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off to be the wizard coverHey Mister Fantasy. Keep it light okay?

Reading fantasy can be a daunting task. Epic series, characters with hard to pronounce names, and sprawling universes add up to a challenging read for those with less than the average attention span.  However, these things shouldn’t stop anyone from entering the realm of the imagined unreal. Fantasy has a lighter side.

Scott Meyer’s Off to be the Wizard continues the tradition of Douglas Adams, Terry Brooks, and echoes themes of Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One.

Martin Banks is an average fellow, who happens upon a computer file that literally changes everything.  As he embraces his new found “magic”, the authorities discover a few things askew forcing him to flee. His landing pad? The middle ages. However, he quickly finds that life as a fledgling wizard isn’t so easy in the big hamlet…

 

cover image of world hotels and white elephants

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

 
Ready for a good cry?  The film version of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl comes out June 12, and it's already getting some great buzz.  If you're looking for more smart, tragic fare (and maybe you've already devoured The Fault in Our Stars), here are some great options.  We affectionately call them Downers.
 
Five years old by September? Sign up for school by June 1!
 
If your child will be five years old by September 1, he or she is ready to start school. Register at your school by June 1 to give your child a good start, connect to summer activities and get access to free resources. School offices close for the summer, so don’t wait! When you register by June 1, you have time to get to know your school and your teacher, and your teacher has time to prepare the classroom for your child. To identify your school or get help with other childhood issues call 211 or email children@211info.org. Interpretation is available.
 
How can the library help you and your child get ready for kindergarten? Bring them to storytime!  By the time your child is 5 years old, you may have heard many messages  on TV, in magazines, from other parents  about the importance of learning letters and numbers.
 
But kindergarten teachers care much more about having children who are ready and excited to learn. Kindergarten readiness includes things such as playing well with others, following simple instructions and talking about feelings and thoughts. There are lots of fun ways to develop these skills, and the library is here to help you!
 
At storytime we read stories and sing songs. We talk about the things we’ve read. We work on following directions with shakers and scarves and simple group games. Storytimes are a great opportunity for your child to learn to socialize with other children and adults. In storytime children also learn to ask questions and function well in a group; develop language and problem-solving skills; and perhaps most importantly, discover that books and learning are fun!
 
What else can you do?  Read, talk, sing, write and play!  

 

 

Photo of Appomattox re-enactmentI am endlessly fascinated in reading about America’s Civil War. So now that we come to the end of the four-year observance of its sesquicentennial, I feel inclined to say a few thoughts about it.

The observance began in April of 2011 which actually is beginning to feel like a long time ago to me. That has given me an appreciation for what it might have felt like to those who lived through it, although I suspect it must have seemed much longer to those folks who served and those who suffered the loss of loved ones.

During these four years there have been numerous special observances at battlefields and re-enactments across the nation. And this period of remembrance has also sparked a good deal of publishing about the war, its battles, and the personalities who shaped the conflict. Yet after 150 years, people are still asking themselves about the war’s causes and ultimately what the meaning of the war was for us as a nation.

April 9, 1865 is generally recognized as the date the war ended. This was the day that General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to Federal forces under the command of Illustration of Grant and Lee at AppomattoxUnion General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia. Due in part to delays in communications and in part to southern determination, it took a while for all Confederate forces to surrender in places as far-removed as Florida, Texas and territories west of the Mississippi; and it wasn’t until November that the Confederate ship C.S.S. Shenandoah ended its around-the-world raids before surrendering in Liverpool, England.

For some great books on the Appomattox campaign, I'd suggest checking out Bruce Catton's class A Stillness at Appomattox or the more recent Appomattox: Victory, Defeat, and Freedom at the end of the Civil War by Elizabeth R. Varon. For a shorter account of the campaign with lots of color illustrations and maps, take a look at Appomattox 1865: Lee's Last Campaign by Ron Field.

 

 

 

"Something just clicked."

by Sarah Binns

From her youth in Minnesota, Kathy Parkin distinctly remembers the stories that molded her as a lifelong reader: “My favorite childhood books were Beverly Cleary's. Even now I can see myself in the elementary school library, picking up her books. They sparked my love of reading.” Kathy couldn't know that several decades later she'd start post-retirement life in the same city that Oregon-born Cleary once called home: our beloved Portland.

In 2011, after 30 years as a lab technician in Minnesota, Kathy decided she wanted a change. That's when she saw an AARP magazine article describing Portland, Oregon, as a perfect place to retire. “Something just clicked,” she said, when she read about the city. “The very first thing I did when I moved here was get a library card—even before I got a driver's license!” In May 2012, Kathy began her Multnomah County Library volunteer work helping with weeding, traveling to different neighborhood libraries to ferret out damaged, dilapidated and outdated books. “I got around and saw more of Portland,” she explains. “And I love Portland.”

Kathy harnessed this love of Portland to write the short story “Summer of Love,” which is featured in the 2013 book Our Portland Story Volume 2, a compilation of stories about the city. Kathy has also explored calligraphy and collage and has worked in many other volunteer positions, with Store to Door, a grocery shopping service for seniors and people with disabilities, and Friendly House, where Kathy worked with older adults.

In addition to her love of Portland, Kathy is one of those MCL volunteers who has always loved libraries. Between working and raising a family she volunteered for libraries in her native Minnesota. “At one point I worked at one library system and volunteered at another. That's right,” she adds, “I worked in a library and they paid me!” Let the record show that Kathy has lived the dream of many an MCL volunteer, including this one. This doesn't mean she'll stop volunteering for MCL, though: “I'll keep on until I can't,” she says with a smile.


A Few Facts About Kathy

Home library: Central Library for the books but she volunteers at the Northwest Library. “I really like working at the smaller libraries.”

Currently reading: “I like chick lit and I just finished Walking Back to Happiness by Lucy Dillon.” Also reading The Way of the Woods, by Linda Underhill. 

Most influential book: Jane Eyre. “I like books with strong female characters. I always come back to Jane Eyre.”

A book that made you laugh or cry: Lisette's List by Susan Vreeland made me both laugh and cry; a good book about how life is just that so often, sometimes a comedy and sometimes a tragedy.”

Favorite book from childhood: Beverly Cleary's books. “It's also nice to know she has an Oregon connection.” (Cleary's birthday is April 12th and is celebrated by publisher Harper Collins as Drop Everything and Read (DEAR) Day.)

E-reader or paper? Paper

Favorite place to read: "In my recliner."

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

cover of novel Ross Poldark; links to item in catalogSome years ago I read Ross Poldark by Winston Graham.  I fell headlong into the story and quickly recommended the novel to my dad who shared it with a friend.  The three of us have varied reading tastes, but share a love of fine historical fiction and each of us read the entire series (12 books!). I’ve been rereading it, and it's just as wonderful as I remembered. Why? 

Let’s start with the fabulously good dialogue and concise description. Graham reveals character and relationships in deft strokes. Add a strong sense of place and accurate historical cover of Poldark DVD series 1; links to item in catalogdetails which bring to life the social upheaval in Cornwall and England from 1783 - 1820's: the corn riots, smuggling, the vagaries of mining, the effects of industrialization and the Napoleonic wars. 

In the first novel Ross Poldark returns home after fighting in the American colonies to a world where nobody is much interested in or affected by the war he fought in. He’s been gone so long that everyone close to him thinks he died. What does he find? His father dead and buried, the house he inherited in a squalid state. I’m not even going to tell you what his sweetheart has done!

In 1975 the BBC adapted some of the early Poldark novels into a tv series which was wildly popular In June 2015 PBS’s Masterpiece Theatre will air a new BBC production starring Aidan Turner as PoldarkI plan to watch it with my dad, so we can compare the screen versions to the novels we love.

Come meet the dashing war veteran for yourself. 


 
Flash Gordon movie posterYou know that one movie. Maybe you’ve loved this movie since you were a kid, so your love for the movie is based in part on a sense of nostalgia as well as the movie’s inherent awesomeness. That movie that you’ve seen dozens of times because anytime a friend says they haven’t seen it, you insist that they watch it with you.
 
For me that movie is the 1980 cult classic Flash Gordon. And yes, if you haven’t yet experienced the splendor that is Flash Gordon, I recommend that you make it your #1 movie watching priority. Based on the comic strip of the same name, Flash Gordon is over-the-top campy science fiction at its finest.
 
The movie opens with football star “Flash” Gordon and travel journalist Dale Arden boarding a small plane. During the flight red clouds suddenly block out the sun, and the pilots disappear. Of course this is all the work of Emperor Ming the Merciless who has declared that he will have a little fun with planet Earth before he destroys it. Flash and Dale crash land the plane into mad scientist Dr. Hans Zarkov’s greenhouse. Zarkov has built a rocketship that he tricks Flash and Dale into boarding, and with one quick scuffle and an accidental push of the launch button the trio are off to planet Mongo, home of Ming the Merciless. 
 
Flash Gordon’s wacky plot  isn’t the only thing that makes it a must watch movie. What also makes it such a cult favorite are the opulent costumes, the color saturated set, and the hilarious special effects. But wait, the topping on this decadent campy sci-fi cupcake...the soundtrack, composed and performed by Queen!  
 
 

Cathedral bookjacketI’ve never written a novel or a short story (unless you count the required writing course I took about a million years ago as a freshman in college) but in some ways, I think that it might be harder to write a short story than a full-fledged book. A short story has to suck you in immediately, tell a full plot in a small number of pages, and shoot you out at the end with a quick climactic pay-off. A great short story will stay with you forever. Raymond Carver’s "A Small Good Thing" with a young boy’s unpicked up bakery cake has been part of my very soul since I first read it years ago.

The past few months, I’ve read several collections of really amazing short stories. When I did a search in our catalog, I found that there have been a ton of short story booksSingle, Carefree, Mellow bookjacket published in the last couple of years; I checked a bunch out and found a bounty of vivid stories that I find myself still thinking about weeks after reading them. Kelly Link’s stories in Get in Trouble are a feast of surreal images that are also weirdly believable. Katherine Heiny writes about infidelity in her collection, Single, Carefree, Mellow, but she does it in a refreshingly nonjudgmental way. And then there are always my old favorites, Flannery O'Connor and Peter S. Beagle.

If you're in the mood for a short story or two or three, try one of these collections.

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