronavirus, school closures, and no playdates. The Child Mind Institute, a national nonprofit whose focus includes children and families struggling with mental health, has suggestions to help.

  • Don’t avoid talking about the coronavirus since most children will already have heard something about it.
  • Share developmentally appropriate information and take your cue from your child. What does your child know, what questions do they have, how are they feeling.
  • If you're anxious, it's not the right time to talk with your child. What can you do to alleviate your own worries?
  • Be reassuring.
  • Routine is important. 
  • Keep talking.

Visit Talking to Kids about the Coronavirus for more in depth suggestions as well as their Supporting Families during COVID-19 page with other tips such as how to make home feel safe and how to avoid passing anxiety on to your kids. Information is also available in Spanish.

Here are other resources to help you explain and share information with your child.

Talking to Children about the Coronavirus: A Parent Resource. From the National Association of School Psychologists; available in multiple languages

Coronavirus video from BrainPOP. An entertaining, basic explanation of COVID-19 and needed precautions for elementary age children and young teens.

Comic from NPR. Basic information for youth in a graphic format that can be read in the Blog or downloaded and folded into a zine.

Oregon YouthLine. Teens helping teens. Resources on their website as well as open daily from 4p-10p via text, chat, or call. 

Coronavirus: What Kids Can Do. Kids Health has information on COVID-19 for children in English and Spanish and available in audio.  Other sections of their website have information for parents.

Coronavirus Social Story. Little Puddins Blog has a nice, English language "Coronavirus Social Story."

Multnomah County Library has digital resources for you and your child. Below are stories about worrying and resources about practicing mindfulness that may help during this time. For more, check out our E-books and more page.

While the doors are closed to our physical buildings, the library is still here for you. We are communicating with publishers and digital platforms to increase your access to online resources and content however we can. 

On March 17, Macmillan Publishers announced it is ending its library e-book embargo. Multnomah County Library (MCL) joins the American Library Association and other libraries in welcoming this decision. Equitable service to our community is critical, especially during these times.

Effective immediately, MCL will resume purchasing Macmillan e-book titles. The library is also purchasing additional copies of other titles to help reduce your wait time for e-books and audiobooks. 

Thank you to everyone who expressed their support of MCL’s previous decision to boycott Macmillan. It is because of your support, and collective action from libraries around the country, that we can continue to provide #ebooksforall. 

Login with your library card and get free access to thousands of digital titles. If you don’t have a library card, you can sign up for OverDrive access with your mobile phone number. 

Although schools are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Multnomah County school districts and community resources are providing meal assistance. Here is district information followed by restaurants we know of that are helping the community. The SUN Service System also has information on accessing food during COVID-19 closures.

Information has been updated as of 3/23/20. We will update again as needed.

Centennial 

Providing grab-and-go meals for all children under 18 during the extended closure except during Spring Break, March 23-27.

Breakfast 9:30am-10:30am and Lunch 11:30am-12:30pm at Centennial High School, near the auditorium, and Parklane. Food will be shared at a drive up or walk up.

Corbett 

Will be providing grab-and-go meals for all children under 18 during the extended closure starting after Spring Break [March 23-27].

David Douglas 

Will be providing grab-and-go meals for all children under 18 through April 28 at these locations:

  • David Douglas High School
  • Gilbert Heights Elementary
  • Ron Russell Middle School
  • Ventura Park Elementary School

DDSD food pantries

Gresham-Barlow 

Providing grab-and-go meals for all children under 18 during the extended closure including spring break and through the month of April. Meals will be provided at specific school sites AND school buses will deliver meals to specific neighborhoods throughout the district.

Breakfast 8:30am-9am and Lunch 11:30am-12:30pm.  Grab and Go Meals from school locations

See Grab and Go Meals Distribution Routes to find out when and where buses will drop off “grab and go” meals.

Parkrose

Food for district students starting Monday, March 16th at Parkrose Middle School and Russell Elementary School from 11 am to 1 pm. These will be packaged meals that include food for breakfast and lunch. Please note, students must be present to get a meal. Our sites will be set up for students/families to pick up food only.

No breakfast/lunch provided during spring break

Food pantry will be open March 19 and 26. We will have the Food Pantry open 3:30-6:00 pm at Parkrose Middle School. This will be a simple pick up of prepared boxes at the cafeteria rolling doors turn-around area, no need to even leave your car. We are consolidating sites so the Food Pantry at Shaver will not be open.

Portland

March 17-20 and March 30-31

from the PPS website, 3/18/20 : "Work continues around the clock to provide academic and social emotional supports as well as meals to students during the statewide school closure, which per Governor Brown’s Executive Order, will extend through April 28." Their schedule continues to be the above dates, we will update when confirmed for food availability past March.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided for children ages 1-18. Meals will be available for pickup outside the school from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the following locations:

  • Boise-Eliot/Humboldt Elementary - 620 N Fremont Ave
  • César Chávez Elementary - 5103 N Willis Blvd
  • George Middle School - 10000 N Burr Ave
  • Grout Elementary - 3119 SE Holgate Blvd
  • Harrison Park School - 2225 SE 87th Ave
  • Lent School - 5105 SE 97th Ave
  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary - 4906 NE 6th Ave
  • Rigler Elementary - 5401 NE Prescott St
  • Rosa Parks Elementary - 8960 N Woolsey Ave
  • Scott Elementary - 6700 NE Prescott St
  • Sitton Elementary - 9930 N Smith St
  • Woodmere Elementary - 7900 SE Duke St
  • Markham Elementary - 10531 SW Capitol Hwy
  • Madison at Marshall - 3905 SE 91st Ave
  • Franklin High School - 5405 SE Woodward St

Food pantry pickup dates March 16-20 on PPS campuses

Reynolds 

Providing meals to children 18 and under during the closure. As previously planned, we will not be delivering meals during Spring Break week (3/23-3/27/2020).  More information on where and when you can access meals after Spring Break week will be coming soon.

11:30am-1pm at H.B. Lee Middle School, Reynolds Middle School, Walt Morey Middle School, and Reynolds High School

Meals for all students and families 18 and under. Meals will be provided for curbside pick-up (in cars or on foot) at each location. Signage will be posted directing you where to pick up.

Agencies

Information may change so please check their websites.

C3 Pantry: Tuesdays and Saturday, doors open at 11:30am, shopping is 12-1pm

Mainspring Food Pantry

Northeast Emergency Food Program: Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, 1-4 pm

Partners for a Hunger-free Oregon

Portland Adventist Community Services: offering prepacked food boxes for pick up,  Monday – Friday 9am– 11am.

Sunshine Division:  free emergency food boxes. They are located at 12436 SE Stark St, Portland, OR 97233. For hours and more information, please visit sunshinedivision.org or call  (971) 255-0834

William Temple House: offering food boxes, Tuesday-Thursday, 10am-12pm

Human Solutions and Central City Concern are picking up meals and delivering them to families in their apartment complexes.


For more information about access to food for families including the Oregon Food Bank, please call 211 or visit oregonfoodfinder.org.

Restaurants

There are many great local businesses stepping up to make sure students are fed. This list was correct as of 3/18/20. Please check their websites or call to confirm as restaurants have been mandated to do take-out only, but may close.

Laughing Planet, all locations are offering meals to students on meal assistance programs.

Pita Pit in Oregon City

Grain and Gristle : Bring your student to Grain and Gristle to order a school lunch special. This discreetly lets our staff know that your child is on a free or reduced lunch program. Your child can choose a kids cheese burger, kids burger or grilled cheese. Their order will come with carrot sticks and ranch dressing to dip their carrots in. Just 1 per student per day. Children must be present. As of 3/17/20, to-go orders only, available 12pm-8pm.

Bless Your Heart Burgers : A free kid’s menu option is available at each of our pickup locations for any child in need and we are offering sliding scale pay what can options for those inneed of food assistance.

Matta (Vietnamese Soul Food Truck)
Free meals for kids and service industry workers.
1533 NE Alberta St
971-258-2849

PDX Sliders
Free kids meals, just mention "school is out."
1605 SE Bybee Blvd
(971) 717-5271
3111 SE Division St
(503) 719-5464

Stella Taco
All children who qualify for Meal Assistance Programs. Call and ask for "school lunch".
3060 SE Division
503-206-5446

Lionheart Coffee (Beaverton)
FREE brown bag lunches available for anyone who needs them.
4590 SW Watson Ave.
11421 SW Scholls Ferry Rd
503-521-7051

P’s and Q’s Market
Free meals to anyone in need. Call and ask for a “feed it forward” meal, then pickup meal within 15-30 min (server will tell you how long).
1301 NE Dekum St.
(503) 894-8979

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

All Multnomah County libraries are closed until further notice due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Do not return library materials. Book returns are closed.
  • You will not be charged for late returns. 
  • Your holds will stay on the shelf.
  • No new holds can be placed on physical items while the library is closed.
  • We encourage patrons to use digital library resources during the closure.
  • We are adding more services as we are able. We are not able to mail books right now.

The library is acting under direction and guidance from the Multnomah County Health Department, the Oregon Health Authority, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"The unprecedented nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and the real threat to the health and safety of our families, friends and neighbors requires swift and dramatic action. Sadly, the action we must take to help stop the spread means that people will lose access to library spaces until public health officials advise that it’s safe for the public and library staff to resume our work." — Vailey Oehlke, director of libraries

Multnomah County Library will continue to monitor the guidance of public health authorities and provide support to those efforts in every way possible. The library will post any updates to this site.

Please check Multnomah County's COVID-19 page for updated information and resources.

by Sarah Binns, MCL volunteer

By the time Title Wave volunteer Diane Hogan and I finish our meeting we’ve talked about everything: From politics to cats, from the #metoo movement to how societal gender roles have changed over the past fifty years. I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface of the very interesting life of another one of Multnomah County Library’s fantastic volunteers.

Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Diane and her family moved to Corvallis when she was a pre-teen. She later attended Oregon State University, graduating “with a degree that no longer exists: secretarial studies.” She also got a bachelor’s degree in graphic design at PSU, but long before computer programs were the design method. “I’m not sure I could do it now,” she laughs.

Diane worked for a time as a civil service secretary with organizations like civil defense and the Worker’s Compensation Board. After marrying, she and her husband moved to Portland’s Alberta Street area in the early 1980s. Adventure arrived when her husband got a six month contract to teach in the Czech Republic. Diane laughed remembering their communal living arrangements there, especially being woken late at night by drunken people wandering the halls. She ended up teaching English to students, too: “Their teenagers are a lot more mature than ours!” she recalls.   

Diane started working at Title Wave in 1998, first organizing books in the back room and then becoming a cashier. She says she most appreciates “the great atmosphere and good coworkers. And you know,” she adds, “most volunteers, when they leave for the day, they take a book home.” Besides her time at Title Wave, Diane also volunteers at the cattery at the Oregon Humane Society three days a week and enjoys going out to eat with friends in her Alberta neighborhood. As we parted ways we exchanged cat photos (naturally) and I realized the next time I need a book I might bypass my library—and head to Title Wave to talk to Diane instead!


A few facts about Diane

Home library: Thanks to the wealth of books at Title Wave, “I haven’t been to the library in years!”

Currently reading: Underland: A Deep Time Journey by Robert Macfarlane. “It’s all about caves!”  

Most influential book: A twenty-volume encyclopedia set called The Book of Knowledge that originally belonged to her grandfather. “It had everything from French lessons to handwriting lessons…”

Favorite book from childhood: Mr. Bear Squash-You-All-Flat by Morrell Gipson. “A few years ago I bought a brand new edition.” 

Favorite place to read: On the couch or on her exercise bike. 

E-reader or paper: “I don’t read e-books!”

 

When you respond to the 2020 census, our community benefits. 

Respond to the 2020 census here.

Look for mail from the United States Census Bureau delivered to your street address in early to mid-March. This is your invitation to answer the 2020 census. You can respond using a computer, tablet, smartphone, telephone, or via the paper form.

Will you need help answering the census? 

The Census Bureau has prepared Information about the census and how to respond in 60 languages, including English, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Somali

This 10-minute video (available in English and Spanish) describes the census and will walk you through the process of responding to the census online.

English: Video Guide to Completing the 2020 Census Online

Why answer the census?

An accurate count of Oregon’s residents will ensure:

  • We will have representation in Congress that reflects our population. 
  • Oregon will receive its fair share of federal funds. These funds support programs that affect nearly all of us (education, health care, housing, infrastructure, small business).

Is it safe to answer?

It is illegal for any government organization to use the answers you provide on the census against you. Census employees take a lifetime oath to protect any personal information you share with them. Your responses are only used to provide statistics. There is more information on privacy and security at the census 2020 website.

If you want to learn more about the census, take a look at the resource list below.

Here are the library’s most popular computer classes for adults - you can find the complete list, including classes in other languages, at https://multcolib.org/tech-classes. Click on each class to find out more, including how to sign up.

Note to Welcome to Computers participants: Tech Help, Computer Help, Experience Virtual Reality @ the Library and E-Books and Audiobooks: Hands-on Help are not eligible for the tracking card program. 

Starting out with Computers

Career & Business Skills

Create and Explore

Library Tools and Resources

 

Black Cultural Library Advocates staff members
Join our Black Cultural Library Advocates for special events honoring Black culture and heritage.

 

The History of African Storytelling
February 1
Central Library

Black History Month Film Fest
Saturdays in February
February 1: Mavis!
February 8: Moonlight
February 15: Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise
February 22: Rafiki
St. Johns Library

Songs from Vanport Musical
February 2
Wayfinding's Academy

Hadisi ya Tuamini — Swahili Storytelling
February 5
Midland Library

African American Read-In
February 8
North Portland Library

Urban Head Wrapping
February 8
Rockwood Library

South African Gumboot and Pantsula Dance Performance
February 8
Albina Library 
February 10
Kenton Library

A Place Called Home: From Vanport to Albina
February 12
Midland Library
February 24
Northwest Library

Story Hour with Nikki Brown Clown
February 14
Central Library
February 16
Rockwood Library

The HeART Gallery
February 15
Rockwood Library

Honoring Black Heritage Through Art
February 16
Kenton Library

Ken Burns' Central Park Five Movie Screening
February 16
Central Library

Power to the People: The Black Panther Party's Legacy in Albina
February 16
Rose City Book Pub
February 23
North Portland Library
February 29
St. Johns Library

I Love Being Me
February 21
North Portland Library

I Never Knew There Were So Many Books About Us!
February 22
Hollywood Library

Black History Month Tribute To Toni Morrison
February 22
North Portland Library

Keep the Beat!
February 29
North Portland Library

 

Several libraries will also feature Black History Month displays in February: Albina, Central, Gregory Heights, Hollywood, Kenton, Midland, North Portland, Rockwood and St. Johns. 

 

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