Blogs: Business

Link to whatslegaloregon.comIn November 2014 Oregon voters approved Measure 91, allowing the possession and sale of cannabis by adults 21 and older for recreational use (here is the full text of Measure 91.) Deciphering the details of the law can be tricky, especially if you are considering starting a marijuana-related business.

The most reliable source of information about the laws surrounding recreational marijuana is the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC). Their What’s Legal? Educate Before You Recreate site lays out what you can and cannot do starting July 1, 2015.

The OLCC Rules Advisory Committee & Subcommittees on Recreational Marijuana recently had a series of public meetings at their main office at 9079 SE McLoughlin Blvd. in Portland. You can look up agendas and listen to audio of past meetings online.

If you are considering starting a marijuana-related business, start with the OLCC’s frequently asked questions on marijuana licensing. The OLCC will not be accepting applications for recreational marijuana licenses until January 4, 2016, and the rules are still being written; to stay up-to-date, subscribe to receive email alerts from the OLCC.

Measure 91 has no impact on Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Act. You can apply for a Medical Marijuana card through the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP), or apply to be a medical marijuana dispensary through the Medical Marijuana Dispensary Program.

To stay informed, you can find the OLCC's updates on Twitter and Facebook and subscribe to receive OLCC updates by email.

Link to Legalization of Marijuana booklistIf you’re interested in looking at the broader issues surrounding the legalization of marijuana, check out this blog post on legalizing marijuana that my colleague Cathy wrote before the election. And here are some books that go more in depth into the pros and cons of marijuana legalization and medical use.

Always use caution when searching for information and make sure your sources of information are credible; the Southern Illinois University Law Library has a great guide to Evaluating Websites and Other Information Resources. And remember, you can always ask a librarian for help; we love questions!

what you say matters

    We are deep in social media, of course. 74% of adults who use the internet use social media sites! It’s what we do now: how we maintain friendships, meet people, have conversations, begin relationships, learn about news, undertake social change, and market our services and products. There’s a lot (A LOT) that can be said about this, from whether or not it’s good for us to what Big Data from social media tells us about ourselves.

    So we do social media, and it results in a whole lot of writing. Research from last decade indicates that people are writing more than ever before. If we’re going to do a ton of writing in social media, we should do it well!

    That could mean a few different things:

    Hungry for more books on how (or why) to do social media? There’s something out there for the beginner, for the optimist, for the contrarian, or the pragmatist.

    Every nonprofit has to start somewhere and the library is a great first stop. Since 1973, Multnomah County Library has been part of the  Foundation Center's Funding Information Network, a nonprofit organization established in 1956 concerned exclusively with gathering, analyzing and disseminating information on philanthropic foundations. Foundation Center libraries are located throughout the United States.

    Via our Nonprofit Resource Center, Multnomah County Library makes the publications of the Foundation Center available to the public along with other materials on foundations, corporate philanthropy, government grants, proposal writing, fundraising and nonprofit management. Library staff provide help in using these materials, and brief reference questions can be answered by telephone. Some of the indexes and directories published by the Foundation Center are also available online. Multnomah County Library provides access to these online Foundation Directory resources, including Foundation Directory Online Professional, a database of nearly 100,000 U.S.-based foundations, grantmaking public charities, and corporate givers and IRS 990s, has federal grant information and offers periodicals, newsletters and the Foundation Center's Web site, which contains current information on nonprofit management, grantmakers, news and events. And here are a few more handy sites that will help you track down just the right way to kick off your cause. 

    A directory of Federal programs, projects, service and activities which provide assistance to the American public. It contains financial and nonfinancial assistance programs administered by departments of the Federal government.
     
    An independent organization that evaluates the financial health of America's largest charities. Rates charities on their fundraising efficiency; fundraising, program, and administration expenses; primary revenue growth; and capital ratio. Can be searched by keywords, category of charity, or geographic region.
     
    A nationally prominent charity rating and evaluation service dedicated to helping donors make informed giving decisions.
     
    Provides news and information for nonprofit leaders, fund raisers, grant makers, and other people involved in the philanthropic enterprise. It also offers lists of grants, fundraising ideas and techniques, statistics, and more.
     
    A National Charity Reports Index provides reports on charities and other soliciting organizations that solicit nationally. Reports on local charities that solicit regionally are also available via a link to local Better Business Bureaus. Reports provide contact information, evaluation conclusions, programs, governance, fund raising, tax status, and financials.
     
    A central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant programs awarded to universities, researchers, cities, states, counties, and nonprofit organizations.
     
    A comprehensive directory of public and private research funding resources from the Society for Research Administrators International.
     
    The center provides links to more than 70 nonprofit groups' websites and the "Nonprofit Locator," a searchable data base of IRS data on charities in the United States.
     
    On-line search tool that allows users to search for tax-exempt organizations that are eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions.
     
    National clearinghouse of data on the nonprofit sector in the United States.
     
    Formerly known as TACS, this is a statewide network of nonprofits, foundations, business partners, and individuals dedicated to supporting Oregon’s nonprofit sector.
     
    In order to solicit for donations in Oregon, most charitable organizations must be registered with the Oregon Department of Justice. Before you give, check their database or call (971) 673-1880 to confirm that the organization is properly registered. Also has information on how to become a charity.
     
    An overview of key topics for consideration by people who work for, lead, or support nonprofit organizations in the United States.

    Yeah, that shoe box is probably not the best place to keep your nest egg. The library has a lot of great online resources that can help you make wise decisions about where to put your money. Take a look at Mergent Online and Standard & Poors NetAdvantage, both available from anywhere with a valid library card.

    Here are some other websites to help you grow your savings:

    Charts, reports, indicators and quotes on over 24,000 US stocks, mutual funds, and major market indexes. Historical quotes back to 1970.

    EDGAR Database of Corporate Information
    As of May 6, 1996 all public domestic companies are required to file SEC forms electronically on EDGAR, the Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis & Retrieval system.

    InvestorGuide.com
    Comprehensive information for investors, including links to market news and commentary, stock research, personal finance, and education.

    Do you have a favorite? Let us know in the comments.

    Forbes Lists: Companies
    Lists of companies include the 200 best small companies, the Private 500, America's 500 Leading Companies, the Platinum 400, the International 800, and Best Places. Listings contain contact information, web addresses, basic revenue, assets, market value, and stock price and earnings information. Searchable.

    ThomasNet (formerly Thomas Register)
    ThomasNet is a directory containing over 72,000 product headings and 170,000 U.S. and Canadian manufacturers. It allows you to search by product, company or brand name. Provides you with basic contact information as well as links to websites and e-catalogs. Free registration required for some features.

    Did we miss one? Let us know in the comments.

    Want to find out how your stocks are doing? Want to track down the hottest companies to invest in? Starting a business? Stopping a business? You need information. Here are a few places to look.

    American City Business Journals
    This research database has access to local business news & information from metropolitan business newspapers in many American cities. To use it, you'll need your library card number and pin code to log in. You can access this resource from anywhere you want.

    Portland Business Journal
    The PBJ is an interactive site giving business news for greater Portland, with links to stories from the print edition. A pull down menu allows you to look at Business Journals of other cities. Current and archive editions are searchable.

    CNN/Money
    CNN is one of the most visited in the world and it provides news and articles on U.S. and international companies, stock markets, currencies and interest rates.

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