Recycling and donating: beyond the free box

Photograph of donation boxes, by Flickr user Joe Schueller.
Is simplifying and spring cleaning in full swing at your house? Have you accumulated quite a collection of unnecessary belongings that need to go? In my house the answer to both is, yes! Luckily there are many resources to help you find where to donate or recycle these items.

Oregon Metro is my go to site for information on where to donate, recycle, or as a last resort dispose of as garbage. They have a database where you enter what you want to get rid of and it finds places to either donate, recycle, or dispose of it. There is also information on where to bring hazardous wastes, neighborhood collection programs, and tips on reducing waste in the first place.

211 Info is a clearinghouse of resources. Simply put in your zip code and "donation" in the search bar and it brings up a list of organizations that accept items ranging from glasses to camping gear. If you like more of a list format this is the website for you.

If you have questions about recycling check out Earth911. They have a recycling guide as well as a search feature to find local places to recycle. 

What about that growing collection of old electronics? Free Geek accepts donations of computers, phones, and other electronics. If able to be reused your device will be refurbished and donated back to the community, how cool is that! If it can't be reused your device can be recycled through Oregon E-Cycles. If you aren't able to make it to Free Geek, Oregon E-Cycles has many other collection sites. 

If you aren't able to go to donation sites the good news is there organizations that can come to you. The Vietnam Veterans of America and The Arc of Multnomah-Clackamas both offer pick up services.

Finally here are my my personal favorites:

  • SCRAP accepts a wide range of art and office supplies. Just be careful not to leave with more than you donated!
  • The Rebuilding Center accepts building supplies and it's a fun place to wander around for hours. They also offer a pick up service.

What library blog would be complete without mentioning that the Friends of the Multnomah County Library can accept your book and DVD donations? If you have a small donation your local library will be happy to accept it.


Do you have questions about recycling, donating your unwanted posessions to local organizations, or anything else?  Librarians love questions, so please call, email, or text us -- or just ask the librarian on duty the next time you're at the library in person.  We'd be happy to help you get more information, or even just help you get your curiosity satisifed.


 

Comments

The Rebuilding Center sounds cool. Simple. ---Eugene :)
Thank-you Eugene! It is very cool, so cool I even volunteered there over the course of a few days to see how it operates.
The Gaia Movement USA's charitable status has been disputed by CharityWatch for reporting fundraising expenses as charitable contributions. It also appears to be a scam and part of a money-laundering operation tied to a secretive Danish cult organization whose leader is a fugitive from INTERPOL and hiding in a lavish Mexican resort villa, according to multiple media reports. See for instance: "Gaia-Movement Living Earth's "Recycling" Program, Debunked!" (CharityWatch, 2015); "The Green Bins of Gaia" (Chicago Tribune, 2004); "US taxpayers are financing alleged cult through African aid charities" (Reveal News, 2016).
The Gaia Movement has been a 501c3 non profit organization keeping clothes out of the landfill and supporting project in Africa and India - just do not believe all you see on internet

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