Blogs:

I judged a book by its cover.
The cover is fantastic—I mean look at it.

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It was screaming for me to pick it up and then, well that’s a coincidence, the author’s name is Ned Beauman. Could it be? Why yes. This is the son of Nicola Beauman, founder of Persephone Books Ltd.—and we all know how I feel about Persephone Books.

Ned, I congratulate you on the stunning representation of L.A.

"The whole city felt like an apartment for sale, which the estate agent had sprayed with perfume just prior to a viewing."

and the many other, equally unique sentences that I wanted to copy down and pin to my wall. However, I could have done without reading the whole of the book. 

Can someone please just put together a book of collected witticisms by Ned Beauman and call it good?

Want a list of more book covers that are better than the books? Try this.


 

dog and jim butcher book

 

Thanks to a colleague's enthusiastic recommendation of Jim Butcher’s Dresden Filesmy summer reading is all set

However, all good things must come to an end(or at least until a new book in the series comes out…) and the hunt for the ever elusive "next book" begins.

 

 

 

If you are looking for your next book, check out a few of the many ways you can discover them through Multnomah County Library

Don't forget that you can always ask any of us on the My Librarian team for a personalized recommendation!

Take a look around! While you do that,  I'll be hunkered down with Stella and Chicago's best wizard for hire...

 

 

 

Mời quý vị đến tham quan Hội Chợ Y Tế Cộng Đồng Người Á Châu vào thứ Bảy, ngày 22 tháng 8, 2015. Thư Viện Hạt Multnomah sẽ có một gian hàng ở hội chợ. Hội chợ sẽ có nhiều thông tin hữu ích về sức khoẻ đời sống và các dịch vụ y tế miễn phí.

Did Aztecs practice human sacrifice? Yes, and so did the Incan and Mayan people. These three Mesoamerican cultures all practiced different forms of human sacrifice for religious reasons.

The Aztec religion included the belief that the sun god, Huitzilopochtli, needed human blood so that the sun would continue its journey in the sky. Both volunteers and prisoners of war found themselves sacrificed for the god.Aztec ceremonial knife

Both the Aztec and Mayan played a ball game that differed a little between the cultures but was a religious ritual for both. And for both the Aztec and Mayan, you didn't want to lose--losers lost a lot more than just the game. Learn about the game at http://chichenitzaruins.org/mayan-ball-game/

Incan priests practiced divination, a ritual to answer questions or to tell the future. Incan divination involved offerings of food and drink to the gods, but also animals and people. The young members of society were valued as sacrifices, which happened in sacred places high in the mountains, closer to the sky gods. One young woman who died hundreds of years ago was found in 1995. She was named Juanita and also is known as the Ice Maiden Mummy.

You can find out more about sacrifices and the ties to religion by going to Student Resources in Context or UXL Encyclopedia of Mythology. Search for "inca mythology," "aztec mythology," or "maya mythology" to learn about the gods, myths and ceremonies. You'll need your Multnomah County Library card if you are outside the library.

Need help finding more information?  Ask a librarian!

 

Sexual orientation, sexual identity, and gender identity have been getting more attention in the news lately, with the Supreme Court decision about same-sex marriage and Caitlyn Jenner's public transition.

Confused? Curious? Concerned? All of the above? The library is a great place to learn more. Teen Health and Wellness has informative articles and also offers teens the opportunity to submit your own stories and videos.  

If you're in or close to Portland, the services of the Sexual Minority Youth Resource Center and TransActive Gender Center may be helpful.

No matter where you are, you can call, text, or chat YouthLine.

And the video below, LGBTQ: Understanding Sexual Orientation and Gender Identities, is a good brief overview of these topics that includes stories from several youth.

“Help! I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” We’ve all seen and heard that ad on TV. But if you decide to get a medical alert device, or are helping an older friend or relative get one, you might be ready to scream “Help! I need a device but can’t decide which one to get!”

Here’s some tips to make things easier. First, make a list of features you want the medical alert to have. The Federal Trade Commission has some good advice about things to consider. An article called “Personal Emergency Response Systems” from CRS – Adult Health Advisor (June 2012) also gives a checklist of possible concerns [ Note: to read the article, you may have to enter your library card number and PIN]. This blog post from Huffington Post, Post 50 examines three major designs and providers of each kind.

It’s hard to find unbiased reviews. For example, AARPseems to recommend ADT Companion Service, offering a discount to members, but if they are profiting on these sales, their endorsement might not be unbiased. 

Luckily, Consumer Reports did this unbiased online comparison in 2015. And in 2014, Consumer Reports Magazine also published some unbiased information in their articles "Should You Buy a Medical Alert System?" and "How to Pick a Medical Alert System."  [ Note: to read these articles, you may have to enter your library card number and PIN]. 

Also, Lawserver Online RatingLab’s comparison of medical alerts provides product reviews, advice about comparing them and a ratings chart. You can also go to the Better Business Bureau and do a search for “medical alarms” limited to your zip code, to find how they’ve rated local services.

If you are trying to help an older person who lives out of state, you might also want to find out what is available to them locally. You can use this eldercare locator to find agencies where they live, that can help you.

Be wary of phone salespeople, and online ads; there are lots of scams out there. The resources we’ve listed should help you find a reliable device that will work for you.  Need more help? Contact a librarian and we'll be glad to help. 

 

Chinese staff波特兰华人服务中心将于八月二十二日举行一年一度的亜裔社区义诊活动,你会到场吗?穆鲁玛郡图书馆将会在场参与,提供有关促进身心健康的资源及书籍,並有华语职员为大家解答有关图书馆各类活动的资料。欢迎各位到图书馆的摊位与我们見面,让我们为你介绍最热门的健康食疗、运动新书及影带。亜裔社区义诊活动在8/22 上午十一时至下午四时于3430 SE Powell 街华人服务中心举行。

Ah, the lost art of letter writing. I still find myself checking my mail hoping that there will actually be a personal letter mixed in with the credit card applications. But alas, I can’t recall the last time I received a real letter. When I want to immerse myself in the beauty of letter-writing, I shall open up Shaun Usher’s, Letters of Note: An Eclectic Collection of Correspondence Deserving of A Wider Audience

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Shaun Usher loves letters (and lists too. His second book, Lists of Note includes such wonders as Michelangelo's illustrated shopping list and Marilyn Monroe’s New Year’s resolutions written when she was 29-years-old. Unfortunately MCL doesn’t own a copy right now.).

But back to the pleasures of letters. Usher has collected 125 letters from far and wide and long ago to more recent times. Many of the letters are from well-known figures but some are from everyday folks. All of the letters have a short introduction to put them into historical context and a good share of them include a reproduction of the letter itself. The effort and creativity that went into these letters - a 13-year-old boy at a school for the blind wrote in Braille to President Eisenhower. The sadness - Virginia Woolf’s note to her husband before she committed suicide. Witty, funny, artistic ones. Beautiful, heartfelt, poignant letters. They’re all here.

If you’d like to peruse even more letters, take a look at Shaun Usher's website where he has posted a whopping 900 letters; they’re indexed in various ways so one could spend weeks reading all of them. Or take a look at some of these books that are chock full of letters. I, however, think I’ll go write a letter to a friend.

RoganGoshMcCarthyArtDark Horse Comics' The Best of Milligan & McCarthy is a gorgeous and (almost) exhaustive compendium, collecting the duo's legendary runs like "Paradax!," "Rogan Gosh," and the previously unavailable "Skin."  Both Milligan and McCarthy went on to forge distinctive careers, but the work collected in this collection is explosive, bewildering, and immediate - completely ignoring the careerist ambitions and institutional strictures both artists eventually had to confront and contend with . 

The comics are all over the place (sometimes head-wreckingly so) but they're always readily situated in the catastrophic top-spin of Thatcher-Reagan economic/social tachycardia.  McCarthy's artwork is typically hyper-active and color-saturated, pushing the physical boundaries of panel and page (the exception being the provisionally censored "Skin" - which is wrought in unique pastel colors by the always incredible Carol Swain). Milligan's writing winds a loose balance between non-linear and scabrous - taking very little seriously - but capable of surprising moments of tenderness and expansive vision.

Their work can definitely jolt - and possibly offend (especially "Skin" - which tells the sad angry, and brief tale of a thalidomide-deformed skinhead in the 1980s UK).  But it's heavily recommended for fans of politically-charged comics that explore the horizons and possibilities of graphic narrative and page art (see Grant Morrison, Alan Moore, Sandman-era Neil Gaiman).

 

World War Two posterSecond World War- Spitfire - cut out viewAt the end of the Great War (as World War One was called at the time), people thought that such a large-scale conflict could never happen again.  Treaties were signed, the League of Nations was formed, new countries were created and Germany was heavily punished for its part in the war.  These measures did nothing to prevent a war from erupting twenty years later and, in fact, caused resentment in Germany that led to new German aggression.  In 1939, another conflict began in Europe that became World War Two.

For summary information and timelines, check out these two websites:
The History Place provides a timeline of World War II events. Many of the events have links to more detailed information and photographs. In its WWII section, BBC Education online explores secret service, presents radio reports the days before Britain declared war and sound clip memories of evacuees, and various photos from the war. The BBC also features a site for primary school students about children’s experiences during the war.  For a visually interesting site, see The Imperial War Museum’s page on WWII. It includes short essays, photos and film clips on everything from “How Alan Turing Cracked the Enigma Code” and “How Radar Changed The Second World War” to “11 Amazing Home Front Posters from the Second World War”.

For primary sources, take a look at Yale University’s World War II documents. This site provides the text of major documents including armistice agreements, Nuremberg War Crimes Trial sources, German and Japanese surrender documents, and more. The University of Washington also has links to primary sources from WWII and the era including photos of ration cards and posters, diaries, films and a WWII image bank with photos from the Netherlands, and much more.

photo of raising the flag on Iwo JimaFor resources about the involvement of the United States in the war, check out some of these sites:
A People at War highlights the contributions of thousands of Americans, both military and civilian, who served their country during WWII. The Pictures of World War II site from the National Archives includes about 200 photographs divided into a wide variety of categories; everything from "Japan Attacks" to "Rest & Relaxation". The National Archives website also includes links to World War II records including sections on America on the Homefront, Japanese American Internment and Relocation Records, and photographs of African Americans during World War II.  The National WWII Museum has a great collection of images and oral history interviews.  The U.S. Navy has a website devoted to WWII including information on Pacific battles, Pearl Harbor and the invasion of Normandy. PBS and Ken Burns created a televsion series entitled The War that is "the story of the Second World War through personal accounts of a handful of men and women from four American towns." You'll find lots of information from the series and links to other media and sources on this website

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