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Drawing of child on laptop

We know that distance learning from home has been hard on kids and their families. Finding the joy in school and keeping engaged can be really hard for students. So we asked some experts - teachers and students - how they motivate, and stay motivated, to learn!
 
Ms Horn, a Middle School teacher and parent to a 1st and 4th grader learning from home, suggests giving students multiple ways to do their work (video, writing, drawing, etc.). Hopefully their teachers are already allowing this, but if not, she stresses communicating with  your child’s teacher and working with them to create workarounds that play to your student’s strengths. 
 
This makes sense to me... a kid may not be motivated to write a paper, but if they could do a podcast instead, that might be the push they need! 
 
One thing that has worked well for Ms. Horn with her own kids is using speech-to-text for writing assignments, since writing is the most challenging for her children. Her 4th grader uses it to get her thoughts out. Her first grader needs to physically write since he is still learning that skill, but using speech-to-text to get the letters removes the worry of spelling and lets him "do it himself!" Which is also very important to many students.
 
With how little choice and control is available right now, Ms. Horn’s best advice is to “try to find ways for [students] to have as much choice as possible while completing [their] school work.” 

Third graders from James Johns Elementary shared their expert advice on staying motivated. They mentioned that they like having fun breaks between assignments, and a consistent "reward" like 10 minutes of games/videos, drawing, stuffie time, or a virtual friend meet-up. Interestingly, every other suggestion they gave had to do with help scheduling or understanding when to do what. They suggest having a schedule posted, something that they can easily see while in school. They also enjoy having a schedule they can check off when something is done and/or having a schedule with must do (blue), should do (orange), or choice (green). I think we can all agree that whatever help with structure and organization we get right now, relieves stress and helps us be more productive and engaged. Thank you to Library Teacher Ms. Rolf for interviewing these local experts for us!

And here are some additional resources to help:

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, brought to you by Home Learning Support and available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

When people in Portland talk about a story that was “in the paper,” they often mean it was in the Oregonian. Until recently, the Oregonian was the city’s daily paper -- and it sort of still is: a daily edition is available online, at newsstands and at the library; while home subscribers get their papers only on Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.

Front page of the July 24, 1904 Oregon Journal (image from Historic Oregon Newspapers, http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn850).

Portland-area newspapers

For most of of the last 170-odd years, the Portland area has been home to multiple, competing newspapers.  Let's take a brief tour of a few of the local newspapers, published from about 1900-present, that are part of the library's collection, plus a few that have been digitized and are available online.  And, I'll show you a bit about how you can use these historical newspapers for your research.  

Daily newspapers

For most of the 20th century, Portland residents had two or three local daily newspapers to choose from. The Oregon Journal was published daily from 1902 to 1982, and the Portland Telegram (also called the Evening Telegram and the News-Telegram) was published daily from 1877-1939. And, the daily Oregonian was available too, of course!

During this heyday of daily news, each paper had a different editorial policy and political niche. People generally say that the Journal supported the Democratic Party, the Oregonian supported the Republican Party, and the Telegram’s editorial stance was independent.

Weekly, semiweekly and neighborhood newspapers

There have always been many non-daily newspapers in the Portland area, too! These days, we have a long list of weeklies and semiweeklies, such as the Portland Observer, Street Roots, the Willamette Week; and of course many neighborhood and suburban papers like the St. Johns Review and the Gresham Outlook.  Some of these still-running non-daily newspapers have been in print a long time, and can be useful for historical research as well as for current news.

Other Portland-area weekly or semiweekly newspapers have sadly left us, but are still available at the library! Here are a few gems that you will not see on today’s newsstands, but which are in the library’s collection:

But wait, there's more!

The lists above are just highlights!  If you'd like to find archives of even more current and historical daily, weekly, semiweekly, and monthly local newspapers, try browsing the subjects Portland (Or.) -- Newspapers and Gresham (Or.) -- Newspapers in the library catalog.


Finding newspaper articles at the library

Sometimes, the best way to research is to browse. If you want to know what was in the news on a particular date, you can go right to the library’s archive of the newspaper you’re interested in and start reading through the issues one by one. Nothing could be simpler -- except that this method is sometimes a little slow!

What if your research requires you to find newspaper articles by topic? To do this, you’ll need two things:

  • an index or a way to search for articles by keywords or topics, so you can find what you need
  • an archive of the newspaper, so you can read it (this archive could include the print edition, a microfilm copy, and/or an online version)
photograph of the Local Newspapers Index at Central Library

Indexes

While you’re in the Periodicals room at Central Library, take a look at the library’s local newspaper index. This card file index is like a big giant catalog of news topics -- you can look for any subject, from A to Z, and the newspaper index will point you to Portland-area newspaper articles on that subject.

When you find your subject in the newspaper index, you'll see one or more cards, like the one in the photograph on the right.

This particular card gives us information about a couple of articles reporting on Portland freeways. This card is in the “F” section of the index, under Freeways. Portland. The article cited at the top is from the Oregonian (noted as “Oreg”), and was published November 28th, 1974, on page A56, column 1. The headline is “Let people speak on freeway issue.” The little red note on the left, “ed.,” tells us it was an editorial. The red note below tells us that there’s another reference to this article in the “M” part of the index, under the heading Mt Hood Freeway.

The second article cited on this newspaper index card has the headline “McCall asks end of Mt. Hood freeway,” and it was published in the Oregon Journal (noted as “Jour”) on November 28th, 1974, on page A11, column 3. This one also has a note in red underneath it -- but this time it’s just an explanation about the contents of the article.

[An aside: the Mt. Hood Freeway was never built; if you want to learn more, try reading the great article about it in the online Oregon Encyclopedia.]

The newspaper index card file mostly focuses on helping you find articles published 1930 to 1987, and like I said above, it only includes information about local newspaper articles. If you are looking for a news story from before 1930, consult the card file newspaper index first just in case (it does include cards for a few pre-1930 articles!).

photograph of bound newspaper index volumes, at Central Library
If the newspaper index doesn’t help you find that pre-1930 story, try one of the bound index volumes that are on top of the card file case. Each of these bound newspaper index books works differently, and they cover different newspapers and different dates as you can see.

Talk to the librarian on duty in the Periodicals Room to get started with the bound newspaper indexes -- or if you have any questions about finding the articles or newspapers you need.

Archives of old newspapers

The library maintains an extensive archive of Portland newspapers of all stripes and stretching back more than a hundred years (some of which are mentioned above, in the section "Portland-area newspapers"). Most are kept at Central Library -- visit the Periodicals room on the second floor to take a look at this wide-ranging collection.

Gresham Library has an archive of the semiweekly Gresham Outlook, and the librarians at Gresham are experts at finding old articles! Consult them any time you'd like help getting started with your Gresham newspaper research.

Digital archives of the Oregon Journal and the Oregonian

Maybe you’ve consulted the card file local newspaper index, and the article you want was in the Oregon Journal or the Oregonian. Or maybe you’ve tried using the newspaper index and it didn’t have everything you need.

The library has some great resources for finding articles that were originally published in the Oregon Journal and the Oregonian.  All three of them allow you to search and read online:

Historic Oregon Newspapers

If your research requires reading newspapers from other parts of our state, be sure to consult Historic Oregon Newspapers -- an ever-growing archive of early Oregon newspapers that you can search and read online. You can choose newspaper titles from a list or a map, or search the entire archive.

And, in addition to its wealth of historical newspapers originally published in other parts of Oregon, Historic Oregon Newspapers includes a wide range of 19th and early 20th century local Portland-area papers.  Here are a few highlights: 

  • The Advocate, an African American weekly published in the 1920s and 1930s
  • the weekly Beaver State Herald, published in Gresham and Montavilla in the early 20th century
  • Mt. Scott Herald, a weekly published in the Lents neighborhood of Portland, in the 1910s and 1920s
  • The New AgePortland New Age, an African American weekly published published around the turn of the 20th century
  • Portland Inquirer, an African American weekly from the 1940s
  • St. Johns Review, a weekly published in the neighborhood (and one-time city) of St. Johns

And Historic Oregon Newspapers contains several newspapers published in recent decades as well, such as:

Have fun with your newspaper research!


Do you have more questions about searching for historical newspaper articles? Are you working on a local history project? If you'd like specific advice or help with your research challenges, do please Ask the Librarian!


 

El juego es muy importante para el desarrollo y aprendizaje de los niños y el clima cálido nos da la oportunidad de pasar más tiempo jugando afuera y recorriendo parques y áreas naturales a nuestro alrededor. La importancia del juego no solo es fundamental en los primeros años de los niños pero también es parte del aprendizaje y desarrollo continuo durante toda la infancia y aún más allá; el juego Soy yo

Soy yo - La Observacion del Articulo 31- en Espanol

Jugar afuera tiene muchos beneficios para la salud, el aprendizaje y el desarrollo de los niños. A través del juego los niños aprenden. Jugar ayuda con las habilidades del conocimiento, habilidades físicas, nuevo vocabulario, habilidades sociales y habilidades para la lectura y la escritura. Jugar y aprender van de la mano; además, jugar es muy saludable y ayuda a reducir el estrés. Aquí compartimos una lista de parques y áreas naturales que pueden ser utilizados para explorar al aire libre y jugar juntos. Portland cuenta con 144 parques desarrollados y más de 7,900 acres de áreas naturales que pueden visitar como familia y jugar al aire libre. En Fairview, Gresham, Troutdale, Wood Village también pueden encontrar parques, jardines, canchas de fútbol y áreas naturales a la disposición de la comunidad. El área escénica nacional de Columbia River Gorge es una gran opción para explorar el bosque, cascadas y arroyos. Jugar es fundamental para los niños, pero si salir de la casa no es una opción, pueden salir al jardín o patio de su hogar y jugar con un juego simple de pelota, soplar burbujas o saltar la cuerda. 


Escrito por Minerva L.

Una niña escribe con un lapiz y escucha a alguien fuera de la foto

Nuestros niños responden a diferentes estrategias; sin embargo, los especialistas en educación recomiendan actividades y medidas específicas para todos los estudiantes. Recuerden que la disciplina constante  es importante para que los estudiantes formen buenos hábitos de estudio.

He aquí una lista de recursos que pueden poner en práctica.

Common Sense:

Ofrece consejos para ayudar a los padres y cuidadores a mantener a los niños enfocados, interesados y sanos ​​mientras aprenden a distancia.

Prepara a tus niños para el éxito  

Invita a mantener motivados a los niños durante el aprendizaje en línea haciendo lo siguiente:

Mantén motivados a tus niños

Nos da 5 consejos para ayudar a los niños a ponerse al día en la escuela.

Understood:

Sugiere 8 actividades para preparar a los estudiantes para el aprendizaje desde casa.

Aprendizaje en línea

El Departamento de Educación de Nebraska:

Nos da ideas de cómo organizar el tiempo durante el día.

Ejemplos de cómo crear horarios para aprender desde casa


Escrito por Delia P.

Are you trying to create a resume but don’t know where to start? Then check out the LearningExpress Library’s Job & Career Accelerator. Use this resource to build your resumes and cover letter, find a career match, search for jobs and more! 

Do you already have a resume and cover letter built but need a second pair of eyes to review it? Live Homework Help from Tutor.com can do that! At Tutor.com you can submit your resume and cover letter for review and they’ll get it back to you in as little as 12 hours. 

Now that you have a resume and a cover letter, do you need the right job to submit it to? Then go to Glassdoor and search millions of jobs and get the inside scoop on companies with employee reviews, personalized salary tools, and more! 

Need help getting started with any of these resources? We are here to help

English | Español | Tiếng Việt | Русский | 简体中文


La fecha límite para presentar declaraciones de impuestos federales y estatales es el 17 de mayo de 2021. Aunque la pandemia de COVID-19 ha dificultado la obtención de ayuda en persona, aún puede obtener asistencia y apoyo para la preparación de impuestos de las siguientes maneras.

Copias en papel de formularios o instrucciones de impuestos

Asistencia para la preparación de declaraciones de impuestos

Otra asistencia fiscal

Puede obtener información sobre la desgravación fiscal por coronavirus y verificar el estado de su pago de impacto económico en el sitio web del IRS.

Si necesita ayuda con un problema de impuestos más allá de la preparación regular de impuestos, la Clínica para Contribuyentes de Bajos Ingresos de la Facultad de Derecho de Lewis & Clark podría ayudarlo. Póngase en contacto con ellos llamando al 503.768.6500, enviando un correo electrónico a litc@lclark.edu o llenando un formulario en línea.

Declare sus impuestos en línea gratis

three preschool age kids - two girls and one boy - sit on the carpet.  The boy has the facial characteristics of Downs Syndrome.  One girl has her hand raised.

Kids are naturally curious about the world around them. They notice differences in people, because there are differences.  

Visible differences, like how we look, skin color, how we dress, and how we get around.  

And less visible differences, like how we learn, how we interact with one another, and how we experience the world.

Responding to kids’ observations about people with disabilities and visible illnesses can be hard for parents and caregivers who are not sure how, or are afraid they will say something wrong.   

Let’s remember that some of us are different, and experience the world differently, than others. And that’s not a bad thing! In fact, it’s a beautiful thing. Talking about it can be hard, but it’s important!  

My kids' cousin has autism. I tell my kids about how his brain works differently and experiences the world differently than our brains do.  We read books with characters who have autism and talk about them together. Their cousin's mother, my sister-in-law, shared a post on Facebook written by staff at the EDAM Center for Special Education in the Philippines.  This part really stuck with me, and I hope it sticks with you, too.

For all the children who struggle every day to succeed in a world that does not recognize their gifts and talents, and for those who are walking beside them, please let this be a gentle reminder to be kind and accepting of all people.

Recognize that the "playing field" is not always a level surface.

Children who learn differently are not weird. They are merely gifted in ways that our society does not value enough. Yet they want what everyone else wants: To be accepted!!

At the library, we strive to celebrate differences and find common ground in kindness and acceptance.  We want to support you in being comfortable talking to your kids about differences from an early age, and to keep up the conversations as they get older. Below are some resources that may help.  

This post is part of our “Talking with kids” series, as featured in our monthly Family Newsletter.  Reach out to us at learning@multcolib.org if you need more support or have questions. We’re here for you!


 

Two children at playground, holding hands, one child is in a mobility device.

Movement, especially during the winter months when we are all stuck inside, can be vital for our physical and mental health. But not all of us move in the same ways. We’ve pulled together some resources for kids of all abilities, to help get our sillies out:
 
Cosmic Kids Yoga
While not specifically intended to be for youth with disabilities, this YouTube channel is great for kids with ADHD and older youth with learning disabilities. The instructor includes a story with animations that help grab and keep kids attention. She also describes moves in easy to understand ways like, puff up like a ball and roll around singing *jigglypuff* for the Pokemon video
 
Gympanzees:
Gympanzees has an excellent online resource hub for exercises and activities that are disability specific, such as sensory processing, Down Syndrome, wheelchair users and more. 

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity, and Disability
NCHPAD has a ton of content on their YouTube channel. There is a playlist on Adapted Kids Yoga for a number of conditions, and another on Improving the Lives of Individuals with Autism through Exercise. The latter specifically addresses the sensory overload of going into a gym or during PE at school. Beyond those two kid-focused playlists they have lots of others that could be of interest to the whole family, such as Home Workouts.

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes:
NWABA has a YouTube playlist with adapted Physical Education lessons for different age groups, and for kids with Multiple Disabilities.

And here's a great article from Chicago Parent with ideas on how to incorporate physical activities for children with developmental disabilities into daily life. 

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

Students in a classroom taking a standardized test.

The point of the SAT and ACT is to determine a student’s readiness for college and many colleges and universities have required them. So the library is here to help get you ready!

Please note that many colleges and universities are going test-optional for 2021 Admissions. This means ACT/SAT scores are not mandatory for admission. The list includes Eastern Oregon University, Oregon State University, Portland State University, Southern Oregon University, University of Oregon, and Western Oregon University. 

But if you still need (or want) to take these tests, your first question might be, which one should I take? According to a recent article by US News & World Report, the tests “vary in structure and timing as well as the content matter and scoring.” One statement in the article suggested that students with a “strong English background” might do better with the ACT, which puts a stronger emphasis on verbal skills. And for those who are strong in math, well “the SAT may reflect that much better.” They suggest taking the practice tests for each and seeing which suits you best. And that makes sense to us.

But where do you get free practice tests? The library offers free exams for the SAT and ACT through a resource called LearningExpress Library. You just need your library card number and PIN to login. You will need to set up a free account, so you can track everything

LearningExpress Library also gives you access to the most up-to-date prep books, it can help you figure out colleges to apply to, it can locate scholarship information, and help you write your college essay! Just log in and take a look under “College Admissions Test Preparation.” We librarians always wish more people knew about this amazing free resource, so please use the LearningExpress Library and tell a friend!

And if you like to hold books in your hand, rather than read ebooks, you can find test prep books for the SATs and the ACT in our catalog and place them on hold for curbside pickup. If you want more information in general, try our post on College Help for Teens

This article was written for our Family Newsletter, available in English and Spanish. Please sign up here and you can email us at learning@multcolib.org with any questions.

El SAT y el ACT son los dos exámenes estandarizados que la mayoría de las  universidades piden como requisito en la solicitud de admisión. La mayoría de las universidades piden uno u otro y el estudiante puede escoger el  examen que más le guste o tomar los dos para ver en cuál obtiene mejores resultados. La diferencia principal entre los exámenes es el contenido y tipo de preguntas.  

El SAT

El SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) evalúa más el razonamiento y la aptitud. Está diseñado para determinar qué tanto han aprendido los estudiantes en la preparatoria. El SAT examina lectura de comprensión, escritura y matemáticas. 

El estudiante puede preferir tomar el SAT si: 

  • Trabaja despacio y se toma el tiempo para analizar las preguntas 
  • Lee mucho y tiene un vocabulario amplio  
  • Piensa “fuera de lo convencional”, usa pensamiento analítico 
  • Escribe bien. Aunque la sección del ensayo es opcional, la prueba incluye secciones de lectura y escritura. 

 

El ACT

El ACT (American College Testing) evalúa más el conocimiento de información en lugar de evaluar sus habilidades. El ACT examina las matemáticas y las ciencias además de lectura de  comprensión y escritura.  

El estudiante puede preferir el ACT si: 

  • Trabaja con rapidez 
  • Se destaca en matemáticas y en ciencias  
  • Prefiere ver las preguntas como las ve en los exámenes de la escuela 
  • Tiene dificultad para escribir ensayos. 

 

Recursos

Es importante que el estudiante pregunte a las universidades a las que desea asistir, si los exámenes del SAT y ACT son parte de los requisitos de admisión.

Información y recursos sobre el SAT

Información y recursos sobre el ACT 

 

Escrito por Delia P.

  1. Ross Gay has written both poems and essays. What are the different approaches an author might take in considering how to capture their thoughts?  Why might one idea make a better essay than a poem?
  2. View or listen to Ross Gay reading a poem or essay. Consider how the author’s experience as a poet informs his writing of essays; how does hearing the pieces read aloud by the author change your experience of the reading? If you listened to the audiobook, what did you like about Ross Gay’s narration?
  3. Consider how slam poetry, music and hip hop influences might show up in both the written language and Gay’s reading aloud from The Book of Delights. 
  4. In chapter 71,  Gay returns to the subject of sta
    tues armed with guns that he first mentions in chapter 9. Over the summer of 2020, statues in public spaces were the focus of controversy. What do you think of Gay’s assertion that all new statues should have in their hands “flowers, or shovels, or babies, or seedlings…”?
  5. Gay often uses a direct, conversational writing style. Why do you think he employs this style? How does it make you feel when the writer addresses you directly? 
  6. “I’m trying to remember the last day I haven’t been reminded of the inconceivable violence black people have endured in this country.” (p. 16) Discuss Gay’s ability to overlap themes of systemic racism, delight and kindness, loss and sorrow, often in the space of one essay.
  7. Ross Gay often finds delight in the smallest of objects: a flower thriving in a sidewalk crack, or two people sharing the work of carrying a bag. How does attention to these small details add to Gay’s overall themes? 
  8. What role does humor and tragedy play in Ross Gay’s observations. How does he juxtapose the two for greater effect?
  9. One interviewer pointed out that the essays in The Book of Delights often feel like journal entries. As a reader, how did you feel about the personal tone of the writing? Would you have enjoyed the book more or less if the writing adhered to a more traditional essay format?
  10. Gay seems to take pleasure in ritual or routine (one example being the journaling exercise about "delight" which led to the book). What are some rituals that bring joy to your life? 
  11. Even though The Book of Delights isn't poetry, Gay is a poet and the writing is very poetic. Who is another poet (or writer, or speaker, or singer, or rapper) whose words bring you delight?In Chapter 38 Ross mentions an interaction with a flight attendant calling him “Baby.” Have you had delightful interactions with strangers? What made it special?

Assignment: Find something that delights you and share it with a friend or loved one. Bonus points: take a photo of the delight and post it to social media, using the tags #DailyDelight #EverybodyReads #RossGay @MultCoLib (Twitter and Facebook) @multnomahcountylibrary (Instagram) @PDXLibraryLove @LiteraryArts 

English | Español 


Books for beginners are scattered on a table in the foreground. Yellow, blue, red and green bags hang in the background under a shelf. More books are stored on that shelf.

The library has reorganized its entire collection of Spanish leveled readers for students learning to read. There are now four distinct reading levels: Comenzando (Beginning), Desarrollando habilidades (Developing Skills), Leyendo más (Reading More) y Por mi cuenta (On My Own).

The goal of this reorganization was to help families find books that better matched their children’s reading levels. This goal is meant to improve the library experience for children and their parents, and to help children become successful readers.

The levels purposefully do not have corresponding numbers, to discourage correlation between reading level and grade level. 
Each level is categorized in its own color. Click on the links to see books for each level:

Look for the corresponding color label on the spine of each book. 

Bienvenidos a la Lectura and CTIAM (STEAM) bags

Four youth holding book bags in the library. Their shirts and the bags have a logo that says "Bienvenidos a la Lectura". Each bag is a different color: purple, green, yellow, red and blue.
​​​​​​

Similarly, we have organized Bienvenidos a la Lectura (Welcome to Reading) bags by reading levels and themes. Each bag contains 5 books and an information sheet for children and their families to enjoy reading.

The bags can be borrowed like any other library material.

Yellow bags - Comenzando
Blue bags - Desarrollando habilidades
Red bags - Leyendo más
Green bags - Por mi cuenta

We also invite you to explore the CTIAM (STEAM) bags that include books related to science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics as indicated by the acronym CTIAM (ciencia, tecnología, ingeniería, arte y matemáticas).

Made possible by gifts to The Library Foundation.

Introducing videos about the Spanish Beginning Readers Collection

Presentando videos acerca de los libros para lectores principiantes

Watch this and the other videos in Spanish in the playlist to learn more about how you can use the Spanish Beginning Readers Collection with your family.

 

English | Español 


Libros para principiantes están esparcidos sobre una mesa en el primer plano. Unas bolsas de los colores amarillos, azules, rojos y verdes cuelgan en el fondo debajo de un estante. Más libros están almacenados en ese estante.

La biblioteca ha reorganizado la colección de libros para lectores principiantes en cuatro niveles de complejidad. Los niveles son: Comenzando, Desarrollando habilidades, Leyendo más y Por mi cuenta.

Esta reorganización de libros se hizo con la finalidad de facilitar la búsqueda de libros por nivel, así como para mejorar la experiencia de los niños y sus padres en la biblioteca y para que los niños lleguen a ser lectores exitosos.

Los niveles de lectura están representados por color en lugar de ser por número para evitar la comparación entre el grado y el nivel de lectura. Haga clic en los enlaces para ver los libros de cada nivel:

Encontrará la etiqueta correspondiente en el lomo de cada libro.

Bolsitas de Bienvenidos a la Lectura y CTIAM

Cuatro jóvenes con bolsas de libros en mano en la biblioteca. Sus camisas y las bolsas tienen un logo que dice "Bienvenidos a la Lectura." Cada bolsa es de un color diferente: lila, verde, amarillo, rojo y azul.

Igualmente hemos creado bolsitas de libros por niveles de lectura y por temas. Cada bolsita contiene 5 libros y una hoja informativa para que los niños y sus familias disfruten de la lectura.

Las bolsitas se prestan como cualquier material de la biblioteca.

Los invitamos a explorar las Bolsitas de CTIAM que incluyen libros relacionados con la ciencia, tecnología, ingeniería, arte y matemáticas como lo indica la sigla CTIAM.

Este programa es posible por los regalos dados a La Fundación de la Biblioteca.

Presentando videos acerca de los libros para lectores principiantes

Presentando videos acerca de los libros para lectores principiantes

Vea este y los otros videos en la lista de reproducción para aprender más sobre cómo puede usar la colección de libros para lectores principiantes con su familia.

WorkSource Oregon offers free virtual workshops for job seekers. See the workshop descriptions below and when you are ready, click here to register.

The workshops cover the following topics:

Interviews – Are you landing interviews, but not your dream job? Are situational questions keeping you up at night? Let us help answer all these and more. 

Virtual Interviews - Are you ready to take on a virtual interview? If not, let us help you build skill and confidence for your next virtual interview. 

Soft Skills - What is a soft skill and why it is important in finding, and keeping, a great job? In this workshop, we will introduce soft skills, as well as help you discover which soft skills are your strengths. 

Resumes - Learn techniques and strategies to create, or refurbish, your resume for industry specific, job tailored, and unique-to-you uses. 

Networking - Branding, an elevator speech and LinkedIn—how will they support your job search? Let us help you discover and navigate the new, virtual networking environment, while reinforcing your in-person networking skills. 

Successful State Applications - Are you interested in applying to jobs with the State of Oregon? Review how to research State of Oregon job announcements, agencies and job classifications. Discover how to tailor your resume to the job description, all while networking with live State Agents.

WorkSource Oregon ofrece los siguientes talleres virtuales para quienes buscan trabajo y para quienes están considerando cambiar de trabajo. Se llevan a cabo cada semana al mismo día y a la misma hora durante todo el mes.

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Entrevistas - ¿Está consiguiendo entrevistas, pero no el trabajo de sus sueños? ¿Las preguntas situacionales lo mantienen despierto por la noche? ¿Cómo responde a una pregunta sobre su último empleador si lo despidieron? Ayudemos a responder a todos estos y más. 

Entrevistas virtuales - ¿Está listo para realizar una entrevista virtual? ¿Su iluminación, vestimenta, fondo, voz y tono son ideales para el escenario virtual? ¿Sabes lo que es grabar previamente las preguntas de tu entrevista? ¿Eres experto en moverse en un espacio virtual? De lo contrario, permítanos ayudarlo a desarrollar habilidades y confianza para su próxima entrevista virtual. 

Habilidades blandas - Se ha dicho: "Lo contratan por sus habilidades básicas y lo despiden por sus habilidades blandas," pero ¿qué es una habilidad blanda y por qué es importante para encontrar y mantener un gran trabajo? En este taller, presentaremos las habilidades blandas y le ayudaremos a descubrir qué habilidades blandas son sus fortalezas. 

Currículums - Aprenda técnicas y estrategias para crear o renovar su currículum para usos específicos de la industria, personalizados para el trabajo y exclusivos para usted. Descubre trucos que atraen la atención de los equipos de contratación. ¡Comprenda cómo pasar el sistema de seguimiento de candidatos del robot a los ojos humanos y más! 

Redes - Marca, un discurso de ascensor y LinkedIn: ¿cómo respaldarán su búsqueda de trabajo? Permítanos ayudarlo a descubrir y navegar por el nuevo entorno de redes virtuales, mientras refuerza sus habilidades de redes en persona. 

Baby playing with food

You’ll hear a lot of different opinions about this topic, but many doctors and early childhood educators actually believe it is a good idea.

Playing with their food:

  • Helps babies learn to feed themselves
  • May prevent picky eating
  • Helps babies build their brains
  • Gives you a moment to catch up!

Playing with food begins as soon as babies are old enough to sit in a high chair. They love to reach for food and explore it in a hands-on, messy experiment of texture and taste. It may not be pretty, but it is a normal and healthy stage of development.

There is an element of play, but there are also important stages of learning taking place. Like mastering the pincer grasp, which eventually leads to holding a pencil! And kids who play with their food can be faster to learn words associated with food textures. In a 2013 study, toddlers who poked, prodded, swirled, mashed and even threw their food were interacting with key developmental concepts more than other children.  

And playing with your food isn’t just for babies, many preschool programs include activities where children participate in "sensory sessions," and touch, listen, taste, and smell different kinds of foods—then share observations with each other.

At any age it's fun to sing a song while you and your child “play” with your food. Here is one where you can make up your own variations together about the foods you like and how you cook and eat them.

All Around the Kitchen
Soup, soup, put it in the pot,
warm it up, warm it up, eat it while it's hot!

Bagel, bagel, put it in the toaster,
warm it, toast it, eat it with some jelly!

Ice cream, ice cream, put it in my tummy,
I like (flavor), yummy, yummy, yummy!

This post was featured in our monthly Family Newsletter. Sign up for the newsletter here, and email us at learning@multcolib.org if you have any questions.

Family having dinner at the table

I know in my own family, it can be hard convincing my child to drink enough water and eat their veggies. And just saying, “it’s healthy” doesn’t cut it. So how do we convince our kids that eating healthy is important? 

Before we start, the most important thing is to never connect eating well to losing weight, being slim, or being attractive. All bodies are fabulous! It’s just great if they can feel their best, too. And second, healthy eating looks different to different people. Some families are vegetarian or vegan or keep halal or kosher.  What people do or don't eat can be driven by values and culture, as well as health.

Teaching kids to eat well can be tricky. You don’t want to give them more facts than they can handle or turn every meal into a lecture. But you also want them to know that everything they put in their mouths affects their whole body. And the more nutritious the food they put in, the better they will feel, the more energy they will have, and hopefully, the more fun! 

One idea is to talk about the properties, or nutrients, of food and how they can help give our bodies energy for playing our favorite sports, help our brain and mind focus on schoolwork, and make us better with our hobbies, even video gaming! Some of the books in this booklist might help with these conversations.  

Another tip is to avoid calling foods “good” or “bad.” Kids should learn that all foods have a place in their diet. Try labeling foods as “go,” “slow,” or “whoa.” Kids should eat “go” foods, like vegetables, every day. But they might want to go “slow” with less nutritious foods, like pancakes. And say “whoa” to foods like candy bars, and leave those for special occasions. Foods with less nutrition don’t need to be off limits, but the goal is for kids to stop and think twice before they eat them often. 

Another great idea is to have your kid help plan and post menus for the week. Include some favorites and try some new foods, as well. You can even check out a kid’s cookbook from this booklist.

In some cases of extreme pickiness or disordered eating, it's important to remember that doctors and occupational therapists can help and you should talk with your child's pediatrician.  

Perhaps the most important thing is teaching through modeling. Seeing their grownups eat nutritious food, will help kids want to do the same. Talk to them about how eating well is fun, makes you feel good, and gives you energy!

This post is part of our "Talking with kids" series, and was featured in our monthly Family Newsletter. Sign up for the newsletter here, and email us at learning@multcolib.org if you have any questions.  

Child baking with grownup

For many, food is an important part of family life. Gathering together for meals is a way to share warmth, community, and family history. A recipe passed down through generations is a treasure. Exploring different cuisines is an opportunity to learn about other cultures. Homemade food is more nutritious than take-out or convenience foods and youth who learn to cook have healthier eating habits later in life. Beyond that, the kitchen is also an ideal place to teach kids reading, science and math.

Children under five learn about the world by using their senses. By touching, tasting, and smelling they’re being little scientists trying to figure out what the world is about. Using these senses is an integral part of the cooking process. Helping with simple tasks such as stirring, washing vegetables, and tearing lettuce helps these young learners develop their fine motor skills. Following step-by-step instructions teaches children executive functioning and gets them ready for school. 

As children get older and gain confidence, they can take over reading the recipe. There is so much that can be learned by reading a recipe. Recipes are math. Children need to understand fractions and ratios. They need to understand different units of measurement. It also supports literacy by exposing them to vocabulary that they won’t find elsewhere. How often are words like sear, tablespoon, dice, drizzle, or crimp used in daily conversation? Through trial and error children learn problem solving and that failure is just another opportunity to learn.

They say that baking is chemistry and cooking is art. The truth is that each one is both chemistry and art. Both allow for creativity once you understand the basics of a recipe. But it’s important to understand the basics for your recipe to turn out right. This is where science comes in. You probably don’t even realize how much science you use in the kitchen. Foods go through chemical and physical changes as they’re prepared and cooked. Certain elements are necessary in order for the recipe to turn out correctly. Which elements can change and which need to stay the same? Why? What adjustments, if any, do you need to make for any modifications? Why? These are scientific questions. Encourage children to ask questions. Don’t worry if you don’t know the answer. You can search for the answer and learn together. You can even ask the library for help!

Looking for more ideas? Look no further than Oregon State University's Food Hero program. They have lots of learning activities for all ages!

By grounding learning in the real world, kids are more likely to understand why the skills they learn are important and are better able to retain them. They’ll also have the satisfaction of eating the results of their lesson and the pride of sharing it with others.

- Keli Y, Teen Librarian, Rockwood Library

This article was featured in our monthly Family Newsletter, you can sign-up here to receive your copy!

Somos Familia es una organización que tiene una misión de “desarrollar el liderazgo en nuestras familias y comunidades latinas para crear una cultura donde las personas de géneros y orientaciones sexuales diversas puedan prosperar.” Ha creado infográficos y herramientas de cómo hablar sobre el género y la orientación sexual con su familia y videos sobre la importancia de la aceptación familiar.

Ve el video Tres Gotas de Agua de cómo el amor de tres madres les ayudó a entender a sus hijas e hijos LGBTQ+.

Tres Gotas de Agua


Escrito por Kimberly S.

La situación por la que estamos pasando en la actualidad tal vez no nos permita seguir con algunas de nuestras tradiciones familiares, pero también nos brinda oportunidades para alcanzar nuevos propósitos y empezar nuevas costumbres.

Se puede elegir una actividad simple por mes. La actividad tendrá éxito si todos están de acuerdo y es algo definido. Los niños, pueden jugar a contar los calcetines mientras los doblan y los guardan, ayudar con la preparación de algún postre o ¡hacer una piñata!  Los jóvenes, pueden ser parte de la planeación de cómo distribuir el presupuesto familiar, participar en las compras del mandado y ponerlo donde corresponde al llegar a casa. 

En familia, se puede hablar acerca de las celebraciones tradicionales que se han pasado de generación en generación. Cuando los niños y jóvenes aprenden y participan activamente de estas conversaciones, es más probable que aumenten su confianza, sean optimistas y refuercen su identidad. Jueguen y creen un libro con fotos y algunas historias de esas tradiciones para revivir los recuerdos.

Escrito por Violeta G.

Caring for ourselves helps us to better care for our families, especially during times of extreme stress. This post is being written during the time of the Covid pandemic: children are learning from home, grownups are struggling with work, people are scared, and stress is running high. It is In these times, more than ever, that parents and caregivers need to take care of their needs, to fill themselves up so they have enough care, patience and time to share with their families.  The Child Mind Institute has put together a wonderful article for caregivers on prioritizing their own well-being in order to benefit the whole family. Here are the main takeaways:

  1. Make time for yourself
  2. Prioritize healthy choices
  3. Be realistic (my favorite!)
  4. Set boundaries
  5. Reconnect with things you enjoy

We know it's easy to say, but not always easy to do. The library is here to help:

  1. If it would help to have the kids entertained so you can have quiet time, check out our storytimes and events for kids! These are always changing, so check back often.
  2. If you are looking for healthy recipes or exercises, we have thousands to choose from!
  3. We have books to help you set boundaries, help you set realistic expectations, and to give yourself a break
  4. If one of your favorite activities is sitting down with a good book, or watching a fun show, or listening to some beautiful music, we can help recommend any of those things for you. Check out the My Librarian group for a great suggestion (or 20!).
  5. If you want to learn something new or get back into an old hobby, we have lots of ways to help you get started. Just connect with us.

We are here to help, so please let us know what we can do for you, and for your family! You can leave a comment below, or email us directly at learning@multcolib.org. Also consider signing up for our monthly Family Newsletter. Take care!

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