​This is a tale of two Patti(e)s.

The Patti(e)s I’m referring to are Pattie Boyd and Patti Smith, authors of ​Wonderful Tonight and ​Just Kids. Recently I listened to both books on cd and discovered that one of these things is not like the other.

Both have musical ties, both of the audiobooks are read by the author, and both authors are named Patti(e). That is where the similarities end however.  Wonderful Tonight has been on my list for years because who doesn’t want to read about the woman who inspired songs by both George Harrison and Eric Clapton? I thought she must be pretty great, a woman of mystery and substance (and if you would like to keep thinking that, you may want to stop reading now). 

cover image of wonderful tonightWonderful Tonight (co-written by Penny Junor) is a retelling of events and it reads as a boring list of dear diary entries. Very British Empire as in: I grew up in Kenya, my mommy and daddy didn’t get along, after my parents divorced we were very impoverished (read—no maid), 1960s England was very revolutionary and I began modeling, then I met and married George Harrison of the Beatles, then his friend Eric Clapton fell in love with me and I left George for Eric. Both marriages ended, we did a lot of drugs, I didn’t have children, the end. 

​Yawn and stretch. cover image of just kids

Just Kids in comparison, is like reading poetry (or listening to it rather). Patti is able to paint a vivid, yet gritty picture of New York City in the 60s and 70s. She too, runs into many famous characters of the day (artists, musicians, poets), but hers is a story of the underdog. She created herself and she is able to retell what she endured, how she grew as a person, and how her friendships formed her in such a way that doesn’t romanticize and is quite beautiful. 

​I choose punk poet laureate over muse everytime.  


cover image of world hotels and white elephants

cover image of anne sexton love poems

cover of walking in rainI found a single remaining copy Of Walking in Rain by Matt Love on the shelf of a coffee shop in Manzanita. It was high summer, but I couldn’t resist its pull, the feel of the paper, the promise of reading it on a rainy day in autumn. There was no price tag and the cashier seemed baffled as to what to charge. I had a $20 bill in my pocket and offered that. A signed copy for $20? Done.

It sat on my bookshelf the rest of the summer. And it was an unusually hot, long, and dry summer too. By the time the rains came and leaves began to change colors and fall, it was November. At last. Historically I have been a sun worshipper, but have long had a love affair with rain. Especially stormy downpours. The sun brings out the super efficient doer in me, while the rain gives me a reason to take a breath, pause, reflect.

This is Matt Love’s contemplative musings on rain. Will it make you a lover of rain?

Notes to Mr. Love:

p.s. Counting Crows have some of the best rain songs around and none were mentioned.

(Raining in Baltimore and Amy Hit the Atmosphere)

p.p.s. Also, I carry an umbrella and refuse to feel guilty about it.










cover image of the life changing magic of tidying up
The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up...this was the first book I finished reading in 2015. I am a very organized and tidy person by nature and so am not the intended reader, but just the same, I love reading about organizing and simplifying. Also while browsing the pages I saw the words: storage experts are hoarders and I knew that Marie Kondo and I would be fast friends.
The presentation is nice, small little hardback edition, nice to hold, sparks joy. This is the main theme of the book—you should only keep those things in your life that spark joy when you touch them, look at them, use them, think of them.  Wouldn't that be lovely to only have the things in your life that spark joy? She believes you can.
As a reader of these sorts of texts, I didn't come away with any new information, but if you like a good prompting to tidy, this is the one.