What to expect with hybrid learning

two students sitting outside of school on steps, looking at schoolwork, with masks on

School is once again changing for many of our kids. Some will be returning to Modified In-Person Learning either part-time or full-time, while others will continue with Comprehensive Distance Learning that will most likely look different. We tried to pull together some resources to help families know what to expect with this new hybrid learning and help support you through this time. 

Here are some great general ideas for Helping Your Child Prepare for Hybrid put together by the Anne Arundel County Public School district in Annapolis, MD. They include things like:

  • Re-establish predictable bedtime and mealtime routines (because if your family is like mine, those have gone right out the window!)
  • Be ready for behavior changes (just like adults, changes cause stress and stress can lead to some not-so-flattering behavior)*
  • Focus on the positives (something we all can try and do!)

And the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds has put together ways to support kids and teens in “Returning to the Classroom During COVID-19,” including helping them with:

  • Fitting in at school after a year away
  • Health and safety for kids and teens who might be nervous about catching the virus
  • Catching up academically

Looking at things locally, Oregon Public Broascasting’s (OPB) Education Reporter Elizabeth Miller has written a number of articles about schools returning to in-person. Including this one titled, “Here’s how hybrid will look for Portland Public Schools students.”

Local station KGW has put together “Frequently asked questions amid plans for reopening Oregon schools” and made a video about what returning to school looks like in Portland. And here are all their recent stories regarding schools in Oregon. 

Multnomah County put together an extremely helpful COVID-19 Teen Guide To Returning To Class.

If you like Podcasts, we highly recommend checking out All in My Head Podcast 3. Online School: How are we coping? This episode features teens giving their take on online school and mental health. 

And we recommend this article for parents and caregivers on Managing Your Own Anxiety During School Reopening.

And here is specific information from all the school districts in Multnomah County (who knew we had so many?!):

And Student Health Centers are now open at Centennial, David Douglas, Parkrose, Roosevelt and Reynolds high schools, for kids 5-18. Student Health Centers are like doctor’s offices and offer comprehensive primary and mental health care services to all Multnomah County youth. There are no out-of-pocket costs.

If you have questions about finding the most up to date information regarding your child’s school we can help. Please contact the library for assistance.

*If you'd like to read more on change, and how to help support your family through change, please check out our article on "Talking with kids about change."

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

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