Blogs: Diseases

It can be frustrating, if you are a kid or teen, to find answers to questions you have about your own health. Sometimes you feel shy about asking someone else questions. And when you look on the Internet, there are so many articles, it’s hard to tell what to read and believe.

Try using KidsHealth and TeenHealth, to look up stuff about yourself, and for homework assignments about health, disease and the human body.

The library database Teen Health and Wellness has good articles about health and disease, (also great for homework), as well as links to teen help hotlines (including info on getting free mobile apps for hotlines). Articles here can be instantly translated into dozens of common languages other than English too. You will need your library card barcode number and PIN number to use this.

This list from MedlinePlus connects to lots of different articles about teen health you might also find useful.

Need more information? Contact a librarian to be sure you get what you need.

 

Medicine is one thing people use to help them feel better when they are ill.  Some medicines are taken once, some for a few days, and some for longer. For medicines that can't be swallowed, other methods like shots can help you stay healthy. 

Another common reason for getting a shot is vaccination. Vaccination, also called immunization, is one way that some people choose to prevent diseases and viruses and to stay healthy.  For more vaccination related information, you can:

More questions? You can always contact a librarian for all your library and information needs!

Diabetes is a disease that people have known about for thousands of years, even if they didn't call it by that name.  Wonderopolis has a simple, helpful overview of diabetes and a quick interview with a young diabetic about how he test his blood.  There are actually two types of diabetes with similar symptoms and treatments but different causes.  The American Diabetes Association website has information about Type 1 Diabetes, and they also have a free, dowloadable booklet about living with Type 2 diabetes.  You can even find statistics about the frequency of diabetes in the United States from the Center for Disease Control.  

 

Symptoms of the disease can be scary, but it helps to know more about what is happening inside the body.  Some people take medicine to help control their diabetes, and other people can control it through their diet, choosing recipes and foods that help control their blood sugar levels.

Once you've learned about the disease, you can test your knowledge with this crossword puzzle or one of these online games about making smart food choices.  

And as always you can contact a librarian for more information!

 

Your body is a pretty amazing place to be.  Every day things try to make you sneeze, make your nose run, make you cough, or even something worse.  Lucky for you, your immune system fights them off - most of the time.

So think of your immune system as the Immune Platoon, a bunch of superheroes battling so you can be as healthy as you can be.  Using some great online resources you can get an overview of the immune system, find out how your body responds to an attack on your immune system by playing a parasite game or an immune system game, and even quiz yourself to see what you know!

And you can always contact a librarian for even more info!

You listen to Radiolab, right? I know bunches of you do. We all stood shoulder-to shoulder late last year waiting to get into their live gig at The Keller Auditorium. (I was the short brunette with a glass of wine.) Anyway, did you hear their recent replay of the show on rabies? It blew my diabolical-virus-loving mind. And made me think back to a book I read a couple years ago, Rabid, by Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy. If you loved that Radiolab show, read the book. It chronicles the Milwaukee protocol story, and tons of other cool stuff.   

Book cover, Rabid by Bill Wasik and Monica MurphySo. Rabies. Turns out that it is one smart virus, like so many of the super deadly ones are, and we can learn loads of valuable info from its four thousand year history. It spreads easily from animal to human, and exhibits pretty normal symptoms at first... headache, fever, sore throat. Makes you think twice about that cold you're fighting now, doesn't it? 

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