Blogs: Local interest

Genealogists will often go pretty far out of their way to track down obituaries and funeral notices.  And with good reason!  An average, non-fancy funeral notice often reveals the names of family members, the place of burial or interment, the deceased’s home address, and other details crucial to family history research.  But they can be a challenge to find.

Despite its name, the Oregonian is a local paper and it focuses on readers in the Portland area.  So for the most part, it does not include obituaries for Oregonians from other parts of our very large state.

Whose obituaries can you expect to find in the Oregonian?

Funeral notice for Sam Nudelman, from the Aug. 17, 1944 OregonianThe vast majority of the funeral notices, death notices, and obituaries in the Oregonian are for people who lived in the Portland area or had some deep Portland connections.  They are usually very, very short!  Sam Nudelman’s funeral notice (at right), from the August 17, 1944 Oregonian, is a good example.  It is brief and to-the-point, listing only Mr. Nudelman's date of death, his address, a short list of his surviving relatives, and information about his funeral services and place of burial.

Front page of the July 23, 1974 Oregonian, with an article about the death of Sen. Wayne MorseSometimes the deaths of prominent figures in Oregon politics, business, or social life were written up in the Oregonian, even if they were from Burns or Salem or Joseph.  A person’s statewide fame might make their obituary of local interest despite the fact that they lived and died far away from the Rose City.  

However, these notices often have the feel of straight news, rather than obituary.  For example, the day after former Oregon senator and long-time Eugenian Wayne Morse died in 1974,  the Oregonian ran a full-page-width headline at the very tippy-top of page one (at left).  

obituary for Mrs. Mary Goodman, of Eugene, from the Jan. 2, 1909 OregonianIn the early years of the 20th century and before, obituaries for Oregon “pioneers” (that is, European-American settlers who travelled west to the Oregon country in the mid-19th century or thereabouts) were a regular feature in the Oregonian.  And the editors regularly featured obituaries for pioneers who lived and died in other parts of Oregon.  An example (at right) is the brief obituary for Mrs. Mary Goodman, of Eugene, from the January 2, 1909 Oregonian.

Are you ready to start searching for an obituary or death notice in the Oregonian?

If you think your ancestor's obituary or death/funeral notice is likely to be in the Oregonian, you can get started by searching for their name in the library's Historical Oregonian (1861-1987).  (To use this resource from outside the library, you'll need to log in with your library card number and PIN/password.)

If this resource is new to you, take a look at my tips for searching, or ask the librarian on duty the next time you're in the library in person.  Remember, if you don't find an obituary, death notice, or funeral notice that you think really ought to have been in the Oregonian, librarians can always help you think of other ways to search.  Get in touch with a librarian for personalized help with your research!

When should you look somewhere other than the Oregonian?

Are you looking for an obituary for a Portland resident, but can’t find it in the Oregonian?  Portland has had many other daily and weekly newspapers that ran obituaries over the years.  Central Library has long archives of many of these papers for your researching pleasure! If you want to begin your research on your own, take a look at Research with historical Portland newspapers, beyond the Oregonian.  If you’d like a hand getting started, ask the librarian on duty in Central Library’s Periodicals room (on the second floor), or contact us to get personalized help from a librarian by phone or email.

Did the person you’re researching reside in St. Johns or Gresham? Try looking for a funeral notice or obituary in their local paper.  The St. Johns Review had really lovely, robust obituaries in its early years, and most issues of the Review from 1904-1922 are fully searchable in the University of Oregon Libraries’ wonderful Historic Oregon Newspapers database.  Multnomah County's own Gresham Library has an archive of the Gresham Outlook going back to 1911; librarians there can help you search, or you can get help from a librarian by phone or email.

If the deceased person you’re looking for lived outside the Portland area (even if they died in Portland or in Multnomah County), look for an obituary or death notice in their hometown paper

If you’re not sure what the name of that newspaper was, or even if there was a newspaper in print at the time, the next step is to ask the public library in the town where the deceased person resided.  Oregon public libraries of all sizes are listed in the Oregon Library Directory.  If you need to find a public library in a town outside Oregon, ask us for help the next time you’re at the library, or ask a librarian by phone or email!

 


Do you want to learn more about family history research with obituaries?  My colleague Kate S. walks you through some of the basics in her post on Obituaries 101.

Or, call or email a librarian to get personalized help with your obituaries-related questions. If you’d rather have face-to-face help, ask the librarian on duty the next time you visit the library.  We're always happy to help!


 

Trail photoThe last time I went backpacking, in Southwest Washington’s Indian Heaven, my family and I spent a terrifying night hunkered down in our tent during a midnight-till-dawn thunderstorm. Then in the morning, we made a forced march of about five miles back to our car through a steady drizzle, thankful to be heading back to civilization.

Needless to say, this experience did not turn me into much of a hiker or backpacker!

That being said, I love the idea of long-distance walking and I enjoy reading about other people’s adventures! Wild, Cheryl Strayed’s wildly successful account of her 1,100-mile trek on the Pacific Crest Trail, is coming to the big screen this week. If either the book or the film inspire you to take off on an adventure of your own, we can help you plan and enjoy your armchair backpacking and your actual backpacking.
 

The open enrollment period for for 2015 health insurance coverage is from November 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015. If you want coverage that starts January 1, 2015, you will need to enroll by December 15, 2014. Do you have questions, or are you overwhelmed by the process? Here are some ways to get help:

Enrollment open houses all around the state. Whether you already have private insurance or want to enroll for Cover Oregon, these open houses will give you the chance to consult and ask questions of insurance agents and certified application assisters. Pre-registration is encouraged for these events. Check 211info.org or the Cover Oregon website for locations and details.

Make an appointment at your library. The Midland, Gresham, North Portland and Kenton libraries are partnering with the Multnomah County Health Department to answer your questions about the application and enrollment process. Interpreters are available upon request. Check out the dates and registration info.

Find help in your neighborhood. Type in your zip code and the Cover Oregon website will direct you to assistance close by.

Find answers online or by phone. Healthcare.gov has a one page guide to the Health Insurance Marketplace and a Get Answers page with a lot of information. You can contact Cover Oregon directly at 1-855-CoverOR or info@coveroregon.com; contact the Healthcare.gov Service Center 24 hours a day at 1-800-318-2596.

If you need more resources, you can always contact a librarian!

This month Governor Kitzhaber proclaimed December 1, 2014 Rosa Parks Day in Oregon and encourages “all Oregonians to join in this observance.”

rosa parks

Why December 1st? On December 1, 1955 Rosa Parks was arrested for civil disobedience. Contrary to popular lore Parks was not an elderly woman that just happened to be in the right place at the right moment in history. Rosa Parks was a dedicated activist and served as secretary of the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).  When Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat and move to the back of the bus as the driver demanded, and city law required, her refusal sparked a bus boycott that captured the attention of the world and breathed new life into the Civil Rights Movement.

To learn more, take a look at a timeline of the events that followed in the wake of her arrest. Often called the “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement,” read about the event in her wordsThe National Archives has more primary source data on it's website as well, including the police report and Rosa Parks’ fingerprint cards.

The History Channel also has video about Rosa Parks with information you might not already know. 

Need more information? Check out the books below or ask a librarian.

Smiley Goat photo by Martin Cathrae on Flickr, license CC BY 2.0.Whether you are excited about having fresh eggs and milk and honey, or looking for a new pet that will also mow your lawn, backyard animals can be a wonderful addition to your home.

It can be tricky to figure out what is allowed in your neighborhood: How many ducks are too many? Can I have a pygmy goat and a peacock? Do my neighbors need to know about my hive? Is that a llama peering over my fence?

If you live in the city of Portland, the rules and regulations for keeping animals are enforced by Multnomah County Vector Control. The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability maintains a site that lets you know which animals you can keep, when you need to apply for a permit, and what the requirements are to keep various animals. If you have questions, you can contact Vector Control at 503-988-3464.

If you live in Gresham, you'll need a permit for keeping chickens; the rules for other poultry and livestock vary. Questions should be directed to the Code Compliance Division at 503-618-2463.

The city of Wood Village has fairly clear rules for keeping chickens; for questions regarding other animals, contact the city at 503-667-6211 or City@ci.Wood-Village.or.us.

Live in Fairview or Troutdale? Both Fairview and Troutdale enforce Multnomah County's Animal Codes;  if you have questions, you can contact the Fairview Department of Planning Services at 503-674-6206 or the Troutdale Planning Division at 503-674-7228.

For Maywood Park, call 503-255-9805 or email cityofmaywoodpark@integra.net.

chicken.jpg by Tom Woodward on Flickr, license CC BY 2.0.The rules for unincorporated Multnomah County are enforced by Multnomah County Vector Control. They can be contacted at 503-988-3464.

Once you know the rules and you’re ready to start planning, the library has a lot of resources available for you! Below is a list of books that can help you prepare for your new additions. You can also search the catalog for “domestic animals,” “urban agriculture,” “bee culture,” or the particular animal you are considering. And you can always contact us for help; librarians are standing by!

P.S. If your chickens seem destined for more than just pecking and laying, perhaps it’s time they learn more advanced skills.

Winter in Portland brings short days, long nights, holiday celebrations, extra expenses, and So. Much. Rain. Here are some ways to take care of yourself, your family, and your neighbors near and far.

Keep warm. Find out the latest information on cold weather shelters all over the Portland Metro area. If you need help paying your heating or electricity bills, check out this list of agencies currently offering energy assistance, maintained and updated by 211 Info, a nonprofit organization that connects people with resources.

Get holiday meals, food boxes, toys, and other support around the holidays. Holiday Assistance Programs from 211 Info can direct you to resources all over the Portland Metro area.

Help out your community. Many local organizations are in need of supplies, food and gifts this season. Bring blankets, socks and other cold weather essentials to one or more of these winter donation locations from 211 Info; Hands On Greater Portland has a holiday guide that includes a list of local organizations in immediate need of food, toys, warm clothes, housewares, and other in-kind donations.

The holidays are an excellent time to teach your children about giving back.  PBS Parents has some great tips for teaching your kids about charity. Hands On Greater Portland can connect you with local volunteer projects that are perfect for families with kids of all ages (or grownups of all ages).

Donate money. There is no shortage of organizations that could put your charity to good use, so how do you choose where to give? If you’re looking to give locally, Willamette Week puts together an annual Give Guide featuring more than a hundred Portland nonprofits. Consumer Reports has some tips for making sure your donation counts. Charity Navigator and the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance rate charities based on spending, transparency, and more.

If you have questions, ask a librarian and we will be happy to help!

Do you have other resources to suggest? Share them in the comments!

birthday cakeCan I interest you in a piece of cake? September is a month of celebrating. So many birthdays! Conway Twitty. Sophia Loren. Upton Sinclair. Me! I'm sure that many of you either have birthdays during the month of September, or know many folks who do. I attribute this to the Christmas and New Year's holidays falling approximately nine months before this most celebratory month ;-). But whatever the reason, September offers opportunites to party at every turn.

However you enjoy celebrating your big day, or the big days of your loved ones, I wish you the best. I'm hoping for a quiet day spent out of town, surrounded by people I love, followed by cake, chocolate please, maybe from the library's new acquisition, Betty Crocker Birthdays. The day of one's birth is a time for rejoicing, no matter what that entails.

Before I go, I would like to remind you of another very important September birthday. Our very own Multnomah County Library turns 150 years young this month!birthday logo What an honor to be part of such a special birthday! I, and everyone who has a hand in making our libraries the magical places that they are, would like to invite you to attend our 150th jubilee, Saturday, September 27. Take a look at this page and join us for a bash of unrivaled revelry, with fun for all ages. After all, you, dear reader, are part of what makes the Multnomah County library extraordinary! Happy Birthday! 

Maps to check out, in the Literature & History Room, Central Library, 3rd floor.The library, I’m sure you know, is a great place to borrow a book.  Did you know you can also borrow a map?

A fresh array of maps have recently arrived at Central Library, all available for check out.  This lovely shelf of circulating maps (pictured at right) is in the Literature & History room on Central’s third floor -- the same room that houses travel books, hiking guides, atlases, and other geography-related gems.

What’s in the map collection?

Most of the library’s check-out-able maps are of places in Portland, Multnomah County and Oregon, or of places in Washington and California.   And there are lots of different kinds.  For example, you can find:

  • wilderness, park and forest maps

  • street maps of cities and towns

  • maps showing lighthouses

  • regional maps showing areas like the California coast or the Olympic Peninsula

  • bicycling maps

  • and many other kinds of maps!

Would you like a recommendation for a great map?  Take a look at our brand-new list of Librarians' favorite maps -- or ask a librarian for a more personalized recommendation.

If you can’t or don’t want to come to Central Library to get your map fix, you can use the library catalog to place holds on the maps you want -- and then you can pick them up at your neighborhood library.

Finding maps in the library catalog

Searching for Los Angeles maps [click for a bigger version]Here are some tips for different ways to search for maps in the library’s collection:

When you’re looking for a map of a particular place, start with a search for the name of the place -- let’s use Los Angeles as an example. This search gives you lots of library materials about LA; to get to the maps, go to the Format section on the left side of the screen, click Other, and then click the checkbox next to Maps

Now you have a much shorter list showing only maps and books containing lots of maps.  To find maps you can check out,  go back to the Format section on the left, click on Titles I can…, and then click the checkbox next to Borrow and take home.  Now you should see a nice tidy list of maps (of Los Angeles, in this case) that you can borrow with your library card.

 

Searching for the newest maps at the library [click for a bigger version]If you’d like to see a list of the library’s newest maps, go to the Advanced search screen, look for the Format section down at the bottom, and click the checkbox next to Maps.  Now click on the orange Search button.  This gets you a super-duper crazy long list of all the maps and map-filled things in the library’s collection.  

You can see newest maps by going to the Sort by dropdown at the top of the screen, and choosing the Date acquired option.  Now you’ll see the list re-arranged with the newest maps at the top.  Again, if you'd like to limit your search to maps you can check out immediately, click the checkbox next to Borrow and take home, over in the Titles I can... section on the left side of the screen.

 

Searching for the map Northwest Lighthouses [click for a bigger version]If you know the name of the map you need, you can search for it by title just as you would a book or other item.  Here’s an example: one of my favorite maps shows lighthouses in Oregon, Washington and Alaska -- it’s called Northwest Lighthouses.  A search for these words gets a list of results with the map right on top.

 

 

 

 

 


Remember, knowledgeable and friendly librarians are always standing by to help you with your map and research needs!  Ask us your map-related questions (or really, any questions) by email or phone, or talk to the librarian on duty the next time you’re at the library in person.   


 

The Great Library Card Adventure is a library card campaign for K-5 classrooms in Multnomah County, presented by the Multnomah County Library School Corps. We want every student, faculty and staff member in the county to have a Multnomah County Library card. A library card is the key to the fullest use of Multnomah County Library's information resources.

Dates:  October 1 through December 12, 2014

To sign up: Complete this form by September 19. Your school will then receive a packet of informational materials.

Send completed library card applications toMultnomah County Library School Corps, 205 NE Russell, Portland, OR 97212

Applications can also be labeled "School Corps" and dropped off at any Multnomah County Library location. Remember that library card applications must be signed on the back by the student and parent before they are submitted.

Prizes:

For students who are getting a library card for the first time:

  • 2 free game admissions and 60 nickels or 2 fee movie admissions and 1 small popcorn from Wunderland

For teachers/classrooms:

  • All teachers receive a $5 coupon for the Title Wave bookstore when they send in library card applications.
  • All classrooms with 100% of the students signed up for library cards will receive a $5 gift certificate to Collage and will be entered in a drawing to win one of three collections of age-appropriate fiction and non-fiction books for their classroom.

The Great Library Card Adventure is made possible in part by The Library Foundation.

Logo for Wunderland Cinema & Nickel Games

Two of my favorite things to do around town when I can’t be at the Maker Faire PDX are going out to listen to music and watching movies. While I’m not bad at making music (yay cellos!) and I can take cute videos of my dogs, I can’t really claim to be great at making either. But not to fear! We do live in a great town for making things, from chairs to computers to art and we can all learn together.

Yellow record player

Are you feeling musical? Explore the science of music with your own musical creations, and learn to make your own instruments from maracas to didgeridoos. (This website is set up as lessons for teachers, but there’s no reason for teachers to have all the fun.) Once you have made (or chosen) your instrument it’s time to make some music: Indulge your inner rocker girl or you can check out the Community Music Center for lessons, concerts, workshops and practice space. Or just find some friends and start playing--it’s how all the greats got started.

 

 

strip of film cels

Visual arts more your thing? You can play with your films at the Hollywood Theater with B Movie Bingo and Hecklevison and other series.  The Portland Art Museum’s nwFilm Center has films you won’t find at the mall and classes on how to make your own. If you prefer things to be more non-fiction, head over to Northwest Documentary. They come complete with classes, lab time, opportunities to work with other filmmakers and a great library, all at your creating and making disposal. And if the slow and methodical isn’t your way, maybe The 48 Hour Film Project will be more to your liking.

 

 

Do want to make and learn more? Contact a Librarian!

Hey, We're going to be at the Maker Faire on September 13 and 14 at OMSI. Come see us!

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