Book bundles at Midland
Whether your preschooler needs more picture books, you'd like a stack of DVDs to binge or materials to support your schooling, or you're looking for reading recommendations, we're here to help.

Contact us in the way that works best for you. There are several ways you can ask for a bundle of books or material. 

  • Many libraries also have pre-made bundles at the door, or displayed in the windows. The next time you stop by for a hold pick up appointment, ask library staff what is available at your branch.
  • If you'd like reading recommendations, tell us more about what you like through our reading suggestions form. You can provide your library location and library card if you'd like the suggestions placed on hold for you. You can also check out our My Librarian page if you'd like recommendations from someone who shares your reading interests.
  • Para solicitudes en línea de materiales en español, haga contacto a través del servicio de "Mi Bibliotecaria".
  • Are you a teacher or educator in Multnomah County? You can ask for booklists and materials through School Corps
  • Looking for ideas for your book group or multiple copies of a title? Try Pageturners To Go or use the reading suggestions form to tell us more about what your group needs.
  • You can always contact us by phone or online, and we can direct you to staff who can answer your questions.

Find phone service in your language:

¡Estamos aquí para ayudar! - 503-988-5123

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Мы всегда готовы вам помочь! - 503-988-5735

Chúng Tôi Sẵn Sàng Giúp Đỡ - 503-988-9936

 

 

  1. Ross Gay has written both poems and essays. What are the different approaches an author might take in considering how to capture their thoughts?  Why might one idea make a better essay than a poem?
  2. View or listen to Ross Gay reading a poem or essay. Consider how the author’s experience as a poet informs his writing of essays; how does hearing the pieces read aloud by the author change your experience of the reading? If you listened to the audiobook, what did you like about Ross Gay’s narration?
  3. Consider how slam poetry, music and hip hop influences might show up in both the written language and Gay’s reading aloud from The Book of Delights. 
  4. In chapter 71,  Gay returns to the subject of sta
    tues armed with guns that he first mentions in chapter 9. Over the summer of 2020, statues in public spaces were the focus of controversy. What do you think of Gay’s assertion that all new statues should have in their hands “flowers, or shovels, or babies, or seedlings…”?
  5. Gay often uses a direct, conversational writing style. Why do you think he employs this style? How does it make you feel when the writer addresses you directly? 
  6. “I’m trying to remember the last day I haven’t been reminded of the inconceivable violence black people have endured in this country.” (p. 16) Discuss Gay’s ability to overlap themes of systemic racism, delight and kindness, loss and sorrow, often in the space of one essay.
  7. Ross Gay often finds delight in the smallest of objects: a flower thriving in a sidewalk crack, or two people sharing the work of carrying a bag. How does attention to these small details add to Gay’s overall themes? 
  8. What role does humor and tragedy play in Ross Gay’s observations. How does he juxtapose the two for greater effect?
  9. One interviewer pointed out that the essays in The Book of Delights often feel like journal entries. As a reader, how did you feel about the personal tone of the writing? Would you have enjoyed the book more or less if the writing adhered to a more traditional essay format?
  10. Gay seems to take pleasure in ritual or routine (one example being the journaling exercise about "delight" which led to the book). What are some rituals that bring joy to your life? 
  11. Even though The Book of Delights isn't poetry, Gay is a poet and the writing is very poetic. Who is another poet (or writer, or speaker, or singer, or rapper) whose words bring you delight?In Chapter 38 Ross mentions an interaction with a flight attendant calling him “Baby.” Have you had delightful interactions with strangers? What made it special?

Assignment: Find something that delights you and share it with a friend or loved one. Bonus points: take a photo of the delight and post it to social media, using the tags #DailyDelight #EverybodyReads #RossGay @MultCoLib (Twitter and Facebook) @multnomahcountylibrary (Instagram) @PDXLibraryLove @LiteraryArts 

Every year, we create a beautiful page of the best books of the year -- the ones our staff and volunteers have loved. Whether you're a fan of picture books that celebrate bravery, suspense stories that keep you guessing, or guides to making the most delicious food, we have you covered.  There are many great picks for Spanish readers, too. 

Check out all of our favorite books for 2020. 

Want to see what we've recommended in past years? Explore the links below:

Best Books 2019

Best Books 2018

Best books 2017

Best Books 2016

 

Do you read Facebook or Twitter for news? Subscribe to a newspaper? Peruse websites, or watch videos? In an era of so many choices for information, how do you make a judgement about what's fact, what's slanted and what's just completely untrue? 

Here are some tips for evaluating what you are reading, listening to or viewing.  

  1. Consider the source. You can learn more about a website by clicking on the "About Us" link  that most provide, but don't stop there. Research the organization or author's credentials. If statistics are cited, see if you can find the source, and double-check that they are represented correctly.  
  2. Read beyond attention-getting headlines to check the whole article. If a statement is made, is a source given? Click through to check the sources, and do your own searching on those citations.
  3. Check the date. Sometimes old news stories resurface, and they might be out of date or inaccurate. If currency is important, limit your search to recent results
  4. Watch for bias, including your own. Check different sources to see how each treats a news item. Consider your own beliefs and perspectives and think about how that might change how you perceive what you are seeing. 
  5. Too weird to be true? If something seems implausible, see what fact-checking sites like Snopes, PolitiFact, and FactCheck have to say. 

For more about being a smart information consumer, check out the infographic, "How to Spot Fake News", provided by The International Federation of Library Associations. If you're more of a visual learner, take a look at the CRAAP test video from librarians at California State University. If you'd like to engage in some deeper learning, try this 3 hour online course, Check, Please!

And remember, if you're looking for reliable information, get in touch with us. We're always happy to help.

 

Cindy and her dog, Maddie
Cindy Hiday is the author of Iditarod Nights, a Library Writers Project book that has recently been published in partnership with Ooligan Press. 

People love dogs! What inspired you to write about the Iditarod Sled Dog Race in particular?

I became hooked on the sport when I read Race Across Alaska: First woman to win the Iditarod tells her story, by Libby Riddles and Tim Jones. I'm drawn to stories about women who are courageous under pressure, as Libby Riddles certainly was when she found herself exhausted and caught in a blizzard during the race. When I read about a local woman who put her career on hold to train and compete in the Iditarod, I had the spark of an idea for my heroine in Iditarod Nights. For a time, the research consumed me. I discovered there is so much more behind the Iditarod – from its early beginnings to its present-day sport – than most people realize. I admire the veteran mushers, their dedication and how they put their dogs' wellbeing ahead of their own. And I fell in love with the dogs! They are amazing athletes; the sheer joy in their expressions when they're hooked up to a sled is thrilling!

Are there common themes you find yourself drawn to in your writing and the books you read?

My author brand is writing in the spirit of adventure and happy endings; that's my promise to my readers. The more challenging and seemingly impossible the adventure, the better. There has to be character growth beyond what the character believes themselves capable of. And even though I put my characters on an emotional rollercoaster, there is always a happy outcome. I want a story, whether one of my own or someone else's, to leave me with a good feeling. I'm not genre-specific in what I write or read. To date, I've published three contemporary romances and a humorous adventure novel. If it's a good story, I don't care if it's a romance or western or sci-fi/fantasy. I just finished reading Nora Roberts' dystopian series Chronicles of the OneI'm a huge Stephen King fan, especially his Dark Tower series and Christine, and Whiskey When We're Dry, by John Larison, knocked my socks off!

What can readers expect from Cindy Hiday next?

My current work-in-progress, Come Snowfall, takes place in 1880's eastern Oregon and is about a twelve-year-old girl who discovers how far she's willing to go to save her family. My husband and I went camping near Baker City last summer to research the area where my story begins, near the Elkhorns and Wallowas, and we visited the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. It's beautiful country, and it has been fascinating to learn about the history of that era, the pioneering west. I hope to have the book finished by the end of the year.

Who inspires you in your life?

Resilient people. People who find the silver lining or a solution to a challenging situation. People who don't know the meaning of the word "can't"; And kind people. Something as simple as a smile from a stranger can brighten my entire day.

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