We have specific health needs at each stage of our lives. Websites aimed at new parents won’t give you the health information you need as you’re getting ready to retire! As a senior, where can you find quality health information online?

MedlinePlus is full of high quality health information. Try the About Your Health box in the middle of the home screen. Click the Seniors tab for links to health information related to arthritis, exercise for seniors, Medicare, and more.MedlinePlus

NIH Senior Health is another great resource. This site is aimed at people over fifty. You can easily increase the text size and screen contrast to help if you have vision problems.

NIH Senior Health contains health topics, like complementary health approaches. It also has categories, such as healthy aging and memory and mental health.

The site also contains a collection of videos. For example: Surviving Cancer or Participating in Clinical Trials.

The Administration on Aging links a many resources in one place. The site lets you search for resources and information locally. The ElderCare Locator helps you find information in your area on a specific topic, like Alzheimer's, long-term care, or transportation services.   

Locally, the Senior Health Insurance Benefit Assistance Program (SHIBA) helps with any kind of question about Medicare and Medicare benefits. You can call for individual counseling about coverage, eligibility, comparing plans and choosing a Medicare prescription drug plan.

 

Do you have a giant photo that you need to cut down to size? Maybe you have a photo with lots of extra stuff on the borders that you’d like to cut out. Or, perhaps you’ve got a tiny little photo that you’d like to make bigger. In any of these situations, you there are a number of free online tools to help. Here are two.

PicMonkey

PicMonkey is free, but if you want to, you can pay for a subscription that will give you access to more features and no ads.

Start

  1. Go to http://www.picmonkey.com/

  2. Click Edit a Photo

  3. Upload a photo from your computer or flash drive, or choose a photo from your Dropbox, Flikr or Facebook account.

  4. Default option is Basic Edits


Resize

  1. Click Resize

  2. Either enter the pixel size you want to use, or check the Use percentages box to shrink or enlarge your photo.

  3. Check the Keep proportions box to avoid stretching your photo.

     Be sure to click when you’re done.


Crop

  1. Click Crop

  2. Choose an option from the drop-down menu. No fixed proportions will allow you to change the shape of the photo. Other options will let you easily make the shape what you want.

  3. Change the size of the photo here, or crop it first and then resize.

  4. Drag the grid for more control.

Be sure to click when you’re done.


Save

 

  1. Click Save at the top of the screen. 

  1. Choose a file name.

    1. Choose

      1. Roger: Poor quality, small file size

      2. Pierce: Good quality, medium file size

      3. Sean: Great quality, large file size

    2.  the quality image you want:

    3. Click Save to my computer or use the arrow to choose to save to Dropbox.

     

    Google

    Google also offers a few ways to resize your image, using Gmail or Picasa, both of which are free, but require a Google account. Picasa also allows you to crop your image.

     

     

    Quick! What’s the commutative law of addition?

     

    Can’t remember? It just means you can add numbers in any order and get the same result.

     

    2 + 3 = 5

    3 + 2 = 5

     

    You may have learned this concept in school. You probably remember the rule, but the name may have slipped your mind.

     

    Why does this matter? Maybe you’d like to help your child with homework, or perhaps you’re going back to school and need to take a math placement exam.

     

    A great place to brush up on old math skills (or to learn new ones) is The Saylor.org Foundations of Real World Math course.

     

    The course is free. It uses videos from Khan Academy and portions of College of the Redwoods’ Pre-Algebra Textbook, 2nd edition and Denny Burzynski and Wade Ellis’ Fundamentals of Mathematics.

     

    The course is made of seven units. It covers basic math concepts, like the commutative law of addition, and advances through negative numbers, percentages, ratios and graphs and charts. The goal of the course is “not just to help you learn basic algebra and geometry topics, but also to show you how these topics are used in everyday life.

     

    Elizabeth Blackwell - first woman physicianLadies! Your health issues are different from those of the males in your life. Luckily, there are lots of resources around to help you learn more about your health.  

    Did you know that the Food and Drug Administration has a page devoted to women? You can find information about medicine and pregnancy, heart health and women (did you know that women can experience the signs of a heart attack in different ways than men?) and much more.

    The National Institutes of Health includes an Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH), which partners with the other 27 National Institutes and Centers to “ensure that women’s health research is part of the scientific framework at the NIH—and throughout the scientific community.”

    The ORWH has partnered with the National Library of Medicine to create a women’s health resources portal that links to many resources, including information for women veterans, the ORWH’s Primer for Women’s Health, alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse resources, information on exercise and fitness, and much more.

    Womenshealth.gov is a site created by the US Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health (OWH). Follow the OWH blog for up to date news and thoughts on womens’ health, search for information, or browse health topics A - Z. This site is also available in Spanish.

    OWH also maintains a site for girls ages 10 - 16. At girlshealth.gov, girls can learn about health, fitness, nutrition, bullying, and more.

    MedlinePlus, the National Institute of Health’s consumer website, is a great place to go for health information. The site contains a wealth of information about women’s health, including information on specific conditions, stages of life, prevention, and more. The site is also available in Spanish, and contains information about women’s health in Chinese (traditional) and Korean.

    Multnomah County has a women’s services page, too, as well as a pregnancy resources page.  

    Holding HandsBecoming a caregiver is a life-changing event. Maybe it starts gradually, with a bit of household help now and again, or maybe it starts with the sudden shock of a phone call in the night. Whatever your situation, take heart in knowing that you are not alone. A wealth of resources is available to support you.

    Multnomah County

    When you don’t know where to turn first, the Multnomah County Aging & Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) Helpline is a good place to start. Information and assistance is available to seniors, people with disabilities, and caregivers 24 hours a day. Call 503-988-3646 Monday - Friday, 8am-5pm, to reach the most knowledgeable staff. Through this same number, you can contact the Family Caregiver Support Program, which offers services that can take some of the burden off unpaid caregivers.

    Elders in Action is another great local resource. Through their Personal Advocate Services, trained volunteers help older adults and link individuals to community resources. They focus in the area of housing, healthcare, crime, and elder abuse. Personal Advocate volunteers assist older adults in Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington counties.

    Oregon

    The Aging and Disability Resource Connection is a resource directory for Oregon families, caregivers, and consumers seeking information about long-term support and services. Here you will find quick and easy access to information about resources in your community.

    National

    The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) knows that caregiving can be overwhelming. Through their Caregiving Resource Center, you can connect with caregiving resources both local and far away. Topics covered include Planning & Resources, Benefits & Insurance, Legal & Money Matters, Care for Yourself, Providing Care, Senior Housing, End-of-Life Care, and Grief & Loss. Caregiving Tools include a Care Provider Locator, a Long-Term Care Calculator, and even a Caregiving Glossary.

    Caregivers for persons with Alzheimer’s and dementia face special challenges. The Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver’s Center can help arm you with the information you need to handle those challenges, whether you’re facing them now or need to be preparing for the future. Also through the Caregiver’s Center, you can locate local support groups, which can become an indispensable source of information and emotional support.

    The Family Caregiver Alliance provides information on all aspects of caregiving, from public policy and research to practical tips on caregiving. Fact sheets on multiple issues are available in English, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

    Caregiver’s Magazine is an online magazine for, about, and by caregivers. Here you will find first-hand stories of others’ caregiving journeys, as well as an online bookstore and tips on resources and strategies.

    There are 65.7 million family caregivers in the US--29% of the adult population--and caregiving affects the whole family. The National Alliance for Caregiving is a non-profit coalition of over 50 national organizations focused on family caregiving. The organization identifies new trends and sheds light on the varying needs of caregivers nationwide.

    Caregiving is challenging enough when Mom is next door. What if she’s in Chicago? Or Boston? Having an ally on the ground to help you assess the situation can be exactly the extra bit of assistance you need to make sure that all goes well. The National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers can help you locate a professional Geriatric Care Manager, a health and human services specialist who helps families who are caring for older relatives.

    If you’re a primary caregiver, or if you’re coordinating care at a distance, no doubt you know what it’s like to feel as if you don’t have enough hands, or enough hours in the day, to do everything that needs to be done. Lotsa Helping Hands harnesses the power of community and links it through an online service to provide help when it’s needed. You can create your own community and ask for help, without having to make a dozen phone calls or feel that you’re putting friends on the spot.


    Finally, don’t forget to take care of yourself! The stories of other caregivers and how they’ve handled their challenges may give you the ideas you need to take care of yourself.

    Contributed by jennyw

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