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Сейчас учащиеся пяти местных школьных округов могут использовать свой школьный пропуск в качестве читательского билета, что позволяет им получить мгновенный доступ к библиотеке. 

Они имеют доступ ко всем нашим услугам – от книг и музыкальных стримов до онлайн-репетиторов.

Пятеро школьников улыбаются и показывают жест одобрения - большой палец вверх

Всё это стало возможным благодаря программе Library Connect. Мы начали работать со школьными округами над внедрением данной программы в прошлом году. На данный момент 80 000 школьников пользуются этой программой. До внедрения программы более чем у половины этих учеников не было читательских билетов. 

В настоящее время Library Connect пользуются учащиеся школьных округов Portland Public, Centennial, David Douglas, Gresham-Barlow и Parkrose . В будущем мы надеемся привлечь еще больше студентов.

Программа является настоящей находкой для преподавателей, которые сейчас могут быть уверены в том, что их ученики имеют доступ к одинаковым ресурсам. 

Узнайте больше о Library Connect и других способах поддержки школьников и преподавателей.

Работа системы Library Connect ведётся за счёт пожертвований в Библиотечный фонд.

Last month we told you about resources for families this summer. And now we’d like to highlight a few of our favorite outdoor activities that we think you may enjoy:

  1. Gateway Discovery Park: Art and cultural activities will be hosted all summer long at this East Portland park.
  2. Gresham Japanese Garden: A beautiful Japanese garden to visit, plus they are holding many events this summer. 
  3. Interactive Fountains and Splash Pads: Portland Parks and Recreation hopes to have it’s fountains and splash pads open this summer and it’s a great way to beat the heat!
  4. Local guidebooks: Check out a guidebook on exploring the area with kids. 
  5. Harper’s Playground: Find inclusive playgrounds for all abilities around Portland and beyond. 
  6. Mike Bennett's A to Zoo: Wonderful outdoor art displays that bring fun and education to the whole family. Currently they can be found in NE Portland.
  7. Mural map: Three maps of Portland’s Street art: a walking map of the Alberta Arts District; a biking map of the Central Eastside Industrial District; and an all-city highlights map. 
  8. U-pick farms: U-Pick farms in Portland and Multnomah County, sorted by county.
  9. Walking with Ramona: Do you love Ramona Quimby? Well you can walk in her shoes with this walking map of Ramona’s neighborhood.
  10. Walks around Portland: Portland Bureau Of Transportation’s has many suggested walks, including one that goes to the North Portland Library. And there are also ones for bikes!

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

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Students in five local school districts can now use their student ID as their library card, giving them instant library access. 

That includes everything we have to offer, from books to streaming music to online tutors.

Five school kids smiling and giving the thumbs up sign

It’s made possible by a program called Library Connect. We began working with school districts on the program last year, and so far we’ve reached about 80,000 students. More than half of those kids didn’t have library cards. 

Currently, Library Connect serves students in Portland Public, Centennial, David Douglas, Gresham-Barlow and Parkrose school districts. We hope to reach even more students in the future.

The program is a huge boon for educators, who can now rely upon their students having access to the same resources. 

Learn more about Library Connect and other ways we support students and educators.

Library Connect is made possible by gifts to The Library Foundation.

New federal Emergency Broadband Benefit program offers low-income consumers discounts for high speed internet or laptops and other devices. If you live in Multnomah County, you could get:

  • Up to $50 per month for internet service
  • $100 to buy a new laptop, desktop computer or tablet through a participating provider

Find out if you qualify

You qualify if your household income is at or below 135% of the federal poverty guidelines
 

Qualifying income levels:

Number of people in household Income
1 $17,388
2 $23,517
3 $29,646
4 $35,775
5 $41,904
6 $48,033
7 $54,162
8 $60,291

For each additional person, add $6,129.

You may also qualify if you or a member of your family:

  • Gets free or reduced-price school breakfast/lunch.
  • Lost income due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Received a federal Pell grant for 2021.
  • Meets other criteria.

See if you qualify.

Apply

Apply online, pick up a paper application at any Multnomah County library, or visit or call a participating provider:

  • AT&T: 800-331-0500
  • Comcast Xfinity: 800-934-6489
  • Comcast Internet Essentials: 855-846-8376
  • Human-I-T: 888-391-7249  
  • T-Mobile: 800-866-2453
  • Verizon: 800-922-0204 
  • Ziply Fiber: 866-699-4759 

Get help

If you need help, visit your library or call:

  • Multnomah County Library: 503-988-5123
  • Emergency Broadband Support Center: 833-511-0311
  • Community Information Center: call 211 
  • Portland Customer Service Program: call 311
     

Renee Watson; photo: Shawnte Sims
Renée Watson is a New York Times bestselling author, educator, and activist.  One of  her passions is using the arts to help youth cope with trauma and discuss social issuesRenée grew up in Portland, and splits her time between Portland and New York City.

For so many of us, last year stretched us in ways we could not have imagined. There was great loss, turmoil, and so much change. Still, there was much to be grateful for—unexpected phone calls from loved ones, zoom meet ups with friends, time outdoors and the relief of fresh air. 

And books.

I am so grateful to have books to turn to for comfort, distraction, company. Books have always been a kind of friend to me. I spent a lot of time reading and imagining as a child. I loved walking to the North Portland Library in the summertime to roam the aisles. Books took me to faraway lands, made me laugh, taught me important lessons, and made me see myself in familiar and new ways. I especially gravitated to poetry and loved stealing away to read the words of Nikki Giovanni and Eloise Greenfield.   

I remember the first time I discovered "Mother to Son" by Langston Hughes. I was attending Vernon Elementary School and was chosen to recite the poem at a Black History Month assembly. The speaker in the poem sounded like my mom. I even think my mom had said some of those things before. She was always pushing her children, telling us to never give up no matter how hard life might be. When I first read Maya Angelou’s Still I Rise, I felt powerful and proud of my ancestors. I was buoyed by their resilience. 

And so I fell in love with poetry. 

I loved the rhythm, I loved trying on different ways to say a phrase. I loved the line breaks, how each stanza would take me deeper and deeper into the meaning of the whole poem. I learned that poetry can be about anything. I could write odes to my neighborhood or favorite food, I could honor a loved one who had died, I could protest with my words and write poems that stood up against injustice. 

Over the years, poetry became the way I celebrated, mourned, raged. And so, when the pandemic swept over our nation and living in quarantine became the new normal, I found myself turning to poetry for comfort and peace. And then summer came and with it came a even more police brutality and violence against Black men and women. I was weary. I turned to the poets who raised me, the poets who lived through The Great Depression, Jim Crow, The Civil Rights Movement. They knew something about sorrow, about loss, about protest. They also knew about joy and love and how to hold on to hope. 

It’s a new year and still, we need comfort, we need inspiration. I’m still keeping poetry nearby and I offer these recently published books as a refuge, a guiding light, a healing balm. Some are novels-in-verse, some are traditional poetry collections. All of them are treasures and medicine for the soul.

When families register by June 1, teachers and schools can do more welcoming and communication before school starts, easing the transition for incoming kindergarteners.

Flyer on registering children for Kindergarten in PPS.

If you live in Multnomah County, you can identify your school or district by texting "MYSCHOOL" or "MIESCUELA" to 898211.

Here are some Register for Kindergarten resources at the major school districts in Multnomah County.  Several of them have welcome videos, including in multiple languages. 

The following information is specific to the Portland Public School (PPS) District.

Kindergarten videos: Hear from families and school staff about how to register and get ready for school! Videos are posted on the Kindergarten tab of the Early Learners website and are available in English, Chinese, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Vietnamese.

Register for School by June 1: There are so many benefits to registering early such as families hearing from school staff about events, summer transition programs, and information about the start to school. Please register online or call the school for a registration packet. 

Early Kindergarten Transition Program Applications: Apply now to be eligible for this inclusive, family-centered bridge program, for children entering Kindergarten or first grade at an EKT school in the Fall. EKT schools include: Boise-Eliot/Humboldt, Cesar Chavez, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Faubion, Harrison Park, James John, Kelly, Lee, Lent, Rigler, Rosa Parks, Scott, Sitton, Vestal, and Woodmere. Applications and flyers are posted on the EKT website or call the school for paper applications. 

Pre-K Applications: PPS is currently accepting Pre-Kindergarten applications for the 2021/22 school year. Online applications are available and paper applications can be requested by emailing prekprograms@pps.net or leaving a message at (971) 501-0111. 

Ramp up to Kindergarten: This fall, every family will receive a relationship-based conversation with their Kindergarten teacher prior to the start of school. In addition, every child will receive a small group “warm-up” orientation to classroom and building routines prior to the official first day of Kindergarten. School staff will be communicating their specific schedules with incoming families. Finally, teachers will delay student assessments so families and school staff can focus on building relationships for a welcoming start to the school year. 

Finally, the PPS Early Learners Website includes an FAQ document that answers parent questions about Kindergarten. FAQs are available in English, Chinese, Russian, Somali, Spanish, Vietnamese.

And you can find general contact info for all the school districts on the Multnomah Education Service District website.

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

It feels so good to get outside when the weather is nice!

Child using a watering can to water garden.

Children thrive in the natural setting. But exposure to nature is good for all ages! It not only makes you feel better emotionally, it contributes to your physical wellbeing, reducing blood pressure, heart rate, muscle tension, and the production of stress hormones. Gardening is a great way to get into nature. And if you don’t have a garden space, you can try square foot or container gardening. Or find a community garden nearby. 

It is said that there are seven wonders of the natural world, but for little ones there are seven million wonders in the world right outside their door! Everything is fresh and new. The young child’s work is to play and to make constant discoveries about their environment. 

Gardening is a perfect way for the smallest child to explore and honor the earth. Of course, children learn by using their whole body — and all their senses. Children are naturally curious little scientists and love to experience the sights, scents, sounds and textures of the outdoors. As your little explorer follows you into the garden, you can talk to them about what they are seeing.

Give them the names of familiar plants. Describe the squelch of mud between their toes. Notice the texture of the leaves and how they dance in the breeze. Point out the variety of seeds in the fruits and vegetables you share. Gradually, you can introduce the planting of seeds.

And for older kids and teens, the benefits of gardening are just as valuable. 

Here are some ideas.

Gardening Activities for Toddlers

Fun Garden Activities for Little Ones

  • Make a special fairy garden or dinosaur garden! Decorate with stones and flowers and twigs. 
  • Water plants. Or toes!
  • Paint stones. Toddlers are happy with a bucket of water and a paintbrush!
  • Make mud pies. It’s okay to get your hands dirty! Learning involves all the senses.

And below you will find a booklist with even more stories, projects and ideas. Happy gardening!

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

MHCC Head Start and Early Head Start have over 900 openings for the 21/22 School Year!

They provide FREE services to pregnant women and families of children ages birth to 5 who reside in East Multnomah County, outside of Portland Public Schools.

MHCC Head Start Logo

Programs include:

Home Based Program:

  • For pregnant parents and children 0-5 years old
  • Provides weekly home visits with a childcare provider
  • Focuses on connecting with little ones and parenting skills

Preschool classes:

  • For Children 2-5 years old
  • Ranges from 3.5 – 7 hours per day, 2-5 days a week
  • Learn-by-playing approach builds social and emotional development

Full-Day Childcare*:

  • For children 6 months - 5 years old
  • Ranges from 8.5 -10 hours per day
  • Offers year-round coverage

Here are flyers in English, Spanish, ArabicSomali and Russian


Families who are eligible:

  • Receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Supplemental Security Income, or
  • Are homeless, or
  • Have an income below the federal poverty guideline, or
  • Have a child in foster care

*Additional Eligibility Requirements for Full-Day Childcare:

  • Family must be working and receiving childcare subsidy, or
  • Be an MHCC Student taking 9 credits or more

Ready To Apply? Call the main office at: 503-491-6111 or click here.

As a parent of three children with dyslexia, I have faced many of the challenges common to caregivers of a youth with dyslexia. 

One of the biggest challenges I faced was navigating school special education to provide access to a free education appropriate to my students’ learning style. All students have a right to Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) through Federal Law.  My kids were not learning how to read in the classroom, and the school didn’t seem to be doing anything. Oregon legislation has changed since my kids first started school, and schools are required to do more to address dyslexia. But is it enough? You may have to advocate for the youth in your life. 

Things to consider...

Mental health:

  • Research has shown that individuals with learning disabilities: 
    • may experience increased levels of anxiety.  
    • may be at greater risk for depression.  
    • experience higher levels of loneliness. 
    • may have a lower self-concept (self-esteem).  
    • are at greater risk for substance abuse. 
    • may be at greater risk for juvenile delinquency.
  • 20 percent of children with dyslexia also suffer from depression and another 20 percent suffer from an anxiety disorder.

Incarceration Rates: 

  • Percent of adults in custody with dyslexia: 48% 
  • Percent of adolescents with learning disabilities that will be arrested three to five years out of high school: 31%

These facts are alarming. But there is good news … intervention helps! When modern, research based instruction is put into place in grades K-2, the reading disability rate drops.

Knowing where to go or who to talk to get an assessment for dyslexia can be difficult. Many states have passed legislation to identify dyslexia in children early on.  If you aren’t in school or you feel that your school is missing something, check out our Uncovering Dyslexia blog post, which points to places in Multnomah County who will privately assess for dyslexia. 

Resources for families affected by dyslexia: 

Looking for books to share with your family? Here are some fiction books for kids and teens featuring characters with dyslexia, and here are some nonfiction books on dyslexia written for kids. For more information on dyslexia, including some book recommendations for caregivers, please see our previous post on Uncovering Dyslexia.

- Desiree, Rockwood Branch Library Makerspace Program Specialist
 

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COVID-19 continues to limit our access to public spaces. Many of our everyday activities, like school, work, doctor’s visits and banking are now online. This makes personal information vulnerable to cybercriminals. Learn more about how to protect yourself online.

Protect your passwords!

One of the most common ways scammers can get at your data is by stealing passwords to important accounts. Making good passwords is one of the easiest and most useful ways to keep your data safe and sound.

Update often.

  • Update passwords often to protect from scammers, and make your accounts less open to large data leaks. Experts suggest updating passwords every 3 months.

Use long phrases instead of short words.

  • Try using famous quotes, common sayings, or even song lyrics for your passwords. Long phrases like “we all live in a yellow submarine” are easy to remember, and harder for a computer to guess.
  • Add numbers, capital letters and special characters to your passwords. (For example, P4$$w0rD.) This is an easy way to make your password more secure. Be careful not to make it too hard to remember.

Create unique passwords for each specific account.  

  • Reusing passwords between accounts puts many accounts at risk. If a scammer gets one password, they can open every account connected to that password.
  • Focus on making your most important accounts safe. Start with your banks, social media or health insurance.

Yellow diamond sign that says Scam Alert

Recognize common scams

Internet scams are becoming more and more common. Cybercriminals make up new ways to get your data. Here are some of the most common scams.

Phishing scams

One of the most popular scams is Phishing. Phishing is when scammers pretend to be a reliable source — like a business, a government agency or even a relative, to get at your personal info. They send bogus emails, phone calls and text messages, trying to get a “bite” from victims. The most common phishing scam is an email with hyperlinks to fake websites that can steal passwords, or infect your computer with a virus.

Look for these signs to spot phishing emails:

  • Grammar and spelling mistakes
  • Strange/unfamiliar email addresses
  • Scary language, like threats of legal action, or demands for money
  • Offers too good to be true, like a big cash prize

Gift card scams

One popular scam is when a scammer tells you to buy a gift card to pay a fake bill or fee. There are many types of this scam, such as:

  • A problem with your Social Security account
  • A power company threatening to cut off your service
  • A message that you won a big cash prize, if you buy a card first
  • A grandchild or relative who suddenly asks for money with no warning

Coronavirus scams

With more business moving online because of COVID-19, scammers have created new scams that play on our fears of COVID-19, such as:

  • Unexpected texts/calls asking you to pay for a vaccine 
  • Scary warnings about new COVID cases in your area
  • Offers for fake COVID tests to steal your insurance info
  • Notes that a package you didn’t order is on its way, with a link to its “tracking number”

In short

While the internet can be a scary place, following just a few basic tips can help you stop cybercriminals and enjoy yourself online. Our three most important tips are:

  1. Take care to create strong passwords, and reuse them as little as possible.
  2. NEVER click on any links from an email you did not expect, or a phone number you do not know.
  3. If in doubt, remember that ANY request to pay a bill or fee with a gift card IS A SCAM.

If you see any of the scams listed here, you can call the AARP Fraud-Watch Helpline at 877-908-3360, or contact the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Find more password protection tips at the AARP fraud watch network.

Check out more info about coronavirus scams at Consumer Reports.

Want to learn more about internet scams?  Check out the Federal Trade Commission's glossary of common scams.
 

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