A phishing website or email is a scam to trick you into revealing personal information by appearing to be from a someone or an organization you know. 



Phishing is a game as old as time. Call them hackers, social engineers or bad actors — just new names for the huckster, the hustler, the confidence man. Smooth talkers who manipulate people into parting with their hard earned money, then disappear.

Legitimate agencies rarely ask you to send sensitive information through email or text messages.

It’s probably phishing if:

  • There are spelling and grammar mistakes
  • The language is urgent or threatening
  • The message asks for personal information, such as social security number, bank account number, your mother’s maiden name
  • It’s too good to be true


What if I’m unsure about an email?

  • When in doubt, delete it.
  • Do not reply.
  • Do not open any attachment.
  • Do not click on any links.
  • Hover your cursor over links to see the true address
  • If you know the sender, reach out to them by phone or text to ask if this is a valid email
  • You can report suspicious emails and phishing scams to your email providers, or to phishing-report@us-cert.go

 

Want more info on phishing? Check out these videos:

Phishing in a Minute: Decoded
E-Safe Phishing Cartoon

And of course, your library has hundreds of books to arm yourself with.

More topics to keep you safe online

Children with little or no preschool have the hardest time starting kindergarten. And their parents may be unsure how to help them.

The Early Kindergarten Transition program helps these families tackle the challenges kindergarten will bring. It’s held before school starts, over two to three weeks in late summer.

A kindergarten teacher leads a class for the kids each day during the program. Once or twice a week, parents attend a class, too. They learn what to expect from school and how to help their kids succeed.

The library has been a dedicated partner in these parent education classes ever since Portland Public Schools started the program seven years ago. The program today includes 43 SUN schools in six districts. Multnomah County librarians are active at all of them.

We model reading aloud to kids with an interactive storytime, and we introduce parents to the library and all the ways we can help — such as homework help, English classes, family programs, and books in their native languages.

This year, in addition to partnering on parent education classes, the library provided about 2,000 gently used books for child care locations at every site. (Child care is provided during parent education classes.)

We also signed up people for library cards and Summer Reading, and gave a free book to each of roughly 600 families.

From one PPS educator: "I know all of our parents that attended the library session were happy about our librarian. I myself enjoyed her way of reading the book to children  — showed us how easy it can be to read to any child. Everyone enjoyed all the takeaways from that session."

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