Blogs:

Betsy a Library Assistant at the Hillsdale Library is reading Wild Tales: A Rock n' Roll Life by Graham Nash: "I like that he is narrating his own book and the stories behind the songs."

 

Pigsqueak plant (Bergenia cordifolia)Do you need to learn the parts of a flower?  For a start, look at this clear diagram provided by the American Museum of Natural History.  For more descriptions of the flower parts and what they do, investigate "The Great Plant Escape".

 

 

 

 

This interactive flower dissection activity will give you even more practice in sorting and labelling, then will test your knowledge of flower parts.  Once you're on this site, you can start the activity by clicking on OK in the "try this" box (it's not necessary to download).  To reach the quiz, click on "Label" after you've dissected the flower.  This activity includes clear, printable pictures with descriptions of what each flower part does.

Parts of a flower diagram

If you learn well under pressure, you should look at this timed quiz.  You'll notice that some diagrams, such as the one at this site, may include more terms than you'll see on other diagrams.  You can play this game by clicking on "start" (there's no need to download), then begin pointing and clicking to label the parts.  Try it out, and challenge yourself to keep shortening your time!

If you want more information, contact a librarian through your computer or at your local library. 

PDX pop now coverOnce upon a time, I went out to see bands play several times a week, I read Spin (remember Spin?) and I was on top of the local and national music scene. I had friends with encyclopedic music knowledge, and they lavished it on me. Now I’m old and I’m busy, and so are my friends who used to give me the heads up on music they thought I’d like. Babysitters are expensive, and I find that I like to be in my bed by midnight, book in hand. But although I’m not so interested in standing up in a club or music venue for hours and hours, I still love music. I’m especially always looking for new music to energize me as I take long walks around this city. There’s nothing like a new song I’m really into to get me up to the top of MountPDX pop now cover Tabor faster.

A few years ago, I stumbled upon a CD in the library called PDX Pop Now! 2008, and I found that it was just one of a great annual series. PDX Pop Now is a local nonprofit whose mission is to celebrate local music. In 2004, they started having a music festival every year and releasing a CD of recorded music by the artists chosen for the festival. The music is wildly varied and the CDs don't really hang together as albums, but as a tool for finding something new to love right here in your own city, they are unbeatable. I found a band I’ll call Starf***er, who have three whole CDs of music to get me moving. I found Ioa’s song, called “The Boxcar Children”, which unites my love of kid’s literature and pop music ("Henry and Jesse lived under no rules at all in the little red boxcar..."). And there’s a rolicking song called “Let’s Ride” by Andy Combs and the Moth that always gets me up to the top of Mount Tabor really fast. This CD series might just add some excitement to your life as well.

It’s widely known that smoking tobacco is dangerous:  a major cause of lung cancer, chronic lung disease and premature death.  Not to mention bad breath. 

But what about e-cigarettes?  Since you are inhaling only nicotine vapor, they must be safer than tobacco cigarettes.  Right?

It’s actually unknown if e-cigarettes are safe.    Discovery Health has put together ten facts about e-cigarettes that question the safety of the devices.  For instance,  they go unregulated by the Food and Drug Administration and the side effects of inhaling pure nicotine have not been studied.  Despite the unknowns, double the number of teens tried e-cigarettes in 2013 than in 2012, according to the National Youth Tobacco study, summarized by the American Cancer Society.

What about hookahs?  Since hookahs are legal, social, infrequent, and the smoke passes through water, are they healthier than smoking regular tobacco or marijuana?  No, says the Centers for Disease Control.  But, like e-cigarettes, youth are using hookahs at increasing rates, alarming doctors.

This is a topic where I really needed to pay attention to reliable sources.  Though I found many videos extolling the benefits of hookahs and the safety of water pipe smoke, the source of this information was usually a guy filming a video in his garage.  Whenever you look for health or medical information, especially about drugs, think about the reliability of the source and the potential biases of the writer, video host, or organization.  For more on evaluating health information on the web, take a look at librarian Mary B.’s blog entry

As a child, my uncle Mike would pay me 25 cents to say ‘hello’. Once I said, ‘Hello Uncle Mike’ and got a fifty cent piece. I was an extraordinarily shy child, raised by an extraordinarily shy mother. It was a good partnership and suited me well, until I had my own child.  

My unabashedly sociablSoceity of timid souls bookjackete son liked to sit in other parent’s laps at library storytime. He chats up intoxicated passengers on airplanes and is absolutely confident that whomever sits near us at the neighborhood sushi house is dying to see his Lego minifigure collection. All of this sends me into a state of near panic. I’ve often felt that I ought to start a support group for shy and introverted parents of extroverted children. This was on my mind when I came across Polly Morland’s book The Society of Timid Souls: Or, How to Be Brave.  

Polly Morland is a documentary filmmaker and this book reads exactly like the most captivating of documentaries. From meetings of anxiety-ridden concert musicians struggling to overcome stage fright in the 1940s, to interviews with modern military heroes and high line walkers,  Moreland explores the many different forms that bravery can take and how we define it as a society. What struck me most however, was the idea that some forms of bravery may be practiced and learned. I'm unlikely at this stage in my life to undergo training to fight a bull and let’s just forget about joining Toastmasters. Parenting however is one training I can't opt out of.  My uninhibited son is guaranteed to test my faltering social skills for the rest of my life. In doing so, he might just be training me to move one small step further from timid to brave.

Woman SneezingThe days are finally getting longer, but it is still pretty dark outside! This weather makes me wonder, “Am I getting enough Vitamin D?” “Should I be taking extra Vitamin C or zinc to ward off winter sniffles?”

The information we get about using vitamins and supplements and herbal remedies can be contradictory and confusing. Sometimes it’s difficult to determine if what we’re reading or viewing is an advertisement or a news item. However, there are trusted resources you can use to find information about vitamins and supplements.

The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) is part of the National Institutes of Health. ODS exists to help consumers like you find information about vitamins and dietary supplements, including botanicals. Visit the ODS website to find out what vitamins and supplements have been shown to help with certain health conditions and which have not. You can also find nutrient recommendations (how much of a particular nutrient you need) and fact sheets on many dietary supplements. The website also provides consumer protection information, like safety information and tips on spotting health fraud.

Another great source for information about dietary supplements, botanicals, vitamins, and other alternative or complementary medicine options is MedlinePlus. This website is the National Institutes of Health’s site for patients. Click the Drugs & Supplements button or use the search box to find information on a wide variety of drugs, supplements, and herbals.

MedlinePlus includes information like: what the research says, side effects and warnings, information about how an herb interacts with other medication, and more.

 

Dylan Thomas Caedmon Collection book jacketIt is a truism in the audiobook world that authors do not make the best narrators. Audiobooks have come a long way since Dylan Thomas sing-songed some of his poems in what is considered to be the first audiobook, produced in 1952 by Caedmon Records.

Audiobooks in the 21st century are more performance than reading, and performance requires different skills than reading aloud. Hence the hesitation about having authors read their own works. At the same time, no one is more familiar with a book than its author, and familiarity can bring out aspects of a story that a professional narrator might overlook. Some authors are memorably bad (unnamed here, click through for a book you should NOT listen to!), but some are surprisingly good, even excellent. Here are a few authors I’d be glad to listen to again:Neverwhere book jacket

Neil Gaiman. Absolutely the best author/narrator, his quiet English accent and subtle characterizations make for an entertaining visit to a haunted graveyard (The Graveyard Book) to an alternate London (Neverwhere), or perhaps down at the end of the lane (I’m still waiting for this one!).

Khalid Hosseini. The author reads his debut novel, The Kite Runner, with a sensitivity and emotion that makes it clear that this is a very personal story.

Barbara Kingsolver. With exception of her early books, Kingsolver has read all her work since. Prodigal Summer (2000). Her gentle Southern-tinged voice, along with her clear identification with her female heroines, brings out the humor and pathos of their stories.

Susan OrRin Tin Tin book jacketlean. This writer narrates her most recent book, Rin Tin Tin, in a conversational fashion that makes the listener feel like she’s enjoying a chat with a friend who wants to impart some very interesting information.

Simon Winchester. This prolific master of narrative nonfiction is an excellent reader of his own work, as he delivers a hint of British reserve and irony, fused
with absolute authority and command of his subjects. I enjoyed Krakatoa.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention three author/narrators of books for young adults that are well worth listening to:
ShermThe Golden Compass book jacketan Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian is a revelation into the mind of his alter-ego, Arnold Spirit, Junior.

Libba Bray’s Beauty Queens is a hilarious romp.

Philip Pullman expertly guides the full-cast performances of the His Dark Materials trilogy. Don’t miss them!

It’s easy to find most of the audiobooks read by the author at MCL. At the Advanced Search page, type “read by the author” (use quotes) and click Search.

Violeta, Troudale's Bilingual Youth Librarian says this about Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina:
I loved the occasional, seamless code switching between English and Spanish, and there were several times I had to put the book down to finish laughing about what I'd just read. And yet I've also had deep conversations with others about the themes of this book: cultural identity, mother-daughter relationships, and bullying.

 

​“What caLeopold von Kalckreuth - The Artist's Wife Reading in Bedn I do for you?” I ask my friend undergoing chemo. “Oh, just bring me a funny audiobook to distract me.” I used to arrive with stacks of them, but over time I’ve developed a list of greatest hits that work well for our recuperating loved ones. Some criteria: Not too embarrassing for one unrelated adult to read aloud to another, not too many worrying situations (why did I think that book with a scene where the author is interrogated by the protagonist was okay?), and of course, the kind of humor that makes for belly laughs. Some people claim that anything by David Sedaris will work, and there are plenty of those to choose from, but moving beyond that, here are my three greatest hits for the healing, or anyone wanting a laugh. 

​The story of the beleaguered corporate drop-out Samantha as she tries to fake her way through a live-in cook and cleaning job in Sophie Kinsella's The Undomestic Goddess has left men and women alike unable to stop laughing. Bill Bryson’s A Walk in the Woods seems like it might be a macho mind over matter tale of a journey on the Appalachian trail but is instead a tale of absurd urban warriors. The humor and scenery together make a great distraction. Richard Peck’s look back at his Grandma in the 1930s is so funny because Grandma is not the usual grandma of memoirs. She ​exaggerates, connives, trespasses, and contrives to help the town underdogs outwit the establishment. While A Long Way from Chicago lives in the children’s section, it's a great read for adults. 

Here's Matthew, Branch Administrator at the Belmont Library. He's reading Charles Portis' The Dog of the South. He says that the blurb by Roy Blunt Jr. on the cover says it best: "Charles Portis could be Cormac McCarthy if he wanted to, but he'd rather be funny."

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