Blogs: Hollywood Library

For those of us who love classic literature, Multnomah County Library is a great resource. There are ongoing Classics Pageturners book discussion groups at Hillsdale Library and Hollywood Library, plus a Quarterly Classics group at Capitol Hill Library.  Copies of the books will be available two months in advance of the discussions.  Please call the branch to confirm.  Following that are a series of lists of Western and non-Western literature from every era.

Here are the Classics book group schedules:

Hillsdale Library Classics Pageturners,

Second Saturdays, 3-5 pm

 

September 9, 2017, Sonnets by William Shakespeare. (This is a different edition than the group will read)

 

October 14, 2017, The Nice and the Good, by Iris Murdoch

 

November 11, 2017, It Can't Happen Here, by Sinclair Lewis

 

December 9, 2017, Billy Budd and Other Stories, by Herman Melville

 

January 13, 2018, Canterbury Tales, by GeoffreyChaucer

 

February 10, 2017, Cousin Bette, by Honore de Balzac

 

March 10, 2018, The Persians, by Aeschylus

 

April 14, 2018, The Prince, by Niccolo Machiavelli

 

May 12, 2018, The Early History of Rome, books I-V, by Livy

 

June 9, 2018, The Trial, by Franz Kafka

Hollywood Library Classics Pageturners,

Third Sundays, 2-4 pm

 

September 17, 2017,  Ficciones, by Jorge Luis Borges

 

October 15, 2017, Iphigenia in Aulis and The Trojan Women, by Euripides. (These are different editions than the group will read)

 

November 19, 2017, The Vicar of Wakefield, by Oliver Goldsmith

 

December 17, 2017, The Captain's Daughter and Other Stories, by Alexander Pushkin

 

January 21, 2018, The Heart of the Matter, by Graham Greene

 

February 18, 2018, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, by Matsuo Basho

 

March 18, 2018, The Idiot, by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

 

April 15, 2018, The Consolation of Philosophy, by Boethius

 

May 20, 2018, The Analects, by Confucius. (This is a different edition and translation than the group will read)

 

June 17, 2018, The Mill on the Floss, by George Eliot. (This is a different edition than the group will read)

Capitol Hill Library Quarterly Classics

Second Wednesdays, 1:30 pm, October 2017, January, April & July 2018

 

October 11, 2017, One Hundred Years of Solitude, by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

 

January 10, 2018, Razor's Edge, by Somerset Maugham

 

April 11, 2018, The Golden Notebook, by Doris Lessing

 

July 11, 2018, Native Son, by Richard Wright

 

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

There have always been conflicts in the world that leave innocent populations vulnerable. Currently, there has been a lot of recent news around refugees from various parts of the world. We are always curious to learn more either through fiction or from true accounts. Here are some of the resources that we have found particularly meaningful in understanding our world better, and what others are facing.

Podcasts

99% Invisible Icon99% Invisible

Church (Sanctuary Part 1):

While exploring conflicts in Central America in the 1980, this podcast explores the “social movement based on the ancient religious concept of ‘sanctuary,’ the idea that churches have a duty to shelter people fleeing persecution.”

State (Sanctuary Part 2):

This podcast looks at the government response to churches’ response as being sanctuaries by launching a full-scale investigation into the sanctuary movement.

This American Life iconThis American Life

Are We There Yet? Episode 592:

Staff members of This American Life explore a refugee camp in Greece. They discuss how the Greek government is handling the refugee crisis; explore an abandoned baseball stadium in Athens where about a thousand Afghans are living; talk to a mother about what it is like to be a parent in a refugee camp; and what it is like for a refuge to call the asylum office via Skype.

Don’t Have to Live Like a Refugee. Episode 593:

The second part of the staff's visit to Greece explores what it is like to build a life living in a refugee camp.

Short Films

Many of this year's Oscar nominated documentary shorts were about current refugee experiences. Look for these:

 

Short documentary about the first responders who rescue victims from the daily airstrikes in Syria.
 
Short documentary that was filmed over three years, telling the story of one family's escape from war-torn Syria, and their attempt to make a new life in Germany.
 

4.1 Miles:

Short documentary that follows a coast guard captain on a small Greek island who  is suddenly charged with saving thousands of refugees from drowning at sea.

 

Film

Hotel Rwanda:

Tells the story of hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina, who kept more than 1000 people safe during the 1994 Rwandan massacre.

 

Comics

By New York Times Comic by Jake Halpern and Michael Sloan
 
Follows the true story of a Syrian family's journey to America.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Video Clips

Ted Talk Playlist: Refugees Welcome

Ten different TedTalks about that explore the refugee crisis and refugees' experiences. 

Ted Ed: What Does It Mean to be a Refugee?

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Migrants and Refugees Sept. 28, 2015

Article

The Atlantic log

Refugees and the Limits of Economic Logic

By Derek Thompson in The Atlantic

Explores how taking in people who have no safe home isn't about GDP growth; it's about basic decency.

--by the Hollywood Teen Book Council

We are highly anticipating the release of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child that will be published July 31, and looking forward to the movie release of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them in November. To celebrate, we created a list of our most recent favorite books, and  put them to the Sorting Hat test. Looking at the values of each of the four houses of Hogwarts, this is where we see these main characters most likely getting placed.

Hufflepuff values hard work, dedication, patience, loyalty, and fair play.

Hufflepuff titlesExit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston

Head Cheerleader, Hermione, does a lot to keep the team together and enjoys the athleticism of cheerleading. She has a dedication to the craft.

Dig Too Deep by Amy Allgeyer

Liberty cares about the mining that is destroying and polluting the town. She begins her own investigation seeking fairness and justice.

X: A Novel by Ilyasah Shabazz and Keekla Magoon

Growing up, Malcolm Little is constantly frustrated by the lack of fair play. Trying to leave a past behind him, he knows he can’t run forever and his new found freedom is an illusion.

Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older

Sierra Santiago realizes that something strange is going on, and finds herself to be in a long line of shadowshapers that are currently at war with evil anthropologists and unlikely zombies.

Calvin by Martine Leavitt

Calvin believes that if he can convince Bill Watterson to create one more Calvin and Hobbes comic strip, it will make him better. His dedication to this leads Calvin to go on the journey of the lifetime.

Bone Gap by Laura Ruby

Finn keeps searching for Roza after everyone gives up. He also stands up to the terrible brothers.

Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds

After his mother’s death, Matt values hard work and his job at the funeral home.

Hold Me Closer: The Tiny Cooper Story by David Levithan

Larger than life Tiny Cooper, has written a play about his life. Through his quest for meaningful relationship, Tiny proves to be the most loyal  of friends.

Dumplin' by Julie Murphy

Willowdean wants to prove to everyone in her small Texas town that she is more than just a fat girl, so she prepares to compete in the beauty pageant her mother runs.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Violet is dealing with the loss of her sister, to whom she is extremely loyal. She is dedicated, and follows through on the quest to visit Indiana places.
 

 

Ravenclaw values intelligence, knowledge, and wit.

Ravenclaw picksThe Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

Faith is all about knowledge and solving the mystery of her father’s death through science.

Saving Montgomery Sole by Mariko Tamaki

Monty and the other members of the mystery club are trying to figure out how things work.

The Steep & Thorny Way by Cat Winters

Hannalee values intelligence and wants to be a lawyer.  First she needs to search for the truth about her father's death while avoiding trouble from the Ku Klux Klan

The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz

Joan values education and studies on her own after the day’s work cooking and cleaning is done.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Mikey thinks a lot, and is very intelligent. He just wants to graduate and go to prom before someone blows up the high school. Again.

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Woodson uses her intelligence to make sense of the Jim Crow South and the Civil Rights Movement.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

Feyre is witty and smart, and she doesn’t want to give that away.  She is a very good problem solver.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Noah, one half of an intense twin rivalry, wants to see how it all works while his sister Jude manipulates their fates.

Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith

Austin uses his knowledge of his own family to write the history of the world - a world that has been overtaken by unstoppable soldiers that come in the form a giant praying mantises.

Jackaby by William Ritter

Abigail has very good attention to detail and is accepting of how things come her way - skills necessary when serving as R.F. Jackaby’s assistant, an investigator who studies the unexplained.

 

Slytherin house values ambition, cunning and resourcefulness
 

Slytherin picksOutrun the Moon by Stacy Lee

Mercy wants into the St. Clare’s School for Girls and she uses her cunning to gain admission.

Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

Lisa is ambitious, resourceful and cunning. She’s also very savvy.

Burn, Baby Burn by Meg Medina

Nora is determined to get out and get on with the next part of her life. She wants to be more than what she is currently seeing that there is.

Wink Poppy Midnight by April Genevieve Tucholke

Both Wink and Poppy use secrets to have power over Midnight and their other friends.

A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro

Charlotte Holmes is quite proud of her heritage and is resourceful enough to solve mysteries.

This Side of Home by Renée Watson

Nikki holds onto her ambition that she and her twin sister Maya have had since they were little - to leave Portland and attend a prestigious college. Gentrification in the traditionally African American neighborhood raises challenges.

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman

After the planet Kerenza is attacked, Kady’s mother is on another ship and Kady is determined to get to her.

Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith

Ida Mae has ambition and knows where she is going.  She wants to be a pilot and in order to do that she must use her cunning and pass as white.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

After she was out as gay and sent to a restrictive church camp, Cameron survives the re-education without being brainwashed.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Jude is very ambitious and does what it takes to get in a prestigious art school, even if it means selling out her twin brother Noah.



Gryffindor values bravery, daring, nerve, and chivalry.

Gryffindor picksUnbecoming by Jenny Downham

Katie uses her nerve to navigate around her mother’s rules so she can discover the details of her grandmother’s story.

Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

While Riley demonstrates bravery by keeping a blog about what it is like to be gender fluid, they also inspire bravery in others.

Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez

Naomi navigates through 1937 East Texas dodging racist policies and discrimination.

The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle

Quinn values bravery, even if he isn’t feeling up to it at the moment.

If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

Amanda shows her bravery and nerve as she navigates her school as a transgender girl.

Under a Painted Sky by Stacy Lee

It takes guts to cross the country while dressed as boys, as Samantha and Annamae demonstrate again and again.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Theodore is brave in trying to fix his problems himself.

The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough

Henry was very polite to Flora, but he also was steady and persistent in his pursuit of her.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Queenie is loyal to her friendships and displays bravery while standing up to her German captors that are accusing her of being a spy.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer by Joss Whedon

Buffy kills vampires for her job! Is there anything braver? She also cares deeply about her family.

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

One of the amazing things about science fiction it that it helps us see  a greater possibility imagined: there is more that is possible in our world and in ourselves. Here are two recent reviews of books where our protagonists get creative within the confines of their situation and imagine and create greater possibilities.

The MartianThe Martian by Andy Weir

Review By Hannah Witscher, 8th grade

How do you feel about Mars? What about potatoes? Do you like realistic, thrilling science fiction? If you want to read about people creating inventions to get then out of dangerous situations, then The Martian is the book for you.  In the not-so-distant future, NASA has created a spaceship that can travel to Mars. On the third mission disaster strikes and Mark Watney is stuck on Mars and his team thinks he is dead. I really enjoyed this book. It was full of science, and everything that happened pretty much could happen with technology we will have in the near future. The story is also fast-paced, and I couldn’t put it down. If you like realistic science fiction, this is the book you should read.

 

Archivist WaspArchivist Wasp by Nicole Kornher-Stace

Review by Ella DeMerritt, Freshman

Wasp is the archivist, a ghost slayer chosen by the goddess Catchkeep to protect the people of her land from the ghosts that roam in the realm of the living. She’s forced to kill the “upstarts,” girls who want to take her place as the archivist. Our heroine is tormented by the Catchkeep-priest, her sleazy and cruel superior. Unhappy with her monotonous life, she longs to be free, but can she really be free when she has to die at the hands of an upstart to do so?

So she carries on, harboring hatred for both herself and the priest forcing her to live like this. Until something phenomenal happens. A nameless ghost comes to her for help-- which shouldn’t be possible, considering ghosts can’t speak. The ghost begs her (in an especially harsh way) to help him find his colleague, another ghost named Foster. And thus begins Wasp’s reckless journey to the underworld.

Archivist Wasp is a thrilling adventure story with a strong female character at its core, and even better, with no love interest to center the plot around. As much as I appreciate an original love story every once and a while, it’s  refreshing to read a book that’s not based around a cheesy heterosexual romantic plot. And to conclude, Archivist Wasp is a rousing sci-fi novel that you can’t seem to put down. give it a chance, you won’t be disappointed.

 

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 2009 TEDTalk is a powerful statement  in how only having one story can perpetuate stereotypes.

We try to read broadly at the Hollywood Teen Book Council and seek out books that will expand our worldview. Whether it is a Chinese immigrant living in Canada, soldiers in an unpopular war, or our preconceptions of cheerleaders, here are three books that surprised us and changed how we saw others.

 

Midnight at the Dragon Cafe Midnight at the Dragon Cafe by Judy Fong Bates

Review by Siena Lesher, sophomore

From clothing to teeth to the food you eat, the cultural differences between China and Canada are one that many don’t even consider unless they’re being made fun of it. Su-Jen, who takes the English name “Annie,” leaves communist China with her mom for a hopefully better life in Canada. As she is very young, she begins to subtly assimilate into Western culture, leaving behind the ideas of her past. I actually read this book twice - the first time focussing on the plot, the second on the pressure for Annie to become “Western.” I thought it was very interesting and well written,  thoughtful and very eye-opening.

 

Sunrise Over Fallujah

Sunrise Over Fallujah by Walter Dean Myers

Review by Noah Pettinari, sophomore

Do you like plot twists to the Iraq War? Then this book is for you. Birdy is a soldier newly deployed into Iraq and Kuwait from Harlem, New York. As he learns the ropes of Civil Affairs operations in Iraq 2003, he encounters the true embodiment of war. This book is written in such a way as to personify the commonly dehumanized military, and lacks the catchy plots commonly found in YA novels. I would recommend it to any teen interested in the mental toll of war and how much war can change a person's life.

 

Exit, Pursued by a Bear Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston

Review by Elsa Hoover, sophomore

When I picked up this book I didn’t have any idea what it was about. Exit, Pursued by a Bear? A cheerleader? I wondered what this could possibly be about, but then I read the inside of the flap and found out it was about sexual assault and stopped short. Did I really want to read something so sad? But I went on and I am really glad I did. This is a book about a cheerleader raped at camp, and the next year of her life as she navigates this new world. My favorite thing about this book was its realism in the face of a hard subject. Not everything turned out great. It wasn’t cheery and that why it felt real. You could understand where all the characters were coming from. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a short, emotionally charged book.


Here is a list of more books that helped expand our worldview:

--by the Hollywood Teen Book Council

As summer approaches many of us are making plans for future trips. Some will be enjoying summer with  “armchair travel” while others will be finding adventure on the road. Whichever way you travel, here are some suggestions for you:

Let’s Get Lost by Adi Alsaid

Review by Siena Lesher, sophomore

It seems as though adventure is hard to find these days. We’re all so trapped in what’s expected of us, caught in a web of time that draws tighter with every passing second. But, Let’s Get Lost fights to show that you don’t need to escape to have an adventure, that if you can just manipulate the silk, you can travel within the web. Each character must face their spider, one meeting a sister to whom she  hasn’t spoken  in years, another asking out the person they’ve loved for ages, all stories spun together by a girl on her quest to see the northern lights. I’d recommend this book to those who want to take their own adventure, whether it be traveling to Alaska, or simply seizing the Tuesday.

Also, try one of these:

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

We all have those childhood favorites that will forever hold a place in our hearts. Sometimes we come across something that takes us back. If you want to revisit a blast from the past, try one of these suggestions from Hollywood Teen Book Council member Elsa Hoover.

If you once liked: Yertle the Turtle, now try The Big Short

Yertle the Turtle by Dr. Seuss

The rock that Yertle uses as a throne isn’t high enough so King Yertle stacks himself on top of other turtles to see farther and make his kingdom bigger.  He does not, however, think of how this situation is affecting the turtles beneath him.

The Big Short by Michael Lewis

In Michael Lewis’s book, four high-finance outsiders are the first to understand that the mid-2000-era housing market was the equivalent of a throne of stacked turtles.

Eloise by Kay Thompson

Unforgettable Eloise lives at the Plaza Hotel and knows everything about it.

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Anna has her senior year planned out.  Then plans change and she ends up in a boarding school in Paris.  She’s pining for Georgia, so Paris isn’t very magical.  But there’s this guy…

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg

Claudia and her brother Jamie run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Hiding in the museum is part of the fun, but they also set out to figure out if an angel statue was sculpted by Michelangelo.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Jude and her twin brother Noah were once close and now they aren’t.  Find out what happened when they were 13 and what’s happening now when they are sixteen.

The Paper Bag Princess  Robert N. Munsch

Princess Elizabeth is ready to marry Prince Roland, until a dragon intervenes.

Bitterblue by Kristen Cashore

Princess Bitterblue’s rule of Monsea is complicated by the fact that she can’t leave the castle, and also because the former king was a violent psychopath.  She’s ready to move her kingdom past that stage.  But how?

 

If you like Charlotte's WebCharlotte’s Web by E.B. White

Wilbur, the runt of the litter is saved twice, first by Fern Arable and then by Charlotte, a barn spider.

Animal Farm by George Orwell

The pigs have grown up!  And this time they are taking over the farm in George Orwell’s allegorical novella.

Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

The story of a bunny in a great green room saying goodnight to everything.

Room by Emma Donoghue

Jack says goodnight to things, too, though he does it in Room, the tiny shed which is the only home he’s ever known.  Unknown to him, Room isn’t the world, it’s where he and his Ma are held captive by Old Nick.

Number the Stars by Lois Lowry

Annemarie and Ellen’s friendship persists despite the pressures of World War II and the relocation of Jews in Denmark.

Night by Elie Wiesel

A son’s experience with his father in the concentration camps of Auschwitz and Buchenwald
 

 

 

 

Parks and Recreation Season OneBy the Hollywood Teen Book Council

It has been a little over a year since we had to say goodbye to Leslie Knope and friends. This is the show that brought us Galentine’s Day, “Treat yo self,” and so many heartfelt and funny moments.  Luckily, the library has all seven seasons available for checkout.

Even if there was no love loss between the Parks Department and the Library, (Leslie Knope did say once, “The library is the worst group of people ever assembled in history. They’re mean, conniving, rude and extremely well read, which makes them very dangerous.”); these are characters that continue to stay with us. Just as we are gearing up for more  time in the great outdoors, recreating in our parks, we thought we’d take a moment and pick books for our favorite characters.

Leslie KnopeMy Beloved WorldAdventures with Waffles

Leslie Knope

My Beloved World By Sonia Sotomayor

Leslie Knope is not someone to let anything get in the way of her dreams, and she is inspired by a league of powerful women. Since she is on her path to  Washington, she would be interested in the paths of other women that have landed key roles in the running of different branches of  government.

Adventures with Waffles by Maria Parr

With a strong love of breakfast food, especially waffles, this is a book for Ms. Knope. Where she is all about strong friendships and adventures outdoors, she will delight in the kinship and antics of Trille and Lena.

Hatchet

Ron Swanson

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Ron Swanson is an advocate for self-reliance, and he has his own fantasies of living off the grid. He will enjoy Brian’s story of surviving in the wilderness after a plane crash with only a hatchet to sustain himself.

April LudgateStiff The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers

April Ludgate

Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach

Putting Makeup on Dead People by Jen Violi

As far as working for the City of Pawnee, April’s interest and personality seems to be a better fit for the morgue than the parks’ department. We think she would be fascinated by both Stiff and Putting Makeup on Dead People.

Andy DwyerA Dog's JourneyThe Adventures of Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey

Andy Dwyer

A Dog's Journey by W. Bruce Cameron

We know that Andy has a soft spot for animals. He will enjoy this tender-hearted tale told through the eyes of a dog.

The Adventures of Captain Underpants by Dav Pilkey

We really think that this is Andy Dwyer’s actual secret identity.

Tom HaverfordModern Romance

Tom Haverford

Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari

Even though this is written by the actor that plays Tom Haverford, we know that Tom would appreciate the meticulous research that went into this to show how modern technology is affecting the way that we date.

Donna Meaglefamous-in-love

Donna Meagle

Famous in Love by Rebecca Serle

Donna has all the men falling for her, just like Paige in this book. Eventually both with have to choose if they want to be with just one.

Ann PerkinsLumberjanes

Ann Perkins

Lumberjanes by Noelle Stevenson

Ann is the ultimate best friend. We think that she would enjoy the strong female friendships and the supernatural adventures that take place in the great outdoors.

Ben WyattReady_Player_One_

Ben Wyatt

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Bless the ultimate nerd that is Ben Wyatt. If only this book had some more Game of Thrones references. Still, we know that Ben will love this homage to some of the best things to come out of the 1980’s.

Chris TraegerWhat I Talk About When I Talk About Running

Chris Traeger

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami

Super fit Chris Traeger will love this contemplation about a shared passion from one of today’s greatest writers. .

Jerry GergichWhat's in a Name Everything You Wanted to Know

Jerry Gergich (...or Garry, Larry or Terry)

What's in a Name?: Everything You Wanted to Know by Leonard R. N. Ashley

Really what is in a name? Come on, Jerry!

 

-By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

Luna Lovegood

"I think they think I'm a bit odd, you know. Some people call me 'Loony' Lovegood, actually.” --Luna Lovegood, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

There are so many reasons that Luna Lovegood has captivated us. Her airy ways and perceptiveness bring humor  throughout the series. When we first meet her in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, J.K. Rowling writes, “The girl gave off an aura of distinct dottiness. Perhaps it was the fact that she had stuck her wand behind her left ear for safekeeping, or that she had chosen to wear a necklace of Butterbeer caps, or that she was reading a magazine upside down.”

Initially, as most of us on the Hollywood Teen Book Council are all avid Harry Potter fans, we wanted to do some sort of a book project around the series. When it came time to get started, none of us could get past wanting to suggest books that we thought Luna Lovegood would love to read.

Here is what we would think she should read, if she hasn’t already . And as Luna says, , “Wit beyond measure is man's greatest treasure.”

 

The Theory of Everything

The Theory of Everything by Kari Luna

Luna’s a little bit quirky and so is Sophie Sophia, the girl with an obsession of music from the late 80’s.  Luna will enjoy Sophie’s attempt to find her father, an eccentric physicist who has disappeared suddenly.  Luna will also be glad that Sophie has a friend along on the quest: her giant shaman panda named Walt.

Rats Observations on the History and Habitat of the City's Most Unwanted InhabitantsRats: Observations on the History and Habitat of the City's Most Unwanted Inhabitants by Robert Sullivan

Luna’s interests are varied and thorough, so perhaps she would like this very complete examination of city-dwelling rats and how they have evolved alongside humans.

 

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Aside from Harry, if anyone else at Hogwarts is going to go on a quest, it would probably be Luna.  Unlike Coelho’s shepherd boy, she might come to a quicker understanding of what she needs to find the treasure she seeks.

 

The Magicians A Novel By GrossmanThe Magicians: A Novel by Lev Grossman

Luna attends a school for witchcraft and wizardry, so she might be interested to compare Quentin Coldwater’s school of magic experience in upstate New York to her own.

 

he Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in A Ship of Her Own MakingThe Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in A Ship of Her Own Making by Catherynne M. Valente

Ms. Lovegood is a solid character who is always up for an adventure so she might like this story of a girl named September who’s adventure involves a quest  to retrieve a witch's spoon from the terrible and unpredictable Marquess of Fairyland.

 

The Night CircusThe Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Luna wouldn’t be surprised to see a circus appear with no warning, and she might also like the struggle and love story of two young illusionists.

 

Gutshot By Amelia GrayGutshot: Stories by  Amelia Gray

With so many interests, short stories might be the right kind of fiction for Luna.  This collection is human and dark, and full details of this strange world of ours.

 

A Pattern Language Towns, Buildings, ConstructionA Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction by Christopher Alexander

Luna’s unique thought process sometimes makes communication with others difficult.  Perhaps this book, which helps build a common language and coherence within systems, will help.  It’s strongly recommended if she ever designs or builds a house.

 

Unflattening By SousanisUnflattening by Nick Sousanis

Luna Lovegood sees things differently than your average Hogswartian, so Nick Sousanis’s experiment in visual thinking would be at home in her hands.  This graphic novel disassembles perception and will help her to find even more understanding.  Though perhaps she is already ahead of the rest of us?

 

Want to shake up your reading patterns? Tired of reading a book from cover to cover in a sequential order? Here are two reading suggestions from the Hollywood Library’s Teen Book Council where you get to choose the order you read the stories, and invites you to pick your own pattern.

 

Ghosts of Heaven Book CoverSiena Lesher, sophomore

Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick

True, history goes in chronological order, but that doesn’t mean all stories flow that way. If you were to rearrange the order of certain events in life, you would wind up with an entirely different plot, and The Ghosts of Heaven proves that. A collection of four short tales, you can read them in any order and get a different story each way. It’s a very interesting set of stories, each written in a different style of writing, and I would highly recommend it.

 

 

 

 

Turnip Princess book coverArden Butterfield, freshman

The Turnip Princess by Franz Xaver von Schönwerth

These German fairy tales were lost in an archive for over 100 years, and were recently discovered a few years ago. The stories are fairly short, but there is a large variety in what they are about. The stories are grouped by topic-- tales of romance, of magic, of animals and of banished princes which can make the book feel somewhat monotonous. I would recommend jumping around in this book, instead of reading it cover to cover.

This book is bland. The stories, for the most part, are told without emotion, just matter-of-factly stating whatever happens. While this contributes to the monotony of the story, I also think it makes it feel more dreamlike, in the way that in dreams the wildest things happen completely deadpan. I would recommend it to anyone interested in fairy tales, or interested in German medieval culture.  It isn’t a gripping page turner, but it was very good nonetheless, especially from a historical perspective.

 

Looking for more great reading suggestions? Try one of these picks of the month.

 
 

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