Blogs: Zines

Unlike print graphic design, type design for websites has long been created using images to display text plus a narrow selection of typefaces for content. But within the past several years, systems for using a much wider range of typefaces directly for web text coding have been introduced. The result is that there is more freedom for webpages to display the variety we see in the print world. New e-readers make it possible to read in the typeface of the original print version, bringing the design of the two formats of the book more closely aligned.Mastering Type The Essential Guide to Typography for Print and Web Design 2012 book

There is no doubt that the typeface has an effect on the experience of reading, whatever the form happens to be. In the library, books about letterforms and typefaces can be found in three distinct areas: in the 700's art books for calligraphy, the art of hand lettering, in the graphic design section of the 600's, for more of a production or commercial basis to typography, and within books found in the 006 section for digital media content.

>>>Read this book in e-book format with your Multnomah County Library card.

 

Are you a kid who wants to learn to make your own books?  Are you a grown-up who wants to make books with your kid friend?  Making books isn’t as intimidating as it looks, especially if you’ve got a great how-to book to help you get started!  Here are my favorites:

In Print! by Joe Rhatigan has instructions for 40 different publishing projects for kids -- everything from a make-it-yourself audioboook to instructions for starting a writers’ group or workshop to getting your work published in a magazine.  This book has it all!

Pop-ups and moveable books that fold out or turn into a sculpture when you open them sometimes look complicated, but actually they can be really great projects for a beginner!  Gwen Diehn shows you the basics in Making Books That Fly, Fold, Wrap, Hide, Pop Up, Twist, and Turn.  That’s a long title, but you really know what the book is about now, right?

If you want to go totally D.I.Y. and make a zine -- that’s a book or pamphlet you make and distribute all yourself -- you definitely want to check out Whatcha Mean, What’s a Zine?, by Mark Todd and Esther Pearl Watson.  It covers everything: zine history, tools and methods for making your own zine, why you might want to write a zine, photocopier tricks, promoting your zine, and more.

Are you more of an artistic than a literary bent?  Perhaps comics are your thing?  If so, the book for you is definitely Drawing Words & Writing Pictures: Making Comics: Manga, Graphic Novels, and Beyond, by Jessica Abel and Matt Madden.  It’s an everything guide for comics creators, covering basics like layout and lettering and extra credit topics like how to reproduce your comic so you can distribute lots of copies.

Questions? Let us know if we can help you find the how-to book (or any other book) that's just right for you.

 

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