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Signs that say Hope and Despair.When you are seeking help, it can be overwhelming to figure out where to start. This is a selective list of social service organizations and places that offer housing, shelter, mental health counseling, escape from abusive situations and other basic needs for people who are homeless, jobless or going through personal transitions. If you have any questions or need assistance finding services, contact us and we'll be happy to help!


When in doubt, start here: 211info

211info is a comprehensive support hub for referrals to food, shelter, housing, foreclosure assistance, health care, and much more. Calls are confidential, anonymous and free. Certified Information and Referral Specialists assess the situation and refer callers using a locally managed database of over 4,200 programs in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Telephone interpreters are available for help in more than 150 languages. Dial 211 from any phone; text your zip code to 898211; send an email to help@211info.org; or search resources online.


Other resources:

Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare
Cascadia provides mental health counseling for people with psychiatric and substance use challenges.  They provide crisis intervention, addictions treatment, and housing services for people who are very low-income.  Their website includes addresses and phone numbers for services as well as links to additional resources outside of the area.
 
Multnomah County Mental Health & Addictions Services
Provides mental health services to adults, children and families. They serve Oregon Health Plan members as well as people who have no insurance or resources. Their Mental Health Call Center is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week; call 503-988-4888, 800-716-9769 (toll free) or 503-988-5866 (TTY). Clasping hands; link to Northwest Pilot Project.
 
Northwest Pilot Project
Provides housing and other supportive services for seniors ages 55 and older who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless.  Find housing, transportation help, advocacy and referrals to other resources and services. NW Pilot Project recommends calling 503-227-5605 before coming in.

Outside In
Outside In is a community resource for homeless youth.  They provide health services, counseling and shelter, as well as programs and education.

Portland Women’s Crisis Line
Offers 24 hour telephone crisis counseling for victims of domestic and sexual violence; call 503-235-5333 or 888-235-5333.  The organization also offers support groups and direct service counseling for victims of domestic violence and childhood sexual abuse.

Rose City Resource
Street Roots publishes this very comprehensive online directory of services for people experiencing homelessness and poverty in  Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas counties.  It is continuously updated.
 
Smiling woman; link to Transition Projects website.Transition Projects
This organization can help with a variety of services including housing, showers, food box vouchers, clothing, laundry services, Tri-met tickets, information and referral and housing search assistance.

 

There is so much good teen fiction that I have quite a time (and only moderate interest in) actually getting to the grown-up stuff. Here are two stories I recently discovered and enjoyed.

Seraphina book jacketSeraphina by Rachel Hartman
I discovered Dungeons and Dragons at age 17, and I remember getting pretty excited when my brother told me "There are FOUR kinds of dragons!"  I'd read The Hobbit, The Reluctant Dragon, and a few Norse myths by then, so I knew that all dragons were not the same, but there being actual kinds of dragons was very new to me. Dragon taxonomy, if you will. Years and lots of fantasy later, this book gave me a similar thrill.
 
Among many very cool things about this book (a wry and honest main character, strange dream beings starting to talk back, a sackbut), it has dragons that, by virtue of their ability to assume human shape, can communicate on a level with the humans. But although they look like regular people, Hartman does a great job with keeping them very different. Dragons have a hard time understanding human emotions, so it's a bit like interacting with aliens, or animals, or gods. This had a nice amount of intrigue, a very observant prince, questions of loyalty, medieval music, saints and sayings for all occasions, and a bit of a look at discrimination and hatred.  Good stuff, and the first e-book I read for fun (because it was available and the printed one wasn't). 
 
 An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir
I haven't quite finished this yet, but I'm thinking that I have a great recommendation for people who enjoyed reading The Hunger Games. This has some of the sameAn Ember in the Ashes book jacket themes - power vs. powerlessness, fate vs. choice, battle against friends, star-crossed love triangle. It's set in an empire reminiscent of ancient Rome, but this is not historical fiction. The magic of the desert pervades this story... ghuls, jinn, efrit... and yet it is mostly the tale of one young man expected to become a great leader, and of a young woman with nothing but a rebel pedigree, posing as a slave and struggling to save the last relative she has. The perspective changes back and forth between them with each chapter, and the pacing is used well to build suspense. It's on hold so I'll have to turn it in soon, but I'll finish this one quickly.

 

Lately I've been gravitating towards books that give me respite from working full time and going to school part-time. These are the books I've been loving lately:
 
Bee and Puppycat book jacketBee and PuppyCat by Natasha Allegri: Bee is a twentysomething woman who works for a temp agency fighting monsters with Puppycat in SPACE. It's a pastel dream just as gorgeous as the original cartoon.

Your Illustrated Guide to Becoming One With the Universe by Yumi Sakugawa: Sakugawa takes you on a beautiful intergalactic journey where you deal with little and big things like petty annoyances, self-hatred, and anger. Surprisingly calming.The Misadventures of an Awkward Black Girl book jacket

The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae: This is the funniest book I've read in a long time. I loved reading about her family, '90s culture, and the endless embarrassments. As a POC (person of color), this is the kind of voice I've been wishing wasn't so rare.
 
I hope you can find as much solace in these books as I do. What kinds of books help you keep cool when under stress?

                

https://multcolib.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2738523068_the_boy_in_the_black_suit#bib_info

   

  What does a plate of chocolate chip cookies have to do with a funeral home?                                         

Everything if you are Matt and you get a job in a funeral home because your mother is dead and being around people who understand grief is better than going to high school where even your best friend acts strange and uncomfortable with you.  Then you meet Lovey- who is there for the funeral of her grandma Gwendolyn Brown. Matt waits and waits for her to break down, for her voice to tremble, for tears to fall.  While he’s waiting he notices her eyes and her curly hair.  He also notices how confident she is, how calm. Intrigued he attends the reception after the funeral just so he can meet her.  Talking with  her is magical - he takes a chance and asks her on a date.  She asks if she can plan the date.  Yes!  He almost shouts it.  But the date is  different from any other type of date he’s been on and with her he feels different. So different that it makes him feel like baking his mom's special chocolate cookie recipe, breathing and laughing again. Loving again.

If you like a book that will help you see life and -death- in a whole different way, Read The Boy in the Black Suit by Joan Reynolds

Book jacket: Hammer Head: The Making of a Carpenter by Nina MacLaughlinWhen I was approaching 30, I left a job in Seattle and moved to Portland to become a woodworker.  I spent the last of my cashed out 401k on a table saw, hung my hand tools neatly on pegboard and slowly and with great discipline became a master carpenter.  Not true.  I spent about a month dressed in overalls, creating little more than sawdust before stopping to admire my tools with a self-congratulatory glass(es) of wine. And then I panicked and signed on with a temp agency to do mind-numbing office work.

Nina MacLaughlin carried out what I only fantasized about.  After spending much of her 20s working as a journalist in Boston she realized that somewhere along the line, the work that had once inspired her, had grown oppressive.  Hammer Head: The Making of a Carpenter is her memoir of what happened when she quit her desk job and traded in her cubicle and computer for a hammer, a tile saw and a 50lb bag of grout.

Picking up Hammer Head, I felt an immediate kinship and let’s face it- envy for MacLaughlin.  We share an enormous satisfaction in mastering a new tool and an appreciation for the unique history and warmth that radiates off of a freshly-sanded plank of wood. But by the end, it was her boss Mary that I fell in love with. It was Mary’s Craigslist ad: Carpenter’s Assistant: Women strongly encouraged to apply, that started MacLaughlin’s journey.  Not much of a talker, Mary offered only the simplest instruction and encouragement (“Be smarter than the tools”), but abundant patience and quiet humor. McLaughlin's inspiring memoir is as much about her own leap of faith towards meaningful work, as it is a love letter to her straight shooting and unflappable mentor.

Oh why weren’t you in Portland in 2001, Mary?

 

Check out this list for more memoirs that will inspire you to follow your bliss.

Do you love urban fantasy? I do. I love that the stories are set in the real world with an action paced plots and supernatural beings. I connect better with a story if it’s set in our modern world. And if there is humourous dialogue-you’ve got me. I become a devoted fan!

Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles series is at times so funny I can laugh for a full five minutes about a scene. The stories are pageturners with a mix of supernatural beings that are Nordic, Celtic, Native American, Roman or Greek gods. There are vampires, witches, and werewolves thrown in too.

The Iron Druid is Atticus Sullivan who lives in Tempe Arizona with his Irish Wolfhound, Oberon when we first meet him in book one Hounded. The fact that the story is set in Tempe Arizona makes me giggle. Because then it is a nod to sunny noir.

The humor I love best in the series is in the discussions between Oberon and Atticus. There’s comic relief and diversion when Oberon and Atticus discuss snacks like sausage when they are worried about an upcoming battle. If you like your supernatural action story with a side of humor then you might love Iron Druid Chronicles series. I do.

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

When the days get long and the house gets stuffy, Mother and two children smiling.there are lots of opportunities for you and your family to get out and be entertained without taxing your wallet!

Jump, climb, ride and play. Bring your kids to some structured and supervised playground programs all over the county. The City of Gresham and Boys & Girls Clubs of Portland are hosting field games, arts & crafts, free lunch and more with Summer Kids in the Park. Many Portland parks will also have organized sports, games, crafts and food with Playgrounds in the Park/Area de Juegos en el Parque. Safely bike and walk the streets of Portland all summer long during Sunday Parkways. Check out the variety of parks in Portland, Gresham, Troutdale, Fairview and Wood Village.

Saxafunky to symphonic. Enjoy live classical music performed by the Portland Festival Symphony and Chamber Music Northwest. The Portland Parks & Recreation summer concert series gives you opportunities to experience exuberant Baltic brass at Ventura Park, cumbia and salsa at Fernhill Park, Caribbean grooves at Kenton Park, and much, much more. Discover local music at Music on Main Street in downtown Portland. In Gresham, get down with the Music Mondays summer concert series. Cathedral Park Jazz Festival celebrates its 35th anniversary, while the Washington Park Summer Festival showcases opera, taiko drums, and soul. And don't miss all ages music festival PDX Pop Now!

Make a sLittle girl playing in splash pad.plash. Dive into free open swim hours at pools or run through some splash pads all around Portland. Cool down at the Gresham Children's Fountain or at one of Portland's four interactive fountains.

Pass the free popcorn. Big Hero 6 for the little ones, Field of Dreams for the grown-ups, The Princess Bride for everyone, not to mention Napoleon Dynamite, Captain America, Russian films, documentaries, and more; The Portland Parks & Recreation movie series has an outdoor movie for you!

All the world’s a stage. The Original Practice Shakespeare Festival will be performing The Merry Wives of Windsor, A Midsommer Night's Dreame, Richard III and other plays all over town, while Portland Actors Ensemble is presenting Macbeth and The Taming of the Shrew in multiple parks.

Get festive with your neighbors. There are so many free neighborhood celebrations in the summer months! Hang out at street fairs in Alberta, Belmont, Division/Clinton, Fremont, Gresham, Hawthorne, Lents, Mississippi and Multnomah Village. Experience art at the Gresham Arts Festival and Art in the Pearl; celebrate the LGBTQ and allied communities at the Portland Pride Festival and Parade; create green spaces at the Green Neighborhoods Festival; celebrate your and others' culture at India Festival and Festa Italiana. Two children, their pet rabbit, and a giant library card at the Portland Pride Festival.

Free meals. School is out, but that doesn’t mean kids stop being hungry. No child (ages 1-18) will be turned away from receiving free lunches at locations all over the area, including the wonderful Midland and Rockwood Libraries. Find a location in your neighborhood and check out some other food assistance resources.

But wait, there's more! Check out all of the free events going on at your neighborhood library, including a series of hands-on camps for teens. 211info has a great list of low-cost summertime camps and activities. Most Portland Rose Festival events are free. Check out the Portland Parks & Recreation Summer Free For All website and the Metro calendar. Read the library's blog entries on free art and free museums. Check out the PDX Kids Calendar and the urbanMamas calendar to see what free events are coming up in the city. And don't forget to sign up for Summer Reading to earn books, toys, or coupons for local businesses. (Grown-ups, there's a summer reading program for you, too!)

cover image of alone in the kitchen with an eggplantFood is a lovely thing. Cooking and eating a meal can be one of the more pleasurable things in life, but if you're not sharing it with someone, it can feel like too much to bother. Though we are totally worth it, sometimes corners are cut and the end result can be a sad and pathetic excuse for a meal. Enter some hilarious accounts of What We Eat When We Eat Alone and other tomes like Alone in the Kitchen with an Eggplant. These are full of often innovative recipes that occasionally work and frequently don't.

Did you know there are cookbooks just for one? My personal favorite is by Judith Jones. The Pleasures of Cooking for One will have you cover image of the pleasures of cooking for onerediscovering the joys of cooking, without the drudgery of having to consume what you just made for the whole of next week's lunches and dinners.  

Are you on your way to being a famous chemist?  Then you need some examples of those who came before you!  Or do you just need to write a report on a scientist?  Well, we've got you covered for that too.

A great first stop is the Biography in Context database.  (If you're using this outside the library it will ask for your library card number and pin, so have those at the ready.)  You can search by name if you know who you want information on or click "Browse People" on the upper left and select "scientists" from the drop-down menu to explore your options.

Check out the booklist below for some more ideas!  Need more help?  That's what we're here for.  Contact a librarian to get what you need.

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