Блоги: Learn & Create

KIDS REACT TO TYPEWRITERS

Kids aren't born knowing how to use a keyboard.  But in today’s keyboard-centric world, kids need to learn to type. Luckily, there are some good free online typing programs aimed at students.

The article  Ed Tech Ideas: Keyboarding Sites for Kids lists many links to other free typing games.

Need more help? Contact a librarian

photo of children at Wizard Camp library program
For the past several years, the Hollywood Teen Council has hosted a Hogwarts Camp for 1st-3rd graders during the winter break from school. As many camps and summer programs aren’t happening this summer, they want to share some ideas so that you can create your own wizard camp at home.
 
Usually the teen council would make the gathering of supplies a big part of the first day of camp, and you can pick and choose which supplies you will want to make. During camp, they would try to expose burgeoning witches and wizards to a variety of wizard school subjects such as Potions, Care of Magical Creatures, Charms and more. At home, with more time, there are many possibilities. You can also find ideas for games and activities as well as some magical treats to make. Imagination is the key ingredient for all of these. Here is a list of supplies and activities for your DIY Wizard's Camp.
Download Me and White Supremacy today.

Layla F. Saad's book Me and White Supremacy: A 28-Day Challenge to Combat Racism, Change the World, and Become a Good Ancestor  leads readers through a journey of understanding their

Me and White Supremacy cover
white privilege and participation in white supremacy, so that they can stop (often unconsciously) inflicting damage on Black people, Indigenous people and people of color. Wherever you are in the challenge, here are some supporting resources to help.

Getting started:

Find copies of Me and White Supremacy in the catalog. If you are able, consider supporting the author by purchasing a copy. White Supremacy and Me is designed as a 28-day workbook, so you may need to renew or place another hold if you are using the hardcopy.

Learn more:

Website: The National Museum of African American History & Culture breaks out history, bias, whiteness, antiracism and more. Includes videos and questions for self-reflection and discussion.

For parents talking to children about racism 

Podcast: Talking Race with Young Children, from NPR and Sesame Street

This 20 minute podcast shares ideas for talking about race with children, starting when they are very young.  Additional resources are included at the end.

Website: EmbraceRace

​A great place to start for webinars and more, EmbraceRace was founded by two parents (one Black, one multiracial) seeking to nurture resilience in children of color; nurture inclusive, empathetic children of all stripes; and raise kids who think critically about racial inequity.

Start with the short action guide and then dive into their many book lists, highlighting diverse titles for a wide variety of ages.

Book: Not My Idea, by Anastasia Higginbotham (for elementary school-aged children)

Not My Idea follows a young white girl who is unsatisfied when her family won’t answer her questions about the shooting of an unarmed Black person by a police officer. Higginbotham has a track record of tackling challenging topics (from divorce to death) in a way that respects young readers and gives them the honesty they deserve. Includes activities on how to stand up against injustice and highlights how white people can disrupt white supremacy.

More on talking to kids and teens about race and racism.

Next steps: If you want to engage more deeply in the work of antiracism

Website: Take a look at the offerings from Layla F. Saad's Good Ancestor Academy. A series of classes are offered, including "Allyship in the Workplace" and "Parenting and White Supremacy."

Video: How to be a Good Ally--Identity, Privilege, Resistance, by Ahsante the Artist

Guide: Let's Talk: Discussing Race, Racism and Other Difficult Topics with Students, from Teaching Tolerance

Thinking about starting a discussion group around Me and White Supremacy? Here are some tips on facilitating conversations that challenge participants or cause discomfort.

Video: "What if white people led the charge to end racism?", Dr. Nita Mosby Tyler, TedXMileHigh, Jan. 30, 2020.

What if white people led the charge to end racism? | Nita Mosby Tyler | TEDxMileHigh

Three Penguins Walking
Looking for a useful distraction? Participate in crowd-sourced science or transcription projects to help researchers across the world!

Try your hand at being a citizen scientist by gathering or reviewing data that researchers need to analyze!

More interested in historical research? There are many opportunities to transcribe archival documents, making their contents available to researchers and members of the public. 

You might be keeping safe at home but enjoy these live online performances from some amazing library children’s performers.

Resources for older adults

Are you looking for resources and activities for older adults? Check out these great ideas from Library Outreach Services:

Scrabble pieces spelling "support"

 

Resources for caregivers of older adults

Are you a caregiver for an older adult? Find support and resources from these organizations:

  • Timeslips.org has free stories, images and audio to spark meaningful engagement with family members who have dementia. 
  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection is providing multilingual local support for caregivers and older adults. You can call or email ADRC at 503.988.3646 or adrc@multco.us  for 24-hour information and assistance to seniors, people with disabilities, and caregivers.
  • The Alzheimer's Association 24/7 help line (800.272.3900) is providing specialists and master’s-level clinicians to give confidential support and information to people living with Alzheimer’s, caregivers, families and the public.

computer with person in background
Looking to learn new skills while at home? Or wanting to watch a music or dance performance? Local chefs, fitness teachers, musicians and performers are offering online classes and performances. Check out some of these cool offerings:

Gabriel Rucker from restaurants Le Pigeon and Carnard is offering live cooking classes via Instagram. He posts the recipes on his Instagram stories ahead of time. 

While it isn’t live, the New York Times has some 6, 7, and 9 minute full body workouts to get you moving without needing any equipment at home. 

Artslandia, Portland’s performing arts magazine, is hosting a live happy hour, Standing By, with music on Facebook at 5pm each night. 

Not live, but you can watch Lewis and Clark College’s orchestra play music on their Vimeo channel and various music from the University of Oregon on their YouTube as well. 

Live Music Project Seattle is offering a calendar of live music events you can join via your computer. 

New York Times bestselling Illustrator Wendy MacNaughton of Salt Acid Fat Heat is offering drawing classes via her Instagram stories Monday through Friday at 10am. 

Join one of our amazing performers, Micah and Me, for a live ukelele party on Facebook Live Saturdays at 11am and Mondays at 4:30pm. 

Fun for all-ages, join the Oregon Zoo as they Facebook Live with some of their animals everyday at 9:30am. 

OMSI is hosting a virtual science pub about the dynamic Geological History of the Columbia Gorge: Tale of Two Floods with Scott Burns, PhD, Professor of Geology at Portland State University on March 31st from 6:30 to 8:30pm on Facebook Live. 

Is there anything better for hard times than singing? Choir Choir Choir is holding online singalongs on Facebook.

Bored? Tired of being home? Try a scavenger hunt to explore the library website and catalog. Discover some new resouces and learn a bit about the library. How many languages does TumbleBooks offer books in? What app can you use to learn a language? When did your neighborhood library open? Try all or some of the questions. Click here for the questions and, when you're ready, here are answers and how to find them.

Photo of a camera
You need a photo or an image for a project you’re working on. You need it fast. You don’t want to pay anything or get sued for copyright violation. Luckily, there are lots of sources on the Web for finding free-to-use images!

Some of these websites include images which are in the public domain (public domain = nobody owns the copyright). Others include images where the creator is giving up some of their copyright protection and allowing you to use their photos and artwork. However, the creator or website may have usage rules: for example, they might require you to tell people where the image came from and who made it. Before you copy or use any image, it’s a good idea to check for usage or licensing rules. 

ImageQuest - https://multcolib.org/resource/imagequest: ImageQuest is a library resource created by the Encyclopædia Britannica. It has millions of images that you can use for non-commercial purposes. The collection includes photos and clip art, and it allows you to sort results by shape (horizontal or vertical rectangle, or square). Information about creator and rights is provided for each image.

Creative Commons logo
Creative Commons Search - https://search.creativecommons.org: Creative Commons is an organization that helps people share content on the Web (photos, videos, writing, anything!) This webpage lets you search for images which have Creative Commons licenses. The licenses are like permission statements: they tell you what you are allowed to do with the image. 

Smithsonian Open Access - https://www.si.edu/openaccess/: The Smithsonian has created this site to provide access to millions of images from their museums, libraries, archives and the National Zoo. Every image is Creative Commons Zero (CC0), meaning that the Smithsonian has waived all of their rights under copyright. There is also a Smithsonian Learning Lab with information about the Open Access collection and ideas for how to use it.

Children reading a wireless newspaper
The Commons - https://www.flickr.com/commons: The Commons is a section of the photo-sharing website Flickr which provides access to images from public photography archives at museums and libraries around the world. It’s a great place to find historic photos, and everyone (including you!) is encouraged to add comments and tags to the images. The photos on this site have “no known copyright restrictions.”

Photo of a flower
Morgue File - https://morguefile.com/: A morgue file is a collection of past materials to use for future projects. In this particular online morgue file, you can find many high resolution stock photos.

Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/en/: Pixabay offers over 1.7 million royalty free stock photos and videos. 

Unsplashhttps://unsplash.com/: Over 1 million free, high-resolution photos shared by a huge online community of photographers. The Unsplash license gives you wide permission to use the images.

Scissors illustration

Are websites not your thing? Do you prefer books? The library has many books of illustrations and prints you can use, on all sorts of topics. To find them, just do a subject search in the library catalog for “clip art.” You’ll find books with images of Victorian women’s fashion, birds, children’s book illustrations, fairies and much more. At the end of this post is a book list showing examples of the types of clip art books that the library owns.

If you have trouble finding the images that you want, or if you have more questions about any of this, ask us for help! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.

Images included in this post:

Here are the library’s most popular computer classes for adults - you can find the complete list, including classes in other languages, at https://multcolib.org/tech-classes. Click on each class to find out more, including how to sign up.

Note to Welcome to Computers participants: Tech Help, Computer Help, Experience Virtual Reality @ the Library and E-Books and Audiobooks: Hands-on Help are not eligible for the tracking card program. 

Starting out with Computers

Career & Business Skills

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