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Throughout downtown Portland outdoor public artworks enliven the spaces we walk through. The Regional Arts and Culture Council, a sponsor of Portland’s public art collection, has published a guide to artworks along the Transit Mall, available in the downtown Trimet Ticket Office in Pioneer Square. If you are interested in learning more, Central Library's collections of books, exhibition catalogs, and online sources, such as the Oregonian, offer more in-depth background information and stories about these works and the artists who created them.

"Ring of Time" Bronze sculpture by Hilda Morris Standard Plaza at 1100 SW Sixth Avenue Portland OR photo: Beverly StaffordFor example, “Ring of Time" is a monumental sculpture along the Transit Mall, at the entry to the Standard Plaza building, 1100 SW Sixth Avenue.

The Central Library book Hilda Morris, published by the Portland Art Museum, includes full page color plates of many of her sketches and completed works, with biographical commentary and essays by Bruce Guenther, Susan Fillin-Yeh and David C. Morris.

Quote: “Introduced to the mathematical figure of the continuous one-sided surface of a Möbius strip by her son David, as she was developing the various maquettes for the project, Morris recognized a perfect way to animate the sculpture while creating a work of great visual stability and weight.” p. 24 from the book Hilda Morris - by Bruce Guenther, Portland Art Museum, c. 2006

 

A 1975 chart of Yaquina Head to Columbia RiverWhat is a nautical chart?

To someone who has not been at the helm of a vessel, a nautical chart might look like nothing more than an oddly detailed water map.  To a boater, a nautical chart is much more than a “road map” of the water.  Instead of roads it details water areas, ports, and coast lines; it also includes information about depth of the sea floor, obstructions, restricted areas, recommended routes, and aids to navigation such as lights and buoys. The main purpose of a nautical chart is to give boaters up-to-date information to avoid grounding or traveling in restricted waters, and to navigate safely for themselves and the vessels around them. 

Where can I find current navigational charts?

The United States Office of Coast Survey (USCS) has been producing nautical charts for more than 200 years, ever since President Thomas Jefferson asked for a survey of the coast in 1807. The USCS has made and maintains over 1,000 charts at varying levels of detail that cover all of the U.S. and U.S. territory coastal waters and the Great Lakes. These charts are conveniently available online for viewing and downloading. They are free of charge and regularly updated.

To find a particular nautical chart, start at the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Charts for U.S. Waters Online Chart Viewer. From the Online Chart Viewer you can select a region to view or navigate using the Graphical Catalog. Also available are BookletCharts for printing to help recreational boaters locate themselves on the water.

The Graphical Catalog shows the outlines of charts that are available on a basic geographical map. As you click on a chart, information to the right of the map show you the coordinates for the selected point as well as the Chart number, panel number, and scale of the chart selected. When you zoom in on an area, more detailed charts with larger scales become available to select. The name of each nautical chart is listed below the map as a Panel Title, as well as the date of the most current edition. Each nautical chart is available to be viewed online, downloaded as an RNC (Raster Navigational Chart), or ordered as a paper chart. In addition to finding nautical charts by browsing the map, you can also find nautical charts by entering the coordinates of the location you are seeking.

In addition to these current nautical charts you can also find nautical charts to view at the library by searching for cruising atlas in the online catalog.

Chapman Nautical Chart No. 1 by the U.S. Coast GuardDid you know that nautical charts may have more than one compass rose printed on them?

A compass rose shows both the true North in the outer circle and the magnetic North in the inner circle, and the difference between the two is called the magnetic variation.  It is important to always use the compass rose nearest the area for which you are plotting directions. For detailed guidance on how to read a nautical chart, check out How to Read a Nautical Chart by Nigel Calder or Chapman Nautical Chart No. 1 from the U.S. Coast Guard.

What did nautical charts and maritime maps look like in the past?

In addition to modern nautical charts, the USCS also has beautiful and detailed historical maps and charts available on their website. Other recommended historical resources are The Charting of the Oceans by Peter Whitfield (an overview of Europe’s charting history) and Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor by Hali Felt (in the 1950s, Marie Tharp turned her husband’s records of sonar pings measuring the ocean’s depth into illuminating maps of the ocean floor that proved for the first time the theory of continental drift).   

Finding these charts can be complicated! If you have any questions, do not hesitate to Ask a Librarian.

The NOAA website includes this note: Use the official, full scale NOAA nautical chart for real navigation whenever possible. These are available from authorized NOAA nautical chart sales agents. Screen captures of the on-line viewable charts available here [on NOAA's online chart viewer] do NOT fulfill chart carriage requirements for regulated commercial vessels under Titles 33 and 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 

Viking. Woman. Explorer.
The Far Traveler Book JacketWhen you think of Vikings, perhaps you envision a grim-faced man in a horned helmet, wielding an axe as he stands at the prow of a longship, long hair streaming in the cold wind, mind set on pillage and plunder. But how accurate is this image? What about Viking women - did any of them go along with the men on these voyages? And what did Vikings do when they weren’t raiding or exploring?

My interest in all things northern recently led me to read The Far Traveler by Nancy Marie Brown, which answers these questions and more. It’s a fascinating look at the life of Gudrid, an Icelandic woman who traveled far indeed, from Iceland to Greenland on a harrowing voyage in which half the crew died, then further to the distant continent of Vinland, and in later life to Rome. The book jumps from describing modern-day excavations in Iceland to bits of the ancient sagas (I loved hearing about the brothers, known for their tight pants, who took over as the local ruffians after Eirik the Red got kicked out of Iceland). By combining archaeology with literary evidence, a compelling case emerges that Vinland was in North America, and that Gudrid was there.  As she follows Gudrid’s story, Brown also reveals much about life in Iceland and Greenland around the year 1000. If you ever wanted to know how to build a turf house that will stand up to an Arctic winter, this is the book for you. Some of my favorite parts were details about Viking food, such as bone jelly soup and bog butter. How tasty! I also enjoyed the description of the fuzzy tufted cloaks the Icelanders were fond of for their warmth and rain-shedding abilities, and which they liked to dye… purple?

For more fact and fiction about Iceland and Greenland in the times of the sagas, take a look at the list below.

As I’m sure you all already know, NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration) had declared that this week is National Aerospace Week!  Which means it’s time to indulge in some of my favorite things:  Music, frogs, geodesic domes and home cooked meals.  I guess we should add outer space to the list as well.  But first, a word from Carl Sagan about our Pale Blue Dot.  It’s totally worth the minute and a half.  I’ll wait for you.

Ready?  It has been an exciting time at NASA leading up to this week.  It is time again for the Harvest Moon for those of us on Earth and out in space Voyager 1, which launched in 1977 and is older than me, has officially left the building (and entered interstellar space), the Q&A here brings up some interesting points, like how you can’t get rid of those old computers, because the new ones don’t understand what Voyager is sending back.  And the newest member of family, the LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) left Earth for the Moon with some unintended frog assistance:  

LADEE and Frog Launch

But in spite of all these events and their ongoing efforts to increase awesomeness around (and above) the globe, not all the news for NASA has been cheery lately.  Even while working in partnership with private ventures, the reality is that the Space Shuttles have been retired and the NASA budget, like most government agencies, has shrunk in the last years.  (The video is from 2009, but covers the issues quite well.) 

But there is plenty to still study and dream about.  New types of vehicles are being created, new inventions will be added to the list of thousands that are already are a part of our lives, and work for a mission to Mars is underway.  (Including, but not limited to how to cook for long space missions.  Hint: pack tortillas.)

And what do the minds at NASA do when they aren’t being officially awesome?  The make music videos of course! Not only can you watch the obligatory parody, a group from the Jet Proplsion Labratory helped create this merging of science and rock and roll that we will cap our Aeronautics Week!

Want more?  Ask an astronaut... I mean a librarian!

The story of this country is the story of people coming and going, but mostly coming. The very concept of America has captured the imaginations of millions, among them writers, artists and bloggers. I was reminded of the amazing pastiche of people who have come here after looking at artist Maira Kalman's latest on her blog The Pursuit of Happiness. In "I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door", Kalman takes a long view of the history of this country, beginning with Leif Ericson and ending with a trip to a cemetery in the Bronx, where the diminutive immigrant Irving Berlin is buried, the one who gave us the line "heaven, I'm in heaven...".

New York is a fine place to start if you want to hear stories about outsiders and newcomers. A recent trip there inspired me to read, watch and listen to everything I could find about the city. Intrigued by the Tenement Museum in the Lower East Side, I searched for some fiction of that era and discovered Up From Orchard Street  by Eleanor Widmer. It's a 'slice of life' story about a family living in a crowded apartment in 1920's Manhattan and trying to make ends meet by running a restaurant out of their front room. A earlier and grittier portrayal of immigrants is the movie Gangs of New York. Though Scorsese took artistic liberties in describing the rivalries between immigrant gangs, he did draw from the book of the same name Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld, by Herbert Asbury, first published in 1928. Be sure to watch the extra footage provided on the DVD if you're interested in the environs of 1800's Lower East Side.

A recent album by Steve Earle, who himself 'immigrated' to Greenwich Village from Tennessee, celebrates his adopted home. Washington Square Serenade includes several love letters to the city. "Down Here Below" tells the story of Pale Male, a red-tailed hawk who took up residence near Central Park and became a media darling. Another song rejoices in the diversity of NYC: "I've no need to go traveling; open the door and the world walks in, living in a city of immigrants."

According to the AARP Foundation, across the United States almost 5.8 million children are living in grandparents’ homes, with more than 2.5 million grandparents assuming responsibility for these children. Grandparents are often isolated in their endeavors; they report a lack of information, resources, and benefits to successfully fulfill their caregiver role. Armed with these statistics and anecdotal evidence from community members, I gathered a team of staff members to figure out a way the library could celebrate these grand families. The team agreed on a simple mission statement to direct our efforts: it is through the infinite wisdom and experience of their elders that children learn the unique cultural and familial values that help them grow into valuable contributors of the community. After meeting with different agencies and groups across the County, we saw a unique need the library could fulfill--a space where grandparents could share their stories. Our goal was a series of programs that would highlight a variety of methods of storytelling. Grandparents, Grand Stories was born. 

 

We began with storytelling through film. In partnership with MetroEast Community Media, Midland and North Portland libraries hosted media camps for teens and their grandparents. Our internal tag line for the media camp was simple and spoke to the team’s main objective: “You are a Storyteller, Come Share Your Story.” We wanted grand families to feel empowered to share their voice with the community. Each participant also had the added bonus of learning great technology skills. Jennifer Dynes, Education Director at MetroEast Community Media, reflected on the experience:

As a filmmaker, I learned so much by working with the families of the Grandparents, Grand Stories media camp. Sure, there were the usual lights, camera and action. Of course each participant learned about lighting and audio and interview technique. But when I look back on this camp, I recall a summer filled with more than basic filmmaking workshops. I recall a summer filled with laughter, stories, new friends and revelations about the experiences that make us who we are. In meeting these families and hearing the stories each person told, I glimpsed the connections that we all have with each other.  Families are the fabric that holds us together, and grandparents are often the weavers of this fabric. I am humbled  by the commitment and deep love that I saw each grandparent display to their grandchildren, both in action and in words. I hope that I can carry this lesson to my own family and one day live up to their example.  And I am proud to help bring these stories to you.  

The other forms of storytelling the team chose to focus on were storytelling through music, dance, spoken word, and written word.  Throughout the month of September look for other Grandparents, Grand Stories  programs at a location near you.

AARP fact sheet

See more videos from participants
 

Hazard Diamond displays typesWith Syria in the headlines and talk of red lines, air strikes and diplomacy swirling, the issue of chemical weapons seems to be on the mind.  And even as news outlets are reporting that the Syrian government might have agreed to give up its chemical weapons I find myself wondering what it is about them that frightens us in a way other weapons don’t.

 

Chemical weapons is an umbrella term for a set of chemicals ranging from LSD to Ricin to Mustard Gas that do all sorts of different (and terrible things) to people.  While I conjure images of World War I when I think of chemical warfare (the first mass use was at the Battle of Ypres) its use has been around much longer stretching back Roman times and to an archeological site in, of all places, Syria.  And even after they are banned in 1925 by the Geneva Protocol there is Napalm from the Vietnam War and Anthrax laced letters lurking in our more modern history. 

World War I soldiers wearing gas masks

I suppose part of the reason chemical weapons frighten us so is that it is indiscriminate, works far beyond (and long after) the control of those who release them and can be the work of very few people.  Perhaps it is because many chemical weapons are substances that have been created or used for more positive uses and have been turned into something terrible.  Or maybe we tend to get anxious around too much science.  Or that gas masks are scary. 

From Doctor Who, The Empty Child

Whichever it is, I’m going to go home, hug my puppies and hope for the best.

 

Need some specific information we haven’t covered? Contact a librarian and we’ll be glad to help.

book and e-bookYou’ve written something, and it’s time to publish! Self-publishing isn’t what it used to be - expensive, and often ignored by booksellers. Now you can bring your writing into physical form relatively cheaply, and it can be as glossy and perfect-bound as you like, or if you prefer, hand-stitched and hand-painted. With print-on-demand (POD) services,  you can have one beautiful book printed for a family member or friend, or you can print many to distribute to bookstores. It can also be an e-book - many authors are finding great success with self-published e-books. The avenues to self-publishing are diverse!

Because there are so many options, you’ll want to inform yourself as best you can. Things to consider include:

  • Do you want your book to have an ISBN?
  • How do you plan to market your book?
  • Who is the intended audience for your book?

Check out our booklist featuring books about self-publishing. Many of the books on this list discuss these questions, among others, that you should consider as you plan your self-publishing project.

What follows are just a few of the many resources available for you to choose from as you consider your self-publishing process.

For print-on-demand (POD) publishing, you can choose from a wide range of printers. Some popular POD printers include LuluBlurbCreateSpace (a division of Amazon.com), Lightning SourceIngram Spark (a division of Ingram, a major book distributor), and Smashwords (which publishes e-books only).

There some local resources that might be relevant to your project, too: 

  • Portland State University’s Ooligan Press is a teaching press staffed by students pursuing master’s degrees in the Department of English at Portland State University (PSU). PSU is also the home of Odin Ink, a print-on-demand publisher.
  • Powell’s Books has print-on-demand self-publishing technology in the form of its Espresso Book Machine.
  • Portland’s Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC) is a membership organization with resources and workshops related to printing and book-making. They also have certificate programs in creative nonfiction/fiction, poetry, and comics/graphic novels.

If you’re interested in making contact with a local publisher or association, you might find the following organizations useful:

For advice and news, the Alliance of Independent Authors has an advice blog about self-publishing.

Are you interested in having your e-book available in the library? OverDrive is the service that many libraries, including Multnomah County Library, use to provide access to e-books. Like publishing houses, self-publishers must fill out a Publisher Application found on OverDrive's Content Reserve site. OverDrive has also created a helpful Intro to Digital Distribution pdf for new authors and publishers. OverDrive's public contact info can be found here. If your e-book is added into the OverDrive catalog, you can then suggest that we purchase it.

In your creative work, you may find yourself wondering about copyright law and how it applies to you. We have quite a few books that provide guidance on these subjects - two of these are The Copyright Handbook: What Every Writer Needs to Know by Stephen Fishman and Fair Use, Free Use, and Use by Permission: How to Handle Copyrights in All Media, by Lee Wilson. You’ll find quite a few others under the subject heading Copyright -- United States -- Popular Works.

Have fun, enjoy the process, and feel empowered to get your work into print! As always, please let us know if we can help direct you to books or other resources to help with your project. 

 

 
What is dyslexia?
Dyslexia is an unexpected difficulty mastering literacy skills such as reading, writing, spelling and arithmetic. People with dyslexia have normal or better intelligence.
(Definition courtesy of the Blosser Center.)
 
Identifying dyslexia
“Red flags” to look for – the more you see in yourself or a child, the more likely dyslexia may be present:
Reading: misreads words, avoids reading
Spelling: misspells words
Handwriting: has “sloppy” writing
Math: has trouble with math (such as math facts)
Poor organizational skills
Difficulty telling time
May also have ADD, ADHD
 
Dyslexia Resources in Multnomah County
Provides assessment, tutoring and teacher training.  
 
Advocacy group working to improve public school instruction for children with dyslexia.
 
National organization serving people with dyslexia, their families and communities.
 
Provides assessment and tutoring.
 
Coordinates support groups and family events; provides resources and information.
 
Dyslexia Assessment
Places in the Portland metro area that can evaluate someone for dyslexia:
•Stephanie Verlinden, Children’s Program
•Colleen O’Mahoney, Multnomah Educational Testing
•Cynthia Arnold, New Leaves Clinic, Beaverton

Visiting the Portland Zine Symposium is always exciting - a big room full of zinesters from far and wide, chatting, swapping zines, drawing, and displaying their work. Among the zines on display, there are minicomics, personal zines (aka perzines), works of history, fantasy, art, humor… basically, zines as diverse as the zinesters themselves. This year’s symposium was bursting with exciting new work, and we bought many new titles for the library’s zine collection.

Here are a few of our favorites. Also, check out our blog post about all the food-related zines we found at the Zine Symposium!

That's Not OKThat’s Not Ok: Boundaries for the Conflict-Avoidant by Breanne Boland

A guide to setting boundaries that’s clear, concise, and also fun, interspersed with humor, comics, and drawings.

 

 

Portland Oregon AD 1999Portland Oregon AD 1999 by Jeff W. Hayes

Written in 1913 and beautifully reprinted by Corvus Editions, this speculative story tells of a little old lady who calls upon the narrator to tell him of the vision she’s had of life in Portland in 1999.

 

 

 

Mocha Chocolate Momma: Bessie ColemanMocha Chocolata Momma: Bessie Coleman by Marya Errin Jones

Mocha Chocolata Momma Zine chronicles the lives of black women, real or imagined. It’s part history lesson, part perzine, full of engrossing stories, photos, and illustrations. This issue’s about Bessie Coleman, the first female African American pilot.

 

GrowGrow: How to Take Your DIY Project and Passion to the Next Level and Quit Your Job! by Eleanor Whitney, MPA

From a blurb on the back: “Eleanor Whitney breaks down the daunting process of earning a living as a creative person into chewable, bite-size bits.” With easy-to-digest, step-by-step tips and tangible examples from working artists, Eleanor’s expert advice is some of the most sought-after content on diybusinessassociation.com.” - Amy Cuevas Schroeder, Venus Zine and DIY Business Association

Never Date Dudes from the InternetNever Date Dudes from the Internet: Responses to a Craigslist F4M Ad by Amy

Includes the author’s original posting on Craigslist, as well as all the responses she received. Can you guess which guys she actually went on dates with?

 

PunkPunk by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Golnar Nikpour

A conversation between two lifelong punks about punk and how it’s been defined, studied, and canonized, and the problems and politics therein.

 

Bad Boy Image #1Bad Boy Image #1: Paranormal by Asher Craw, Fiona Avocado, and Moishe

The first comic zine put out by Bad Boy Image, a comics collective consisting of Asher Craw, Fiona Avocado, and Moishe. This issue focuses on stories of the paranormal.

 

Science You ForgotScience You Forgot: An Illustrated Guide to Your Elementary School Science Textbook by Jeannette Langmead

Gorgeous illustrations reminiscent of your childhood science textbooks, including four famous scientists, with facts you may have forgotten. Also includes an experimental cocktail and a pop quiz drinking game because you're a grown up now.

 

Rad Dad #24Rad Dad 24

This issue of the long-running zine about radical parenting focuses on parents sharing hard-earned wisdom with one another.

 

 

Trusty Companion #1Trusty Companion #1 by Katy Ellis O'Brien and Max Karl Key

A charming comic all in blue about a lady space explorer and her robotic trusty companion.

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