Blogs:

In the face of tragedy and violence, it can be hard to know what to say to kids. How do you answer your child’s questions while reassuring them that you will keep them safe? The American Psychological Association says, "It is important to remember that children look to their parents to make them feel safe. This is true no matter what age your children are, be they toddlers, adolescents or even young adults."

Here are three resources that can help parents and caregivers:

Helping your children manage distress in the aftermath of a shooting. From the American Psychological Association.

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network has several resources about mass violence available on their website including Talking to Children about the Shooting and Tips on Media Coverage

A Survival Guide for Parents of Teenagers: What if the next shooting is at my school? A tip sheet for talking to your teen about school violence. From the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development.

We know that snow day closures can throw things off-kilter. Don't worry, we've got you covered. For snow day closures:

  • Don't worry about returning your books when the library is closed for snow days.
  • Late fines won't be charged for the days the library is closed.
  • No holds will expire while the library is closed.

If you can't get into a library once we're open, contact us. We can extend due dates and holds, and fix any problems with late fines. Thanks again for your support of the library.

St Johns Library in the snow

You meet interesting people at the libraryPat Daggett

by Donna Childs

We know that libraries are full of stories, but they aren’t all between the book covers.  The staff and volunteers may have stories too.  Take Pat Daggett who enters holds data at the Sellwood Library every Tuesday.  Who would know that she and her husband lived in Saudi Arabia for four years?  A transportation expert, he helped the Saudis set up a bus system, while she did office work for the US Army Corps of Engineers.  After returning to the US with a new understanding of the region, they answered an ad to host Middle Eastern students.  That led to ten years of serving as second parents to students from Saudi Arabia, Libya, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar.  Not only do the young people keep in touch after returning home, one called when a new student was arriving. He asked to speak to the new fellow to ensure that they’d be ok.   In addition to forming close friendships with their charges, they saw this venture as an “opportunity to create tolerance.”

In addition to the Corps of Engineers, Pat has worked for such diverse organizations as Reed College, AT&T, a congressman in Washington DC, attorneys in Ohio and Delaware, and the Oregon State Legislature.  She also spent 19 years working in many capacities at the American Tinnitus Association, where she became an expert in hearing issues.  

With a BA in Library Science, Pat was also an elementary school librarian for two years. As a member of the University Club’s Library Committee, she helps choose books for the club’s library and organize an annual dinner featuring a local writer as guest speaker.  Thus, it seemed natural for Pat to volunteer at Sellwood when she retired.  At first, she canvassed the library searching for holds, but now foot problems have necessitated a more sedentary task:  processing data on holds coming from and going to other County libraries.  Like many volunteers who work with holds, she relishes the chance to discover new books, and she enjoys Sellwood’s intimate atmosphere where she can get to know staff and patrons.


Home library:  Sellwood

Currently reading:  Dinner with Edward by Isabel Vincent

Favorite book from childhood:  The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Favorite section of the library:  Historical fiction and geography

E-reader or paper book?  paper

Favorite reading guilty pleasure:  before/during chores

Favorite place to read:  in a patch of sun

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Irie Page is about to turn 14. Instead of, say, a birthday sleepover, she has planned a gift for her community, a free event featuring Mike Domitrz, the founder of the Date Safe Project and a consent educator for kids, teens and adults.  The funny, interactive presentation that he gives to teens and adults is called "Can I Kiss You?", which is also the title of his book. It focuses on how to have healthy, safe relationships and how to both avoid sexual assault and avoid sexually assaulting someone else. Her family raised money online to pay Domitrz's speaking fee, and after the story was covered on the local news, they got all the funding they needed. The event will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 9th in the Lincoln Recital Hall at Portland State University. PSU has waived the rental fees in support of Irie’s event.


I first met this remarkable young woman at the reference desk at my library when she was just a little kid signing up for our Read to the Dogs program. We book lovers who work at the library always notice the passionate readers, the ones who leave with huge stacks of books they’re obviously eager to dive into, and that was Irie. When she was old enough, I suggested that she volunteer for our Summer Reading program, giving out prizes to kids for reading, and she brought huge enthusiasm to this as well. When she told me last summer about the event she was planning, we decided to put together a book display. Irie chose all the books herself. If you can’t get in to see the display, here’s the list.

“After I saw Malala speak, I was inspired to do something for my community,” Irie told me. She originally wanted actress and feminist Emma Watson. "That's not going to happen," her mom told her, and then suggested Domitrz. When Irie happened upon a book here at the library about philanthropy parties, her idea took off.

“I’ve always seen things in the world and thought, ‘That’s messed up. I want to change that,” said Irie. Like Malala, the Pakistani advocate for girls’ rights to education, she decided she could make a difference. She chose to start here, in her own city. 


***EDITED to update Irie's story. This event was a huge success. There was so much community interest that Portland State University gave them a bigger theater in which to hold it, and it was still standing room only, with more than 500 in attendance. I took my middle school-age son and we both found it interesting and inspiring. I was delighted last week when I ran into Irie in the library and she told me she's one of two state honorees for the Prudential Spirit of Community Award. This is a very big deal! She's won $1000, a silver medallion, and a trip to Washington, D.C. At a ceremony in D.C., five national honorees will be chosen from among the state award winners. The staff at my library, who has known Irie for so long, is rooting for her to win the national award, which comes with even more honors and with cash awards for her and for the charity of her choice. We're so proud of her.

 

cover of Tales of a Fourth Grade NothingIf I mention Peter and Fudge, I’m guessing there are 10-year-olds, 16-year-olds, 30- and 50-year-olds who will know these brothers. They probably also know that you can’t get freckles by drinking a nasty tasting potion. Many may remember the cruelty of classmates in Blubber. And they’ll probably know exactly who wrote Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, Freckle Juice, and Blubber--Judy Blume of course! cover of Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret

She happens to be celebrating her 80th birthday on February 12 and I've been reminded of how much I loved her books growing up. I commiserated with older sibling Peter living with his irrepressible little brother Fudge. I went along with Margaret as she dealt with friendships and puberty in Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. We were checked for scoliosis at school and I thought of Deenie, the brace she wore and how much she wanted to be a regular teenager.

Judy Blume’s habit of writing real life and real characters continues in her adult novels. She wrote Summer Sisters for adults, but there are no doubt also teen readers for this book about friendship and choices. She later used an event from her own teenage years to explore loss, love and secrets as friends, families and strangers find their lives changed In the Unlikely Event.

Judy Blume is one of the most consistently challenged authors with books like Forever and Then Again, Maybe I Won’t. She hasn’t shied away from divorce, puberty, bullying, sex. It’s likely her honest and realistic writing is the reason for her fans across generations.

cover of Summer SistersI’m glad she’s been part of my reading life. Thank you for your books and happy birthday, Judy Blume!

 

 

 

 

 

Maya Lin:  Thinking with Her Hands book jacketEvery year I make a bunch of New Year's resolutions and this year is no different.  I've decided to ditch the annual "floss daily" one and add something more captivating (and hopefully more achievable). The most fun resolutions I make are all about reading and in 2018, I plan to read more non-fiction for kids and teens.  My nerdy librarian side has decided that I will take one "Dewey century" per month (which leaves me two months to read something else!) and explore books that provide inspiration for careers and vocations within each range.  I'm not talking about books like the super useful, but not super stimulating, Occupational Outlook Handbook, but books about interesting people doing interesting things.  I randomly came across a book about Maya Lin recently, so decided to start with architects and artists,The Shape of the World book jacket thus books from the 700-799 Dewey range were on my nightstand in January.  I loved  Maya Lin: Thinking Wtih Her Hands, a small, perfectly packaged book about Lin and some of her most famous projects like the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial in Washington, D.C.  I knew exactly nothing about another architect, I.M. Pei, until I read I.M. Pei: Architect of Time, Place and Purpose.  What a fascinating guy!  Beyond these two books, I read a number of picture book biographies for younger budding architects and artists.  You can find the list here.  So if you know some kids who love their L-squares, mechanical pencils and paint brushes, hand them a few of these books and see where they go! 

P.S.  I'd love to hear about YOUR reading resolutions for 2018!

Percy JulianWelcome to Black History Month. Every day this month features people and events making significant contributions to American history and how we live Now! Don't miss programming, classes and events throughout February and beyond at a library near you.

 

Slavery to Civil Rights

D'wayne EdwardsInnovation

Fashion

Now!

 

2018狗年年宵会! 一年一度的年宵会, 將于二月十日星期六 (上午十时至下午六时), 在俄勒岗会展中心举行。(详情可参阅波特兰新闻)

穆鲁玛郡图书馆将于年宵会摆设摊位,提供有关文化, 饮食, 健康等等的资源,並有华语职员为大家介绍及解答有关图书馆各类活动的资料。欢迎各位到图书馆的摊位与我们見面!

Chúc Mừng Năm Mới!Chúc Mừng Năm Mới!

Chúc quý vị Năm Mới An Khang Thịnh Vượng. Năm nay, thư viện sẽ có quầy hàng ở Hội chợ Tết tại Holiday Inn. Chúng tôi sẽ có sách và phim cho mượn, các tài liệu về những chương trình phục vụ của thư viện, và quà tặng miễn phí. Mời quý vị đến tham dự và vui Tết với chúng tôi.

Chi tiết:

Chủ Nhật, Ngày 18 Tháng 2 Năm 2018

Giờ: 12:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Địa điểm: 8439 NE Columbia Blvd, Portland OR 97220

 

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