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Students in six local school districts can now use their student ID as their library card, giving them instant library access. 

That includes everything we have to offer, from books to streaming music to online tutors.

Five school kids smiling and giving the thumbs up sign

It’s made possible by a program called Library Connect. We began working with school districts on the program last year, and so far we’ve reached more than 100,000 students. More than half of those kids didn’t have library cards. 

Currently, Library Connect serves students in Portland Public, Centennial, David Douglas, Gresham-Barlow, Parkrose and Reynolds school districts. We hope to reach more students in the future.

The program is a huge boon for educators, who can now rely upon their students having access to the same resources. 

Learn more about Library Connect and other ways we support students and educators.

Library Connect is made possible by gifts to The Library Foundation.

Renee Watson; photo: Shawnte Sims
Renée Watson is a New York Times bestselling author, educator, and activist.  One of  her passions is using the arts to help youth cope with trauma and discuss social issuesRenée grew up in Portland, and splits her time between Portland and New York City.

For so many of us, last year stretched us in ways we could not have imagined. There was great loss, turmoil, and so much change. Still, there was much to be grateful for—unexpected phone calls from loved ones, zoom meet ups with friends, time outdoors and the relief of fresh air. 

And books.

I am so grateful to have books to turn to for comfort, distraction, company. Books have always been a kind of friend to me. I spent a lot of time reading and imagining as a child. I loved walking to the North Portland Library in the summertime to roam the aisles. Books took me to faraway lands, made me laugh, taught me important lessons, and made me see myself in familiar and new ways. I especially gravitated to poetry and loved stealing away to read the words of Nikki Giovanni and Eloise Greenfield.   

I remember the first time I discovered "Mother to Son" by Langston Hughes. I was attending Vernon Elementary School and was chosen to recite the poem at a Black History Month assembly. The speaker in the poem sounded like my mom. I even think my mom had said some of those things before. She was always pushing her children, telling us to never give up no matter how hard life might be. When I first read Maya Angelou’s Still I Rise, I felt powerful and proud of my ancestors. I was buoyed by their resilience. 

And so I fell in love with poetry. 

I loved the rhythm, I loved trying on different ways to say a phrase. I loved the line breaks, how each stanza would take me deeper and deeper into the meaning of the whole poem. I learned that poetry can be about anything. I could write odes to my neighborhood or favorite food, I could honor a loved one who had died, I could protest with my words and write poems that stood up against injustice. 

Over the years, poetry became the way I celebrated, mourned, raged. And so, when the pandemic swept over our nation and living in quarantine became the new normal, I found myself turning to poetry for comfort and peace. And then summer came and with it came a even more police brutality and violence against Black men and women. I was weary. I turned to the poets who raised me, the poets who lived through The Great Depression, Jim Crow, The Civil Rights Movement. They knew something about sorrow, about loss, about protest. They also knew about joy and love and how to hold on to hope. 

It’s a new year and still, we need comfort, we need inspiration. I’m still keeping poetry nearby and I offer these recently published books as a refuge, a guiding light, a healing balm. Some are novels-in-verse, some are traditional poetry collections. All of them are treasures and medicine for the soul.

It feels so good to get outside when the weather is nice!

Child using a watering can to water garden.

Children thrive in the natural setting. But exposure to nature is good for all ages! It not only makes you feel better emotionally, it contributes to your physical wellbeing, reducing blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and the production of stress hormones. Gardening is a great way to get into nature. And if you don’t have a garden space, you can try square foot or container gardening. Or find a community garden nearby. 

It is said that there are seven wonders of the natural world, but for little ones there are seven million wonders in the world right outside their door! Everything is fresh and new. The young child’s work is to play and to make constant discoveries about their environment. 

Gardening is a perfect way for the smallest child to explore and honor the earth. Of course, children learn by using their whole body — and all their senses. Children are naturally curious little scientists and love to experience the sights, scents, sounds and textures of the outdoors. As your little explorer follows you into the garden, you can talk to them about what they are seeing.

Give them the names of familiar plants. Describe the squelch of mud between their toes. Notice the texture of the leaves and how they dance in the breeze. Point out the variety of seeds in the fruits and vegetables you share. Gradually, you can introduce the planting of seeds.

And for older kids and teens, the benefits of gardening are just as valuable. 

Here are some ideas

Gardening Activities for Toddlers

Fun Garden Activities for Little Ones

  • Make a special fairy garden or dinosaur garden! Decorate with stones and flowers and twigs. 
  • Water plants. Or toes!
  • Paint stones. Toddlers are happy with a bucket of water and a paintbrush!
  • Make mud pies. It’s okay to get your hands dirty! Learning involves all the senses.

And below you will find a booklist with even more stories, projects and ideas. Happy gardening!

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

MHCC Head Start and Early Head Start have over 900 openings for the 21/22 School Year!

They provide FREE services to pregnant women and families of children ages birth to 5 who reside in East Multnomah County, outside of Portland Public Schools.

MHCC Head Start Logo

Programs include

Home Based Program

  • For pregnant parents and children 0-5 years old
  • Provides weekly home visits with a childcare provider
  • Focuses on connecting with little ones and parenting skills

Preschool classes

  • For Children 2-5 years old
  • Ranges from 3.5 – 7 hours per day, 2-5 days a week
  • Learn-by-playing approach builds social and emotional development

Full-Day Childcare*

  • For children 6 months - 5 years old
  • Ranges from 8.5 -10 hours per day
  • Offers year-round coverage

Here are flyers in English, Spanish, ArabicSomali and Russian


Families who are eligible

  • Receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Supplemental Security Income, or
  • Are homeless, or
  • Have an income below the federal poverty guideline, or
  • Have a child in foster care

*Additional Eligibility Requirements for Full-Day Childcare:

  • Family must be working and receiving childcare subsidy, or
  • Be an MHCC Student taking 9 credits or more

Ready To Apply? Call the main office at: 503-491-6111 or click here.

As a parent of three children with dyslexia, I have faced many of the challenges common to caregivers of a youth with dyslexia. 

One of the biggest challenges I faced was navigating school special education to provide access to a free education appropriate to my students’ learning style. All students have a right to Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) through Federal Law.  My kids were not learning how to read in the classroom, and the school didn’t seem to be doing anything. Oregon legislation has changed since my kids first started school, and schools are required to do more to address dyslexia. But is it enough? You may have to advocate for the youth in your life. 

Things to consider...

Mental health:

  • Research has shown that individuals with learning disabilities: 
    • may experience increased levels of anxiety.  
    • may be at greater risk for depression.  
    • experience higher levels of loneliness. 
    • may have a lower self-concept (self-esteem).  
    • are at greater risk for substance abuse. 
    • may be at greater risk for juvenile delinquency.
  • 20 percent of children with dyslexia also suffer from depression and another 20 percent suffer from an anxiety disorder.

Incarceration Rates 

  • Percent of adults in custody with dyslexia: 48% 
  • Percent of adolescents with learning disabilities that will be arrested three to five years out of high school: 31%

These facts are alarming. But there is good news … intervention helps! When modern, research based instruction is put into place in grades K-2, the reading disability rate drops.

Knowing where to go or who to talk to get an assessment for dyslexia can be difficult. Many states have passed legislation to identify dyslexia in children early on.  If you aren’t in school or you feel that your school is missing something, check out our Uncovering Dyslexia blog post, which points to places in Multnomah County who will privately assess for dyslexia. 

Resources for families affected by dyslexia 

Looking for books to share with your family? Here are some fiction books for kids and teens featuring characters with dyslexia, and here are some nonfiction books on dyslexia written for kids. For more information on dyslexia, including some book recommendations for caregivers, please see our previous post on Uncovering Dyslexia.
 

English | EspañolTiếng Việt | Русский | 简体中文


COVID-19 continues to limit our access to public spaces. Many of our everyday activities, like school, work, doctor’s visits and banking are now online. This makes personal information vulnerable to cybercriminals. Learn more about how to protect yourself online.

Protect your passwords!

One of the most common ways scammers can get at your data is by stealing passwords to important accounts. Making good passwords is one of the easiest and most useful ways to keep your data safe and sound.

Update often.

  • Update passwords often to protect from scammers, and make your accounts less open to large data leaks. Experts suggest updating passwords every 3 months.

Use long phrases instead of short words.

  • Try using famous quotes, common sayings, or even song lyrics for your passwords. Long phrases like “we all live in a yellow submarine” are easy to remember, and harder for a computer to guess.
  • Add numbers, capital letters and special characters to your passwords. (For example, P4$$w0rD.) This is an easy way to make your password more secure. Be careful not to make it too hard to remember.

Create unique passwords for each specific account.  

  • Reusing passwords between accounts puts many accounts at risk. If a scammer gets one password, they can open every account connected to that password.
  • Focus on making your most important accounts safe. Start with your banks, social media or health insurance.

Yellow diamond sign that says Scam Alert

Recognize common scams

Internet scams are becoming more and more common. Cybercriminals make up new ways to get your data. Here are some of the most common scams.

Phishing scams

One of the most popular scams is Phishing. Phishing is when scammers pretend to be a reliable source — like a business, a government agency or even a relative, to get at your personal info. They send bogus emails, phone calls and text messages, trying to get a “bite” from victims. The most common phishing scam is an email with hyperlinks to fake websites that can steal passwords, or infect your computer with a virus.

Look for these signs to spot phishing emails:

  • Grammar and spelling mistakes
  • Strange/unfamiliar email addresses
  • Scary language, like threats of legal action, or demands for money
  • Offers too good to be true, like a big cash prize

Gift card scams

One popular scam is when a scammer tells you to buy a gift card to pay a fake bill or fee. There are many types of this scam, such as:

  • A problem with your Social Security account
  • A power company threatening to cut off your service
  • A message that you won a big cash prize, if you buy a card first
  • A grandchild or relative who suddenly asks for money with no warning

Coronavirus scams

With more business moving online because of COVID-19, scammers have created new scams that play on our fears of COVID-19, such as:

  • Unexpected texts/calls asking you to pay for a vaccine 
  • Scary warnings about new COVID cases in your area
  • Offers for fake COVID tests to steal your insurance info
  • Notes that a package you didn’t order is on its way, with a link to its “tracking number”

In short

While the internet can be a scary place, following just a few basic tips can help you stop cybercriminals and enjoy yourself online. Our three most important tips are:

  1. Take care to create strong passwords, and reuse them as little as possible.
  2. NEVER click on any links from an email you did not expect, or a phone number you do not know.
  3. If in doubt, remember that ANY request to pay a bill or fee with a gift card IS A SCAM.

If you see any of the scams listed here, you can call the AARP Fraud-Watch Helpline at 877-908-3360, or contact the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Find more password protection tips at the AARP fraud watch network.

Check out more info about coronavirus scams at Consumer Reports.

Want to learn more about internet scams?  Check out the Federal Trade Commission's glossary of common scams.
 

The Business Plan

The first step in starting a small business is a business plan. Use Gale Business: Entrepreneurship for full access to the Business Plans Handbook. There you will find general templates as well as examples of plans for hundreds of specific businesses. As you create your business plan, other resources listed below may be helpful. The other sections below will help you build your business plan with library resources.

Industry Research

ABI-INFORM will allow you to research key elements of an industry and find overviews, opportunities and trends to help determine your business strategies. Mergent Intellect and Mergent Online are databases with access to private and public U.S and international business data, facts and figures, and industry profiles. Business Collection is a place to find articles on management, finance and industry information.

Marketing

Use SimplyAnalytics to find out more about your consumers and your competition and create reports and maps to compare data and hone in on target areas. Linkedin Learning (formerly Lynda.com) can help you with courses on marketing and other business skills. ReferenceUSA is a resource for creating mailing lists and learning about businesses that already exist in a particular area. 

Facilities and Location

SimplyAnalytics can help you research locations for your business by showing you maps and reports with demographics of your customers and where your competition is.

Administration and Management

Use Business Source Premier and Business Collection to find articles about starting and managing a small business including management, finance and industry information. To learn skills to better manage your business, try Linkedin Learning and explore learning courses on topics like business, software, technology, and more. 

Personnel

Linkedin Learning  has courses to learn about Human Resources (HR) and other aspects of hiring and managing people. 

Financial Planning

Find video courses to learn about finance and accounting for your small business using Linkedin Learning. Research articles about finance in the Business Collection.


You may also find these local community services helpful:
Business Xpress Start up Toolkit and Starting a Business in Oregon - Basic steps and requirements from the State of Oregon.
Portland Small Business Administration - “provides counseling, capital, and contracting expertise to entrepreneurs and small business developers”.
Portland SCORE (Service Core of Retired Executives) - Get connected with an experienced mentor at no cost. SCORE also has free workshops and other resources. 

Resource: 

‘Tis the season of flowers, showers and sun breaks. Spring has sprung.

Yet, Nicole Newsom, a program coordinator in Youth Services Outreach, is already thinking about summer. Her mind, though, is less on cloudless blue skies and warm weather, and more on books — as in how Multnomah County Library’s book distribution program for youth will unfold.

Library staff handing out books to mom and child

“Are the parks going to look like pre-COVID times or are they going to look like last summer?’’ Nicole wonders. “We kind of have to be prepared for both of those options.’’ 

The COVID-19 pandemic dictates as much, as it’s arrival in 2020 largely upended gatherings in parks and other lunch sites— places where the library distributes book bags in the summer to families, and readers and readers-to-be, from newborn to age 18.

“Normally, we would take Summer Reading game boards and books and prizes to those sites and meet kids where they were,’’ Nicole says. 

Library interactions in that way changed dramatically as the state limited large gatherings and introduced physical distancing measures to stop the spread of COVID-19. 

And though logistically problematic, the situation was not viewed as a long-term inconvenience by Jennifer Studebaker, youth services manager for Multnomah County Library.

“We tried to approach this work from the yes-place,’’ she says. “We worked to find ways to get high-quality and culturally reflective materials into the hands of both partner organizations and youth and families directly.’’

For Nicole, it became the right project at the right time. In her regular work, Nicole routinely manages logistics, from working with volunteers to apply identification stickers on books, to organizing books in bags or boxes. So last summer, Nicole helped Youth Outreach Services redirect the book distribution program to meet the pandemic challenge.

“I was sort of in that position to take on whatever came up next,’’ she says. 

Nicole started her library career in 1991 as a clerk and has been in Youth Services Outreach since 2008. Over the past 10 months, she’s worked with more than 30 library colleagues, all pursuing a common goal and purpose.

Studebaker commends the group’s efforts and work — a combination of pain-staking attention to detail and heavy lifting. “Each item has to be selected, ordered, received, and processed,’’ she says.

“In normal times, the library has a large team of volunteers to help process these materials. During the pandemic, access services library staff have stepped up to the challenge and worked through a mountain of materials to ensure youth in our community have relevant books to take home with them.’’

Since last summer through February 2021, the program has delivered about 44,000 books in Multnomah County Library-branded bags to youth across the county through various summer lunch sites and housing communities. She says roughly 3,000-8,000 books have been distributed monthly since last summer.

The book distribution program accesses youth in housing communities through a Multnomah County Library partnership with Home Forward, a public corporation housing authority that serves Multnomah County, Portland, Gresham, and other communities in the county. Books are provided by publishers through Book Rich Environments, a program of the National Book Foundation.

The Library Foundation funds cultural and language books for non-English speaking communities, including African languages, and African-American Black cultural books. The funding allows the library to provide high-quality, culturally- and linguistically-appropriate books for targeted communities.

“We can give kids books that they can see themselves in,’’ Nicole says. “Without those additional funds, we would not be able to provide books in Arabic, Tigrinya, Oromo, Burmese, and many other languages.’’

book distribution van

Support from The Library Foundation also provides “the newest and best books by and about BIPOC people,’’ she says, referring to Black, Indigenous, and people of color communities.

In most instances, books delivered to housing communities will be distributed to children and families by a resident coordinator. But on occasion, the team makes deliveries directly to the youth from a Multnomah County Library van.

“We’re standing outside in the hot summer sun, and they sit down on the curb, and they immediately take out the books and start reading one,’’ Nicole says of an outing last summer. 

“I had a couple of kids tell me, ‘I haven’t had new books to read in four months, and I’m so excited to have some new books to read.’ ’’

For Nicole, this is an example of the work at its most rewarding. 

“We’ve seen appreciation and gratitude from people,’’ she says. “It’s been really fabulous.’’

--

Written by Wade Nkrumah

Many workplaces are managing this back-and-forth cycle of ups and downs during the year-long (and counting) COVID-19 pandemic.

Martha Lillie knows this all too well as a library assistant for Multnomah County Library’s Child Care Book Delivery Service, a service that brings age-appropriate, high-quality children’s books to child care centers, in-home child care providers and other organizations that work with children daily. 

Hits and misses. Fits and starts. Retreats and rallies.

Child and adult reading book

Through disruption and interruption of opening and closures due to COVID-19 safety precautions, the library’s Child Care Book Delivery Service pushed forward with an expanded, equity-centered focus while simultaneously broadening its overall reach to youth throughout the county.

During the first library closure last March, Martha brought home several crates of books to continue her work: “The first thing I started doing in those beginning months of the pandemic was a diversity audit of our collection,’’ Martha says.

In the months prior to the pandemic, staff had been evaluating the delivery service, with the aim of more directly addressing the library’s service commitment to historically marginalized communities. These include Black, Indigenous, and other people of color, as well as immigrant communities, and those who have lower incomes.

Martha says the diversity audit underscored the importance of including emergency child care providers, those state-approved providers offering childcare during COVID-19 under revised safety guidelines, as part of outreach to historically marginalized communities.

“It’s a complicated process trying to determine which of our sites are previous book delivery sites doing emergency childcare so that we continue to serve them,’’ she says.

“Which sites do we need to pick up the materials they had so we can quarantine them in order to share them with another child care site? In addition, which new emergency child care sites are interested and have the capacity to start something new like this?’’

Annie Lewis, Early Childhood Services Manager for three-plus years through January 2021, saw firsthand the evolution of the book delivery service reset during COVID-19.

"Martha worked closely with the book delivery staff team to analyze every detail to ensure the team could resume book delivery services,’’ Lewis says.

“From safety measures, to new delivery routes, to communicating with child care providers, the team worked hard to provide this critical service to children in care settings to ensure they had access to high-quality children's materials." 

Since resuming services in October 2020, through March 2021, the team has delivered 75,550 books to 206 emergency child care provider sites. The previous fiscal year, the team delivered nearly 40,000 books to 1,132 classrooms and childcare providers

“So far, I think we’ve probably added around 50 new sites,’’ she says, “in addition to the sites that we were serving that were also working as emergency child care providers.”

Given the many pandemic challenges facing library programs and staff, successfully delivering such high volumes of books is a victory of sorts.

“Our big thing has been just getting books into the hands of kids, particularly those who don’t have access and need the books,’’ Martha says. “That’s our passion: kids and books.”

This has been Martha’s mantra since joining the Child Care Book Delivery Service for what is now called the library’s Every Child Initiative in 1999. She began her Multnomah County Library career in 1988, as a page at Central Library, and in 1994 earned library media specialist certification.

In the past year, she says, she’s become more comfortable with Google Maps and other Google forms. And did so, along with many coworkers, while adjusting to teleworking at some point.

“I had to learn a lot of new skills,’’Martha says. “I used Google Maps to lay out all of the Emergency Child Care sites. And then we kind of had to figure out how we were going to make our way through the county with that process’’ to deliver books.

Martha says the restart of the Child Care Book Delivery Service in the COVID-19 era has been accomplished in great part through the efforts of Annie Lewis, and other library staff including, Eric Barker, Tony Hix, Gordon Long, Brendan McGovern, and Lauren Reese. She says Rachel Altmann assists from home with coordination and communication.

Their commitment inspires Stephanie Orellana, who oversees the program as Youth Services Outreach supervisor.

“They have shown up every day ready to get books into the hands of kids,’’ Orellana says. “It has been amazing to witness their dedication. They are all incredibly collaborative and great champions for equity.”

---
Written by Wade Nkrumah

Cada primavera, los estudiantes de 3.º a 12.º toman un examen estatal de matemáticas y artes de lenguaje en inglés para medir su aprendizaje y para guiar la enseñanza y ayuda de los maestros.

Si los estudiantes no pasan los exámenes en la primaria y secundaria, no impacta la decisión de promoverlos al siguiente grado; sin embargo, el pasar los exámenes estandarizados de Smarter Balanced es un requisito para graduarse de la escuela preparatoria y para seguir sus estudios universitarios.

Es muy probable que este año las escuelas no ofrezcan los exámenes Smarter Balanced debido al cierre de escuelas y aprendizaje a distancia. Sin embargo, sus estudiantes los pueden practicar en casa y asegurarse que están alcanzando los objetivos del año que cursan.

Otra razón por la que practicar y tomar los exámenes estandarizados es importante, es porque ayudan a preparar a los estudiantes para tomar los exámenes de admisión para la universidad como el SAT y el ACT.

Practiquen los exámenes en línea desde el kínder hasta la preparatoria. Estos son los pasos para practicar los exámenes estandarizados en línea:

  1. Entren a la página de práctica; haga clic aquí
  2. Hagan clic en el recuadro verde de abajo donde dice "Sign in" y siga las instrucciones.
  3. Seleccione el grado en que está el estudiante (kínder al 12). ¡Tendrá 99 oportunidades de práctica!
  4. Hagan clic en "Select", si no hacen cambios.
  5. Que su estudiante grabe su nombre con su voz y cheque que funcione el video. Esto es necesario para poder pasar a la siguiente página.
  6. Hagan clic en "Begin test now"
  7. Cuando complete la pregunta o cumpla el comando, haga clic en la flecha "Next" que aparece en la parte superior izquierda para continuar en la siguiente página.
  8. Completen el examen.
  9. ¡Diviértanse aprendiendo!

 

Si sus estudiantes tienen dudas o no pueden contestar las preguntas de los exámenes del grado que cursan, busquen ayuda de un tutor a través de los servicios de la biblioteca

Ayuda con tareas en vivo

Tutoria virtual 

LearningExpress Library

Otros recursos:

Lo que debe saber sobre los exámenes de práctica: Secundaria y preparatoria

Kínder a tercero

¿Qué es el Smarter Balanced y para qué sirve?

Guía para padres sobre la evaluación en Oregón

Es importante que los niños practiquen los exámenes, consideren NO firmar la forma de exclusión 

Muestra de la boleta de calificaciones. Ayudemos a nuestros estudiantes a que obtengan 3 y 4 de calificación


 

Escrito por Delia P.

Más escuelas en el Condado de Multnomah están abriendo siguiendo la planificación del estado de Oregon

Hemos recopilado lo siguiente:

  • Enlaces sobre información acerca del aprendizaje según los diferentes distritos escolares
  • Consejos para familias - Ayudar a sus hijos a prepararse para el aprendizaje en casa y en la escuela
  • Una actividad para iniciar la conversación con sus hijos sobre el regreso a la escuela

 

Información del aprendizaje en casa y en la escuela de los diferentes distritos escolares

Los Centros de salud para estudiantes

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora o un dispositivo móvil, por favor haga clic en la esquina superior derecha donde dice “Select language” y busque su idioma preferido.

Los Centros de salud para estudiantes están abiertos en las escuelas secundarias de Centennial, David Douglas, Parkrose, Reynolds y Roosevelt. Cualquier joven en los grados K-12 que vaya a la escuela en el condado de Multnomah o viva en el condado puede venir a las clínicas. No es necesario que asistas a la escuela donde se encuentra el centro.

Ubicaciones y horarios

Los superintendentes de los distritos escolares de Gresham-Barlow, Centennial y Reynolds hablan de qué esperar de la reapertura de sus escuelas

B2S E Spanish

Centennial School District

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora, por favor haga clic en la esquina superior derecha donde dice “Translate” y busque su idioma preferido.

La actualización del superintendente (10 de marzo) - La información se presenta en inglés. Incluye el horario para los estudiantes del kinder al 6° grado. 

“Los planes de los grados 7 a 12 se compartirán en las próximas semanas. Afortunadamente, el verano pasado los administradores del Distrito Escolar de Centennial y el personal de las escuelas redactaron planes operacionales para el distrito y cada una de nuestras escuelas, basados en el Departamento de Educación de Oregón (ODE) - copias de los planes de cada escuela se pueden encontrar en: https://or50000628.schoolwires.net/domain/107” 

 

Corbett School District

Para ver la información de esa página en español en la computadora o un dispositivo móvil, haga clic en la esquina superior izquierda donde dice español.

Distrito escolar Corbett: Resumen del modelo de reapertura Febrero de 2021

Corbett boletín electrónico: Abril

 

David Douglas School District 

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora, por favor haga clic en la esquina superior derecha debajo de donde dice “Translation by Google” y busque su idioma preferido. Si está en un dispositivo móvil, busque “Translation by Google” cerca del centro superior de la página.

Video - Protocolos de seguridad en persona

Horario de regreso a la escuela (17 de marzo)

 

Gresham-Barlow School District

Actualización GBSD: El Distrito Escolar de Gresham-Barlow reanudará la instrucción en persona a través de un modelo híbrido

Mensaje a la comunidad de GBSD (5 de marzo) - Incluye la línea de tiempo de implementación para el modelo de aprendizaje híbrido

 

Parkrose School District

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora o un dispositivo móvil, descargue la página y haga clic en la esquina izquierda inferior donde dice “Select language.” Busque su idioma preferido.

Sobre la instrucción híbrida de Parkrose (16 de Marzo)

 

Portland Public Schools

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora o un dispositivo móvil, descargue la página y haga clic en el centro inferior donde dice “Select language.” Busque su idioma preferido.

¡La instrucción híbrida (en casa y la escuela) comienza esta semana! Información y actualizaciones importantes (29 de marzo)

Aprendizaje híbrido (en casa y en la escuela) de PPS K-5: Preguntas y respuestas más frecuentes (15 de marzo)

El primer día para que los estudiantes comiencen el aprendizaje híbrido (en casa y en la escuela):

  • Desde Pre-Kínder a 1º grado.: El jueves, 1º. de abril.
  • Desde 2º. a 5º grado.: El lunes 5 de abril.
  • Secundaria y preparatoria: La semana del 19 de abril.

(Nota: las fechas están pendientes según la aprobación por los miembros de la Asociación de Maestros de Portland y la Junta de Educación de PPS)

Servicios telefónicos multilingües | Español:  503-916-3582

 

Reynolds School District

Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora, haga clic en la esquina superior derecha donde dice “Select language” y busque su idioma preferido. Si está usando un dispositivo móvil, toque las tres líneas en la esquina superior izquierda al lado de donde dice “Reynolds.” En el menú que abre, toque donde dice “Select language” y busque su idioma preferido.

Actualización de la línea de tiempo para el modelo de aprendizaje híbrido (en casa y en la escuela) (16 de Marzo)

Viajando el el autobús

Línea de asistencia de servicios lingüísticos: (503) 492-7268

 

Riverdale School District

La información de este sitio se presenta en inglés.

 

Consejos para familias - Ayudando a sus hijos a prepararse para el aprendizaje híbrido

Estos consejos fueron traducidos de las páginas de Anne Arundel County Public Schools: Helping Your Child Prepare for Hybrid y Reach Out Oregon: Ready or Not: We Can Do This! Tips for Navigating Our Kids’ Return to School

  • Cuídense ustedes mismos
    • Es más fácil ayudar a nuestras familias si nos estamos cuidando nosotros mismos.
  • Restablezcan rutinas predecibles a la hora de acostarse, de levantarse y de comer
    • Asegúrense de que sus hijos tengan tiempo y descanso suficiente para prepararse para la escuela.
    • Tengan en cuenta que la hora de inicio de la escuela cambiará cuando comience el aprendizaje híbrido (en casa y en persona). Revisen el horario híbrido específico de la escuela de sus hijos.
    • Consideren hacer un calendario familiar para revisión fácil.
  • Hablen con sus hijos sobre lo que pueden esperar
    • Hablen sobre cómo la escuela podría ser diferente en el modelo híbrido
    • Revisen los protocolos de seguridad actuales, como el uso de mascarillas, el lavado de manos y el distanciamiento social.
  • Asegúrense de que sus hijos tengan sus materiales para el modelo híbrido
    • Consideren hacer una lista de materiales que necesitarán llevar a la escuela cada día.
  • Practiquen la separación
    • Los niños pequeños, en particular, pueden experimentar ansiedad por la separación o timidez al principio.
    • Intenten no demorarse cuando dejen a sus hijos.
    • Dígales que los quiere, que pensará en ellos durante el día y que volverá para recogerlos.
    • Considere la posibilidad de enviar un objeto de transición (como una foto o un pequeño recordatorio) que ayude a sus hijos a sentirse conectados cuando estén separados.
  • Ayude a su hijo a prepararse emocionalmente para la vuelta a la escuela en persona
    • Tenga conversaciones abiertas y sinceras.
    • Puede ayudar a su hijo a sentirse más cómodo hablando abiertamente de sus preocupaciones, respondiendo a sus preguntas y haciéndole saber que está bien sentirse preocupado.
    • Permita que su hijo tome decisiones (por ejemplo, qué ropa ponerse, qué elegir para comer), es decir, cosas que le ayuden a sentirse en control. 
  • Concéntrese  en las cosas positivas
    • Dígale que es natural que esté nervioso, pero que se sentirá cómodo una vez que se haya familiarizado con las nuevas rutinas.
    • Enfatice aspectos positivos, como la posibilidad de ver a sus amigos y a su maestro.
    • Pregunte a su hijo, “¿Qué esperas de la escuela?”
    • Compruebe con su hijo lo que le va bien una vez que empiece el colegio.
  • Prepárese para los cambios de comportamiento
    • Muchos niños pueden mostrar dificultades con la separación de los padres, cierta timidez o preocupación por los horarios, las tareas escolares o los amigos. Esto es normal durante la transición del regreso a la escuela.
    • Continúe comunicándose con la escuela, ya que el retraimiento o las preocupaciones constantes pueden indicar un problema.
    • Si está preocupado por su hijo, póngase en contacto con el consejero de la escuela.
  • Manténgase informado y conectado
    • Siga de cerca la comunicación de la escuela de su hijo.
    • Consulte con la maestra de su hijo para saber cómo está afrontando la vuelta a la escuela y cómo puede apoyar a su hijo en casa.
  • Si su hijo tiene un IEP, póngase en contacto con su distrito escolar lo más pronto posible para hablar de cómo puede ser necesario ajustar el plan de su hijo 
  • Asegúrese de documentar sus preocupaciones con el mayor detalle posible en cartas para compartir con la administración de la escuela y/o el departamento de educación especial
    • Algunos de nuestros niños tienen necesidades emocionales o de comportamiento que no tenían la primavera pasada.
  • Comparta historias sociales para ayudar a los niños a visualizar su jornada escolar
    • Las historias muestran situaciones como las nuevas normas en el autobús escolar o "por qué mi profesor parece diferente".
  • Sea amable, tenga paciencia y conozca los signos de malestar mental en adolescentes y niños
    • Los adolescentes, especialmente los que ya viven con ansiedad y depresión, pueden tener dificultades con las nuevas presiones.

 

Una actividad para iniciar una conversación con sus hijos sobre el regreso a la escuela en persona

Traducido de la idea “future sketch” en el artículo ADDitude: How to Activate Your Child’s ADHD Brain for Distance Learning

Las preguntas guiadas resultan útiles para ayudar a nuestros hijos a anticiparse a las transiciones y cambios.

  1. Pídale a su hijo que dibuje o escriba algo que representa cómo imagina que serán sus días aprendiendo tanto en casa como en persona.
  2. Participe en la actividad dibujando o escribiendo también sus propias ideas.
  3. Compartan que dibujaron o escribieron. 
  4. Hablen de las similitudes y diferencias entre lo que dibujaron o escribieron.
  5. Hagan un plan de cómo hablar de cualquier desafío que pueda surgir.
  6. Señalan al menos una cosa que les haga ilusión.

 


 

Recopilado por Kimberly S.

En algún momento tuve un sueño de escribir y publicar un libro. Y me refiero a esta idea como un plan casi imposible porque en esos días ni siquiera imaginaba que alguien de mi pequeño pueblo podía poner sus ideas en un volumen.

woman standing

La realidad es que a medida que crecí y exploré un mundo de posibilidades, me di cuenta de que, después de todo, publicar un libro no era una idea tan loca. Aunque en realidad, reconozco que había muchas ideas en competencia en mi mente que el sueño de escribir un libro se desvaneció muy pronto.

Ahora, como adulta, me doy cuenta de la importancia de cultivar los sueños y ser la voz amiga si conoces a alguien que tiene ideas y planes, pero que no sabe cómo llegar a ellos. Y es por eso que me encanta lo que hago en la biblioteca del condado de Multnomah.

Como selectora de materiales en español hago mi trabajo pensando en libros que llegarán a las manos de personas que se preguntan cómo emprender un negocio, cómo cambiar hábitos o cómo mejorar publicar un libro entre muchos otros intereses. Me enorgullece pensar que alguien que busque esta información encontrará algunas de mis selecciones efectivas para sus proyectos.

Concluyó invitando a todos aquellos escritores que llevan años pensando en escribir o publicar su libro a que no tengan más dudas. ¡Hazlo! Este año la biblioteca ha abierto la convocatoria para todas las personas que escriban en español. Y me gustaría invitarlo a perseguir ese sueño de ver su libro en nuestra colección. Para más detalles: Proyecto de los Escritores de la Biblioteca

flyer

Boy in wheelchair talking to a woman in the kitchen

Change is always present in our lives, but this past year has been a little extra. And by a little extra, I mean A LOT EXTRA! All this change can be hard on our kids and on ourselves. And if you or your child is neurodiverse or has a history of trauma, that adds another layer that makes dealing with change even harder. So we have put together some information on how to talk with your kids about change, help you support them now and in the future with the change that is inevitable, and hopefully help yourself as well. 

Some things to talk to your kids about:

Talk about the change. Tell them what to expect, both good and bad, and what the change will mean for all of you. Answer as many of your kid’s questions as you can, and if you can’t, be honest with them about that. Tell them you’ll figure it out together!

And talk about it early, as soon as you know there might be a change coming. Time is your friend when processing a big change. Using visuals as you talk can be really helpful, even for children that are verbal. For children who are reading, this can be a list or chart. For big, complicated changes, have lots of conversations over time.

You can also bring up examples of changes that have happened in the past. Talk about what was good and not so good about it? What did your child learn from the experience? How did they get through it, and what coping skills did they learn? Let them know that every time they experience a change, they’ll become stronger and more prepared for the next one! 

Involve your child in decisions about the change. Children typically have no control over the major changes in their lives. By involving and including them in decisions, you help them feel more in control. This can happen in big and small ways, at any age. So give them choices and also ask for their help. Children like to contribute and feel valuable, responsible, and helpful.

Acknowledge your child’s worries and fears. While you’ll want to focus on any positives associated with the change, it’s important to allow your child to feel angry, sad, or scared. These feelings are normal and your child needs to be allowed to express them. 

If your child struggles to name what they are feeling, help them label the emotion (ie, anxious, sad, nervous, worried, scared, etc). Putting a name to a feeling makes it less overwhelming and easier to manage. And coaching children through their feelings is a vital learning experience. Talk about and practice emotional regulation strategies when a child is calm, so that the child can use one of those strategies when their emotions start to escalate. Remember that behavior is communication, and difficult behavior could be a way of saying "I'm having a hard time with change."  

Also be sure to let your child know that you take their concerns seriously. Like us adults, children simply want empathy, understanding and to be heard. 

Encourage your child to write (or draw!) about their feelings around change. Always be there for them to talk to, but sometimes kids need to process on their own. Giving them a journal to write or draw in, is a great way to give them that space.

Show your child the positive ways that you handle change. This can be harder than it sounds. I know I don’t usually react positively to change. But try and talk about how you feel during times of change and about what you do to cope. For example, I show my child the lists I make to help me stay organized and focused and feel more in control.

Keep the connection going. Make sure your child knows that no matter what else changes, you are there for them. If you can, set aside time each day to give your child your undivided attention - even 10 minutes is great. You can talk, play, share an activity. If your child is older, you can watch the same movie or play a video game. A little extra attention doing something you both enjoy reassures your child, making it much easier to cope with life’s changes. And I promise, it will help you as well. 

Beyond talking with your kids, here are some other tips for helping them (and you!) through change:

  • Keep family routines the same, if you can
  • Try to keep other changes in your lives to a minimum
  • Talk with your child’s teacher or child care provider to keep them in the loop and get support
  • Make sure your child eats well, gets plenty of exercise, and gets enough sleep (again, this can be easier said than done, but we can try)
  • If you can, give your family time to prepare for the change. And remember that kids who have had more trouble with change in the past, may need extra time and support in the future.
  • And of course, read books about big life changes (see below for help with that!)

We pulled these tips together from a variety of sources, including these articles:

And we also recommend checking out Purdue University’s page on Families Tackling Tough Times Together.

This post is part of our “Talking with kids” series, as featured in our monthly Family Newsletter.  Reach out to us at learning@multcolib.org if you have questions. We’re here for you!
 

We’ve been reading a lot of memoirs around here lately.  There’s something magical about them, in how intimate and revealing they can be.  Writers of memoirs don’t always include the whole story, but there is an underlying assumption of honesty.  When we read memoirs, we can trust we're getting to know someone, and maybe even ourselves, a little bit better.    

The word “memoir” comes from the French word mémoire, which means “memory.”  It’s just you and the author’s voice, sharing impressions of their memories.  Suddenly, you’re in their world, going deeper with every page you turn.  Reading a memoir offers a unique opportunity to really connect with someone without having to talk to them.  Or, in the case of public figures, it offers an opportunity to learn more about someone you admire, but may never meet.  

Some of our favorite memoirs lately have been graphic memoirs, or autobiographical comics, combining words and visuals to reveal memories.  We enjoy finding diversity in experiences and perspectives in our favorite graphic memoirs.  Whether we’re reading about someone battling an eating disorder, or someone growing up in South Korea in the 1980s, we love getting to know fascinating people through these beautifully drawn and written graphic memoirs!

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Looking for more tips on what to read next?  Check out our My Librarian readers advisory service and contact us for more ideas!

two students sitting outside of school on steps, looking at schoolwork, with masks on

School is once again changing for many of our kids. Some will be returning to Modified In-Person Learning either part-time or full-time, while others will continue with Comprehensive Distance Learning that will most likely look different. We tried to pull together some resources to help families know what to expect with this new hybrid learning and help support you through this time. 

Here are some great general ideas for Helping Your Child Prepare for Hybrid put together by the Anne Arundel County Public School district in Annapolis, MD. They include things like:

  • Re-establish predictable bedtime and mealtime routines (because if your family is like mine, those have gone right out the window!)
  • Be ready for behavior changes (just like adults, changes cause stress and stress can lead to some not-so-flattering behavior)*
  • Focus on the positives (something we all can try and do!)

And the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds has put together ways to support kids and teens in “Returning to the Classroom During COVID-19,” including helping them with:

  • Fitting in at school after a year away
  • Health and safety for kids and teens who might be nervous about catching the virus
  • Catching up academically

Looking at things locally, Oregon Public Broascasting’s (OPB) Education Reporter Elizabeth Miller has written a number of articles about schools returning to in-person. Including this one titled, “Here’s how hybrid will look for Portland Public Schools students.”

Local station KGW has put together “Frequently asked questions amid plans for reopening Oregon schools” and made a video about what returning to school looks like in Portland. And here are all their recent stories regarding schools in Oregon. 

Multnomah County put together an extremely helpful COVID-19 Teen Guide To Returning To Class.

If you like Podcasts, we highly recommend checking out All in My Head Podcast 3. Online School: How are we coping? This episode features teens giving their take on online school and mental health. 

And we recommend this article for parents and caregivers on Managing Your Own Anxiety During School Reopening.

And here is specific information from all the school districts in Multnomah County (who knew we had so many?!):

And Student Health Centers are now open at Centennial, David Douglas, Parkrose, Roosevelt and Reynolds high schools, for kids 5-18. Student Health Centers are like doctor’s offices and offer comprehensive primary and mental health care services to all Multnomah County youth. There are no out-of-pocket costs.

If you have questions about finding the most up to date information regarding your child’s school we can help. Please contact the library for assistance.

*If you'd like to read more on change, and how to help support your family through change, please check out our article on "Talking with kids about change."

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Logo for Multnomah County Library

Multnomah County Library condemns all violence against Asian Americans and people of Asian descent. We offer our ongoing support to the members of all Asian communities, families, elders and children, to thrive and succeed.

穆鲁玛郡图书馆严正谴责一切针对暨施予华裔美国人士以及亚裔人士之暴力行为。我们秉持一贯支持,为所有亚裔社区、家庭、年长者、年幼者等所有成员继续提供服务,以促进个人与社区之发展。

Thư Viện Quận Multnomah lên án mọi bạo lực đối với người Mỹ gốc Việt và người Châu Á. Chúng tôi luôn hỗ trợ các thành viên của tất cả các cộng đồng, gia đình, người lớn tuổi và trẻ em Châu Á, để phát triển và thành công.

La Biblioteca del Condado de Multnomah condena toda la violencia contra los asiático-americanos y la gente de ascendencia asiática. Ofrecemos nuestro apoyo continuo a los miembros de las comunidades asiáticas, familias, ancianos y niños, para prosperar y tener éxito.

Библиотека округа Малтнома осуждает любое насилие в отношении американцев азиатского происхождения и всех народов Азии. Мы предлагаем нашу постоянную поддержку членам азиатских сообществ, семьям, пожилым людям и детям, чтобы они процветали и были успешны .

Multnomah County Board issues statement condemning Anti-Asian hate crimes

Beverly Cleary with a cat, small image of Ramona Quimby in corner

Multnomah County Library is saddened today by the loss of Beverly Cleary. She was not just a genius whose work influenced generations of children, she was also a tireless advocate for youth literacy and libraries. Using the Northeast Portland neighborhood of Grant Park as a setting in most of her work, Beverly created stories that were of particular importance to the children of Multnomah County. She wrote real characters that were smart, mischievous, crafty, and powerful that every child can relate to. She understood children in a singular way that showed her respect for the child in all of us. 

As a young woman she worked briefly as an intern at Central Library and later went on to become a youth librarian. Later she was inspired to create the world of her most famous character, Ramona Quimby, and others, which is now memorialized in a map of landmarks at Hollywood Library. Beverly Cleary was generous in her financial support of Multnomah County Library and the Children’s Library at Central Library is named in her honor. Through The Library Foundation, she kept a strong connection to Multnomah County Library over the years and still considered MCL her library. 

For all of us at the library, she wrote about children that we might have been or known when we were young or that could be our children, playing through the backyards and neighborhoods that we love. We will be forever grateful to Beverly Cleary for all she has given to our library system, our community and children everywhere. 

. . . and Ramona Quimby, for showing us that life is so interesting she had to find out what happened next. 

If you are looking for help with schooling, here are some free tutoring resources to consider.

Virtual K-12 Tutoring / Tutoría Virtual

Tuesdays, 4,6 pm throughout the year
Who is eligible : K-12 students who need support in language arts, math, science, and/or social studies.
Registration required : yes, spots are limited
Who are the tutors : Multnomah County Library volunteers
Which languages is tutoring available in : English and Spanish

Tutor.com

Who is eligible :  K-college students
Registration required : yes for some features, no for live help
Who are the tutors :  college and graduate students, teachers, working professionals
Which languages is tutoring available in : English, Spanish, Vietnamese

Other Tutor.com information : 
available with a library card
live tutoring 2-10 pm daily
essay help
worksheets
suggested websites
learning videos

Learn to Be

Who is eligible : K-12 students with a focus on underserved students
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : high school and college students, adults
Which languages is tutoring available in : English

Interns for Good

Who is eligible : K-8 students
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : high school students
Which languages is tutoring available in : English

ConnectOregonStudents

Who is eligible : K-12 students in Oregon, Southwest Washington, and Northern California
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : Oregon high school students 
Which languages is tutoring available in : English (but includes language learning tutoring for other languages)
Other : they also offer peer support

Teens Tutor Teens

Who is eligible : Teens 13-18
Registration required : yes
Who are the tutors : high school students
Which languages is tutoring available in : English
 
Other Teens Tutor Teens information :
group tutoring
test prep tutoring
on-demand videos
worksheets
essay editing
 

If you are looking for extra academic support instead of live tutoring, consider these free resources:

Learning Resource Express Library has academic support resources for upper elementary school through high school. Available with your Multnomah County Library card.

Khan Academy has free video-based lessons and practice for K-12 students.

HippoCampus.org is a free web site that delivers content on general education subjects to middle-school and high-school students.

Ben’s Guide to the U.S. Government is a service of the Government Publishing Office (GPO), and designed to inform studentsvabout the Federal Government.

Typing.com is a free resource to help students build their typing skills. Available in English and Spanish.

Mathlearningcenter.org is a nonprofit organization serving the education community and include activities for students K-5 in math. Available in English and Spanish.

English | Español | Tiếng Việt | Русский | 简体中文


2021年5月17日是提交联邦和州府报税表的截止日期。虽然COVID-19 新冠病毒疫情大流行使亲临现场获得报税帮助变得很困难,但是您仍然可以通过以下方式获得准备报税方面的帮助和支持。

报税表或说明书

  • 下载, 打印报税表和说明书, 您可以通过 IRS (美国国家税务局), 和Oregon Department of Revenue (俄勒冈州税务局) 的网页获取报税表和说明书。 如果您在家无法打印报税表,
  • 邮寄报税表给您。如果您想通过邮件接收联邦报税表,请按照IRS (美国国家税务局) 网站的说明进行操作,或致电 800.829.3676。如果您想通过邮件接收俄勒冈州的报税表,请在网上填写订购表或致电 503.378.4988 或 800.356.4222 (免费电话)。
  • 在图书馆领取一些联邦报税表。图书馆提供有限数量的联邦报税表; 要查找您附近的图书馆是否有提供联邦报税表,请致电 503.988.5123 或 发送电子邮件给我们。
  • Oregon Department of Revenue (俄勒冈州税务局) 不再向图书馆发送州府报税表和说明书,因此我们没有任何俄勒冈州的报税表。 但是我们可以帮助打印您需要的报税表。 请与我们联系或可询问任何一间图书馆。

协助报税

  • IRS (美国国家税务局) 认证的志愿工作人员可以辅助您报税. 两个地点是 Lloyd Center 或 Beaverton Community Center。 请致电503.966.7942查看您是否符合资格并预约服务。 我们提供语言翻译服务,您可以在网上找到更多资讯和申请表格。 本服务由 Metropolitan Family Service 和 CASH Oregon 提供,是 IRS 志工所得税申报服务 (VITA) 的一部分。
  • CASH Oregon (俄勒冈创造财富与希望)可以协助 Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (个人纳税识别号)的申请以及续约请致电 503.874.6075 了解更多讯息。
  • AARP Foundation Tax-Aide (美国退休人员基金会税务辅助) 目前提供网上报税辅助。他们有很多自助报税的税务资讯,您也可以发送电子邮件向他们询问有关联邦所得税的问题
  • 如果您是自雇司机,“自雇路程税务表”可以帮助您了解如何申报自雇税款、如何计算您的驾驶收入,如何列出扣税款项、以及如何缴纳估计税款。
  • 从 IRS 美国国家税务局获得网上辅助或致电800.829.1040。
  • 从Oregon Department of Revenue 俄勒冈州税务局获得网上辅助或致电800.356.4222。
  • 获取有关波特兰艺术教育和所得税的更多信息, 请登录 波特兰税务网站,或致电503.823.5157。

其他税务协助

免费网上报税

  • CASH Oregon (俄勒冈创造财富与希望)列出了上网报税的选项,如果您符合某些条件的话,这些选项是免费的。
  • IRS Free File 使您可以免费在网上准备和提交联邦所得税。

Oregon Department of Revenue (俄勒冈州税务局) 列出了经过认可的报税软件,如果您符合资格的话,这些报税软件是免费的。

 

Genealogists will often go pretty far out of their way to track down obituaries and funeral notices.  And with good reason!  An average, non-fancy funeral notice often reveals the names of family members, the place of burial or interment, the deceased’s home address, and other details crucial to family history research.  But they can be a challenge to find.

Despite their names, Portland's two long-running daily newspapers the Oregon Journal (published 1902-1982) and the Oregonian (published 1861-present) were/are local papers focusing on readers in the Portland area.  So for the most part, these newspapers did not publish obituaries for people who lived in other parts of our very large state.

Whose obituaries can you expect to find in the Oregon Journal and the Oregonian?

The vast majority of the funeral notices, death notices, and obituaries in the Oregon Journal and the Oregonian are for people who lived in the Portland area or had some deep Portland connections.  They are usually very, very short!  Sam Nudelman’s funeral notice (at right), from the August 17, 1944 Oregonian, is a good example.  It is brief and to-the-point, listing only Mr. Nudelman's date of death, his address, a short list of his surviving relatives, and information about his funeral services and place of burial.

Sometimes the deaths of prominent figures in Oregon politics, business, or social life were written up in the Journal or the Oregonian, even if they were from Burns or Salem or Joseph.  A person’s statewide fame might make their obituary of local interest despite the fact that they lived and died far away from the Rose City.  

However, these notices often have the feel of straight news, rather than obituary.  For example, the day after former Oregon senator and long-time Eugenian Wayne Morse died in 1974,  the Oregonian ran a full-page-width headline at the very tippy-top of page one (at left).  

In the early years of the 20th century and before, obituaries for Oregon “pioneers” (that is, European-American settlers who travelled west to the Oregon country in the mid-19th century or thereabouts) were a regular feature in the Oregonian.  And the editors regularly featured obituaries for pioneers who lived and died in other parts of Oregon.  An example (at right) is the brief obituary for Mrs. Mary Goodman, of Eugene, from the January 2, 1909 Oregonian.

Are you ready to start searching for an obituary or death notice in the Oregon Journal or the Oregonian?

If you think your ancestor's obituary or death/funeral notice is likely to be in the Oregonian, you can get started by searching for their name in the library's Historical Oregonian (1861-1987).  To look for obituaries in the Journal, search for your ancestro's name in Oregon Journal (1902-1982). (To use these resources from outside the library, you'll need to log in with your library card number and password.)

If these newspaper archive resources are new to you, we can help. Get in touch with a librarian for personalized help with your research! And remember, if you don't find an obituary, death notice, or funeral notice that you think really ought to have been in the Oregonian or the Oregon Journal, librarians can always help you think of other ways to search.

When should you look somewhere other than the Oregon Journal and the Oregonian?

Are you looking for an obituary for a Portland resident, but can’t find it in the Oregon Journal or the Oregonian? Portland has had many other daily and weekly newspapers that ran obituaries over the years. Central Library has long archives of many of these papers for your researching pleasure! If you want to begin your research on your own, take a look at Research with historical Portland newspapers, beyond the Oregonian. If you’d like a hand getting started, ask the librarian on duty in Central Library’s Periodicals room (on the second floor), or contact us to get personalized help from a librarian by phone or email.

If you've done all that great newspaper research but you're not finding an obituary for a Portland ancestor, you might want to try another tack. Take a look at my post Can't find that Portland obituary? Try the Ledger Index instead -- it talks about using an early and surprisingly detailed death index to learn details about a deceased person when there isn't an obituary available.

Did the person you’re researching reside in St. Johns or Gresham? Try looking for a funeral notice or obituary in their local paper. The St. Johns Review had really lovely, robust obituaries in its early years, and most issues of the Review from 1904-1922 and 2015-2016 are fully searchable in the University of Oregon Libraries’ wonderful Historic Oregon Newspapers database. Multnomah County's own Gresham Library has an archive of the Gresham Outlook going back to 1911; librarians there can help you search, or you can get help from a librarian by phone, chat or email.

If the deceased person you’re looking for lived outside the Portland area (even if they died in Portland or in Multnomah County), look for an obituary or death notice in their hometown paper

If you’re not sure what the name of that newspaper was, or even if there was a newspaper in print at the time, the next step is to ask the public library in the town where the deceased person resided. Oregon public libraries of all sizes are listed in the Oregon Library Directory. If you need to find a public library in a town outside Oregon, ask us for help the next time you’re at the library, or ask a librarian by phone, chat or email!

 


Do you want to learn more about family history research with obituaries? My colleague Kate S. walks you through some of the basics in her post on Obituaries 101.

Or, call or email a librarian to get personalized help with your obituaries-related questions. If you’d rather have face-to-face help, ask the librarian on duty the next time you visit the library.  We're always happy to help!


 

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