Blogs:

7 Reasons Your Grant Proposals Are Being Rejected

  1. You don't write for your audience.
  2. You aren't proofreading enough.
  3. You aren't thorough enough.
  4. Your proposal contains too much fluff.
  5. You have a goal but no plan.
  6. You aren't providing enough data.
  7. You are using unreasonable budgets.

Read the entire article at Non-profit2point0.com!

Professional genealogists say you start your family tree with YOU. You find the records for YOUR birth, for YOUR education, YOUR travels, YOUR relationships and family AND your photos.

Do you need a copy of your birth certificate? a marriage or divorce record? a death record? If you were born in the United States or one of our territories, you can find the sources for these records at Where to Write for Vital Records.

When you are doing genealogy on other people in your family, if the event (the birth, marriage, divorce, death) occurred in the U.S., this will help you find out where the information you need may be found (and costs associated with obtaining it.)

As you look through your papers, the family file cabinet, the attic or other storage places for your records, keep an eye open for documents that will help you know where and when the important life events for other family members occurred.

If you find information for other family members, ask their permission to copy it. You will be able to use it as you move on to research the generations before you.

 

 

Nutrition is an important component of a healthy lifestyle. On this page we have gathered some resources to help you learn more about diet and nutrition for you and your family.

Organizations are often a useful resource for information. The National Dairy Council, The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and Oldways: Health Through Heritage, are all examples of organizations from which you can find lots of current, practical information about what to eat! For instance, Oldways provides recipes based on cultural traditions and heritage. Their mission is to support eating as a family and cultural heritage, and to promote the "old ways" of eating. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) has a section for the public that offers articles about eating right for healthy weight, allergies, and other conditions. The National Dairy Council also offers recipes as well as a special section on child nutrition.

Many general health and medical web resources include nutrition information too. MedlinePlus, one of our favorite all purpose health sites, includes a section on food and nutrition. The Mayo Clinic, a well-respected medical institution, offers a section on healthy living which includes articles about nutrition and healthy eating. Nutrition.gov is a comprehensive resource for nutrition information for all members of the family and includes everything from medical information to shopping, cooking and meal planning.

The library subscribes to databases of journal and newspaper articles that focus on specific topics, such as health. Health and Wellness Resource Center is one of the most "user-friendly" databases. Type a search term into the box, or choose from a selection of tabs to find what you need. Alt Health Watch focuses on non-Western medicine, including articles that discuss diet and nutrition. Health Reference Center Academic has a nice subject guide search to help you find articles about diet or nutrition (and any other health or medical subject).

Enjoy browsing some of these consumer friendly resources about nutrition and diet and then check the library's catalog for some great books we have on these topics.

The library's film collection consists of entertainment and nonfiction DVDs and Blu-rays on a wide variety of subjects. Documentaries, educational films, instructional videos, short films, and DVD re-releases of feature films and television series are all part of the collection.

Searching My MCL for a DVD

My MCL makes searching DVDs easy:

  1. Go to My MCL and search for a title, actor, keyword, etc.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Format on the left side of the screen.
  3. Click the checkbox next to DVD in the format menu.

Screen shot of search for a DVD

Searching My MCL for a Blu-ray

  1. Go to My MCL and search for a title, actor, keyword, etc.
  2. Click on the arrow next to Format on the left side of the screen.
  3. Click the checkbox next to Blu-ray Disc in the format menu.

Movie night ideas

Use these lists to find something for movie night:

As always, if you don't find what you are looking for, you can ask a librarian.

It's said that history is written by the winners but many stories go untold, especially when they concern women. It's lucky for us when authors choose to highlight unfamiliar stories of accomplished women.

Take the recently released Eighty Days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland's History-making Race around the World, by Matthew Goodman. I had a vague notion about Nellie Bly buried somewhere in my brain - 'a reporter, wasn't she?' - but I knew nothing more. As it turns out, she entered journalism at a time when the only role for female reporters was to contribute to the society pages. In a bold move to show her editor that women could do hard-hitting journalism, she volunteered to go undercover, and be committed to the notorious women's asylum on Blackwell's Island. Bly reported that if one wasn't insane when committed, one would most certainly lose one's sanity in the horrendous conditions on the island. Her work resulted in improvements to the facility and better care for inmates.

A good reporter can never rest on her laurels though, and so in 1889, Bly set out to race around the world in 80 days or fewer to see if the journey that Jules Verne imagined in Around the World in 80 Days could be accomplished. What she didn't realize was that a rival paper decided to make it a race by sending the young Elizabeth Bisland around the world in the opposite direction.

Goodman's book is a great chase by ship and train across many countries. The excitement of the race is nicely balanced by the historical detail, and satisfies the curiosity while reading like a novel.

There are many more suprising histories about women and their accomplishments, focusing on people like Hedy Lamarr and Gertrude Bell. Take a look at the accompanying reading list for more.

"Mom! I had a scary dream and now there's a scary noise!" (This from the child who sleeps with a giant plush albino python named Night Demon, aka Deathy.)
 
The clock reads 3:33 a.m. as I blearily think of horror movies and hope the walls aren't oozing. In Child the Younger's room, I sit next to his bed and prepare to activate my supermom extrasensory bat hearing to detect the noise. It turns out I can hear it just fine, no bats necessary. It is high-pitched and repeats steadily, something between a squeak and a wheeze. Sort of what I imagine a bat might sound like, drunk and asleep in front of a tiny bat television.
 
The noise is originating from the large cage in the hallway which houses our three pet rats. The Girls (as we refer to them collectively) are piled together inside their fleecy hammock, asleep.
 
They are snoring.
 
Blerg! I have all manner of Liz Lemon expletives for them as I reach in and gently jostle their bed to interrupt the noise. They poke their little faces out in my direction and blink their sleepy eyes at me, showily yawning in a ratty version of "What the what?"
 
By the hammer of Thor, after all this middle-of-the-night waking and yawning and walls that are decidedly not oozing (thank Thor), we all deserve some good movies that will not inspire another sleepless night. Something to wake us up, pick us up, make us believe in a future with much stronger coffee but not so strong as to induce nasty heart palpitations. Here are the movies of dreams gone right and wrong that have earned my attention lately:
 
First Position: Six serious young ballet dancers from five continents participate in the Youth America Grand Prix, a prestigious competition that could transform their lives overnight. Follow the progress of some amazing and talented children and teens as they compete with eyes wide open for places in the high-stakes international world of professional ballet. Even if you don't care one bit about ballet, the stories of these dedicated kids and their families will mesmerize you.
 
Mariachi High: This program documents a year in the life of Mariachi Halcon, a top-ranked competitive high school mariachi band in the rural ranching town of Zapata, Texas. These passionate teens and their devoted teacher will make you want to cheer as they pursue excellence and find strength in themselves and each other.
 
The Queen of Versailles: The riches to rags story of a billionaire and his wife seeking to build the largest house in the United States until the economic downturn flips the family fortune. Show up for the schadenfreude, stay tuned for the unexpected bits of compassion and insight that lend a surprising balance to what should be (and, yes, mostly is) an unmitigated train wreck of greed.
 
Dream away.

Has your child asked you “Where do babies come from?” yet?  Are you prepared to answer that question?  I was a bit unprepared when my 4 year old son asked me recently.  He saw a woman nursing her baby at the swimming pool and ever since then he has been fascinated by the human body.  I felt that I was only able to give him a cursory answer, which spurred me to check out the library for books.  I found some to read to him and others to help me answer his questions the best I could.  If you have found yourself in this situation with your child or are just preparing for it ahead of time, please check out the attached list for some books I found to help me.  Good luck addressing what can be a touchy topic for parents.

Did you know that librarians are experts at making book recommendations? Our library staff have compiled lists of great books for everyone in the family - on many subjects.

If you want more information, or a personal recommendation, ask a librarian online or at your local library.

I spent most of last year reading non-fiction books for teens as a member of a booklist committee.  It was interesting and, for the most part, enjoyable. I learned a whole lot about the Titanic, Steve Jobs, the Civil Rights movement and rufa Red Knots, among many other topics.  When I finished up my work in late January, I started casting about for books written for adults, and found some new titles on the Lucky Day shelf.  
 
In Me Before You  by Jojo Moyes, Louisa loses her waitressing job when the 'Buttered Bun' closes and has a heck of a time finding a new one that doesn't involve dead chickens or tricking old people into buying something they don't need.  So when a job opening appears for a daytime companion to a thirty-something quadriplegic man, she decides to apply. It's a six month appointment, so if things don't go well, at least she knows it's only for a short time.  Will is not particularly easy to get along with, but as the weeks go by, they develop a quirky kind of relationship and suddenly six months seems like much too little time.  A publisher's representative told me that this was the best book she'd read in a while and although I'm not sure it will be the best book that I will read in 2013, it was a pretty good start.
 
I feel like I'm pretty aware of what's forthcoming in the publishing world, so I was a bit surprised to find two books on the Lucky Day shelves that I hadn't heard of, especially because they were by authors I usually enjoy.  Maeve Binchy died in July 2012, so presumably A Week in Winter is her last book, unless, like V.C. Andrews, she'll be writing from the grave.  It's classic Binchy with a wide cast of characters coming together for a week at a newly opened seaside hotel.  Each chapter tells the story of one of the guests, and all the stories dovetail at Stone House Hotel.  
 
Anne Lamott's latest foray into faith and spirituality is Help, Thanks, Wow: The Three Essential Prayers.  It's slight in pages, but large in spiritual concepts, although I felt like I'd heard pretty much the same thing in Lamott's previous books.  Still, I can never hear too often how people struggle with big challenges and still manage with a little help from their friends, including the "big entity upstairs", especially when it's dished out with Anne Lamott's signature humor and humanity.
 
If you're hankering after something new, check out the Lucky Day shelves.  You might be surprised at what you'll find!

In addition to the usual places to search for your next gig, government employers feature new opportunities on these sites:

  • The Multnomah County government notes all open positions, including jobs with the library. 
  • The City of Portland's Employment Center is a great resource for learning more about employment with the city, including internships and workstudy opportunities.
  • Portland Development Commission has a page for job and internship seekers.
  • Metro Jobs is the place to browse current job openings at Metro, the Oregon Zoo and the Metropolitan Recreation Exhibition Commission.
  • The State of Oregon has a useful page which includes links to city, county, state and federal government job pages.
  • USAJOBS is the Federal Government's official one-stop source for Federal jobs and employment information.
  • Government Jobs is a handy government sector job board showing openings in many different agencies. 
  • Port of Portland is the place to go for jobs at the airport, marine facilities, industrial parks and more.

Also, don't forget that Multnomah County Library locations offer computer labs and other resources for job seekers

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