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Two children smilingDental health is really important to our overall health; teeth and mouths need to be healthy so that we can eat, talk and smile, and they are also portals into our bodies, so it’s important to keep them in good working order.

How can you get a good start, if you’re a kid, or give your child a good start, if you’re a parent?

First, have a look at this page from the Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives to learn about kids’ healthy mouths. You can also find out about teeth at different ages here, too.

There is also much more information on MedlinePlus, a great resource for health information and you can also check out the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD)’s website for parents and caregivers.

Babies

Healthy baby teeth are important, too, even though they’ll later be replaced by adult teeth. Find out why baby teeth matter, and how to keep them healthy.

Children

Want to learn about your teeth, and how to keep them healthy? Start here.

Teens

How can you take care of your beautiful smile? Find out about tooth health here.

Parents

How much do you know about taking care of your child’s teeth? Try this quiz to find out! Want to learn more? Start here. Here are some more tips for taking care of your child’s teeth.

Get step by step instructions on brushing and flossing with your child here.

Does your child resist cleaning his or her teeth? Here are tips to help you and your child succeed.

 

Still have questions? Remember that your library is here to help. Contact us by email, phone or come right in!

 

The first page of The Hound of the Baskervilles, from The Strand MagazineMmm... cereal. For the longest time I dreamed of opening a food cart which would serve nothing but different variations on breakfast cereal - and this was before food carts were such a très-Portland thing. But wait a second! I’m getting off track. This blog post isn’t about cereals, it’s about another 19th century innovation: serialized novels, stories told in installments.

Serials are big right now. Television epics like Game of Thrones or Mad Men are all serialized stories, with each episode leaving you hungry for the next. There’s the true-crime podcast titled simply (and rather unimaginatively, in my opinion) Serial. And if you want to get creative, even something like professional sports could be considered a serial: you follow the story of the Portland Trailblazers through regularly occurring games, newspaper columns, and blog posts, as the story of the season unfolds in all its promise and anticlimactic tragedy.

Serials used to be a big deal in written fiction, too. The dead white guy that everyone always talks about is Charles Dickens, but there were lots of other novelists whose works appeared monthly in literary magazines of the day: Arthur Conan Doyle, George Eliot, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Wilkie Collins, and even Oregon’s own Abigail Scott Duniway, to name but a few. More recently, writers like Michael Chabon and Laura Lippman have released serialized stories in the New York Times Magazine.

If you want to really experience it 19th-century style, take a look at the Victorian Reading Project from Stanford University: you can download PDF scans of story installments from Dickens and Doyle exactly as they appeared in the magazines of the time. Try reading one installment every week, and see if you can resist the temptation to binge-read the entire story.

I’ve made a reading list of novels, both old and new, which started life as installments. I invite you to sit down, pour yourself a big bowl of serial, and dig in. One chapter at a time.

I just read a fun library book about a family that sailed from Kodiak Alaska to Australia with their ten month old son. The book came from the Fairbanks Alaska public library, but I picked it up at the Capitol Hill Branch of the Multnomah County Library. Interlibrary Loan made this possible.

Several times a year I want to read a book that Multnomah County Library, (MCL), doesn’t own so I put a request in for an Interlibrary loan, (ILL). It is an easy way to expand my reading horizons.

To get started you need to set up an ILL account. Just type ILL in the orange search box on the MCL web site. Then click on Service - Interlibrary Loan to get to the ILL information page. You will want to read the what we borrow and how to use Interlibrary loan pages. There is also a Create an interlibrary loan account link.

The process is more involved than placing a hold so feel free to ask your local librarian for help. You also need to be patient since a four to five week wait is fast for an ILL. Next time MCL doesn't have the book you want give ILL a try.

Oh, the book I read was South From Alaska, by Mike Litzow. He also has a blog, http://thelifegalactic.blogspot.com/, they are now sailing in Patagonia.

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

Photo of Gustav HolstOne hundred years ago, English composer Gustav Holst began work on what would become his most famous work -- The Planets -- which he would complete in 1916. The work is a suite for orchestra, with each movement being named after a planet in the Solar System. At the time of its writing, the existence of Pluto was unknown; and so Neptune was the most remote planet to be included in the work.Image of Solar System

Holst died in 1934, not long after Pluto's discovery in 1930 by astronomer Clyde Tombaugh at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona. With the official count of planets expanded to nine, I always thought it was unfortunate -- maybe even a little sad -- that Holst was not able to "complete" his suite by adding in a movement named after the planet Pluto. But fast-forwarding about 75 years, Pluto's status was reduced to that of a dwarf planet by the International Astronomical Union.

So maybe Holst didn't just run out of time after all. Perhaps he just didn't consider the tiny newcomer to be worthy of sitting alongside such lofty celestial bodies as Mars and Jupiter!

Years ago I had the opportunity to work as an English teacher in a Montessori school. It was then when I had my first experience working with bilingual books. Listen to the Desert by the Mexican American writer Pat Mora kept my attention because of its simplicity and content. Inspired by the book, I developed a project with the 1st grade children studying the desert. The project ended with a class open to the children’s parents -- it was a total success. You can have experiences like this at home, too! Libraries are a fantastic resource for parents who want to explore a variety of topics and reading levels with bilingual books.

 

Who could imagine that years later Pat Mora would visit our libraries during the Children’s Day, Book Day celebration, where she autographed her book Yum! MmMm! Qué Rico! I even got a chance to share with her my experience of using Listen to the desert as part of my teaching project.

 

Here's a list of my favorite bilingual books. Enjoy!

 

Años atrás tuve la oportunidad de trabajar como maestra de inglés en una escuela Montessori y fue entonces cuando tuve mi primera experiencia trabajando con libros bilingües. 

Oye el desierto de la escritora México americana Pat Mora llamó mi atención por su simplicidad y contenido e inspirada por tal contexto desarrollé un proyecto con los niños de 1er grado sobre el  desierto como tema principal. El proyecto finalizó con una clase abierta a los padres de familia la cual fue un éxito total. Experiencias como esta pueden ser repetidas en casa y las bibliotecas son un recurso fantástico para aquellos padres de familia que quieran explorar diversos contenidos y niveles de lectura con sus hijos interactuando con libros bilingües.

 

Años después Pat Mora visitaría varias de nuestras bibliotecas durante la celebración del Día de los niños, El día de los libros y al autografiarme su libro Yum! MmMm! Qué Rico! pude compartir mi experiencia con aquel proyecto cuando siendo maestra.

 

Te invito a que utilices nuestros recursos y espero que disfrutes esta colección de mis libros favoritos.

 

 

 

His readers know suspense writer Andrew J. Rush as a successful mild-mannered author of high profile suspense mysteries and thrillers. His publisher is happy because Andrew’s books sell thousands of copies and he is in high demand as a speaker in bookstores across the U.S.  He has a beautiful house, a lovely submissive wife and is able to send his children to the best and most exclusive schools.  Enthusiastic reviewers hint that he may be compared to Stephen King, although Andrew himself can’t see it.  

But Andrew holds his cards close to his chest because on the side where it is dark and unkempt and cold, is the Jack of Spades.  The  books written by the Jack of Spades are cruel and twisted and violent.  They are so secret that even Andrew’s publisher doesn’t know his real name; he has a locked room in the basement where he writes his Jack of Spades books.

The manuscripts are unsigned and all the profits  go to a private bank account.  His family live in complete ignorance of these secrets.

Then two things happen:

First a woman accuses him of breaking into her house and stealing her ‘words’- ideas, sentences and whole paragraphs that appear in his published titles.

Second- his daughter accidently picks up and reads one of the books written by the Jack of Spades.  She is disgusted and horrified to find some events described there are taken from her own family.

As Andrew desperately tries to hang on to his ‘normal’ life he begins to hear a black, ugly voice buzzing in the back of his mind. ‘Do it, Do it Do it’.                                                                          Wondering who ends up holding all the aces? Read Jack of Spades by Joyce Carol Oates

                                                                      

                                                                       

Upcycling is the transformation of an object from one use to another. A man’s shirt might become a little girl’s dress, for example. The best upcycling is when trash is transformed into treasure. Crafty people see potential where other people see waste, so the next time you wonder if there might be another purpose for an item that you are about to throw out, take a few minutes to search online first to see what’s out there.

 

Try a Google search using the words “upcycle”, “reuse”, or “repurpose” with the name of the object to be remade (for example, “tin cans upcycle”). One of the top results will generally be images for your search words, so click on these words to quickly scan for appealing ideas. There may be many ways to repurpose common objects and fewer for less common items. Some of the ideas are brilliant and some are daffy, but these might stimulate ideas of your own.

 

Many of the top results will be from Pinterest, the visual bookmarking tool. Of course, you can go directly to Pinterest and search using the same search terms that you used in Google. However, the search will generate slightly different results depending upon whether you use “upcycle”, “repurpose”, or “reuse” so be sure to play around a bit. You must have an account to search Pinterest but if you do not, it is easy to create one since all you need is an email and a password. The only personal information that you provide is your name, age, and sex.


Of course, the library has many books featuring upcycled projects and the best way to find these is to search by subject using the words “salvage waste” in either the Classic Catalog or My MCL. Alternately, you can do a keyword search using “upcycling” or “repurpose”.

In the 1970’s, if you lived in a small southwestern desert town near the Mexico border, you didn’t expect to hear much soul music on the radio. So, when Diane Mays ran down 2nd Street hollering “there’s Negroes on the radio!” ; nobody paid attention. Then Gary, her brother, put a radio on the front porch and turned it up. That brought all the Saturday clean-up to a screeching halt. Radios switched on from the gambling man's house all the way down to the preacher's.

The piano was striding, the bass was bumping and the drums thumping. So the words caught us all by surprise.

"Did they say Jesus?"

 "Naw, they must be thinking that's how you say Hay-zeus (spelled "Jesus" in Spanish)."

"Hush now, let's us listen."

And yes, that was gospel on the radio.

For a sample of what we heard go to Hoopla, sign in and type this: "Oh Happy Day". Click on the one by Edwin Hawkins-2004. It's short 'cause church mothers was falling out all over and couldn't take much.

Citing Emma Brown, Washington Post Staff Writer; Wed July 14, 2010:

Edwin Hawkins & Family won a Grammy for "Oh, Happy Day" in 1970. It was the 1st gospel song to climb mainstream charts. In 1968, a (Berkeley, Calif., choir) under the direction of Hawkins recorded an album. They expected to sell a few hundred as a fundraiser for an upcoming trip to Washington, D. C. But one of their songs--"Oh Happy Day"--caught the eye of a local Dj, who played it on the radio. It became an international hit, selling an estimated 7 million copies.  It was the first gospel song to climb the mainstream charts.

Folks started talking about modern vs traditional gospel.

"What is tradition, anyway?" Bishop (Walter) Hawkins once said. "Gospel music doesn't have a particular style. Gospel's got to progress."

In our little dried up town, far from the centers of black culture, even we knew 'thangs' had changed!

 

 

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