Signs that say Hope and Despair.When you are seeking help, it can be overwhelming to figure out where to start. This is a selective list of social service organizations and places that offer housing, shelter, mental health counseling, escape from abusive situations and other basic needs for people who are homeless, jobless or going through personal transitions. If you have any questions or need assistance finding services, contact us and we'll be happy to help!


When in doubt, start here: 211info

211info is a comprehensive support hub for referrals to food, shelter, housing, foreclosure assistance, health care, and much more. Calls are confidential, anonymous and free. Certified Information and Referral Specialists assess the situation and refer callers using a locally managed database of over 4,200 programs in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Telephone interpreters are available for help in more than 150 languages. Dial 211 from any phone; text your zip code to 898211; send an email to help@211info.org; or search resources online.


Other resources:

Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare
Cascadia provides mental health counseling for people with psychiatric and substance use challenges.  They provide crisis intervention, addictions treatment, and housing services for people who are very low-income.  Their website includes addresses and phone numbers for services as well as links to additional resources outside of the area.
 
Multnomah County Mental Health & Addictions Services
Provides mental health services to adults, children and families. They serve Oregon Health Plan members as well as people who have no insurance or resources. Their Mental Health Call Center is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week; call 503-988-4888, 800-716-9769 (toll free) or 503-988-5866 (TTY). Clasping hands; link to Northwest Pilot Project.
 
Northwest Pilot Project
Provides housing and other supportive services for seniors ages 55 and older who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.  Find housing, transportation help, advocacy and referrals to other resources and services. NW Pilot Project recommends calling 503-227-5605 before coming in.

Outside In
Outside In is a community resource for homeless youth.  They provide health services, counseling and shelter, as well as programs and education.

Portland Women’s Crisis Line
Offers 24 hour telephone crisis counseling for victims of domestic and sexual violence; call 503-235-5333 or 888-235-5333.  The organization also offers support groups and direct service counseling for victims of domestic violence and childhood sexual abuse.

Rose City Resource
Street Roots publishes this very comprehensive online directory of services for people experiencing homelessness and poverty in  Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas counties.  It is continuously updated.
 
Smiling woman; link to Transition Projects website.Transition Projects
This organization can help with a variety of services including housing, showers, food box vouchers, clothing, laundry services, Tri-met tickets, information and referral and housing search assistance.

 

When the days get long and the house gets stuffy, Mother and two children smiling.there are lots of opportunities for you and your family to get out and be entertained without taxing your wallet!

Jump, climb, ride and play. Bring your kids to some structured and supervised playground programs all over the county. The City of Gresham and Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland are hosting field games, arts & crafts, free lunch and more with Summer Kids in the Park. Many Portland parks will also have organized sports, games, crafts and food with Playgrounds in the Park/Area de Juegos en el Parque. Safely bike and walk the streets of Portland all summer long during Sunday Parkways. Check out the variety of parks in Portland, Gresham, Troutdale, Fairview and Wood Village.

Saxafunky to symphonic. Enjoy live classical music performed by the Portland Festival Symphony and Chamber Music Northwest. The Portland Parks & Recreation summer concert series gives you opportunities to experience exuberant Baltic brass at Ventura Park, cumbia and salsa at Fernhill Park, Caribbean grooves at Kenton Park, and much, much more. Discover local music at Music on Main Street in downtown Portland. In Gresham, get down with the Music Mondays summer concert series. Cathedral Park Jazz Festival celebrates its 35th anniversary, while the Washington Park Summer Festival showcases opera, taiko drums, and soul. And don't miss all ages music festival PDX Pop Now!

Make a sLittle girl playing in splash pad.plash. Dive into free open swim hours at pools or run through some splash pads all around Portland. Cool down at the Gresham Children's Fountain or at one of Portland's four interactive fountains.

Pass the free popcorn. Big Hero 6 for the little ones, Field of Dreams for the grown-ups, The Princess Bride for everyone, not to mention Napoleon Dynamite, Captain America, Russian films, documentaries, and more; The Portland Parks & Recreation movie series has an outdoor movie for you!

All the world’s a stage. The Original Practice Shakespeare Festival will be performing The Merry Wives of Windsor, A Midsommer Night's Dreame, Richard III and other plays all over town, while Portland Actors Ensemble is presenting Macbeth and The Taming of the Shrew in multiple parks.

Get festive with your neighbors. There are so many free neighborhood celebrations in the summer months! Hang out at street fairs in Alberta, Belmont, Division/Clinton, Fremont, Gresham, Hawthorne, Lents, Mississippi and Multnomah Village. Experience art at the Gresham Arts Festival and Art in the Pearl; celebrate the LGBTQ and allied communities at the Portland Pride Festival and Parade; create green spaces at the Green Neighborhoods Festival; celebrate your and others' culture at India Festival and Festa Italiana. Two children, their pet rabbit, and a giant library card at the Portland Pride Festival.

Free meals. School is out, but that doesn’t mean kids stop being hungry. No child (ages 1-18) will be turned away from receiving free lunches at locations all over the area, including the wonderful Midland and Rockwood Libraries. Find a location in your neighborhood and check out some other food assistance resources.

But wait, there's more! 211info has a great list of low-cost summertime camps and activities. Most Portland Rose Festival events are free. Check out the Portland Parks & Recreation Summer Free For All website and the Metro calendar. See what's going on at your neighborhood library (always free!). Read the library's blog entries on free art and free museums. Check out the PDX Kids Calendar and the urbanMamas calendar to see what free events are coming up in the city. And don't forget to sign up for Summer Reading to earn books, toys, or coupons for local businesses. (Grown-ups, there's a summer reading program for you, too!)

You face a lot of challenges when you are transitioning back into the community. The library can help you find resources to help you deal with those challenges and get back on your feet. Londer Learning Center teacher shares a poster; link to Londer Learning Center.

You are not alone.

MercyCorps Northwest’s Reentry Transition Center provides a variety of services, including helping with immediate needs like clothing, meals, and access to phones and Internet. The center also helps ex-offenders work towards long term goals of education, employment and driver’s license reinstatement.

Londer Learning Center is the only adult education program in Oregon working exclusively with adults in transition from jail, prison and treatment programs. They offer GED classes, job search assistance, and apprenticeship preparation for construction trades and connections to apprentice training programs like Constructing Hope. SE Works also has several programs for community members leaving jail or prison who are looking to re-enter the workforce or improve their job skills.

Pathfinders of Oregon program Parenting Inside Out has been specifically designed to provide support for parents who are on parole and probation.

For other social services, contact 211info.org by dialing 211 or texting your zip code to 898211 to start a live conversation.

Your library card gives you access to so much.

Take advantage of free computer classes, assistance for job seekers, personal finance information, and resources for parents, not to mention books, ebooks, movies, and audio on any subject you can imagine. And you can always contact a helpful librarian with any question -- even if you don't have a library card, we're glad to help you!
 

When it seems like the rain is never going to stop, don’t despair! Whether your tastes run more towards Portland puppets or Troutdale trains, Multnomah County has no shortage of fascinating and quirky museums that won’t cost you anything. (Check the links for updated hours and contact information.)

Whimsy. Revisit the toys of your (or your grandparents') childhood at Kidd's Toy Museum. And if your pipsqueaks are pleading to ponder a plethora of puppets, perhaps Ping Pong's Pint Size Puppet Museum is your pleasure.

Safety. Witness the evolution of fire fighting at The Safety Learning Center & Fire Museum. You also might find the Portland Police Museum rather arresting.

History. We love that the Gresham Historical Society museum is housed in an original Carnegie library! Not to be outdone, the Troutdale Historical Society has three museums: The Barn Museum, The Harlow House, and The Rail Depot. And don’t forget, the expansive and amazing Oregon Historical Society is free to all Multnomah County residents; just be sure to bring a proof of residency that includes photo identification.

Miscellany. Check up on medical history with the fascinating exhibits in the Main Library of Oregon Health & Science University. If you're interested in "the art and industry of the cast letterform," then the Museum of Metal Typography is definitely your type. Then float on over to the Lincoln Street Kayak and Canoe Museum to learn more about indigenous small watercraft and suck up some cleaning history at the Vacuum Museum at Stark's Vacuums.

Free Museum Day Portland and Portland on the Cheap both have information about when paid admission museums might cut you a break. And for more on free and not-free-but-still-great museums definitely check out the Hidden Portland website, which was an invaluable resource for this blog post!

P.S. More in the mood for an art gallery ? Check out Rainy Days, Part 1: Free Art.

When it seems like the rain is never (ever) going to stop, don’t despair! Multnomah County has a lot of hidden art to see that will get you out of the house and won’t cost you anything.

The area’s colleges and universities are a treasure trove of free art galleries! Here are links to some all over town:

Government buildings are a great place to see rotating exhibits, usually by local artists. Experience interactive and experimental media installations in the Portland Building Installation Space; visit the art gallery in the Gresham City Council Chamber Foyer; and check out the current exhibition at Central Library’s Collins Gallery.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council has a searchable database of public art around the county. (Tip: Click on Advanced Options to search by Collection and Discipline.)

View work by local photographers at Blue Sky Gallery, originally founded as the Oregon Center for the Photographic Arts.

Learn more about contemporary art in the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s Resource Room. It is both an archive and library, housing over 3,500 artist publications, magazines, and audio and video recordings, as well as a video archive of performances and lectures presented by PICA over the span of the organization's history.

But wait, there's more! Check out Rainy Days, Part 2: Free Museums!

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