Blogs: Social Issues

Clues to climate change, from the Environmental Protection Agency

 

Want to show what climate change is doing to the planet? Here you go! While one drought or bad wildfire season does not mean that the world is going up in flames, here are some websites from teachers and scientists that will get you started and help your report stand out.

 

 

 

Big 3 -- all about climate

Learn about climate

http://scied.ucar.edu/climate
Climate information from the National Center for Atmospheric Research. This up-to-date educational site includes links to many stories about the climate.

Impacts of climate change

http://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/kids/impacts/index.html
See the Impacts of climate change at this page from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Effects of climate change from NASA

http://climate.nasa.gov/effects/
NASA scientists describe consequences of climate change, including more droughts and heat waves, stronger hurricanes, and rising sea levels.


Did you know?
The world's oceans are warmer now than at any time in the last 50 years.
Source: Environmental Protection Agency  http://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/kids/impacts/index.html


3 more -- frequent questions

How hot is it getting?

Climate monitoring from the NOAA temperature monitoring site
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/climate-monitoring/ , including worldwide data, as well as data from the United States.

Is the ice really melting?

Snow, ice and climate change from the National Snow and Ice Data Center
http://nsidc.org/cryosphere/climate-change.html

What about the endangered species?

Biodiversity as an Indicator of Global Climate Change, from Exploring the Environment from Wheeling Jesuit University.
http://ete.cet.edu/gcc/?/biodiversity_teacher_pages/
This page was designed for teachers, but has information and links about endangered species.

 


News Flash!

2015 is likely to be the warmest year on record.
Source: World Meteorological Organization https://www.wmo.int/media/content/wmo-2015-likely-be-warmest-record-2011-2015-warmest-five-year-period


You can also consult a database like Today’s Science. You will need your library card number and PIN to login from home. Click on the Topic Index at the top of the page, which contains a wide range of headings, or you can use the search bar. This database, from Facts on File, is for high school and older students. 

Remember, if you need help, you can ask a librarian online, or at your neighborhood library.

Sexual orientation, sexual identity, and gender identity have been getting more attention in the news lately, with the Supreme Court decision about same-sex marriage and Caitlyn Jenner's public transition.

Confused? Curious? Concerned? All of the above? The library is a great place to learn more. Teen Health and Wellness has informative articles and also offers teens the opportunity to submit your own stories and videos.  

If you're in or close to Portland, the services of the Sexual Minority Youth Resource Center and TransActive Gender Center may be helpful.

No matter where you are, you can call, text, or chat YouthLine.

And the video below, LGBTQ: Understanding Sexual Orientation and Gender Identities, is a good brief overview of these topics that includes stories from several youth.

Logo for the Intellectual Freedom Issues in Oregon database

Curious about censorship or banned books in Oregon?  Need to know what's been published in the local news?  The Intellectual Freedom Issues in Oregon: A News Database, may have what you need.  The database is the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse's news clipping files, and is updated twice a year. The database includes news articles and editorials about intellectual freedom issues printed in Oregon newspapers over the past 65 years. The database can be searched by article title, newspaper name, date, city/location, name of challenged book or material, and organizations or individuals involved. After you have found what you want to read, contact the coordinator of the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse, Katie Anderson, 503-378-2528 to request a complete text of the articles or editorials.  And if you have any trouble, don't forget to Ask a Librarian!

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