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Students looking at grammar workbook together, outside
As the end of the school year comes closer, students start thinking about spring finals and Advanced Placement exams, or looking ahead to the PSAT, SAT or ACT for colleges. The library is here to help with print and online resources and live tutoring help, along with some study tips.

Your student can get started with study guides and learn how to organize and stop putting off their homework and studying. The library has books to help with math, science, essay writing, and AP exams. The library can help with college entrance exams too!

Be sure to also check out our online resources. Students of all ages can get live help in English, Spanish and Vietnamese, 2-10 pm daily, with Live Homework Help from Tutor.com. Tutors can proofread papers and work through math problems with students. Tutor.com also has practice tests, PSAT study guides, AP exam tips, flashcards and more.

High school students can find more AP practice tests, flashcards, study guides and practice college entrance exams in Learning Express Library. They can also find resources for their math, science, language arts, social studies, and technology classes.

All this is free and available with a library card number. Chances are your child has one with Library Connect, our partnership with public school districts. If they know their student ID number, check for your district code to begin using the resources. If password help is needed, the quickest way is by phone. You can also use email or chat between 9 am and 5 pm to reach one of our staff members.

Now that your student is ready to use and borrow library resources, the next step is studying. Teachers and school counselors have tips to help:

  • Plan ahead. Create a schedule of when each test is and how much time to study for each. Avoid stress and worry by spacing out study time rather than cramming.
  • Find a place where your child can concentrate and be comfortable. The library can be a great place! It’s free and there are computers to use for those online resources mentioned above.
  • Have study supplies ready--notes, textbooks, highlighter, pen or pencil, paper. If using a tablet or laptop, make sure it’s charged or that the charger and an outlet are handy.
  • People learn in different ways. What does your child need: a fidget to occupy hands and focus their mind? space to move? ability to listen to a video or audio recording or to read aloud?
  • Remind your student about silencing or using the ‘do not disturb’ feature on their cell phone if they have one. Remind them to close any apps and tabs on their laptop that aren’t for studying.
  • Set an alarm so your child gives their mind and body a short break every hour or so. Suggest to your child that they take a walk, get some food and/or talk to family or friends before returning to study.
  • Ask a couple classmates if they’re interested in forming a study group to support each other.
  • Know what can be taken into the test. If notes are okay, organize them. Only #2 pencils allowed? Have a couple extra ready. Check calculator batteries.
  • Get a good night’s sleep.

Most important is remembering that it’s okay to ask for help, especially if they have feelings of anxiety. Worrying about tests is common. If your child has anxiety about test taking or school in general, we have recommended resources for parents, children and teens that may help.

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Child with pirate face paint at Día de los Niños at St Johns Library, 2019
Día de los Niños y Día de los Libros, conocido como Día, es una celebración de la niñez, el alfabetismo bilingüe y la diversidad en nuestra cultura con un enfoque en la inclusión. Para celebrar este día especial, los niños pueden venir a la biblioteca para recibir un paquete de actividades encantador y un libro de su gusto completamente gratis. Los paquetes y libros estarán disponibles en nuestras 19 bibliotecas desde el 25 de abril; y serán regalados hasta agotar existencias. No es necesario inscribirse.

En asociación con organizaciones comunitarias, la biblioteca será anfitriona de celebraciones del Día de los Niños en la comunidad. Síganos en nuestra página de Facebook o nuestro sitio multcolib.org/es para más información y conocer los últimos detalles.

El día de los niños/El día de los libros es posible en parte gracias a La Fundación de la Biblioteca con apoyo de The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation.

Día de los Niños / Día de los libros (Children's Day / Book Day), commonly known as Día, is a celebration of childhood, bilingual literacy and multiculturalism with a focus on inclusion. To celebrate this special day, children can come to the library to receive a free activity kit and a book of their choice starting April 25th, until supplies last. Kits will be available at all 19 Multnomah County Library locations. No registration necessary.

In partnership with community organizations, the library is also planning on hosting Día celebrations out in the community.  Follow us on our Facebook page and multcolib.org for updates. 

Children's Day/Book Day is made possible in part by The Library Foundation with support from The Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Foundation.

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Hằng năm vào mùa khai thuế, thư viện chuẩn bị sẵn sàng để hỗ trợ — hoặc là sách, buổi hướng dẫn, giới thiệu dịch vụ trợ giúp khai thuế, hay in ra các biểu mẫu khi quý vị cần. Chúng tôi ở đây là vì quý vị! Hãy tìm kiếm những hoạt động trợ giúp sắp diễn ra, chương trình, và bài Blog đăng trên trang mạng của chúng tôi để có những thông tin mới nhất.

Hạn chót để nộp tờ khai thuế liên bang và tiểu bang là thứ Hai, ngày 18 tháng 4, 2022. Mặc dù dịch bệnh COVID-19 đã gây khó khăn cho việc giúp đỡ trực tiếp, quý vị vẫn có thể nhận được sự trợ giúp và hỗ trợ khai thuế theo những cách sau.

Bản sao các biểu mẫu hoặc tập sách hướng dẫn

Hỗ trợ chuẩn bị khai thuế

Các hỗ trợ khác về thuế

Khai thuế miễn phí qua mạng

Quý vị còn có câu hỏi?

Gọi thư viện số 503.988.5123, gửi mẫu thư, hoặc trò chuyện với chúng tôi. Nhân viên thư viện không thể giúp chuẩn bị hồ sơ khai thuế, tư vấn cho những vấn đề thuế, hoặc giải thích luật thuế.

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Todos los años, durante la temporada de declaración de impuestos, la biblioteca está lista para ayudar, ya sea con libros, talleres, referencias para ayuda con los impuestos o para imprimir los formularios que necesita, ¡estamos aquí para ayudarle! Busque los próximos eventos, programas y publicaciones de blog en nuestro sitio web para obtener la información más actualizada.

La fecha límite para presentar declaraciones de impuestos federales y estatales es el lunes, 18 de abril de 2022. Aunque la pandemia de COVID-19 ha dificultado la obtención de ayuda en persona, aún puede obtener asistencia y apoyo para la preparación de impuestos de las siguientes maneras:

Copias en papel de formularios o instrucciones de impuestos

Asistencia para la preparación de las declaraciones de impuestos

Otra asistencia fiscal

Declare sus impuestos en línea gratis

¿Todavía tienes preguntas?

Llame a la biblioteca al 503.988.5123, envíenos un correo electrónico o chatee con nosotros. El personal de la biblioteca no puede preparar declaraciones de impuestos, asesorar sobre asuntos fiscales o interpretar la ley fiscal.

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Каждый год во время сезона подачи налоговых деклараций библиотека готова помочь с предоставлением необходимой литературы, семинаров, распечаткой необходимых вам форм и информации об организациях, где можно получить индивидуальную помощь. Мы всегда готовы вам помочь! Чтобы получить самую свежую информацию следите за сообщениями в блогах, новостями о предстоящих событиях и программах на нашем сайте.

Крайний срок подачи федеральных и государственных налоговых деклараций — понедельник, 18 апреля 2022 г. Пандемия COVID-19 осложняет получение непосредственной помощи, но вы все равно можете получить поддержку в подготовке налоговых деклараций следующими способами:

Бумажные копии налоговых форм или инструкций

  • Загрузите и распечатайте формы и инструкции для федеральных налогов с страницы Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Forms & Instructions, а для штата Орегон с страницы Oregon Department of Revenue Forms and Publications. Если у вас нет возможности распечатать формы и инструкции дома, то вы можете их отправить на принтеры библиотеки практически с любого устройства или из любого места, где есть подключение к Интернету.
  • Получите формы по почте. Чтобы получить федеральные налоговые формы по почте, следуйте инструкциям на веб-сайте IRS  или позвоните по телефону 800.829.3676. Чтобы получить налоговые формы штата Орегон по почте, заполните форму онлайн-заказа или позвоните по телефону 503.378.4988 или 800.356.4222 (бесплатно).
  • Обратитесь в библиотеку. Ограниченное количество федеральных налоговых форм доступно в библиотеках. Чтобы узнать, что конкретно имеется в ближайшей к вам библиотеке, позвоните по телефону 503.988.5123 или свяжитесь с нами, отправив электронное сообщение.
  • Налоговое управление штата Орегон больше не отправляет налоговые формы и инструкции в библиотеки, поэтому у нас не будет в наличии никаких бумажных форм штата Орегон. Однако мы можем распечатать многие из необходимых вам форм. Свяжитесь с нами или спросите сотрудников в любом отделении библиотеки.

Помощь в оформлении налоговой декларации

  • Волонтеры, прошедшие сертификацию IRS, будут оказывать виртуальную помощь в заполнении налоговых деклараций начиная с 29 января. Необходима предварительная запись. Позвоните по телефону 503.966.7942, чтобы узнать, соответствуете ли вы требованиям, и записаться на прием. Доступны услуги переводчика. Вы можете найти дополнительную информацию и получить пакеты документов онлайн с веб-сайта организации Metropolitan Family Service и CASH Oregon в рамках программы IRS Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA).
  • Другие общественные группы организуют очные и виртуальные программы налоговой помощи IRS (VITA)  для налогоплательщиков, отвечающим определенным требованиям; проверьте сайт бесплатной подготовки налоговой декларации  IRS Free tax return preparation для партнеров, предоставляющих эту услугу в вашем регионе.
  • CASH Oregon также может помочь с заявкой и продлением индивидуального идентификационного номера налогоплательщика (ITIN). Звоните 503.874.6075 для получения дополнительной информации.
  • Служба налоговой помощи фонда AARP предлагает налоговую помощь онлайн. Есть обширный раздел самопомощи. Вы также можете отправить им по электронной почте свои вопросы о федеральном подоходном налоге. Чтобы получить индивидуальную налоговую помощь от организации AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, используйте их сайт, чтобы найти ближайшее к вам местонахождение.
  • Если вы являетесь самозанятым водителем, то Roadmap to Rideshare Taxes может помочь вам сориентироваться в том, как работают налоги на самозанятость, как подсчитывать свой доход от вождения, как отслеживать налоговые вычеты и как платить ориентировочно-предполагаемые налоги.
  • Получите помощь от IRS онлайн или по телефону 800.829.1040.
  • Получите помощь в Налоговом управлении штата Орегон онлайн отправив электронное письмо по адресу question.dor@oregon.gov или позвоните по телефонам 503-378-4988 или 800-356-4222. Рабочие часы - с 7:30 до 17:00 с понедельника по пятницу. Телефонные линии закрыты с 9:00 до 11:00 по четвергам и в праздничные дни.
  • Дополнительную информацию о подоходном налоге на Portland Arts Education и Access Income Tax можно получить на веб-сайте Portland Revenue Online или по телефону 503-865-4278.

Другая налоговая помощь

  • На веб-сайте IRS вы также можете узнать о налоговых льготах (Coronavirus Tax Relief ) и проверить статус ваших выплат за экономические последствия (Economic Impact Payment) в связи с коронавирусом.
  • Если вам нужна помощь с налоговым вопросом, выходящим за рамки обычной налоговой декларации, возможно вам сможет помочь Low Income Taxpayer Clinic юридической школы Lewis & Clark. Они обеспечивают бесплатное юридическое представительство по вопросам федерального налогообложения, специализируясь на спорах клиентов с IRS. Свяжитесь с ними по электронной почте sarahlora@lclark.edu или заполните онлайн-форму.
  • У вас есть вопросы об административных постановлениях и позициях IRS? Хотите прочитать анализ последнего налогового законодательства или информационный бюллетень налоговых брифингов CCH Tax Briefings? VitalLaw (ранее CCH Cheetah) - это ресурс, предназначенный главным образом для налоговых юристов и профессиональных налоговых специалистов, который может помочь в нестандартных налоговых ситуациях. Он доступен в любом из 19 наших библиотек (без удаленного доступа).

Подайте налоговую декларацию онлайн бесплатно

MyFreeTaxes от United Way помогает правомочным налогоплательщикам бесплатно подготовить и подать в электронном виде свои федеральные налоговые декларации и налоговые декларации штата, а также предлагает различные способы получения поддержки.

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每年在报税季节,图书馆随时准备提供帮助——无论是书籍、研讨会、转介税务辅助,还是打印您需要的表格,我们都在这里为您服务!

请在我们的网站上查看即将举行的活动、节目和博客文章,以获取最新信息。

2022年4月18日是提交联邦和州府报税表的截止日期。虽然 COVID-19 新冠疫情使现场的报税辅助变得很困难,但是您仍然可以通过以下方式获得准备报税方面的帮助和支持。

报税表或说明书

报税辅助

其他税务协助

  • 您可以在 IRS 网站上找到有关新冠疫情报税纾困查询如何获取补助金的信息。
  • 如果您需要在常规报税准备之外的其他帮助,请联系 Lewis & Clark Law School 的低收入纳税人服务处,他们或许能帮助您。他们提供联邦税务方面依据民众基本需求而定的免费法律协助,专门处理纳税人与 IRS 的争议。请发送电邮至sarahlora@lclark.edu在网上填写表格与其联系。
  • 您是否有关于 IRS 的行政裁决与立场方面的问题? 或是想阅读近期税法分析或 CCH 税务简报(时事通讯)?VitalLaw (前身为 CCH Cheetah) 主要是提供税务律师和专业报税员所用,参考这个资料库或许有助于处理某些特殊税务情况,我们所有19个图书馆都备有 VitalLaw 资料库 (无法远端使用)。

免费网上报税 

  • CASH Oregon 列出了免费上网报税的选项,如果您符合条件便可免费使用。
  • IRS Free File 网站有免费的网上准备和提交联邦所得税服务供您使用。
  • Oregon Department of Revenue 列出了免费的认证报税软件,如果您符合资格便可免费使用。了解更多有关俄勒冈州税电子申报信息
  • 从2022年1月24日开始,使用 IRS free fillable forms 网上免费可填写表格,俄勒冈州不再提供免费可填写表格。
  • MyFreeTaxes (United Way) 免费协助符合条件的纳税人准备以及电子提交联邦与州税申报表,协助并包括其他数种支援方式。

仍然有问题吗?

请致电 503.988.5123 或发电邮与我们连络。图书馆工作人员无法为您准备报税表、就税务问题提供建议、或解释税法。

 

In celebration of Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day (March 8), Multnomah County Library is highlighting renegade women authors who challenge the status quo with their innovative and groundbreaking work.

#BreakTheBias and discover women authors past and present that have been writing about changes in society, what they hope to see, and how we can get there. 

Svetlana Alexievich (1948 - present)
Journalist, poet, and Nobel Prize laureate Svetlana Alexievich writes in Russian, and currently lives in Germany. Her father was Belarusian, her mother Ukrainian, and she was born in Ukraine. Her first book The Unwomanly Face of War received strong criticism and praise for adding over 500 perspectives of women in war, as both victims and soldiers. Her books have sparked conversation and broken barriers. She has spoken out about the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster, the children of World War II, and the fall of the Soviet Union. Alexievich’s novel Secondhand Time was the 2015 winner of the Nobel Prize in literature. It is an oral history of the collapse of the USSR, focusing on the voices of women and men whose stories may have been lost. Alexievich has channeled her works in sharing stories of war and turmoil, while humanizing those most impacted. Find books by Svetlana Alexievich

Renegade author Svetlana Alexievich
 
Octavia Butler (1947 - 2006)
Science fiction author and winner of the MacArthur “Genius” Grant, Octavia Butler wrote dystopian novels about women’s rights, Black injustice, and the climate crisis. Butler’s novel Parable of the Sower centers on an African American woman in 2025, suffering from a hereditary trait where she feels other people's pains as her own.  Her novels focused on the points of view of characters that had not been written about before and brought their experiences to light with empathy and integrity. Butler won awards for best science fiction or fantasy, including several Nebula and Hugo Awards. She also won the PEN West Lifetime Achievement Award. Find books by Octavia Butler.

Renegade author Octavia Butler
 
Laura Kate Dale (1991 - present)
Laura Kate Dale is an activist, author, and video game journalist. She is most well known for writing about and for the transgender and autism communities. Her second book Uncomfortable Labels: My Life as a Gay Autistic Trans Woman is an autobiographical account of her life. Dale’s third book Gender Euphoria: Stories of Joy from Trans, Non Binary and Intersex Writers is a joyful set of essays about the happiness of living out your true identity. Dale constantly pushes back on the narrative of gender dysphoria and struggles of being transgender through true gender euphoria. Find books by Laura Kate Dale.

Renegade author Laura Kate Dale
 
Joy Harjo (1951 - present)
Performer, author, and Poet Laureate, Joy Harjo has written poetry books, plays, memoirs and children’s books. An American Sunrise is a collection of poems about the Mvskoke people who were forcibly removed from their original land. Harjo intertwines her personal story and journey with tribal history. She is the first Native American to serve as Poet Laureate for the United States, and is on her third term. Harjo has received many accolades and awards for her work. In the last decade, she won the Lilly Prize for poetry and music (2017), the Griffin Poetry Prize (2016), and the Wallace Stevens Award by the Academy of American Poets (2015). Find books by Joy Harjo.

Renegade author Joy Harjo

bell hooks (1952 - 2021)
Renowned author bell hooks, also known as Gloria Jean Watkins, was a feminist, activist and cultural critic. Ms. hooks, who intentionally did not capitalize her name so as to place more attention on her work than herself, wrote more than 30 books exploring racism, gender, class, sexism, intersectionality, and history. She is most well-known for Ain't I a woman? Black Women and Feminism and the Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center. She was critical of the feminist movement for centering whiteness and rallied people to consider a new wave of feminism where race and class where interwoven. Her books ranged in genre including children’s fiction, poetry, education, and memoirs. Central to conversations about race, sex, and feminism, hooks' literature has won numerous awards. Find books by bell hooks.

Renegade author bell hooks

Ursula K. Le Guin (1929 - 2018)
Ursula K. Le Guin was an essayist who wrote short stories, poetry, science fiction and fantasy. Her novel, The Dispossessed, won her a Nebula Award, and made her the first woman to win the Hugo Award. This book also made her the first person to win two distinguished awards in science fiction at the same time. Her 1969 novel, The Left Hand of Darkness, pushed discussion about gender and sex roles. Set in a world where people are androgynous or ambisexual, she challenged ideas on human connection and expectations. She fought against the digitization of books by Google and was critical of Amazon’s treatment of authors. In 2014, Le Guin was awarded the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She won several Nebula, Hugo, Jupiter, and Locus awards throughout her lifetime. Le Guin was active in the Portland and Oregon literary community. She was a member of both the Literary Arts and Multnomah County Library advisory boards. Find books by Ursula K. Le Guin.

Renegade author Ursula LeGuin

Gabby Rivera (1982 - present)
Gabby Rivera is a queer Puerto Rican woman from the Bronx, and an LGBTQ+ youth advocate. She is also the first Latin woman to write for Marvel Comics, in a series titled America. In America, Rivera features Chavez as the first Latina lesbian teen superhero of the comic. Rivera focuses on centering joy in the narratives about LGBTQ+, Latinx and people of color. In her 2016 young adult novel Juliet Takes a Breath, Rivera’s character makes the move to Portland, Oregon, after coming out to her family. This book won her the 2017 Silver IPPY Award for Best LGBTQ Fiction, and was re-published by Penguin Random House in 2019. Rivera is a public speaker, writer, activist, and youth mentor. Find books by Gabby Rivera.

Renegade author Gabby Rivera

Jenny Zhang (1983 - present)
Jenny Zhang is a writer, poet and essayist. Her books touch on different perspectives for current and sensitive topics including extreme poverty, sexual assault, the immigrant experience and identity. In her 2017 novel, Sour Heart, Zhang writes a collection of short stories about the complex relationships between Chinese-American families. In 2018, she won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize (Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction). This same year, Zhang won the PEN/ Robert W. Bingham Prize for Sour Heart, an award specifically for debut work in fiction, where the collection of stories showcase great literary achievement. Throughout her career, Zhang has written numerous essays and poetry. In Dear Jenny, We Are All Find, Zhang writes poems that vary in structure and style. She covers racism, sexism, and objectification, with the outcome of self discovery. Find books by Jenny Zhang.

Renegade author Jenny Zhang

Discover more women breaking the bias with these My Librarian book recommendations.
 

Zines are a crucial piece of the social justice movement, publications that prompt conversations of race, sexuality, and activism. A zine can be anything, about anyone, made with any items available. They are self-published, or by a small publisher, and usually printed in small numbers. 

Cover of Erase This! with scissors and glue stick

In definition, “zines are any DIY publication that could include text, or not, illustrations, or not, and collages, or not,” said Marissa Yang Bertucci (pictured), a queer, mixed-race femme writer, counselor, and community educator. “Growing up in an immigrant family, we relied on my mother to share stories of her land and her family in North and South Korea,” says Marissa. “There was something about oral storytelling that made me afraid to forget the stories told to me. Journaling, collaging, and developing zines were a way for me to remember stories told to me - not just in a written way, but visual too.”

Marissa Yang Bertucci, author of Erase This!

Zines have been around since the 1930s as a response to sci-fi stories, where readers wanted to imagine more. In the 60s, zines grew in popularity. By the 80s, they were a form of art separate from the mainstream media and part of both the punk and feminist movements. 

“A lot of zines are just papers folded or stapled together,” said Marissa. “There is no strict format, they are easily reproducible, and either free or low-cost.”

This year’s Everybody Reads book, Good Talk by Mira Jacob, is a graphic novel, and will be the inspiration for the zine workshop hosted by Marissa in partnership with the library. 

In Good Talk, Mira Jacob has similar base illustrations for the characters that she modifies throughout the whole novel. Jacob lays images on top of others, adds speech bubbles, or photos of artists and places them near each other to convey locations, sentiments and moments in time. Good Talk is an example of the difficult topics and themes that can be discussed in a visual way.

“For folks of color, queer people, disabled people, punks, artists, nerds, and any community that has ever felt like they wanted more, zines have been a way to do this,” said Marissa. “It is about dreaming and saying that here and now are not enough, and staying connected to all possibilities for expression.”

Marissa’s current and former students use art as a form of self-expression, and as a way to build empathy in the community. Creating and sharing art has helped students and families feel safe and elevate what students are going through. 

In her upcoming workshop, Marissa will guide conversations on personal values, the purpose of art, and self-expression. There is no filter, and no censoring. 

“When you think about zines, social justice and race, we can see how a text can be used to carry a conversation, and an illustration to capture a moment.There are more ways of engaging with social change than just changing laws and protesting. One way can be to imagine change and get your message out there with art,” said Marissa. 

Teens are invited to register for ERASE THIS!, a free workshop on Sunday, March 6 from 2-4 pm. The event will discuss scenes from zines—  what’s working well and what could be adapted. Event registration includes a DIY art kit, with limited stock for attendees. Registration closes March 5.

All ages are welcome to try creating their own zine by picking up a free copy available at all library locations while supplies last.
 

Image of adult male showing adult female how to cut wood on a table saw
Apprenticeship can be a great path to a career. Apprenticeships are usually programs that train you in a trade or craft while doing the job. There are many ways to get started and learn more about apprenticeships.

Oregon Apprenticeship is a group of organizations working to connect you to Registered Apprenticeship. They can help you explore careers, learn about application guidelines and search job openings.

The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) can help you find a program and answer your questions about apprenticeship programs.

Oregon Career Information Systems has lots of information about different careers and the education and skills required, including apprenticeships. A library card is needed to sign in.

Portland Workforce Alliance can help connect students to apprenticeships and pre-apprenticeships to improve students’ career readiness.

Portland Community College and Mount Hood Community College both offer several different apprenticeship programs and can help you learn more about them.

The Workplace Team can help you do research about apprenticeships and other career paths. Contact us to ask questions or book a One-on-One appointment.

Almost every week parents come to the reference desk at my library asking for children’s books about new babies. They want picture books to start getting expectant siblings ready for the world-overturning event that is to come. It always gives me a moment of pause, though, because so many new sibling books lead with the problems. While there might be problems, you don’t want to present books to toddlers or preschoolers that talk about how tired and distracted their parents will be, or that the new tiny humans will need so much attention that there won’t be any of it left for them. A new baby is a miracle. The first books that you give the big brother- or sister-to-be should be about how miraculous it is to have a new little person joining their family. They should expect to celebrate!

 

So I made this list of celebratory picture books. And later, if there are problems to work out? Definitely come see us at the reference desk. We can help with those, too. But in the meantime, congratulations!

 

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate influential people, events and actions contributing to Black History in the United States. Each year, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History selects a theme for Black History Month to focus the attention on one specific aspect of the Black experience. In 2022, the theme is “Black Health and Wellness.”

“I absolutely love the theme and focus on health and wellness,” said Lana Sweeting (pictured), Black Cultural Library Advocate (BCLA) at Rockwood Library. “It’s a topic that often gets swept under the rug, but to take this time to bring attention to self-care, and taking a step back when we can, is perfect.”

Lana Sweeting, BCLA at Rockwood Library

Each library location is finding their own way to celebrate Black History Month and connect with their local communities, offering book recommendations, activities, library displays and more, around the theme of Health and Wellness. 

At Hollywood Library, BCLA team members Tamara Stigler and Kariisa Allen are highlighting lesser-known African-Americans who made a large impact for the civil rights movement. Some examples include Diane Nash and Dorothy Height, women in the civil rights movement who were behind the scenes fighting along other more well known civil rights leaders. As part of her display, Tamara is sharing information about the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) and how to visit the museum virtually. 

Tamara Stigler and Kariisa Allen, BCLAs at Hollywood Library

The Black Cultural Library Advocates team “creates programs and services that, from the foundation, are by and for the community,” said Sonja Ervin, Multnomah County Library Equity and Inclusion Manager. “This gives folks the opportunity to know that the library is a space for them, and this is why the BCLA position is so vital in connecting with the community.” 

The library has intentionally and rapidly expanded the team over the past few years, with an increase of 33 BCLA positions between 2019-2021. The total number of BCLA staff is 38. Currently, 14 libraries have dedicated Black cultural staff positions: North Portland, St. Johns, Kenton, Hollywood, Albina, Midland, Central, Capitol Hill, Hillsdale, Sellwood, Gregory Heights, Gresham, Fairview-Columbia and Rockwood libraries. 

“There is so much knowledge and resources that should be afforded to everyone, and representation matters," said Tamara. "I am a native Portlander, and I remember going to the school library, but I don’t recall going to the local library. When I had my son, we encouraged him to go. The library opened up so many doors for him to explore and to learn, and in part because of these experiences he is now a Computer Engineer.”

The BCLA team has a mission to “leverage Multnomah County Library’s platform and resources to preserve and strengthen Black communities.” Part of this is through displays, programing, book selections, storytimes, and community outreach.

“This year we are adding a display of children’s books for Black Children’s Week that are just stories of kids being kids,” said Melanie Boyd (pictured), BCLA at Kenton Library. “There are so many books out there that focus on how people of color are different from white people. These stories show Black children as worthy of love and fun.”

Melanie Boyd, BCLA at Kenton Library

Kenton Library’s Black History Month selections range from stories of Afro-Latino families, to culturally sensitive and relatable children’s books:

  •  Just Like Mama, focusing on relationships between a caregiver and child.
  • Time For Bed, Old House, about a boy who is afraid to go to sleep at his grandpa's house because of the noises made. But once his grandfather goes to sleep, he knows it is okay and he is safe there.
  • Sharing a Smile, a relevant and timely children’s book of a girl who is worried she cant see people’s smiles because of masks. 

Many library locations will have a Black History Month display, Black Resource Book List and Black History Month giveaways - including free books to take home!

Take a look at these events and more to celebrate Black History Month:

The BCLA team's work brings our larger community together so that we can continue to include materials, programs and services that match what the community wants and needs. “We want to create spaces where people can ask questions,” said Lana. “With this dedicated role, we are able to find ways to connect people with resources, and make the library a safe space.” 

Check out other reading recommendations from the Black Cultural Library Advocates:

The national theme for Black History Month 2022 is Health and Wellness for the Black Community

Join these virtual programs

It’s Black Storytime Live
Wednesdays at 5:15 pm • February 2, 9, 16 and 23

Peace of Mind: Navigating, stress, anxiety, school & COVID
with ZaDora Williamsz
Tuesday, February 8 • 6–7:30 pm
For teens

Stones, Bones and Black Eyed Peas
with Chefs Michelle Guinn and Sable Askew
Thursday, February 10 • 6–7:30 pm
Live event with recipe cards

Music and Movement for Children
with Nikki Brown Clown
Saturday, February 19 • 10–10:45 am

What’s Going On? A barber shop talk series
with James McKenzie, Nick Herrick and Cary Pratt Jr.
Wednesday, February 23 • 7–8 pm

Mental Wellness for the African American Community: Trauma-informed care
with Javelin Hardy
Tuesday, March 1 • 6–8 pm

Explore these related collections

We Had Jazz Exhibition
February–March 2022 • Collins Gallery, Central Library, 801 SW 10th Ave.
Highlights Albina and North Portland community’s jazz scene – 30 photos

National Museum of African American History and Culture — Searchable Museum
A place to explore history and culture through an African American lens.

For more information, visit library events or call 503.988.5123

All abilities are welcome. For disability accommodations, call 503.988.5123 or email help@multcolib.org 2-3 days before a program.

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Every year during tax filing season, the library is ready to help— whether that be books, workshops, referrals to tax help, or printing out the forms you need, we're here for you!

Look for Upcoming Events, Programs and Blog Posts on our site for the most up-to-date information.

The deadline to file federal and state tax returns is  Monday, April 18, 2022. Though the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get help in person, you can still get tax preparation assistance and support in the following ways.

Paper copies of tax forms or instructions

Tax return preparation assistance

Other tax assistance

File your taxes online for free

Still have questions?

Call the library at 503.988.5123, send us an email or chat with us. Library staff cannot prepare returns, advise on tax matters, or interpret tax law.

Nearly every house history researcher wants to see old photographs or drawings of their house.  Who wouldn't, right?  Unfortunately for Portland-area house history buffs, this can be one of the hardest bits of house history ephemera to track down!  But don't despair; there are surviving photographs of some houses and it is possible (sometimes) to find them. 

The challenge is that there has never been a comprehensive house-portrait project in Portland -- or any other city or town in our area -- so there is no treasure trove of photos of local homes that you can dig through.  You might wonder, if there's no big archive of house pictures, where should you start?  There are a few possibilities:

First, ask your neighbors or the people in your neighborhood association.  People who live on your street may have their own old photographs of family events, parties, or other occasions which include your house in the background.  And a bonus -- when you find that long-time resident and photo-saver, they may share stories about past residents of your house or other interesting neighborhood lore!

Houses sometimes appear in the background of photographs taken to record activity on the street.  The city of Portland has a lot of photographs of infrastructure and maintenance work they've done over the years. 

Many of these images are carefully preserved in the Portland City Archives collection. These images usually show city workers doing something in the neighborhood (such as repairing the sewer like in the photo at left) or were taken in connection with city planning work, like a street scene before the installation of a new traffic light.  You can search for records (including photographs) using the Archives' catalog, Efiles, and some have been published on the archives's Vintage Portland blog -- see below for more about that! But, most photographs in the collection aren't available online.  To look at original photographs in person, you'll need to visit the Archives reading room downtown (1800 SW 6th Ave., Suite 550; 503.865.4100).  

NOTE: As of March 2021, the Portland City Archives is closed to the public due to the coronavirus pandemic.  Contact them to see what services they can offer remotely.

The Oregon Historical Society library is another treasure trove for house history researchers.  Their collection includes more than 2.5 million photographs and negatives of people, communities, commerce, and life in the Pacific Northwest -- the photograph collection doesn't have a section devoted to house portraits, but you may find photographs of your street, or photographs indexed under the name of a former owner of the house.  Some of the library's photographs have been digitized and are available through OHS's Digital Collections website, but many, many images are available only by visiting in person (1200 SW Park Ave.; 503.222.1741).  

Another potential source for house portraits and street scenes is the Vintage Portland blog, run by the Portland City Archives.  Every weekday the site features a different historical photograph (or sometimes a map or drawing) of Portland.  The posts are sorted into categories for neighborhoods, street names, time periods, and topics.  For example, if you are curious about the development of your neighborhood as well as the history of your house, you might want to look at the blog's many aerial photographs; or you might try looking at a neighborhood street like Foster Rd., Powell Blvd., or 82nd Ave.

If the house you're researching happens to be in the Albina district, you may find a photograph of it in The History of Albina, by Roy E. Roos.  The book begins with a brief a history of the district (and former city), but it also includes brief architectural history for a selection of houses and other buildings that are representative of different eras in Albina's development.  Many of the brief house histories are illustrated with contemporary photographs or have no pictures, but some have historic photographs or drawings.

Have fun hunting for a historic photo of your house!

 

  Questions? Ask the Librarian.

Reforzar la educación de nuestros hijos en el hogar es una gran oportunidad para ayudarlos a avanzar al siguiente nivel académico. Esta lista de recursos incluye sitios web donde pueden practicar actividades de diferentes materias escolares, recursos de ayuda con las tareas y consejos para padres. 

Recursos para seguir reforzando la educación de los estudiantes: 

Ayuda con las tareas en vivo: Tutor en vivo por medio de chat, ayuda personalizada en vivo de 2 p.m. a 10 p.m. diariamente. Se ofrece ayuda en español y en inglés. Necesita una tarjeta de la biblioteca para acceder al servicio. Pasos para usar el servicio.

Consejos para padres: 10 consejos para apoyar el aprendizaje de los estudiantes en el hogar

Cursos sin costo para estudiantes de la preparatoria: Estos cursos son excelentes opciones para estudiantes de preparatoria. 

Khan Academy en español: Es un recurso excelente para que usted vea en su idioma lo que su hijo debe aprender por grado o para aprender algo totalmente nuevo.

Khan Academy: Práctica de matemáticas. Un programa totalmente gratuito. Abajo de la página se encuentran todos los temas de matemáticas por grado.

Khan Academy: Práctica de lectura e Inglés como materia. De la misma manera, desplácese hacia abajo de la página para ver los temas por grado.

Mantener a los niños comprometidos y aprendiendo: Recursos para ayudar a los niños a mantenerse comprometidos y aprendiendo. 

Oregon Starting Smarter: Aunque los estudiantes no presentarán los exámenes estatales este año escolar, este recurso le da ideas de las preguntas que vienen en los exámenes. Desplácese hacia abajo de la página para ver todos los recursos. Si prefiere ver la página en inglés, cambie en la parte superior derecha. 

Otros recursos para toda la familia: Recursos de educación, salud, comida, tecnología y seguridad para toda la familia. 

Tutoría virtual en la Biblioteca: El programa de tutoría virtual es para estudiantes en los grados K-12 que necesitan apoyo en lectura, escritura, matemáticas, ciencias naturales o ciencias sociales.

 Tres niños, enlace a el artículo Evaluación del Dominio del Idioma Inglés
¿Qué es la Evaluación del Dominio del Idioma Inglés (ELPA)?

La ELPA mide el conocimiento del idioma inglés de los estudiantes en las áreas de lectura, escritura, expresión oral, comprensión auditiva y comprensión escrita. La ELPA se lleva a cabo en línea y está diseñada para ser interactiva e incluye preguntas que reflejan escenarios del mundo real. Su objetivo principal es calificar a los estudiantes para que reciban los servicios lingüísticos adecuados e informar y orientar a las escuelas para que apoyen mejor las necesidades de los estudiantes.

El estado de Oregón es miembro de la Evaluación de Dominio del Idioma Inglés para el siglo XXI (ELPA21), un grupo de estados comprometidos a apoyar a los educadores, administradores escolares y comunidades a medida que adoptan e implementan los nuevos Estándares de Dominio del Idioma Inglés (ELPA, por sus siglas en inglés) y los estándares para la universidad y carreras profesionales.

¿Qué incluye la Evaluación del Dominio del Idioma Inglés (ELPA)?

Incluye elementos de escritura, comprensión auditiva, expresión oral y preguntas de respuesta abierta para que el alumno demuestre su conocimiento crítico sobre el tema que se le presente.

¿Quién toma la prueba ELPA?

Cualquier estudiante que califique para los servicios de Inglés como Segundo Idioma (ESL por sus siglas en inglés) o que haya salido del programa de ESL en algún momento durante el año escolar. Hable con el maestro para saber si su estudiante toma esta prueba y para saber en qué nivel se encuentra. Las escuelas envían los resultados de la prueba de su estudiante una vez al año por correo postal.

¿Qué mide o evalúa esta prueba?

La evaluación sumativa de ELPA se basa en los nuevos estándares de Dominio del Idioma Inglés de Oregón y mide los cuatro dominios del lenguaje: lectura, escritura, comprensión auditiva y expresión oral. Estos dominios también se conocen como habilidades de comprensión lectora, producción escrita, comprensión auditiva y producción oral. Para obtener más información sobre lo que se incluye en esta prueba visite https://www.elpa21.org/about-us/

¿Cuándo se administra esta prueba?

Por lo regular, ELPA se administra a fines del invierno o en la primavera. Los estudiantes tienen la oportunidad de tomarla una vez al año hasta que salgan del programa de ESL. Llame a la escuela de su estudiante para informarse de las fechas exactas en que tomará la prueba. 

¿Cómo se administra ELPA?

Las evaluaciones se administran a los estudiantes a través del Sistema de Evaluaciones del Estado de Oregón (OSAS, por sus siglas en inglés). Este es el mismo sistema en línea que se utiliza para otras pruebas que administra el Departamento de Educación del Estado de Oregón (ODE, por sus siglas en inglés), como las pruebas de ciencias y artes del lenguaje inglés y matemáticas.

Este es el tiempo estimado para realizar la prueba de acuerdo al grado en que se encuentre el estudiante:

K​​ y 1.º grados: 1 h

2.º y 3.º grados: 1.5 h

6.º y 8.º grados: 3.25 h

9.º y 12.º grados: 4 h

¿Cómo se usan los resultados de la prueba?

Los resultados de las pruebas se utilizan para medir el conocimiento del idioma inglés de los estudiantes y determinar si un estudiante está listo para salir del programa de ESL. Los resultados también se utilizan para cumplir con las responsabilidades estatales y federales del departamento de educación.

Los resultados se envían por correo a las familias una vez al año, a finales del verano o principios del otoño. Los maestros también pueden compartir los resultados con las familias durante las conferencias de padres y maestros y otras reuniones. Asegúrese de pedir los resultados de la prueba y conversar con el maestro de su estudiante acerca de cómo ayudarle a mejorar su proficiencia en el idioma inglés. 

¿Quién lo requiere?

El estado lo requiere. Los estudiantes desde el kínder hasta el 12.º grado, cuyo idioma materno no es el inglés, deben ser evaluados en el dominio del idioma inglés de acuerdo a la Ley Federal y Estatal de Oregón. En Oregón, se usa la prueba ELPA.

¿Tiene la evaluación ELPA componentes para apoyar a los estudiantes con discapacidades o necesidades especiales? 

Sí, la prueba ELPA tiene varios componentes para ayudar a los estudiantes con discapacidades o necesidades específicas de aprendizaje. Hable con el maestro de su estudiante para mayor información.

 

¿En dónde puedo encontrar más información acerca de ELPA?
Contacte al Representante de la ELPA21 en Oregón: Ben Wolcott, 503-947-5835, ben.wolcott@ode.state.or.us. O llame al Departamento de Educación de Oregón, 503-947-5600. 

O en este volante de la ELPA21

 

También puede comunicarse con el maestro de su estudiante.

the cover of vol. 1 FullMetal Alchemist
Curious about the library’s collection of manga (Japanese-style comics and graphic novels)?  Wondering which manga series are right for you?  Looking for a new series to try?  Whether you are new to manga or already deep into it, we’re here to help.   Elle from Central Library has compiled a few booklists full of their favorite manga series.  For beginners, they created First Stop: Manga, which is full of recommendations for those who are new to manga.  For fans of Jujutsu Kaisen by Gege Akutami, Elle shares the best of the shounen genre in this booklist.  

Looking for more?  We asked library staff who read a lot of manga to share their favorites!  We hope you find plenty to read and explore.  Here’s what they have to recommend:  

Sailor Moon by Naoko Takeuchi

“The classic manga about teen girls who discover they're reincarnated Sailor Guardians who protect the universe continues to be a fun read about friendship, hope, courage, and talking cats. Sprinkled with some references to astronomy, mythology, and mineralogy mixed with humor and romance, read this under the moonlight.” -Kimberly, Central Library

Laid-back Camp by Afro

“A group of girls revive the school camping club, dust off the old supplies, and head out to the forests and lakes in the foothills of Mount Fuji.  Along the way, the girls form lasting friendships.  Reading about their trips made me fall in love with camping all over again and now I always plan for an instant ramen lunch or dinner when I spend a weekend outdoors. File under cute, cozy, and low key.”  -Karen M., Gregory Heights Library

FullMetal Alchemist by Hiromu Arakawa

“How would you react if you were handed a series of unexpected outcomes? What if your actions only made the situation worse?  FullMetal Alchemist deals with these very injustices. Two brothers work through their trials as well as develop to understand that other members of their community are also dealing with difficulties too.”  -Juan, St. Johns Library

Delicious in Dungeon by Ryoko Kui

“If you find yourself dreaming of food while watching anime or playing D&D then Delicious in Dungeon will satisfy your appetite. Monsters, dragons, and dumplings, oh my!”  -Erica, Technical Services

Witch Hat Atelier by Kamome Shirahama

“It's gorgeous, and I got caught up in the growing mystery of what's really going on with learning magic in and outside of magic school!”  -Natasha, Hollywood Library

a shelf full of manga series books
Uzumaki by Junji Itō

“If you like horror at all, you owe it to yourself to check out the works of Junji Itō. All his books and short stories are chilling, but Uzumaki is the perfect place to start.  A twisted tale in the vein of H.P. Lovecraft, about a quiet coastal town that slowly spirals into madness.  It's guaranteed to shock, terrify, and leave you hungry for more.”  -Ophelia, Belmont Library

Golden Kamuy by Satoru Noda

"I'm not usually a fan of westerns, but my favorite ongoing series has all the hallmarks of a Sergio Leone cowboy movie, with a unique eastern perspective.  Set in the early 1900s, the series follows an unlikely alliance between a grizzled Japanese war veteran and a young indigenous Ainu huntress as they journey across snowy Hokkaido, fighting vicious killers and dangerous creatures in pursuit of a hidden gold fortune. The series has all the bloody action and colorful characters you want from a Shonen manga, with a surprising amount of comedy and cooking tips. But my favorite part is its rich depiction of the Meiji Restoration, when Japan's push towards modernity began to engulf the ancient traditions of its native people. A real page-turner; my only complaint is that there isn't more yet."  -Ophelia, Belmont Library

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Young kids in line at school getting temperatures taken by a teacher
Dear families, we know you have been through the wringer for almost two years and it doesn’t seem to be ending anytime soon. As we start 2022, we find ourselves once again having to worry about school closures and remote learning. And we are still trying to figure out how to get tested for and vaccinated against Covid-19. Here are some resources to help support you and your family during this difficult time. 

Testing information

Vaccination information

Finding masks

School closure information

Remote Learning resources

And remember, the library is here to help. We can help you find something good to read, watch or listen to while you are isolating. And you should contact us if you have holds ready for pickup, but are not able to get to the library due to Covid. 

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

child brushing teeth in bathroom
Dental health is an important part of our overall health. Two of the best things we can do for our children’s dental health are regular dental checkups and helping them develop a daily toothbrushing habit. Learn more about children’s oral health at the CDC.

If you need dental insurance, Multnomah County can help you apply.

Ever wondered why dental insurance is separate from the rest of your health insurance? Find out why in this Sawbones podcast episode.

It is odd, right? Our teeth and our mouths are just as much part of our bodies as our arms or stomachs. They’re also part of our sensory systems, so children with sensory processing issues often have sensory problems with oral care. If your child has a poor tolerance for tooth brushing, see if any of these strategies help. Communicate with your child’s dentist about sensory processing issues ahead of time to talk about strategies to create a successful dental visit, such as mitigating noise, getting used to the reclining chair, or being sensitive to your child’s cues.  A social story, such as one from this list or from your dentist, explains the dental visit step by step so that your child knows what to expect.

Another good idea? Books of course! Here is a link to books for kids about the dentist and another about taking care of yout teeth

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

sad person covering head with sweatshirt hood
If you, or your child, feel a sense of fatigue and sadness when summer ends and the weather changes to a pattern of continuous cloudy or rainy days, it may be more than just a case of the ‘winter blues.’

Some people experience a regular low period when the seasons change. Doctors have a name for it - Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD. It is more common in adults, and more so in women, but children and teens can sometimes be affected, as well. 

SAD is a type of depression that can appear when there is less sunlight. Unlike other types of depression, SAD symptoms seem to arrive as winter arrives and then fade away as spring approaches. Like other depressions, Seasonal Affective Disorder can be mild, or it can be more severe. 

Why does this happen? In most cases, SAD seems to be related to the loss of sunlight. Researchers have found that reduced sunlight can affect the body in ways that could contribute to Seasonal Affective Disorder. These include: Circadian rhythm (biological clock) – the decrease in sunlight could disrupt your body’s natural rhythms. There may also be a drop in vitamin D levels and in the brain chemical, Serotonin, that affects our mood. These changes can lead to depression.

Symptoms of SAD may include:

  • change in appetite, especially craving sweet or starchy foods
  • fatigue
  • sleeping more than normal
  • difficulty concentrating
  • irritability and anxiety
  • increased sensitivity to rejection
  • avoidance of social situations
  • loss of interest in the activities you used to enjoy

If you or your child are experiencing some of these symptoms your doctor can help determine the best way to cope and feel better.

And here is an article written for teens about SAD from Nemours KidsHealth (also available in Spanish). 

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

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