Blogs: Educators

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a neurological difference often characterized by difficulties with reading, writing and spelling. It may run in the families and cannot be “cured.” Individuals with this condition must learn coping strategies.

Dyslexia has nothing to do with intelligence. With the right instruction, almost all individuals with dyslexia can learn to read.  A multi-sensory, phonics based approach is often the best way to help kids learn to read. The Orton-Gillingham, Barton System and/or Lindamood-Bell programs are well known programs that work.

This great Ted-Ed talk provides an overview of dyslexia.

What should I look for?

Decoding Dyslexia offers these early signs of dyslexia:

  • Late speech (3 years or later)
  • Mixing up sounds in multi-syllable words (e.g. bisghetti, aminal, mazageen)
  • Inability to rhyme by age 4
  • Difficulty with substitutions, omissions and deletions
  • Unusual pencil grip
  • Difficulty remembering rote facts (months of the year, days of the week)
  • Confusion of left vs. right  

One of the biggest challenges of dyslexia is counteracting shame caused by teasing and misunderstanding. Children are often teased because they can’t read as well as others. Teachers may say things like “she’s a slow reader” in front of the child or parents. Kids know what “slow” means and they often grow up believing they are “stupid” and/or “lazy.”

Headstrong Nation’s Learn the Facts wants you to know the facts, help your child recognize her/his strengths and weaknesses, learn how to talk about it with trusted friends and family and eventually, be comfortable sharing one’s real self with the world.

Dyslexia Assessment in Multnomah County

Oregon Senate Bills 612 and 1003 require school districts to universally screen for risk factors of dyslexia in kindergarten. The Oregon Department of Education provides guidance and training for districts and educators. If you or your child aren't in school or you feel the school is missing something, here are a few of the many assessment and intervention providers in the County.

The Blosser Center - Accredited by the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators, the Blosser Center provides assessment, tutoring and teacher training.

Language Skills Therapy - Provides assessment and tutoring

New Leaves Clinic - Provides assessment and treatment in Hillsboro, Oregon

PDX Reading Specialist, LLC​ - Provides assessment, tutoring, advocacy and professional development

How the library can help

There are three valid types of reading: with your eyes (print & video), with your ears (audiobooks), and with your fingers (Braille).  

Audiobooks

Typically easier for someone with dyslexia, the library has thousands of audiobooks on CD and in downloadable formats for people who read with their ears. Library information staff can help you find and use audiobooks.

DVD/Blu-ray and streaming

The library has thousands of DVDs, Blu-ray and downloadable films for people who read with eyes and ears. Library information staff can help you find and use these media.

E-books

E-books are available to borrow through OverDrive to read on your desktop or with the Libby app. Accessibility options include using screen readers, changing text size, turning on dyslexic font, reading in sepia or night mode, and more. When searching for a subject, you can also look for the format "OverDrive Read-along" which provides narration that plays along while you read. The OverDrive help page explains how to find these read-along books and library staff can help as well.

Additional resources

Bookshare e-books have functions for people with print disabilities, including low vision, dyslexia and the inability to hold a physical book. Adults with a library card can get free access through the library. Students can get access through their school.

The Oregon Talking Book and Braille Library is free for any Oregonian with a print-disability including dyslexia or dysphasia.

Attention, K-12 educators! This summer attend one of our educator workshops to learn about the library's services for teachers and the latest and greatest books to use in the classroom. All workshops will be offered online this year.

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum: This workshop highlights new books you might integrate into your language arts, social studies, math, science and arts curriculum. We have separate resources for educators of grades K-5 and 6-12.

  • Kindergarten to fifth-grade educators: This is a two-part webinar, with part one (covering language arts and social studies) on August 2 from 2-3:15 pm, and part two (covering science, math, health and the arts) on August 4 from 2-3:15 pm. Certificates of attendance will be provided. Register now for part one | Register now for part 2  
  • Middle and high school educators: Sign up now, and we’ll contact you to let you know when the online booklists are available.  

Library Connect Introduction: Chances are every K-12 student in your school district already has a Multnomah County Library card! Learn about this school-library partnership and how to get your students started: August 9, 2-3:30 pm. 

Library Connect Advanced: Are your students all set to use their Library Connect accounts?  Learn more about the Multnomah County Library resources available to support classroom learning and extracurricular interests: August 11, 2-3:30 p.m. 

Talking Equity and Social Justice: Booktalks for Educators and Parents: Are you looking for some new books to share with youth on topics like diversity, equity and social responsibility?  Our librarians will share quick booktalks for educators and parents of grades K-12 on titles that address these topics. Certificates of attendance are available. 

Novel-Ties self-paced online workshop (for educators of grades 4-8) : Hot, new fiction to use in book discussion groups and literature circles. Register now, and we’ll contact you to let you know when the workshop is available.  

Contact School Corps with questions.

“Why do you only have one copy of [super popular e-book or audiobook]?”

One of many things could be happening here.

Is it Before the Book’s Release Date?

This is expected. The library buys a single copy of e-books and downloadable audiobooks in advance of their release dates so that they are in the catalog for you to place holds on them.

The week before the book is released, we buy enough copies for the title to meet demand based on the number of holds on the title at that time. This prevents “over-buying” in the expensive e-book and audiobook formats that often range in price from $55 to $109 per copy. This is how we meet demand while staying within our budget.

Is it After the Book’s Release Date?

There are two possibilities:

  1. The holds have built up since the librarians last reviewed holds and bought additional copies (this happens once a week). We will buy more copies within the next few days.
  2. The title is no longer available for the library to purchase and we are unable to add more copies. Titles can be removed from the purchasing catalog for many reasons. One of the most common is that Amazon purchased the rights to the title after the library bought our first copy. Amazon does not sell the digital versions of the titles it publishes or owns the rights for to libraries.

In the case of titles in the second category, librarians do check to see if new editions of any of these titles have been released. If they have, we add them to the collection and move the holds to the “active” copies. When new editions are not available to buy, it just means a really long wait for the title.

One way to check on audiobook availability is to see if the title has an “Only From Audible” banner on the cover on its Amazon page. If it does, the library cannot buy it.

If you have questions about specific titles, please let us know.

¡La biblioteca te ayuda a prepararte para el fin de cursos!

Recibe ayuda para completar tus trabajos escolares con Live Homework Help from Tutor.com. Los tutores pueden revisar y editar tus escritos y ayudarte a resolver problemas matemáticos. Tutor.com también ofrece prácticas para exámenes como PSAT, SAT, ACT y Clases Avanzadas (AP). Los tutores están disponibles todos los días de 2 a 10 pm; y pueden ayudarte en español, inglés y vietnamita. 

Tenemos varios libros electrónicos y guías de estudio para ayudarte con las matemáticas, ciencias y escritura de ensayos; así como prepararte para los exámenes de Clases Avanzadas. Otro sitio para practicar los exámenes del SAT y ACT es LearningExpres Library. ¿Indeciso si tomar el SAT o el ACT?

Para usar los recursos en línea, solo necesitas una tarjeta de la biblioteca o tu número de Library Connect, que es como una tarjeta de biblioteca. Para usar Library Connect, revisa estos pasos. Si necesitas una contraseña, llámanos por teléfono, correo electrónico o chat entre las 9 am y 5 pm.

 

El terminar la preparatoria es emocionante, pero también puede ser preocupante. He aquí algunos Recursos para la Vida Después de la Preparatoria

Entra al colegio de dos años o a la universidad de cuatro años

Muchos estudiantes deciden continuar sus estudios superiores en una universidad o colegio. La biblioteca te ofrece varios recursos para elegir la universidad o colegio y solicitar ayuda financiera. 

Información adicional que puede ayudarte a decidir:

Algunas ideas

Continúa una carrera universitaria

Aprovecha el tiempo en la universidad

Ideas para padres para ayudar a su adolescente

Aprende algún oficio

Con el alto costo de las universidades, muchos estudiantes buscan alternativas. Los colegios comunitarios y escuelas que ofrecen carreras técnicas, pueden ser una opción. Los programas de escuelas vocacionales como Benson Polytechnic, pueden abrirte la puerta directamente a una práctica de aprendizaje. Girls Build ofrece campamentos después de la escuela para animar a las chicas a entrar al trabajo de construcción.

Si ya te graduaste de la universidad o colegio, Oregon Tradewomen ofrece clases y carreras de oficios como el primer paso para aprender acerca de los trabajos en construcción y entrar a una práctica de aprendizaje pagada.   

Si estás interesado en el trabajo y servicio comunitario, AmeriCorps tiene muchas posiciones para ayudarte a desarrollar y mejorar tus habilidades y hacer una diferencia en la comunidad. 

Si tienes alguna discapacidad, puedes trabajar con Vocational Rehabilitation Youth Services desde los 14 años de edad para empezar a desarrollar habilidades, explorar intereses y opciones, y aprender acerca de los recursos que pueden ayudarte a encontrar un trabajo y mantenerte empleado. Una vez que entres al tercer año de preparatoria (junior), puedes empezar a trabajar con el equipo de apoyo de tu escuela para conocer las opciones y obtener tu diploma de preparatoria. También puedes empezar el plan de transición para tus años después de la escuela preparatoria.

Haz una práctica o voluntariado en el área de tu interés

La experiencia en un campo puede ayudarte a determinar si esa carrera es para ti. ¿Te interesa la medicina? Inscríbete como voluntario en OHSU.  ¿Te interesa la tecnología? Prueba Free Geek. ¿Estás interesado en un trabajo social? Prueba el  Banco de Comida de Oregón.  Si estás interesado en la construcción, prueba The Rebuilding Center. ¿Te gustan los animales o deseas estudiar para ser veterinario? Prueba el Zoológico, la Audubon Society o la Humane Society. ¿Te gusta la biblioteca? ¡Conviértete en voluntario con nosotros!  

De acuerdo a la ley de Oregón, todos los distritos escolares ofrecen Programas de Educación Profesional y Carreras Técnicas: Portland Public Schools, Gresham, Centennial, Parkrose, Reynolds y David Douglas. Estos programas incluyen una amplia variedad de oportunidades de aprendizaje práctico en clase y en la comunidad.

¿Deseas más ideas de qué hacer después de la preparatoria? Con gusto te ayudamos, comunícate con nosotros a aprendiendo@multcolib.org

Attention educators! Did you miss our summer educator workshops this year? They are a great place to learn about the latest and greatest materials to use in the classroom. Don't worry; we now have booklists and videos available to share.

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum: This workshop highlights new books you might integrate into your language arts, social studies, math, science and arts curriculum.

For K-5th grade educators: Watch part 1 and part 2 of the Gotta Read This K-5 recorded webinar.

For 6th-12th grade educators: This booklist is broken down by subject, so you can choose the topics most relevant for you.

 

Novel-Ties (for 4th -8th grade educators): Discover hot, new fiction to use in book discussion groups and literature circles. 

Watch the Novel-Ties videos (and feel free to show them to students, too).

 

Talking Equity and Social Justice: School Corps librarians share quick booktalks on titles that address these topics, in this recorded webinar. A list of all the books and other resources mentioned in the talk can be found below the videos on YouTube.

Contact School Corps with any questions!

Two women and a young girl blow bubbles outside in a field

“I routinely prescribe nature to children and families.  Nature has the power to heal."  

-Dr. Nooshin Razani, pediatrician, presenter of the TED Talk "Presribing Nature for Health"

Research suggests that taking a walk, visiting a park, or getting out in nature can relieve stress, encourage social bonds, and support physical activity.  Less stress means less depression, anxiety, and isolation...not just for kids, but for adults, too!  

Portland Parks and Recreation offers plenty of opportunities for adventure!  Search for your next destination through the Find a Park feature, and be sure to check out their list of Inclusive Playgrounds, which is growing!  Gresham also offers an array of parks and trails to explore. Troutdale, with its proximity to the Sandy and Columbia rivers, offers plenty of fun options as well, and Fairview is home to many others, including our favorite, Salish Pond Wetlands Park.

Wait, there’s more! Metro Parks and Natural Areas offer 17,000 acres of outdoor exploration!  Try out the Interactive Park Finder, and while you’re there, check out their Parks and Nature News section for the latest on the ways our community enjoys nature.  

We love keeping up with Metro’s Our Big Backyard magazine and exploring back issues for beautiful photographs. The latest (Fall 2020) issue features two articles written by members of our community.  

While you're outside, you can take advantage of the learning opportunities it offers.  Portland Parks has created an at-home nature activities page, with links to videos and other activities that tap into kids’ sense of curiosity.  You can find a Flower Scavenger Hunt, a Birds of Portland guide, and a map of Tree Museums that are open for viewing right in your neighborhood.  

There’s so much to see and do out there, so take Dr. Razani’s prescription and get outside!   Even just a little bit can do wonders for your health - mental, physical, emotional, and overall!


This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

three preschool age kids - two girls and one boy - sit on the carpet.  The boy has the facial characteristics of Downs Syndrome.  One girl has her hand raised.

Kids are naturally curious about the world around them. They notice differences in people, because there are differences.  

Visible differences, like how we look, skin color, how we dress, and how we get around.  

And less visible differences, like how we learn, how we interact with one another, and how we experience the world.

Responding to kids’ observations about people with disabilities and visible illnesses can be hard for parents and caregivers who are not sure how, or are afraid they will say something wrong.   

Let’s remember that some of us are different, and experience the world differently, than others. And that’s not a bad thing! In fact, it’s a beautiful thing. Talking about it can be hard, but it’s important!  

My kids' cousin has autism. I tell my kids about how his brain works differently and experiences the world differently than our brains do.  We read books with characters who have autism and talk about them together. Their cousin's mother, my sister-in-law, shared a post on Facebook written by staff at the EDAM Center for Special Education in the Philippines.  This part really stuck with me, and I hope it sticks with you, too.

For all the children who struggle every day to succeed in a world that does not recognize their gifts and talents, and for those who are walking beside them, please let this be a gentle reminder to be kind and accepting of all people.

Recognize that the "playing field" is not always a level surface.

Children who learn differently are not weird. They are merely gifted in ways that our society does not value enough. Yet they want what everyone else wants: To be accepted!!

At the library, we strive to celebrate differences and find common ground in kindness and acceptance.  We want to support you in being comfortable talking to your kids about differences from an early age, and to keep up the conversations as they get older. Below are some resources that may help.  

This post is part of our “Talking with kids” series, as featured in our monthly Family Newsletter.  Reach out to us at learning@multcolib.org if you need more support or have questions. We’re here for you!


 

I love a good romance and I recently discovered a fun romance series written for adult learners. It led me to explore the world of books for adults learning to read.

Are you looking for books for teens or adults who need simpler texts? If you search the catalog using the phrase “readers for new literates,you’ll get a long list of books at different reading levels.  If you’re looking for levels, choose a title. For instance, when I clicked on the title Water for Life, I looked for “Series that include this title” and then I could link to all the books in the Penguin active reading series or just the Penguin active reading level 2.

You can find  versions of English and American classics or modern fiction. You can find biographies, true crime, and a book written in both Somali and EnglishWe have horror stories as well as romance. 

Back to that romance series. All of the books in the series feature photographs which add a lot of meaning to the stories about long time love and new love. My personal favorite is The Big Goof:  Jan loves Bill. Will Bill love Jan? It makes me laugh every time I read it. Everyone I’ve shared it with has noticed different things in the photos which deepened the story. 

If you’d like a customized list of books, you can ask us at My LibrarianWe’re happy to help you find good reading. Here’s a list I made that features books and poetry for a romance fan. Let’s champion reading together! Thanks.


 


 

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