Blogs: Teens

Wikipedia logo.Wikipedia, is a free encyclopedia with over 4 million articles in multiple languages, created by users all over the world. Can you trust all of them? Probably not, although this website can be great for finding a quick answer when you don't need the information to be 100%-guaranteed accurate.

Your professor or teacher might say that you can't use Wikipedia when you're writing a research paper - but this doesn't mean that it's not useful to you in your research. Many of the articles in Wikipedia have citations indicated throughout them, and a list of references at the end where the authors are claiming to have found their information. This doesn't prove that everything in the Wikipedia article is true - but if you find a fact that you need, you can use the citations and the list of references in the article to find out which source might have that fact. 

And if you need help finding any of the sources listed in your Wikipedia article, just ask a librarian and we can help!

Calling all artists in grades 6-12 and their parents, caregivers & educators! 

2014 Teen Summer Reading Art Contest WinnerTeen Summer Reading Art Contest Winner 2013Teen Summer Reading Art Contest Winner 2012

If you've played the Summer Reading game or been a volunteer for the program, you know that a LOT of people participate. So if your art is chosen to illustrate the teen gameboard, a LOT of people will see it! (Above are the winning entries from 2014, 2013, and 2012.) And if you submit the winning artwork, you'll also win a $100 gift certificate to Collage: mixed media art supplies and creative classes!

Download the entry form in PDF and submit your artwork by March 29th. The theme is superheroes. Good luck!

 

Summer Reading is made possible, in part, by The Library Foundation.

When it seems like the rain is never (ever) going to stop, don’t despair! Multnomah County has a lot of hidden art to see that will get you out of the house and won’t cost you anything.

The area’s colleges and universities are a treasure trove of free art galleries! Here are links to some all over town:

Government buildings are a great place to see rotating exhibits, usually by local artists. Experience interactive and experimental media installations in the Portland Building Installation Space; visit the art gallery in the Gresham City Council Chamber Foyer; and check out the current exhibition at Central Library’s Collins Gallery.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council has a searchable database of public art around the county. (Tip: Click on Advanced Options to search by Collection and Discipline.)

View work by local photographers at Blue Sky Gallery, originally founded as the Oregon Center for the Photographic Arts.

Learn more about contemporary art in the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s Resource Room. It is both an archive and library, housing over 3,500 artist publications, magazines, and audio and video recordings, as well as a video archive of performances and lectures presented by PICA over the span of the organization's history.

But wait, there's more! Check out Rainy Days, Part 2: Free Museums!

Searching for information online can be a great way to learn more about issues in the news. But trying to follow constant updates on social media can be overwhelming and confusing, and sometimes it's hard to make connections between events elsewhere and what's happening here in Oregon. 
 
Here are a few articles about how people are responding locally to the issues being raised about civil rights and policing in the protests in Ferguson, Missouri and around the country.  
 
Ferguson shooting: Why does it matter to Portlanders? Casey Parks, OregonLive, November 24, 2014.
 
 
 
"For anybody willing to feel uncomfortable." Eliza Kamerling-Brown, Grant Magazine, December 4th, 2014. 
 
For more information and suggestions about how to further research the issues, read "I Can't Breathe."

photo of the Royal Irish Rifles ration partyWorld War I was called the Great War, not because it was so fantastic (it wasn’t - just ask any soldier who fought in the trenches), but because it was huge – bigger than any other war that had happened before.  More than forty million soldiers from over a dozen countries participated, and there were millions and millions of casualties. To find out more about the war in the trenches and on the home front, check out these websites.

From famous battles and statistics to body lice and dysentery, Spartacus Educational gives a vast amount of information on all things WWI. Take a look at the detailed chronology for a sense of what happened when and why.  Click on each event to find out more.

BBC has an excellent collection of WWI information including interactive guides, television episodes and radio shows, and images and information about present day memorials.

For an overview from PBS, take a look at The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century. You’ll find maps, quotations from people involved in the war, commentaries by historians, further reading, and links to other WWI websites.

Need the text of a treaty, personal accounts of soldiers or newspaper stories about a battle? Look no further than The World War I Document Archive.  Here you’ll find documents by year as well as diaries, a biographical dictionary, photographs and links to other WWI websites. 

Britain’s Imperial War Museum has an entire section of its website devoted to WWI.  This is an excellent place to find photographs from the war. Click here for photos from the fighting front. Find photos of the home front here. For more WWI photos, take a look at the World War I Image Archive.

Watch hundreds of films from WWI here including propaganda , films of prisoners of war, the war at sea, retrospectives and documentaries .

E-reader popularity has been rapidly increasing over the past few years, which brings the question to mind: are e-readers the technology of the future? I believe that they are. 
 
I understand many people's hesitation to utilize e-reader technology, but comparatively, the pros of e-readers outweigh the cons. Since I'm trying to acknowledge my opposition's reasoning, let's delve into the cons. A common issue is that it can be hard to learn to use an e-reader.This is a problem that won't last long. Many Multnomah County libraries offer hands-on classes on how to use and operate various kinds of e-readers, and as if that isn't enough, the website has a page filled with information to help you better understand your e-reader
 
Many people are opposed to e-readers for cost reasons, but each wave of new e-readers tends to be less costly than the last. Surprisingly, there are many e-readers that market for less than $100, such as the Kindle Keyboard, Nook Touch, Kobo Wi-Fi, Skytex Primer, as well as numerous others. Another factor is the comparative cost of books. E-books cost less in the long run than paper books, due to the fact that they have no printing fees. To give you a better understanding of the pricing differences, in this New York Times #1 Besteller, the hardcover edition is listed as $16.79, while the kindle edition is listed as only $12.95 (and may be discounted further by the time you read this).
 
I've spent all this time trying to convince you that e-readers are vastly superior to books, yet I still see a place for books in the future. I think that books will retain the market of the anti-technological; the people still clinging to the old traditions and ways (which is a surprisingly large accumulation). Even when e-readers are the status quo (just a prediction of mine), books are all but extinct, and e-reader sales continuously grow while book sales decrease, I believe that those anti-technologicals will continue to cherish books. I think that they will hold onto them as 70s and 80s children hold onto records, as mementos of the past.
 
Additional resources:
 
 

The Book Thief jacketThere’s a theory I subscribe to that no matter what our chronological age might be, we all feel a different age inside. As in, our bodies grow, we mature in different ways, but mentally, we all feel stuck at some earlier age. For instance, I am mentally a 17-year-old girl who doesn't quite fit in anywhere yet.

I was thinking about this recently after reading an article in Slate Magazine entitled, Against YA by Ruth Graham. The gist of her essay is that teen fiction is written for teens and adults “should feel embarrassed when what you’re reading was written for children.”

There are several things I’d like to say to Ms. Graham. Here goes. . .

First of all, it’s sometimes a marketing/publishing decision as to what gets published as a young adult book. Take The Book Thief. Please, please take it. It's a brilliant bookFangirl bookjacket that should be read by everyone! In Australia where Markus Zusak hales from, you’ll find it in the adult section. But here in the U.S., it sits in the young adult section because his previous book was put out as teen fiction in the U.S. Arbitrary? Indeed.

And then I think back to my growing-up years. Once I reached a certain age, definitely when I was still in middle school and high school, I started reading “adult” books. These were books with younger protagonists that certainly were appealing to teens but they also were well-written novels that adults enjoy. Books like My Name is Asher Lev and To Kill a Mockingbird. The chances are that if these books were published today, they would be cataloged as “young adult” fiction and think how many adults would miss out on them?!

That brings me to today and my reading tastes. Sometimes I read young adult books and I enjoy them because I can totally remember what it was like to be that teen (Fangirl, I’m talking to you). I relate to the characters because I’m still a 17-year-old misfit inside. Other times, I enjoy a teen book because it tells a really good story (A Brief History of Montmaray fits the bill).

I hereby proclaim, I am not embarrassed to read young adult literature and you shouldn't be either! Here are a few more titles that you too can be proud to read.

Sometimes it's hard to decide what you think about an issue. 

Other times the truth seems so obvious  you can't imagine anyone disagreeing with you.

And sometimes you need to back up your strong opinions with more information that helps prove your case.

For all those times, check out IQ2: Intelligence Squared Debates.  

The site has archived debates on many topics -- vegetarianism, Obamacare, online education to name a few -- and regularly broadcasts new ones.

You can watch videos of past debates, read the research that each debater used to support their arguments, and see graphs that show listeners' opinions before and after the debate. 

On April 5, 2014, the Multnomah Youth Commission held the 3rd Annual Rob Ingram Youth Summit Against Violence at the Ambridge Event Center (1333 NE MLK Jr. Blvd).

Youth Summit Against Violence photo

The youth-planned, youth-led event featured in-depth exploration of school, gang/police, and dating/sexual violence.

Multnomah County Library supports the summit's goals and has compiled these resources:

 

 

 

The Divergent movie, based on the insanely popular series by Veronica Roth, is coming March 21, 2014. Looking through the cast list, I noticed several interesting bits of trivia:

Shailene Woodley, starring as Tris, appeared in another movie adapted from a young adult novel: The Spectacular Now by Tim Tharp -- as did Miles Teller, who plays Peter. Ms. Woodley is also starring in another hotly-anticipated movie adapted from a young adult novel: The Fault in Our Stars by John Green.

Zoe Kravitz, daughter of musician Lenny, playing Christina, was in yet another movie adapted from a young adult book: It's Kind of A Funny Story by Ned Vizzini.

Theo James, playing Four, had an important role in the third episode of the first season of the BBC TV series Downton Abbey.

You might know Kate Winslet, playing the Erudite leader Jeanine Matthews, from Titanic or Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Back in 1994, when she was a teen, she made her feature film debut in the creepy and compelling Heavenly Creatures.

Tony Goldwyn, playing Tris's dad Andrew Prior, also plays President Fitzgerald Grant on the ABC drama Scandal. And he's the grandson of producer Samuel Goldwyn, who's responsible for the G in the name of the movie studio MGM: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. 

And finally, Mekhi Phifer, playing Max, was in Eight Mile along with Eminem and is name-checked in Eminem's famous track "Lose Yourself."

Lose yourself in books, movies, music & TV while you wait for the Divergent movie!

 

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