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Take a bite of an apple. Chew, swallow, and then presto, it comes out the other end! But how does it happen? How do our bodies turn an apple into fuel that helps us play sports, breathe, walk, and talk? The digestive system is the body system responsible for this process. The basic process is well understood by scientists but new research is coming out all the time changing the way we understand the inner workings of our guts.

Image of the organs of the digestive systemThere are many resources on the Internet and through the library that can help you learn about the digestive system. Visit KidsHealth or TeensHealth to find information in English and Spanish for kids and teens including videos, articles, and puzzles to help you learn all about the digestive system and other health topics. Ask a Biologist lets you ask a real biologist science related questions. Ask a Biologist also has lots of great information about microbes and the role they play in our digestive systems.

The Multnomah County Library has science databases where you can search for topics, view videos and print pictures to help with school reports. Today's Science is a database that can help you answer questions like, "What is the latest research on the roll of bacteria in our guts?" or to ask more general questions such as, "how does the digestive system work?" For help using Today's Science, the library provides this useful handout.  If you need to look up basic facts about the digestive system, but can't use Wikipedia, try using Grolier Online, a science encyclopedia. Here you will find information for elementary, middle and high schoolers, great for writing school reports.

When you use the library databases outside of the library, you will need to log in with a library card. Try using key words like: "Digestive System," and "Body Systems." Topics that might include the Digestive System are "Human Anatomy & Physiology," "Nutrition," and "Health."

Check out this video from KidsHealth about the Digestive System from KidsHealth:



If you want to explore this topic more, or if you have more questions about any of this, Ask a Librarian! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.
 

Here are summer delights recommended by a few of my favorite people. No names,  just a few salient traits. Click on the list to find the associated character trait!

You may not be able to tell a book by its cover, but can you match a reader with her/his favorite book of Summer 2015?

Guess away, which is whose favorite? Sorry, the winner only gets bragging rights. Hint: All pics below are Avatars, chosen by me.

Willy Wonka asks if you write poetryIf you are trying to teach others about writing poetry, how should they get a start? Will they set out to rhyme? Will they rely on imagery?  Will they make a list of words they have to use? Will they use magnetic poetry as a tool? Will they be offended if their funny poem doesn't make anyone laugh?

If you can make the time, there are several poetry-building tools for your perusal. For example, Read Write Think is a top-notch resource for accessible activities. One of their most popular games is Word Mover-- a bit like using magnetic poetry, with the capability of resetting a word bank and including our own vocabulary. Other options include ReadWorks' lesson on rhythm for 1st grade and LearnZillion's learning-to-read poetry post for 3rd grade. For reluctant readers, try the PBS Haiku game or the Fun/Games page on the Shel Silverstein websiteFor specific lesson plans, try using Poetry Archive or the National Education Association

And if students don't finish writing their poems, there is always the Paul Valery quote, "A poem is never finished, only abandoned."

 

 

Christina Hammett and Troutdale: A Perfect Match

by Donna Childsvolunteer Christina Hammett

In the best relationships, each believes they got the better deal. That is clearly the case with Christina Hammett and Troutdale Library. Christina thinks the staff and patrons at Troutdale are terrific, and library staff has the highest praise for her artistic know-how, her shining attitude, and her unflagging readiness to help. 

Thanks to fond memories of participating in Summer Reading as a child, Christina began at Troutdale as a Summer Reading volunteer; now she is also a Branch Assistant and a Youth Program Assistant. She has really shone with youth programming, designing whimsically creative, interactive storyboards—often a couple a month--for the youth librarian to use in her storytime presentations. Because she is such a talented artist, the library has also asked her to make displays for other activities: Summer Reading, Lucky Day books, and the Lego group, for example. 

Christina studied journalism at Mount Hood Community College, where she was editor-in-chief of the student newspaper; she has also been a sports reporter and photographer at the Gresham Outlook. However, with the decline in print journalism, plus the tight job market for new grads, Christina is now taking stock and trying to figure out what to do, whether to go back to school and what to study. Meanwhile she has a retail job and the Troutdale Library where she feels useful and connected to her community. She loves the people at the library, working with books, and interacting with people who read and talk about books. 

Every Wednesday, Christina goes through her 10-15 page list of holds requests. Like many volunteers, she finds this task a terrific way to discover new books she might not otherwise have known about. 

Christina may be unsure of her future path at the moment, but her intelligence, poise, creativity, and cheerful enthusiasm will make her an asset anywhere. Meanwhile, Troutdale benefits from her many talents.


A Few Facts About Christina

Home library: Troutdale Library

Currently reading: The works of Agatha Christie and A Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare

Most influential book: The Diary of Anne Frank

Favorite book from childhood: The Giver by Lois Lowry, The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster, and Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes

A book that made you laugh or cry: The Green Mile by Stephen King

Favorite section of the library: Fiction and mystery

E-reader or paper? Paper

Favorite reading guilty pleasure: A Song of Ice and Fire (series) by George Martin and anything by Agatha Christie

Favorite place to read: My bed

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

The Boys Who Challenged Hitler book jacketAnyone who is a fan of Star Trek will be familiar with the phrase “Resistance is futile.”  It’s the Borg’s mantra that basically means you just need to give up and become assimilated.  Don’t even think about fighting against the mighty collective as it’s no use.  You’ll surrender in the end, become a cyborg and be worse off for the struggle.  I probably would have caved, but Knud Pedersen wouldn’t have given up without a fight.  When the Danish king and government decided to give in quietly to the Nazis rather than have their country become war-torn, Knud and some fellow Danish youth decided they needed to take some action.  They took their inspiration from the Norwegians who were fighting back and the British RAF pilots and formed a resistance club.  They stole weapons, sabotaged vehicles and did damage to Nazi-occupied buildings.  Most of them were just teenagers, but they showed an immense amount of courage in standing up to the Germans who were occupying their country during WWII.  Phillip Hoose tells their compelling true story in The boys who challenged Hitler: Knud Pedersen and the Churchill Club.

For more true stories of resistance, check out this list.

The characters of fantasy novels are so often great warriors or mighty magic users (aside from the hobbits of course!) .  Special people marked for greatness.  Somebody Important! What about the rest of us?  How about a book about a miller's daughter in a humble colony village?  Or a teenage prostitute? 
 
A Turn of Light book jacketA Turn of Light by Julie E Czerneda is about Jenn, a miller's daughter in an isolated frontier community.  Jenn dreams of a wider world that she can never see and as her birthday marking adulthood approaches she is in many ways still a child. Though nearly an adult and with her father suggesting marriage, Jenn is still running off to pick flowers in the meadow and dodging her chores.  Jenn has always had an invisible protector that only spoke to her.  A careless wish of hers one day turns him into a man.Karen Memory book jacket
 
In Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear,  Karen Memery ("like 'memory' only spelt with an e"), a teenage "seamstress" at Madame Damnable's Hôtel Mon Cherie in Rapid City (reminiscent of a gold rush era Seattle) is making the best of things...  Her world is full of steam powered marvels that can do wondrous things and steam powered terrors as well.  Karen is well treated where she is and knows most girls in her trade have it much, much worse.  Sensible sort that she is, she is putting every coin she can aside as a girl can't "sew" forever.  Once she had a mother and father and a good life helping them gentle horses.  Then death claimed them both too soon.  She had no higher hope than setting aside enough silver to buy a little bit of land and a couple of promising horses to train and sell, but she can't turn aside when a badly brutalized girl is found near the establishment she works at.
 
And now I'm going back to lords and heroes with the new book by Stina Leicht: Cold Iron. I always enjoy finding a new author to try.  Maybe
it'll be great!

Taiga or boreal forest is one of the most pristine biomes on earth and it  spins the Northern Hemisphere in a wide swath across Alaska, Canada, Russia and Scandinavia,  forming the world’s largest continuous biome.  Most of taiga's trees are conifers, or trees that make cones: cedars, cypresses, firs, hemlocks, junipers, larches, pines, redwoods, sequoias, and yews.  Kids Info Bits is a very helpful resource for obtaining information on commercial uses of conifers and their importance in global environment.

Boreal forest

Which conifers grow in taiga? The spruces are very common, with the Norway spruce thriving in European forests and the Siberian spruce in Siberian taiga. In North American boreal forest white spruce and black or bog spruce are very common

Conifer needles and bark of the trees contain a sap called resin. If you make a small cut in a pine tree, you will see resin oozing out. It is very sticky and it does not taste good. Can you eat resin? What are some uses of resin? United States Department of Agriculture provides a wealth of information on use of resin in medicine and manufacture .

But many animals and birds feast on conifer seeds, which unlike needles and bark  contain no resin. Voles and deer mice, ground squirrles and crossbiles have conifer seeds as a part of their daily diet. Cedar cones is a yummy treat for many kids and adults in Eastern Siberian taiga( boreal forest). These seeds are collected from the trees by special "cone hunters"  with the help of a wooden hammer. Cedar seeds then are roasted or consumed raw. Read more about cedars and their role in the life of Northwest Coast Native Americans.

 

 

 

 

hammers used for obtaining cedar cones

cedar cones

Mayor Charlie Hales at National Night Out - City of Portland photo

Are you thinking of planning a block party this summer? In early August for the last 30 years, communities and neighborhoods have been getting together to meet, celebrate, and have fun as part of the National Night Out celebrations. These events were started to promote safe neighborhoods and crime prevention initiatives by solidifying partnerships between law enforcement and communities. These events are generally free and family-friendly. A continuing feature of local celebrations is that groups can request to have police officers and firefighters show up at their party. And who knows, your neighborhood could throw a party and maybe even the Mayor will show up!

I know my neighborhood party will have grills and hot dogs and some games for the kids, but each party is a little bit different. Some are small affairs with a handful of neighbors potlucking, while others occupy the better part of a city park. Thinking of planning your own party? The Office of Neighborhood Involvement in Portland has a variety of National Night Out party planning resources to help you get started that should assist planning for everything from a small potluck picnic with chalk out for the kids to a big bash with a live band that shuts down the street. There is a brief National Night Out page for Gresham and a National Night Out page for Fairview, each with a contact person for more information. The message from the experts is to start early--it's not too early to plan for next year! 

The official date of National Night Out is the first Tuesday in August, but there are so many parties happening in Multnomah County, they can't all take place on the same day. The City of Portland compiles a list of parties submitted to them for publicizing. In Gresham, call 503-618-2567 to find out where there's a party near you and in Troutdale call 503-665-6129. Learn more about Fairview's party on their National Night Out web page

We've compiled a list of books to get you planning your party, meeting your neighbors and thinking about community. See our picks for National Night Out celebrations. 

You might see your Library at a National Night Out party. We can't hit all the parties (we'd be so tired!), but where you see us, you can guarantee that we'll be talking about all the great books, services, and resources the Library can provide to you.  Below is a list of neighborhood parties and which location's staff will be attending. Come say hi!

Cully - Tuesday, August 4, 4:00-8:00
6723 NE Killingsworth St.
Gregory Heights Library staff

Downtown Friday, August 7, 6:30-8:30pm
Lovejoy Fountain Park, 
1990 SW 4th Ave
Central Library staff

Fairview - Tuesday, August 4, 5:00-8:00
Community Park, 21600 NE Park Lane
Fairview Library staff

Foster/PowellTuesday, August 4, 6:30-8:30
Kern Park, 
SE 67th Ave & Center St
Holgate Library staff
 
Mill ParkTuesday, August 4, 5:00-8:00
Mill City Park, SE 117th Ave & Mill Ct
Midland Library staff
 
Rockwood Tuesday, August 4, 5:00-8:00
Vance Park, 1400 SE 182nd Ave
Rockwool Library and systemwide staff
 
South BurlingameTuesday, August 4, 5:00-8:00
Burlingame Park, SW 12th Ave & Falcon St
Hillsdale Library staff
 
 

Spare Parts book jacketI like finding a book that is both engaging and makes me think. Spare Parts is one of those books. It is the story of four teens in a poor Phoenix high school who join the robotics club. Their teacher decides to challenge them to design an underwater robot for a NASA sponsored robotics competition. They overcome all sort of design challenges to end up winning.That would be a good story in itself; now throw in the fact that all four boys are undocumented. They are from Mexico and they live under constant threat of being deported. If they had been citizens, winning a major robotics competition would have led to scholarships and opportunities. For Oscar, Cristian, Luis and Lorenzo it led to struggling to get into college, deportation and dead end jobs.

Spare Parts; Four undocumented teenagers, one ugly robot and the battle for the American dream, by Joshua Davis will change the way you view the debate on immigration and show how people's lives can be negatively affected by government policies.

Were you popular? I don’t think I was popular. Actually I don’t know if I was mean or nice. I thought I was a social outcast until I saw the 30 Rock episode about Liz Lemon’s class reunion. Liz Lemon thinks she was a lonely nerd but she was a tyrant!  Oh she had a way with words that tormented her classmates. I felt haunted after seeing that episode. I know I said zingers like Liz Lemon, but I don’t know if anyone heard them. The last time I read one of my middle school or high school journals I tore it up and burned it. I felt pretty tortured by classmates and my mother. I definitely expressed that on the journal page.

When you read Maya Van Wagenen’s memoir you won’t be tempted to tear it up. No. Popular a Memoir : vintage wisdom for a modern geek is filled with good tips for teens who are working on popularity. And her writing isn’t full of angst -- it’s inspired! When Maya’s family was decluttering their house she discovered her father’s garage sale find: Betty Cornell’s Teen-age Popularity Guide . Betty has lots of tips on how to become popular. Maya was intrigued. And her mother, a documentarian, encouraged Maya to secretly take on the experiment of using Betty’s 60 plus year old tips on how to become popular. Could you wear pearls? Maya takes on wearing pearls, makeup, and sitting where no unpopular teen has sat before: the popular kid’s lunch table. Is it the experiment? Or the journey that enlightens Maya? You’ll have to read her most excellent memoir and find out.

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