Blogs: Educators

Attention educators! Are you tired of using the same old books with your classes every year? Attend one of our summer educator workshops in August to learn about the latest and greatest materials to use in the classroom!

 

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum

Come to this workshop to learn about new books you might integrate into your language arts, social studies, math, science and arts curriculum.

 

For K-5th grade educators:

  • Tuesday, August 5, 2014, 2-4:30 p.m. Central Library, 801 S.W. 10th Ave. in the U.S. Bank Room. Register by July 31..

 

For 6th-12th grade educators: Gotta Read This! online

  • Educators can selectively pick the subjects of greatest interest to them. We’ll notify you when online workshops are available. Register by July 31. 

 

Novel-Ties (for 4th -8th grade educators)

Discover hot, new fiction to use in book discussion groups and literature circles.

  • Thursday, August 7, 2014, 2-4:30 p.m. North Portland Library, 512 N. Killingsworth St. Register by July 31.

 

Hotwire Your Students’ Research Skills:

Connect your students with free online tutors, help them locate reliable, librarian-selected resources for their homework assignments, and find free short videos and infographics to teach information literacy skills.

  • Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 2-3:30 p.m., Central Library, 801 SW 10th Ave., in the U.S. Bank Room. Register by July 31.

 

Professional development certificates will be available for in-person and online workshops. Contact School Corps with any questions!

Attention middle and high school educators: are you looking for good, new books to use in the classroom? Watch our online booktalks from Gotta Read This: New Books to Use in Your Curriculum for Grades 6-12. We've broken them down by subject for convenience in viewing. Feel free to share the videos with other educators and your students, too! Here’s the complete list of titles from this workshop; please note that only selected titles are included in the video booktalks. 

Did you miss the summer educator workshops presented by the Multnomah County Library School Corps?

Never fear, the reading lists from all the workshops are now available in the library catalog!

 

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum for Grades K-5

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum for Grades 6-12

Learn about new books you might integrate into your language arts, social studies, math, science and art curriculum.

 

Novel-Ties: New Fiction for Literature Circles

Do you lead book discussion groups or literature circles for students? Here's a list of hot, new, discussable fiction for grades 4-8.

 

Happy reading!

What is dyslexia?
Dyslexia is an unexpected difficulty mastering literacy skills such as reading, writing, spelling and arithmetic. People with dyslexia have normal or better intelligence.
(Definition courtesy of the Blosser Center.)
 
Identifying dyslexia
“Red flags” to look for – the more you see in yourself or a child, the more likely dyslexia may be present:
Reading: misreads words, avoids reading
Spelling: misspells words
Handwriting: has “sloppy” writing
Math: has trouble with math (such as math facts)
Poor organizational skills
Difficulty telling time
May also have ADD, ADHD
 
Dyslexia Resources in Multnomah County
Provides assessment, tutoring and teacher training.  
 
Advocacy group working to improve public school instruction for children with dyslexia.
 
National organization serving people with dyslexia, their families and communities.
 
Provides assessment and tutoring.
 
Coordinates support groups and family events; provides resources and information.
 
Dyslexia Assessment
Places in the Portland metro area that can evaluate someone for dyslexia:
•Stephanie Verlinden, Children’s Program
•Colleen O’Mahoney, Multnomah Educational Testing
•Cynthia Arnold, New Leaves Clinic, Beaverton

The Great Library Card Adventure is a library card campaign for K-5 classrooms in Multnomah County, presented by the Multnomah County Library School Corps. We want every student, faculty and staff member in the county to have a Multnomah County Library card. A library card is the key to the fullest use of Multnomah County Library's information resources.

Dates:  October 1 through December 13, 2013

To sign up: Complete this form by September 20. Your school will then receive a packet of informational materials.

Send completed library card applications toMultnomah County Library School Corps, 205 NE Russell, Portland, OR 97212

Applications can also be labeled "School Corps" and dropped off at any Multnomah County Library location. Remember that library card applications must be signed on the back by the student and parent before they are submitted.

Prizes:

For students who are getting a library card for the first time:

  • A free Mini Murph Pizza from Papa Murphy's
  • 2 free game admissions and 60 nickels or 2 fee movie admissions and 1 small popcorn from Wunderland

For teachers/classrooms:

  • All teachers receive a $5 coupon for the Title Wave bookstore when they send in library card applications.
  • The first 25 classrooms with 100% of the students signed up for library cards will receive a $10 gift certificate to Green Bean Books. These classrooms will also be entered in a drawing to win one of three collections of age-appropriate fiction and non-fiction books for their classroom.

The Great Library Card Adventure is made possible in part by The Library Foundation.

Logo for Papa Murphy's Take 'N' Bake Pizza Logo for Green Bean Books Logo for Wunderland Cinema & Nickel Games

For kids, teens and teachers interested in zines, Portland offers some great resources. At the library we have a couple some good books that will tell you most of what you need to know to make zines.

The author of Stolen Sharpie Revolution 2, Alex Wrekk, lives in Portland. She's an expert on zines, and this little book, a zine itself, will tell you all the basics information you need to create a zine. She also explains tricky stuff, like how to layoutyour pages so when you print your zine, the pages will come out in the correct order. 

 

Check out Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine? by Mark Todd and Esther Pearl WatsonIt covers zine history, tools and methods for making zines, reasons for writings zines, photocopy tricks, how to promote your zine and more. 

 

 

Portland has a great zine resource called the Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC). With a name like that, of course it includes zines! The IPRC has a huge library of zines, and offers classes in zine and book making, readings, zine sales and lots of zine-related events. If you join and become a member, many of these things are discounted. If you’re a teacher, you can contact them to have someone come to your class and teach a Media Action workshop. Call them to learn more. 

Every summer, Portland has its own Zine Symposium. People come from near and far to attend this fun event to sell their zines, meet other zinesters, attend workshops and visit Portland. Best of all, it provides you with an opportunity to table and sell your own zines. Check their site  in the spring each year to get the most current  news, as they post updates about dates, location and tabling. 

Want to know more about making your own books? We have a separate blog post for kids who want to make books.

Contact us if you have other zine-related questions. 

 

Hearing and using lots of words helps children get ready to read.  The more words they know, the easier it will be for them to learn how to read.  So how do we help kids develop a BIG vocabulary?  By talking with them!  

Of course every day we might use words like breakfast and shoes and bedtime.  But when we expose children to the world, and then have conversations about what they experience, we introduce them to lots of new words!  

There are so many fun places to take young children in Multnomah county.  Some of them are free (like your neighborhood playground) or inexpensive (like Portland Parks & Rec’s indoor parks), but some of them can make a pretty big dent in your wallet!  

Fortunately many of our local attractions offer discount days on a regular basis.  Admission to OMSI only costs $2 the first Sunday of the month.  The Oregon Zoo charges only $4 on the second Tuesday of every month.  The Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden is free every Tuesday and Wednesday, free from the day after Labor Day through the end of February, and free year-round for children under 12.  The Chinese & Japanese Gardens and the Art Museum also have free days periodically each year.  

Pairing your adventures with books on related topics provides a great opportunity to continue and extend your conversations.  If your toddler loved watching the monkeys at the zoo, try reading Busy Monkeys together.  After building a tower at OMSI, your child might enjoy Dreaming Up.  Try pairing a trip to the Art Museum with Katie and the Water Lily Pond or a visit to any of the gardens with Flower Garden.  These are just a few suggestions to get you started.  We can help you find just the right book for you and your child.  And you can help your child get ready to read by having fun conversations every day.

A teacher from a childcare center recently contacted me for some library resources. She was looking for few board books, a picture book or two, a music CD, and a few rhymes with interesting content for infants and toddlers, all related to the same theme. My immediate thought was Multnomah County Library’s collection of Storytime It’s in the Bags. We have 20 themed bags for toddlers (ages 18 mths—3 yrs) and another 21 bags for preschool-aged children (3—6 years). Each bag centers on a theme and contains five books, a small toy, game, puzzle or music CD related to the theme, and an activity sheet. The sheet has a couple of rhymes or games to play with children to extend the theme, as well as some tips for sharing books with children to effectively help them gain the skills they need to become successful readers. These bags are perfect for busy childcare teachers, family childcare providers and parents who want to share thematic materials with the little ones in their care. The Storytime bags are a popular resource and they are available on the shelves in some MCL locations. The easiest way to get your hands on these bags is to look through the toddler and preschool bag lists and place holds on the ones you would like to share with the kids in your life.

MCL also has bags for infants and their caregivers (0-6 months, 6-12 months and 12-18 months). Another new set of resources are the Bolsitas de Cuentos, which are themed bags with books in Spanish and bilingual English/Spanish. The Cuentos bags contain books appropriate for children 0-5 years old, and are fun for Spanish-speaking families and families who are working at being bilingual.

Read it Again!

Does that sound familiar? How many times have you read Goodnight Moon or Where the Wild Things Are with your little ones?  I know many parents who can recite The Cat in the Hat from memory. Young children love to hear their favorite books again and again. There’s a good reason for this: the developing brain needs repetition. Repetition strengthens brain cell connections. For example, when a child encounters a new word in a  book and begins to understand the meaning of that word, each time the book is read the child’s brain secretes a chemical called “myelin,” a substance that strengthens that connection. The child’s understanding deepens each time. This is true for new words, new concepts and new experiences; learning occurs with repetition.

That’s not all. Young children notice different things each time a book is read. They just can’t take it all in on one reading. Repeated readings also help a child understand how stories work, an important skill for beginning readers. Your child will develop confidence when you stop reading at a dramatic point in a familiar story and encourage her to tell what she thinks will happen next. Children feel secure with books they know, and they learn best and absorb new information when they feel confident and secure.  So when you hear “again, again,” know that your willingness to indulge that request one more time will reap lovely rewards.

Do you read Nursery Rhymes to your child?  Do you sing to your baby?  These are wonderful ways to bond with your child.  Rhymes, such as, Itsy Bitsy Spider or songs like Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star are rhymes that many of us have known since our childhood, but I bet you didn’t know that nursery rhymes or childhood rhymes helped us learn to read and can help your child as well.  

Whenever you talk, read or sing to your child you are building connections in her brain that will last a lifetime.  Babies will show interest by widening their eyes, moving their arms and legs and smiling when they recognize a rhyme.  When you sing songs and do fingerplays with your child, you will find that they will soon imitate you.  These fingerplays and movement rhymes can help children associate words with their meanings.  Singing songs is a fun way to bond with your child and it also helps kids learn Phonological awareness or that words are broken into smaller sounds.  When children achieve phonological awareness, they are able to think about how words sound, apart from their meaning.  Research shows that children who play with sounds of words in preschool years are better prepared to read in school.  So, you can help your child from birth start getting ready to read and it doesn’t involve flashcards or videos.  It only requires you to have fun singing, rhyming, talking and reading to your child.  

Attached is booklist of rhyme collections that you can check out from the library.  Within these collections, you should be able to find rhymes and songs you may know from your childhood, as well as, new ones to use with your baby, toddler or preschooler.  Happy Rhyming!

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