Image of man holding a laptop while standing next to racks of cannabis plants
Oregon has been at the forefront of the legal Cannabis industry and Multnomah County Library has several resources to help entrepreneurs or those considering a career in the Cannabis industry.

Industry Research

You can find articles in newspapers and magazines available through the library to do research on the cannabis industry. Gale Business: Entrepreneurship has business plans, directories and articles. The Business Collection and Regional Business News are resources to find articles from a variety of newspapers and magazines. Business Source Premier provides articles as well as company and industry profiles. The library also subscribes to the magazine High Times.

The library has books that can help you get started too. We’ve created a helpful list of titles that you can access here.

Licensing and Regulations

Several state and local agencies will also be important to know about. Multnomah County requires cannabis related businesses to register with them. The City of Portland Cannabis Program oversees licensing in the city. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission is the state agency for licensing for cannabis businesses and workers and provides more information in the Business Readiness Guidebook for OLCC Marijuana Operations, while the Oregon Department of Agriculture oversees such things as water safety and pesticides. Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board oversees licensing in Washington.

Advocacy, Connection and Education

Many organizations exist to help with advocacy, education and connection to others in the business. Nuleaf Project is a Portland based organization “working to build intergenerational success for Black and Brown people through the legal cannabis industry”. The Oregon Cannabis Association provides networking events and workshops. The Oregon Entrepreneurs Network provides connection and resources to cannibis businesses. Oregon NORML and Oregon Retailers of Cannabis Association both provide advocacy for legislative policy change.

Several national organizations may also be helpful. This is our Dream is a socially inclusive digital cannabis space that centers minorities and includes a comprehensive state-by-state guide on available government supported social equity resources. The NCIA: National Cannabis Industry Association also has many resources as well as a State Policy Map. The library also has many resources for getting a small business started. Read more about them here.

Image of woman in a hardhat reading building plans on a construction site
The construction industry is growing and is projected to create many jobs for skilled employees. Have you been considering getting a job in construction or a similar trade? Here are some ways you can get started!

Check out these facts and projections about the construction and laborers field from the Occupational Outlook Handbook including pay, training requirements and work environment.

Portland Community College offers Trades and Construction training through their On-Ramps to Trades program and a Pre-Apprenticeship Career Pathway program.

Oregon Tradeswomen helps women build careers in the trades industry through education and training. They also provide support and advocacy for women in the trades. Contact them online or by phone 503.335.8200

Constructing Hope provides education and skill building in the construction industry. They primarily service People of Color, people transitioning from incarceration and low-income adults. They also have youth programs. For more information contact them online or by phone 503-281-1234.

Worksource Portland Metro can help guide you through career planning navigation with resources and coaching. Create an account online to get started and connect to services.

Image of woman sitting on a couch working on a laptop. A man and child are next to her drawing at a table.
Work from home jobs have always been popular, even before the pandemic. But despite exciting promises, many work at home offers can leave job seekers high and dry. Scams and dishonest claims abound on the Internet and it can be hard to tell an honest job offer from a scam.

Below we list steps you can take when searching for remote work to protect yourself from scams. You'll also find ways to find legitimate work from home opportunities.

Steps to spotting a scam

Trust your instincts. Does the offer seem too good to be true? Are they offering you a six figure salary for minimal skill or effort? Can you find no information about the company or the owners? Then the job offer is likely a scam. Be wary of providing any personal information to these websites or companies as they may be selling your information.

Don’t pay to work. Legitimate employers do not require fees or investments as a condition of employment. If they ask for money up-front, with the promise that you’ll make it back many times over, it may be a scam. According to the Federal Trade Commission, “promises of a big income working from home, especially when the ‘opportunity’ involves an up-front fee or giving your credit card information, should make you very suspicious.”

Take time to learn about the company. If there’s little available information about the company and the people who work there, that’s a red flag that the job offer is not legitimate. You can look up company information on sites like Better Business Bureau or Glassdoor to make sure the company offering the job has a good reputation.

Keep your information private. Websites that require you to give personal information before applying for a job could be selling that information to third parties. Research the website/company before signing up for an account. You can do so by searching for the company name and “review” in a search engine.

Tips for finding remote work

Know where to look. Because more jobs are becoming remote due to the pandemic, large job search sites now have the option to filter jobs by both industry and work from home offers. Try Indeed.com, Google Job Search and Zip Recruiter to find jobs in a large range of fields.

Update your resume. Remote work takes additional skills that you will want to showcase in your resume. This article on LinkedIn will give you a solid foundation of actionable steps you can take to make your resume remote work ready.

Get social. Recruiters and companies are increasingly turning to social media sites like Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram to promote their job openings and look for candidates. Take a look at your social media accounts and consider creating a professional profile separate to your personal account. Follow companies in your industry on social media and share or comment on their posts to add to the conversation. Also make sure to follow local business/industry groups in your field, it’s a great way to network and keep an eye out for job openings.

We’re here to help. The library offers free classes on creating resumes, searching for jobs, using LinkedIn, updating your skills and more. Check out our event calendar for our current classes.

Contact MCL’s Workplace for more help or information at workplace@multcolib.org.

The Business Plan

The first step in starting a small business is a business plan. Use Gale Business: Entrepreneurship for full access to the Business Plans Handbook. There you will find general templates as well as examples of plans for hundreds of specific businesses. As you create your business plan, other resources listed below may be helpful. The other sections below will help you build your business plan with library resources.

Industry Research 
ABI-INFORM will allow you to research key elements of an industry and find overviews, opportunities and trends to help determine your business strategies. Mergent Intellect and Mergent Online are databases with access to private and public U.S and international business data, facts and figures, and industry profiles. Business Collection is a place to find articles on management, finance and industry information.

Marketing
Use SimplyAnalytics to find out more about your consumers and your competition and create reports and maps to compare data and hone in on target areas. Linkedin Learning (formerly Lynda.com) can help you with courses on marketing and other business skills. ReferenceUSA is a resource for creating mailing lists and learning about businesses that already exist in a particular area. 

Facilities and Location
SimplyAnalytics can help you research locations for your business by showing you maps and reports with demographics of your customers and where your competition is.

Administration and Management
Use Business Source Premier and Business Collection to find articles about starting and managing a small business including management, finance and industry information. To learn skills to better manage your business, try Linkedin Learning and explore learning courses on topics like business, software, technology, and more. 

Personnel
Linkedin Learning  has courses to learn about Human Resources (HR) and other aspects of hiring and managing people. 

Financial Planning
Find video courses to learn about finance and accounting for your small business using Linkedin Learning . Research articles about finance in the Business Collection.

You may also find these local community services helpful:
Business Xpress Start up Toolkit and Starting a Business in Oregon - Basic steps and requirements from the State of Oregon.
Portland Small Business Administration - “provides counseling, capital, and contracting expertise to entrepreneurs and small business developers”.
Portland SCORE (Service Core of Retired Executives) - Get connected with an experienced mentor at no cost. SCORE also has free workshops and other resources. 

Resource: 

Are you trying to create a resume but don’t know where to start? Then check out the LearningExpress Library’s Job & Career Accelerator. Use this resource to build your resumes and cover letter, find a career match, search for jobs and more! 

Do you already have a resume and cover letter built but need a second pair of eyes to review it? Live Homework Help from Tutor.com can do that! At Tutor.com you can submit your resume and cover letter for review and they’ll get it back to you in as little as 12 hours. 

Now that you have a resume and a cover letter, do you need the right job to submit it to? Then go to Glassdoor and search millions of jobs and get the inside scoop on companies with employee reviews, personalized salary tools, and more! 

Need help getting started with any of these resources? We are here to help

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