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Where do you go to find a new doctor, or health care professional?  How do you know if your doctor is licensed or board certified?

Here are some resources to help you find information about health professionals.  These tools allow you to search in a variety of different ways - by physician name, by geographic area or by medical specialty.  You can find a doctor's education and training, area of specialty, licensing information, and even malpractice claims.

The Oregon Medical Board licenses physicians and other health professionals such as acupuncturists.  On this site, you can look up a physician or other healthcare provider,  and find out when they were licensed, if their license is active and if they have malpractice claims filed against them.   Be sure to read the information about what constitutes a claim against a physician.

DoctorFinder, sponsored by the American Medical Association, is a physician locator.  It also provides basic professional information on amost every licensed physician in the United States, including doctors of medicine and osteopathic medicine.

DocFinder from AIM, the Administrators in Medicine,  sponsors this site from which you can search for physicians anywhere in the United States.  This list is only as complete as those State Boards that make the information available, however.

MedlinePlus, from the National Library of Medicine offers a comprehensive list of directories on its website.  You can locate a physician by specialty or by geographic area.  You can also find organizations for almost anything medical or health related.  Organizations can be a good resource for information too.  For instance, the American Headache Society has a page to help you locate a headache specialist?

Remember to always evaluate the information you find on the Internet and use websites you trust when researching medical information!

 

Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons The author of this biography, Thomas Nast The Father of Modern Political CartoonsFiona Deans Halloran, has written a fascinating book about the complex and controversial work of Thomas Nast, whose cartoons portrayed the political and social events of 19th century America. "Nast’s work marked an important transformation of political cartooning. Before the Civil War, cartoonists’ work relied on dialogue rather than imagery. To Nast, the picture became the message: text commonly was relegated to a caption or appeared in the picture as a broadside. Many historians call him the father of modern American political cartooning. His work remains in the first rank of that genre, expressive and passionate." -from: Simpson, Brooks D. "Thomas Nast." American National Biography (2010):  Biography Reference Center.

An interesting sidenote in the American National Biography is that there is no complete collection in a library or archive of the papers of Thomas Nast other than three volumes of "scrapbooks" of his cartoons in the New York Public Library. The most complete record is in the periodicals that originally published his cartoons.

Infinite Jest; Caricature and Satire From Leonardo to Levine
Infinite Jest: Caricature and Satire from Leonardo to LevineThe drawing for this bookcover is part of a series titled Collection of Grimaces, lithographs from 1823-1828 by the french painter Louis-Leopold Boilly, who began the set with exaggerations and contortions of his own face. Infinite Jest is the catalog of an exhibition last year from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, featuring works of the Museum's collections from 1590 to the present.  The book explores the varieties of intent of these images: as simple caricatures and forms, as visual satire, and as weapons to mock the political and social power of celebrities and political leaders. The website for the exhibition features an interesting short introduction about the history and artists whose works are included in the catalog.

For more on caricatures and political cartoons in art,  take a look at the booklist sampler of titles from Central Library. You can place holds for delivery to your closest neighborhood branch. 

Millions of consumers get health information from magazines, TV or the Internet. Some of the information is reliable and up to date; some is not. How can you tell the good from the bad?

First, consider the source. If you use the Web, look for an "about us" page. Check to see who runs or sponsors the site: Is it a branch of the government, a university, a health organization, a hospital or a business? Focus on quality. Does the site have an editorial board? Is the information reviewed before it is posted? Be skeptical. Things that sound too good to be true often are.  Is the site current and has it been updated recently?  Scroll to the bottom of the page for update information.  Is the information factual or does it represent opinion?   You want current, unbiased information based on research.  And finally, ask who is the intended audience of the site—is it consumers like us, or health professionals. 

As you look through the following material about evaluating health information specifically, you will realize that you can use the same criteria to evaluate other information you find on the Web.  Think about bias when you are looking for consumer reports about a product;  think about currency of information when you are evaluating the purchase of a computer;  and think about sponsorship and authority of a site if you are trying to find a lawyer.  

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/evaluatinghealthinformation.html
MedlinePlus offers an overview of evaluating health information and also provides links to more articles to help you find reliable, authoritative health information.

http://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/evaluating_health_information/

University of California San Francisco provides this overview of criteria to use when judging the reliability of health information, including red flags to watch for.

http://www.mlanet.org/resources/userguide.html

The Medical Library Association provides this comprehensive article about finding and evaluating good medical information and includes a selection of “Top 10 Most Useful Consumer Health Sites”.

If you look through the Library catalog for books about chairs, Bookcover: The Chair: Rethinking Body, Culture, and Designyou will find a whole array of titles about the history and design of chairs for interiors. However, this book has a different focus; it is more of a sociological tour through the chair as familiar object and how it affects us on an everyday basis. As compared to the Library's other books about chairs, this book is mostly text, with few images. The small black and white images are in a resolution that only allows them to be used for basic identification of styles, nothing more. The text, however, is entertaining, generally humorous and conversational, with advice about why chairs can be uncomfortable and how the ergonomics could be improved.

Quote: "Without a doubt, their effects are profound. What is true of the chair is true of all the artifacts we create. We design them; but once built, they shape us. As sitting in chairs spread to the common person over the centuries, it left its mark on the human body and human consciousness. The chair offers a glimpse into our collective ideas about status and honor, comfort and order, beauty and efficiency, discipline and relaxation. As our ideas change, so do our chairs." - from the introduction to The Chair, by Galen Cranz.

Want to impress your friends by serving them that delicious crab and mango salad from The Heathman menu? Need help replicating the flaky, crispy crust that ring the pies at Ken's Artisan Pizza? Ready to try cooking with Caprial? Then this is the blog post for you. Check out these great cookbooks that offer recipes from some of Portland's favorite chefs.

 

 

Savor Portland Cookbook offers recipes from over 25 area restaurants including several James Beard Award winners and Stumptown stalwarts including Papa Haydn's, Saucebox, Veritable Quandry, Paley's Place and Higgins. A culinary glossary and a list of sources for hard to find ingredients will help guide your dishes to success. You can preview the book here

 

 

 

Few can do comfort food better than Lisa Schroeder, the chef behind wildly popular Mother's Bistro and Bar. Chicken and Dumplings, Pot Roast (oh, that pot roast!), Meatloaf and Mac n' Cheese are some of the delicious homestyle plates offered at Mother's. Lisa has shared over 150 of her fabulous recipes in Mother's Best: Comfort Food That Takes You Home Again.

 

 

 

If you've never eaten one of Ken's Artisan pizzas, or croissants, or walnut bread, raisin bread, brown bread, or a brioche bun, or.....sorry, I got lost daydreaming for a minute there! Well, if you haven't yet tried one of these delectable treats, you must go grab one of his out-of-this-world creations. Go ahead, I'll wait. Okay, see what I mean? This man knows dough! And he's sharing his secrets with us in Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast.

 

 

 

Caprial and John Pence have been feeding Portland for the past seventeen years, first from their Sellwood Bistro and now at Supper Club and by teaching cooking classes at their Chef's Studio or in your own home. If you want to try making some classic cuisine that is sure to please, check out Caprial and John's Kitchen: Recipes for Cooking Together.

There has been much tragedy in the news lately and consequently, much talk about how we prevent further tragedies. One topic we are hearing a lot about involves gun control, and today the Senate will be voting on the current gun control measure in Congress. We hear from gun control advocates, we hear from gun rights activists - there are a lot of opinions and facts out there - and it can be overwhelming. But the library is here to help.

We have an amazing resource called Congressional Quarterly Researcher (or CQ Researcher*) that consists of weekly reports written by experienced journalists on current issues. Each report includes an overview, background, data tables, images, opposing viewpoints and bibliographies, and features comments from experts, lawmakers and citizens on all sides of every issue. The different topics they cover are varied, and one of the most recent reports was on gun control*, published in March of 2013 . Whether you are doing a report for school, preparing an op-ed piece for your local paper, or just staying well-informed, CQ Researcher is an excellent first step.

Also see this recent post titled Gun rights and gun control, which includes a reading list.

And as always, if you want to dig even deeper, Ask a Librarian! We're here to connect you to the information you want and need.

* Note: you will need your valid Multnomah County Library card number and PIN to access this database from outside the library

If you have diabetes, diet and exercise are key to controlling the disease. Learn how following a meal plan and engaging in regular physical activity can help you manage your diabetes.

For more on specific exercises for older adults, check out Go4Life®, the exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging (NIA).

The information on Diabetes was provided by NIHSeniorHealth and developed by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health.

 

I read a lot of books last year and kept a little list as I finished each one and gave them a point rating.  As the year closed I sorted them by rating looking for some really good titles I hadn't yet recommended. I finished out last year with the Grey Walker series by Kat Richardson.  Set in modern day Seattle, the series features Harper Blaine, a P.I. who develops the ability to move through the Grey after dying for a couple of minutes and being revived.  The Grey is the the realm of ghosts, vampires, witches, and magic that exists between our world and the next. Aside from this ability she's a very human and real-feeling character.  

Harper is possessed of human flaws and foibles.  She's touch too self centered: at one point when she has someone gunning for her, she hides out at the house of friends who have a little child.  She does keep trying though, and learns from her mistakes eventually. The secondary characters are also well-developed.  I'm really looking forward to seeing what happens to a certain major secondary character whose background and family history has been gradually revealed.  (I fear giving out the secondary's character name would be too much of a spoiler for early books in the series.) Sadly, now I've got to wait until August 2013 for book 8.  This is now one of my top ten favorite urban fantasy series.

Speaking of character driven urban fantasy, I'm currently enjoying the second season of Alphas.  In the short first season the viewer is introduced to a small group of characters who all have super-human ability, and a shrink who is studying/helping them.  None of the characters strike me as being very likable but they're all so very interesting that watching the unfolding story was one of my viewing highlights last year, not counting Game of Thrones of course!

Bridging Cultures is dedicated to promoting understanding and mutual respect for people with diverse histories, cultures, and perspectives within the United States and abroad.  Its most recent effort is the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf, a collection of books, videos and other resources  addressing both the need and the desire of the American public for trustworthy and accessible resources about Muslim beliefs and practices and the cultural heritage associated with Islamic civilizations.  

Another feature of the Bookshelf collection is access to a library resource tool, Oxford Islamic Studies Online (OISO).  With your library card number and PIN, use this resource to access thousands of reference entries, chapters from scholarly and introductory works, Qur'anic materials, primary sources, images, maps, and timelines. This resource provides a first stop for anyone needing information and context on Islam.

The Bridging Cultures Bookshelf: Muslim Journeys is a project of the National Endowment for the Humanities, conducted in cooperation with the American Library Association. Support was provided by a grant from Carnegie Corporation of New York. Additional support for the arts and media components was provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

When faced with a blank page, how do you begin a new writing project? Sometimes just getting the pen moving or keyboard clicking feels like the toughest aspect of creative writing.

Writing prompts or exercises can help you create an entry point into your work, provide a little momentum, and release the pressure of the scary expanse of white page. Whether you’d like to write a novel, short stories, poetry, memoir or other nonfiction, you have to start somewhere.
 
There are some great books that offer advice about the craft of writing, advice about the writing life, as well as offering prompts to get you started. A few web resources also offer writing prompts, including Poets & Writers magazine and LitBridge.
 
Of course, writers and other artists find inspiration in all sorts of places. Perhaps a visit to browse the shelves at your favorite library will turn your eye to something that makes you want to write!

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