Blogs:

Update: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 at 10:30 a.m.

This morning the app developer made some changes that appear to have largely fixed the problem.

If you are still having difficulties with staying logged in, please let me know. Tap the Suggestion box item in the main menu of the mobile app and send me a note.

Thanks to our app users for all your help troubleshooting and for your patience as we worked on a fix.


Last updated: Monday, February 6, 2017 at 4:30 p.m.

Over the last ten days, the library mobile app has had trouble remaining logged in, mostly on iPhones and iPads. For example, if you were trying to place a hold on a book you found in the catalog, you would have to login into your account. But then you would be bounced back to the log in at each step in the hold placing process --  selecting the branch to pick up the book, etc. Sometimes you landed in an endless loop. I experienced this myself on my own phone.

We are not certain what is causing this problem, but the developer is investigating.

Many app users contacted us and I thank you for the good information you provided. It was very helpful.

We apologize for the frustration this has caused.

If you are experiencing this issue, while we work on a fix, please try our two catalog and account sites, both of which are optimized for mobile screens. You access these sites through the browser on your phone or tablet. Go to the recently improved mobile version of My MCL at https://multcolib.bibliocommons.com. Or, try the Classic Catalog at http://m.multcolib.org.

Thank you again for your help on this issue and your patience as we work to fix things.

Do you read Facebook or Twitter for news? Subscribe to a newspaper? Peruse websites? In an era of so many choices for information, how do you make a judgement about what's fact, what's slanted and what's just completely untrue? 

Here are some tips for evaluating what you are reading, listening to or viewing.  

  1. Consider the source. You can learn more about a website by clicking on the "About Us" link  that most provide, but don't stop there. Research the organization or author's credentials. If statistics are cited, see if you can find the source, and double-check that they are represented correctly.  
  2. Read beyond attention-getting headlines to check the whole article. If a statement is made, is a source given? Click through to check the sources, and do your own searching on those citations.
  3. Check the date. Sometimes old news stories resurface, and they might be out of date or inaccurate. If currency is important, limit your search to recent results
  4. Watch for bias, including your own. Check different sources to see how each treats a news item. Consider your own beliefs and perspectives and think about how that might change how you perceive what you are seeing. 
  5. Too weird to be true? If something seems implausible, see what fact-checking sites like Snopes, PolitiFact, and FactCheck have to say. 

For more about being a smart information consumer, check out the infographic, "How to Spot Fake News", provided by The International Federation of Library Associations. If you're more of a visual learner, take a look at the CRAAP test video from librarians at California State University. 

And remember, if you're looking for reliable information, get in touch with us. We're always happy to help.

 

Many members of our community have questions about how President Trump’s first travel ban, his January 27 Executive Order, #13769, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States,” will affect them and their loved ones. While the library does not offer legal advice, we can refer community members to a wide variety of resources.  Here is the official Homeland Security/U.S. Customs and Border Protection Questions and Answers about the Executive Order.

This page on local low-cost legal resources for immigrants is a great place to start. Another useful resource for information on this topic is the American Immigration Lawyers Association, which includes up-to-date explanations of policy changes and finding an immigration lawyer. ACLU of Oregon is another good source for legal questions about immigration status and civil rights.  For refugees, the Refugee Center Online offers resources on a variety of legal topics in a wide range of languages, including information on recent executive orders and other policy changes.

Localy, Immigrant & Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) is a key organization in Portland serving recent arrivals. The Muslim Educational Trust is a nonprofit educational organization that addresses issues faced by the Muslim community in the Portland area, including travel and immigration, as well as presenting interfaith events and programs. MultCo Global is a Multnomah County site that seeks to support county staff, as well as nonprofit and government partners, who serve immigrant and refugee communities.

Please seek legal counsel for legal interpretation of these and other court rulings regarding Executive Order 13769.   Here is a brief summary of some of the initial cases:

Immigration is one of many issues that have been in the news lately. We know that it can be hard to keep up with all of the important topics that affect our lives; please think of the library whenever you are looking for more information or trying to find a reputable source. We are here to connect everyone in our community with the information they need. Please contact us.

You face a lot of challenges when you are transitioning back into the community. The library can help you find resources to help you deal with those challenges and get back on your feet. The Change Center teacher shares a poster; link to the Change Center.

You are not alone.

MercyCorps Northwest’s Reentry Transition Center provides a variety of services, including helping with immediate needs like clothing, meals, and access to phones and Internet. The center also helps ex-offenders work towards long term goals of education, employment and driver’s license reinstatement.

The Change Center is the only adult education program in Oregon working exclusively with adults in transition from jail, prison and treatment programs. They offer GED classes, job search assistance, and apprenticeship preparation for construction trades and connections to apprentice training programs. SE Works also has several programs for community members leaving jail or prison who are looking to re-enter the workforce or improve their job skills.

The national organization Fair Shake is dedicated to supporting the successful reintegration of formerly incarcerated people into society. Their website includes employment and education support, free web page and email hosting, and other resources and tools for the formerly incarcerated and their families, employers and community.

Pathfinders of Oregon program Parenting Inside Out has been specifically designed to provide support for parents who are on parole and probation.

For other social services, contact 211info.org by dialing 211 or texting your zip code to 898211 to start a live conversation.

Your library card gives you access to so much.

Take advantage of free computer classes, assistance for job seekers, personal finance information, literacy assistance and resources for parents, not to mention books, ebooks, movies, and audio on any subject you can imagine. And you can always contact a helpful librarian with any question -- even if you don't have a library card, we're glad to help you!
 

穆鲁玛郡图书馆将于年宵会摆设摊位穆鲁玛郡图书馆将于年宵会摆设摊位

一年一度的年宵会, 將于二月四日星期六 (上午十时至下午五时), 在俄勒岗会展中心举行。(详情可参阅波特兰新闻)

穆鲁玛郡图书馆将于年宵会摆设摊位,提供有关文化, 饮食, 健康等等的资源及书籍,並有华语职员为大家介绍及解答有关图书馆各类活动的资料。欢迎各位到图书馆的摊位与我们見面!

Tết Nguyên Đán Năm Đinh Dậu 2017Chúc Mừng Năm Mới!

Chúc quý vị Năm Mới An Khang Thịnh Vượng. Năm nay, thư viện sẽ có quầy hàng ở Hội chợ Tết tại Oregon Convention Center. Chúng tôi sẽ có sách và phim cho mượn, các tài liệu về những chương trình phục vụ của thư viện, và quà tặng miễn phí. Mời quý vị đến tham dự và vui Tết với chúng tôi.

Chi tiết:

Thứ Bảy, Ngày 04 Tháng 2 Năm 2017

Giờ: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Địa điểm: Oregon Convention Center – Exhibit Hall C

Recently I had a heavenly vacation most of which I spent on the couch drinking tea and reading British police procedurals.  I'd been in a mystery rut; I had stalled in some of my favorite series and felt the need for something fresh, so I brought home a stack of newish books and cracked their spines.  Here are a few of the mysteries I read, all of which were written in the past few years and are either stand-alones or series starters.  If you need some fresh blood in your (reading) life of crime, check these out!

She's Leaving Home book jacket1968 London. It might be swinging for some, but for one teenager, it's deadly. DS Breen has just left another policeman alone in a dangerous situation and isn't very popular at the moment.  When a teenage girl is found lying naked and dead close to Abbey Road, Breen and his female (and newly minted) detective constable are on the case.  Can Breen redeem himself?  Can DC Tozer make a go of it in CID, a department completely dominated by men?  I loved experiencing the officers' struggles as they dealt with the challenges of the late 1960s in She's Leaving Home by William Shaw.

Moving into the 21st century, policing (and finding a guy to date) is still not necessarily easy for a woman.  DS Bradshaw is on the cusp of forty and is not particularly satisfied with her circumstances. She gets a chance to take her mind off her crappy life when a young woman goes missing from her home leaving a trail of blood.  It's up to Bradshaw and a team of detectives from Cambridgeshire to figure out what happened in Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner.Coffin Road book jacket

In Coffin Road, a man washes up on an island in the Outer Hebrides with no idea who he is. It's possible he may have killed a man, and he and the police separately try to figure out the mystery of his identity.  This is as much a thiller as a police procedural - we see the mystery mostly from the point of view of the unidentified man.  The setting was fantastic and I got to learn about a real life mystery that took place on the Flannan Islands.

For more British police procedurals written in the 21st century, take a look at this list.

Thank you for your patience as we dig out of the winter storms and their effects. We know you have questions about how that impacted your account and your library items - we'll do our best to answer all of them.

St Johns Library in the snow

First of all, don't worry! If you can't get items back to the library right away after the storms, we can help. We understand the challenges of the last week or so and we're committed to working with you.

  • Late fines won't be charged for the days the library was closed.
  • We also won't charge late fines for the past week or so. We'll do that to give you a chance to return items and give us a chance to get caught up.
  • We are also keeping holds on the shelf for a few extra days.

If you can't get into a library, contact us. We can extend due dates and holds, and fix any problems with late fines. Thanks again for your support of the library.

Volunteer Extraordinaire

by Donna ChildsVolunteer Jean Frazier

Having just celebrated her 90th birthday, Jean Frazier is the oldest volunteer at the Multnomah County Library’s Title Wave Used Bookstore, but that may not be the most interesting thing about her. For example: 
  • At 90, she still volunteers three days a week, one at the Title Wave and two more in the ophthalmology department at Kaiser Permanente
  • A lover of dance, Jean not only took aerobic dance for years, but she is looking for a new Zumba class because the one she was taking wasn’t vigorous enough.
  • She worked the graveyard shift for the railroad switching office, walking the rails to keep track of the cars.
  • Although she taught herself to use the AP wire equipment (receiving, developing, and printing transmissions) at the now defunct Oregon Journal, they couldn’t hire her because she was not yet 18.

Family tradition led Jean to both her railroad and newspaper jobs. Her father and her grandfather had both been railroad men, and her father was a newsman at the Journal. Jean worked for the newspaper during World War II, leaving right before D-Day. After the war, Jean met her husband, a history professor who taught at PSUPacific University, and the University of Washington, among others. His specialty, cultural geography, led him to amass a large collection of maps and slides of cities, buildings, and bridges.

In addition to raising two sons, Jean worked at the PSU bookstore for 21 years and for another six years at the Portland Public Schools. After her sons were grown and she had retired, Jean volunteered at Kaiser Permanente, where her mother had worked. Wanting to do more, she came to the Title Wave in 1998. She sorts, prices, shelves, and manages the store’s paperback fiction, a task she loves because she sees all the books as they arrive. Her favorite parts of the job are “the books and people,” being around books and people who care about them. “I’d be bereft without it.” A World War I and II history buff, she also makes weekly trips to her local Hollywood branch library to see what’s on their shelves. Not bad for a 90-year-old!

 


A Few Facts About Jean
 
Home library: Hollywood Library
 
Currently reading: Anne Tyler
 
Favorite book from childhood: The Oz books and Heidi
 
Favorite section of the library: Fiction, history, and biography
 
E-reader or paper books: Paper books!

Favorite place to read: My chair by the front window or in bed

 
Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

 

IRS 1040 form with penMultnomah County Library is here to help with tax season. All library locations can access state and federal tax forms and instruction booklets online as they become available. Library staff members are happy to help print what you need. Printing costs 10 cents per page; two-sided printing is available.

Thanks to the AARP, the library will offer filing assistance programs at the Central, Midland, Gresham, Woodstock, and North Portland locations. We can also help refer you to tax professionals.

Federal Hard Copy Forms

This year, libraries will have the Form 1040, 1040A, 1040EZ and some acompanying instruction booklets. All locations will have reference copies of the 1040 Instructions and Publication 17: Your Federal Income Tax. We can't promise when forms and booklets will be available, or that we won’t run out, but you can always download and print federal tax items from the IRS Forms & Publications page. You can also direct questions to the IRS offices in Oregon. Of special note, neither the 1099 and 1096 forms nor any of the W series (W-2, W-4, etc.) are available for download. Many office supply stores have the 1099 forms or you can contact the IRS directly to have those mailed to you.

State Hard Copy Forms

Public libraries are no longer a distribution center for state tax forms and booklets. If you need Oregon forms or booklets, you can come into the library to print them or do it yourself from the Oregon Department of Revenue page. If you want forms mailed to you, then you can contact the Oregon Department of Revenue via:

Other States

You can stop by the library for assistance printing out tax forms for other states, or you can go to the Federation of Tax Administrators State Tax Forms & Filing Options, which provides links to tax forms for each state.

Dusty adding machine keysOnline Filing

Once the tax season officially opens, both the IRS and Oregon Department of Revenue will have listings for online filing services. Remember, state and federal taxes are due by April 18th this year.

 

Tax Help/Filing Assistance

Volunteers with AARP will be offering preparation assistance through Tax Help at five different Multnomah County Library locations beginning in February. Keep your eye on the events listed to the right of the library's Taxes page or search the Events page for "taxes." Requirements to get tax help vary by location:

  • Central: Sundays, 10:00-2:00; all appointments are full for this tax season.
  • Gresham: Wednesdays, 12:00-5:00; all appointments are full for this tax season.
  • Midland: Fridays, 12:00-4:00; Saturdays, 12:00-4:00; all appointments are full for this tax season.
  • North Portland: Thursdays, 12:30-4:30; same day registration, in-person only. Arrive at 10:00 AM opening for best chance to secure an appointment.
  • Woodstock: Saturdays, 12:00-5:00; same day registration, in-person only. Arrive at 10:00 AM opening for best chance to secure an appointment.

If you can't make it to the library for tax help, you can find other locations for tax preparation assistance through the AARP's Tax-Aide Locator, CASH Oregon and the IRS's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program.

 

 

 

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