Blogs

The national theme for Black History Month 2021 is The Black Family — Representation, Identity and Diversity. The Black Cultural Library Advocates of Multnomah County Library present the following programs and resources.

Banner for Black History Month

The Black History Month You Thought You Knew — Its origins, past, present, & future
Presented by Ebonee Bell, Black Cultural Library Advocate
Fri., Feb. 5, 6–7 pm

Story Hour with Nikki Brown Clown
Sat., Feb. 6, 10:30–11:15 am
Wed., Feb. 10, 10:30–11:15 am
Wed., Feb. 24, 10:30–11:15 am

The History of African Storytelling
Presented by Javelin Hardy
Sat., Feb. 13, 11 am–12:30 pm

Bring The House Down: A Black, Queer Gospel
Presented by Chanti Darling and Cee Blanco
Wed., Feb. 17, 7–9 pm

Black Queen, You Are Beautiful
Presented by Javelin Hardy
Sat., Feb. 20, 11 am–1 pm
Sat., Feb. 27, 11 am–1 pm

Real Talk with Rashad Taylor 
Mon., Feb. 22, 6–7 pm

Where The Heart Is and Reviving the Black Head Nod Film Screening
Presented by Elijah Hasan
Tue., Feb. 23, 6:30–7:30 pm

Afrofuturism
Presented by Walidah Imarisha
Thu., Feb. 25, 6–7:30 pm

A Call to Black Men, a Holistic Approach to Living Well
Presented by Dr. John Wolfe, from Horizon Counseling
Services
Fri., Feb. 26, 6–7:30 pm

Film Review, Push Out — The Criminalization of Black Girls in School Film Screening and Panel
Presented by ZaDora Williams
Sat., Feb. 27, 2–4 pm

Renée Watson on books as a refuge, a guiding light, a healing balm
Blog post and reading list

For more information, visit library events or call 503.988.5123.
 

English | Español 


Books for beginners are scattered on a table in the foreground. Yellow, blue, red and green bags hang in the background under a shelf. More books are stored on that shelf.

The library has reorganized its entire collection of Spanish leveled readers for students learning to read. There are now four distinct reading levels: Comenzando (Beginning), Desarrollando habilidades (Developing Skills), Leyendo más (Reading More) y Por mi cuenta (On My Own).

Each level is categorized in its own color. Click on the links to see books for each level:

Leveling and labeling our collection of Spanish beginning readers into these four colored categories will empower young patrons and their caregivers. They will be able to find the books they need with ease and become successful readers. Our goal is to improve their experience with the library and with reading. The levels purposefully do not have corresponding numbers, to discourage correlation between reading level and grade level. Look for the corresponding color label on the spine of each book. 

A believer in education, José de la Luz Sáenz became an elementary school teacher and taught Mexican-American children in segregated shacks, known as “Mexican Schools” in Texas. In the evenings, he taught English literacy to adults. At the outbreak of WWI, José de la Luz was called to serve in the US Army. Upon his return, he concluded that dismantling white supremacy culture demanded more than just teaching. He and other Mexican-American civil rights leaders wrote articles and gave public talks throughout Texas to encourage Mexican-Americans to organize. In 1929, they created the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the oldest Latino civil rights organization in the US. 

 

José de la Luz’s commitment and that of other Mexican-American activists’ to education and social justice lives on in children's books. Elementary school students can now read and learn about his and other Mexican-American activists’ fight for equality.

Likewise, parents who want to learn more about the history of Mexican-American civil rights will discover the courageous activism of Emma Tenayuca and Dolores Huerta, and will be moved by such documentaries as “A Class Apart.”

English | Español | Tiếng Việt | Русский | 简体中文


The deadline to file federal and state tax returns is May 17, 2021. Though the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get help in person, you can still get tax preparation assistance and support in the following ways.

Paper copies of tax forms or instructions

Tax return preparation assistance

Other tax assistance

File your taxes online for free

English | Español 


Libros para principiantes están esparcidos sobre una mesa en el primer plano. Unas bolsas de los colores amarillos, azules, rojos y verdes cuelgan en el fondo debajo de un estante. Más libros están almacenados en ese estante.

La biblioteca ha reorganizado la colección completa de libros para lectores principiantes en cuatro niveles para estudiantes que están comenzando a leer en español. Los niveles son: Comenzando, Desarrollando habilidades, Leyendo más y Por mi cuenta. 

Esta nueva organización de los libros de lectura se hizo con el fin de facilitar la búsqueda de libros por nivel de complejidad para mejorar la experiencia de los estudiantes y sus padres en la biblioteca; y para que los jóvenes se conviertan en lectores exitosos.

Los niveles están por color en lugar de ser por número para evitar la comparación entre el grado y el nivel de lectura. Haga clic en los enlaces para ver los libros de cada nivel:

Encontrará la etiqueta correspondiente en el lomo de cada libro.

An online inquiry. Followed by an email. Then an in-person connection.

Author Liz Crain and her cookbooks Dumplings Equal Love

Liz Crain was starting work on her second cookbook collaboration. She put in a digital query to Multnomah County Library for research assistance. Pauline Theriault got an email. So began their librarian-patron alliance.

Pauline is a material selector librarian who has been at Multnomah County Library for 23 years. Until last summer, she was an information services librarian helping patrons in person and assisting patrons who call or email the library with inquiries about myriad subjects and topics.

“If the first tier of people can’t answer the question ... they pass it on to what we now call the Information Services staff work group,’’ she says. “There are two classifications in that work group, and it’s the librarians and the library assistants.’’

“We work on those questions that are passed on to us. We either call the person back or we email them. Or, we might set up an appointment to meet with them in person and go over materials to answer the questions that they’ve asked.’’

Library patrons have immediate access to library staff for research and questions, ranging from general to topical subject matter via phone, email, and chat, all available on the library website. These resources are especially vital now, with only staff allowed in libraries due to COVID-19 safety precautions.

Liz found, in Pauline, a complementary resource for her cookbook writing pursuits. Liz moved to Portland in 2002, saying she brought with her a love for libraries from her childhood growing up in Cincinnati.

So, when she launched into her second cookbook collaboration, initially about brunch and brunch recipes, she says she instinctively turned to the library. That was 2014. The cookbook, Hello! My Name is Tasty, was co-authored with John Gorham and published in fall 2017.

Her research assistance experience in 2014 worked out so well that Liz sought Pauline for another cookbook project. Dumplings = Love: Delicious Recipes From Around The World (see book and e-book in My MCL) was published in fall 2020.

“It was just really exciting for me,’’ Liz says. “I’ve always loved research. But there are so many experts at the library.’’

Pauline says after Liz made the research assistance request in 2014, Pauline saw the question topic and began searching for information based on her knowledge of the library’s collection and Liz’s needs.

“One of the areas I was responsible for was the cookbook collection,” Pauline says, referring to her 22 years as a librarian at Central Library.

“I had a pretty good in-depth knowledge of the resources we have available through the library. So when her question came through, I got back to her with some information. And then it turned out that what was really best for her was that she came in and made an appointment to meet one-on-one.”

Along the way, Liz says, the cookbook idea evolved from centering on brunch to highlighting around-the-clock recipes from Tasty n Sons and Tasty n Alder restaurants. “That was just one research query,’’ Liz says, “and I got enough content from that initial response from Pauline to set me on my way.”

In 2018, Liz says, the idea for her third cookbook was inspired while dining with Sasquatch Books representatives during Portland Book Festival. She says she developed a loose table of contents for a dumpling cookbook and started research with two particular dumplings: Korean Mandu, and Japanese Gyoza. Again, she reached out to Pauline.

“Any kind of query that I have, she’ll immediately have this web of ideas that I wouldn’t have even considered,’’ Liz says.

“The thing I remember is, she looked up some Oxford English Dictionary terms related to what I was researching. That was great, because, who has that at home?”

Luckily, all library cardholders do. The Oxford English Dictionary is available via a subscription database with a library card through the library's website

Just as Liz had an early fondness for libraries, Pauline settled on her professional calling as a young adult. “I knew I wanted to be a librarian. I liked to read.”

Pauline earned her master’s degree in library science from University of Arizona after graduating from Oregon State University with a bachelor's degree in English and minors in fine art and German.

“I knew there was something else that I was striving for,’’ Pauline says of majoring in English. “Because I knew I was going to get a master’s degree, I just took courses I was kind of interested in.’’

She was hired as a librarian for the science and business section of Central Library after starting her career at Salem Public Library. In Salem, she says, she developed a cookbook research-interest connection with a patron, noting that forming bonds with patrons is fairly common.

“I think what happens is, when you establish a good working relationship with somebody, they think of you as their personal librarian. This has been the case with friends over the years, as well as with patrons.”

However, more often than not, Pauline says, such connections generally are with patrons who are regular library visitors. “Like the fellow I knew from Salem.’’

“Liz, I just sort of met blindly,” Pauline says. “I was just answering the email question, and then she made an appointment to come in. So, that just started out strictly digital, and then it turned into meeting somebody in person. Usually, I think, it’s the opposite; we meet somebody in person first, and then establish a relationship.’’

Liz says she was equally grateful for Pauline’s expertise the second time around - “she helped me out immensely, getting all sorts of books, databases, online materials” - while researching for Dumplings = Love: Delicious Recipes From Around The World

“She has such a wealth of knowledge, working at Central for 22 years,’’ Liz says. “I didn’t really know the breadth of research assistance that you can get for free at the public library.” 

Read a full Q&A with Liz and Pauline.

Liz Crain and Pauline Theriault have a question and answer conversation about Pauline’s work as a librarian for Multnomah County Library. The interview has been edited for brevity.

Pauline Theriault and Liz Crain
Liz Crain: Will you please talk about the research assistance part of your work?
 
Pauline Theriault: Years ago we had lines of people at the reference desk requesting help. Now, we have the internet and Google and people email us their questions. I think people don’t realize that there's a level of in-depth research that people can access through the library. They think they have to research everything on their own now. The library staff can help people find a lot of unique, in-depth, and elusive information. 
 
Liz: What are the bulk of requests that people are coming to the Central Library for?
 
PT: It runs the spectrum, from finding information to help start a business to writing a book proposal and needing to know how many books sold on a particular topic. We get a lot of history questions; genealogy is really popular. People ask for information about marriages and divorces. Whatever you can imagine. You know, somebody is making costumes for their kid's play and they need some information on how to make something that looks sort of historical out of towels. 

Liz: In your perfect world, what would you like to see this aspect of library research assistance look like?
 
Pauline: I always think it's great when more people are using this aspect of the library.  I've always been interested in the thrill of finding information. It's nice when people come in and ask us questions because we can talk to them face to face and get immediate feedback. Reference services is a big part of what we do, but it's probably less than it used to be because of the changing nature of the information world. Either way is great. It's nice to be able to talk to someone and ask questions and confirm if you're headed in the right direction. It's much harder to do that in email. But I'd rather have people email us than not ask at all. 

Liz: What's some advice for patrons when they are requesting research help?
 
Pauline: Sometimes people aren't sure what they're looking for until they start having a conversation with somebody. They're really not sure if something exists, so they ask for something else. People are often surprised that various forms of information even exist. Sometimes we might not be able to find something in the exact format that someone wants but we can provide an alternative that may suit their needs perfectly.

Liz: Any other advice you want to give people on navigating public library research avenues?
 
Pauline: Having that library card is such a valuable thing. It's probably the best card in someone's wallet in terms of access to information and books. You can check things out. There are all of these databases that you would never be able to access yourself for free, like full-text magazines. We have fiction, ebooks, streaming movies, streaming music. We have a database where you can learn a foreign language. Just plug in your library card. 
 
Liz: Is there anything you'd like to advise patrons not to do when querying research requests?
 
Pauline: Don’t be in a hurry. Also, if you don't get the right answer or if it isn't what you're looking for, ask for clarification or explain yourself. It's a conversation. 

Liz: What is your job title now?
 
Pauline: I'm a librarian in Materials Selection. I order adult non-fiction books, DVDs, sheet music, and music CDs.
 

Desde mi propia experiencia como inmigrante, mujer de color e hija de dos personas trabajadoras que creyeron en el Sueño Americano, me tomo muy en serio recomendar libros que reflejen las experiencias de vida de los inmigrantes en este país. Me preocupo por tener libros en nuestra colección que coincidan con personas cuyas historias históricamente han sido suprimidas. Libros que relaten las experiencias de nuestro diario vivir tales como: El libro de los americanos desconocidosPaco un niño latino en Estados Unidos, o  Al principio, viajábamos solas

Y aunque la narrativa del inmigrante no es una sola historia, como explica la novelista Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie en su TedTalk El peligro de una sola historia, creo que los inmigrantes compartIimos muchas cosas en común. Una de ellas es el abrazar los ideales de Estados Unidos. Al igual que cualquier otra persona que adopte estos principios, nosotros, los inmigrantes, nos esforzamos por fortalecer la comunidad en la que vivimos. Recordemos que los inmigrantes y los hijos de inmigrantes son nuestros vecinos, compañeros de clase, colegas y compañeros de trabajo; somos parte de tu comunidad.

From my own experience as an immigrant, a woman of color, and the daughter of two hard-working individuals who believed in the American Dream, I take very seriously recommending books that reflect immigrants' life experiences in this country. I care about having books in our collection that match people whose stories have historically been suppressed, books that are reflective of our everday lives, El libro de los americanos desconocidosPaco un niño latino en Estados Unidos, or Al principio, viajábamos solas

And while the immigrant narrative is not a single story, as novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie explains in her TedTalk, The Danger of a Single Story, I believe immigrants share many things in common. The most important of these is to embrace the ideals of the United States. We, just like anybody else who embraces these principles work hard to make our community stronger. Immigrants and the children of immigrants are our neighbors, classmates, colleagues, and co-workers; we are part of your community.

 

 

¿Que es un minikit? Es una actividad STEAM (Ciencia, Tecnología, Ingeniería, Arte, Matemáticas por sus siglas en inglés) en una bolsita. Hay cuatro diferentes actividades en cada serie. ¡Coleccionalas todas!   
 
Solo en la biblioteca de Rockwood. No se necesita hacer cita. 
 
Los adolescentes (de 6º a 12º grado) o sus padres pueden venir a la biblioteca de Rockwood y pedir su minikit. Los jóvenes se quedan con todos los materiales en su minikit.
 
Instrucciones en inglés, ruso y español vienen con cada kit. Hay videos cortos de los kits en acción en la página de YouTube de MCL. Si los adolescentes quieren participar en una demostración / taller con los minikits, tenemos dos programados para enero en eventos de la biblioteca.
 
La primera serie, Circuitos y robótica para principiantes, comienza en una semana. Cada viernes, repartiremos una diferente minikit
8 de enero       Circuito Eléctrico en Papel
15 de enero     Circuito de Masas
22 de enero     Robot Cepillito
29 de enero     Robot Chatarra 

¡Visitenos en Rockwood!

Minikits de makerspace

WorkSource Oregon offers free virtual workshops for job seekers. See the workshop descriptions below and when you are ready, click here to register.

NOTE: When you register, they will first ask you to provide contact information. Next you will choose the month you want to attend classes, followed by the individual workshops and dates you want to register for.

The workshops cover the following topics:

Interviews – Are you landing interviews, but not your dream job? Are situational questions keeping you up at night? Let us help answer all these and more. 

Virtual Interviews - Are you ready to take on a virtual interview? If not, let us help you build skill and confidence for your next virtual interview. 

Soft Skills - What is a soft skill and why it is important in finding, and keeping, a great job? In this workshop, we will introduce soft skills, as well as help you discover which soft skills are your strengths. 

Resumes - Learn techniques and strategies to create, or refurbish, your resume for industry specific, job tailored, and unique-to-you uses. 

Networking - Branding, an elevator speech and LinkedIn—how will they support your job search? Let us help you discover and navigate the new, virtual networking environment, while reinforcing your in-person networking skills. 

Successful State Applications - Are you interested in applying to jobs with the State of Oregon? Review how to research State of Oregon job announcements, agencies and job classifications. Discover how to tailor your resume to the job description, all while networking with live State Agents.

WorkSource Oregon ofrece los siguientes talleres virtuales para quienes buscan trabajo y para quienes están considerando cambiar de trabajo. Se llevan a cabo cada semana al mismo día y a la misma hora durante todo el mes.

Entrevistas - ¿Está consiguiendo entrevistas, pero no el trabajo de sus sueños? ¿Las preguntas situacionales lo mantienen despierto por la noche? ¿Cómo responde a una pregunta sobre su último empleador si lo despidieron? Ayudemos a responder a todos estos y más. 

Entrevistas virtuales - ¿Está listo para realizar una entrevista virtual? ¿Su iluminación, vestimenta, fondo, voz y tono son ideales para el escenario virtual? ¿Sabes lo que es grabar previamente las preguntas de tu entrevista? ¿Eres experto en moverse en un espacio virtual? De lo contrario, permítanos ayudarlo a desarrollar habilidades y confianza para su próxima entrevista virtual. 

Habilidades blandas - Se ha dicho: "Lo contratan por sus habilidades básicas y lo despiden por sus habilidades blandas," pero ¿qué es una habilidad blanda y por qué es importante para encontrar y mantener un gran trabajo? En este taller, presentaremos las habilidades blandas y le ayudaremos a descubrir qué habilidades blandas son sus fortalezas. 

Currículums - Aprenda técnicas y estrategias para crear o renovar su currículum para usos específicos de la industria, personalizados para el trabajo y exclusivos para usted. Descubre trucos que atraen la atención de los equipos de contratación. ¡Comprenda cómo pasar el sistema de seguimiento de candidatos del robot a los ojos humanos y más! 

Redes - Marca, un discurso de ascensor y LinkedIn: ¿cómo respaldarán su búsqueda de trabajo? Permítanos ayudarlo a descubrir y navegar por el nuevo entorno de redes virtuales, mientras refuerza sus habilidades de redes en persona. 

“Ni de aquí, ni de allá” is a saying I learned at a young age, growing up in a border town with Mexico. Whether in public or in private, I was reminded daily, “you are neither from here (US) nor from over there (Mexico).” I didn’t have to think hard to understand the meaning of these words, either. I just had to listen, and listening was one lesson mi abuelita drilled in to me. (La chancla does wonderful things.) She taught me to appreciate what was around me and to realize that I was not from “here” or “over there” but from both worlds.

Children are going to have fun reading about Mexican-Americans in these picture books, and they will have fun talking about the colorful illustrated stories that complement the narratives. The wide and diverse experiences – from Tomás Rivera’s library visits and Emma Tenayuca’s labor struggles to Pat Mora’s lyrical reflections and Juan Felipe Herrera’s poetic depictions – which these books convey will invite children, as well as adults, to learn more about the history of Mexican Americans. 

These lists of books express a world where Mexican and American cultures, traditions, and values coexist. You just have to listen. 

Baby playing with food

You’ll hear a lot of different opinions about this topic, but many doctors and early childhood educators actually believe it is a good idea.

Playing with their food:

  • Helps babies learn to feed themselves
  • May prevent picky eating
  • Helps babies build their brains
  • Gives you a moment to catch up!

Playing with food begins as soon as babies are old enough to sit in a high chair. They love to reach for food and explore it in a hands-on, messy experiment of texture and taste. It may not be pretty, but it is a normal and healthy stage of development.

There is an element of play, but there are also important stages of learning taking place. Like mastering the pincer grasp, which eventually leads to holding a pencil! And kids who play with their food can be faster to learn words associated with food textures. In a 2013 study, toddlers who poked, prodded, swirled, mashed and even threw their food were interacting with key developmental concepts more than other children.  

And playing with your food isn’t just for babies, many preschool programs include activities where children participate in "sensory sessions," and touch, listen, taste, and smell different kinds of foods—then share observations with each other.

At any age it's fun to sing a song while you and your child “play” with your food. Here is one where you can make up your own variations together about the foods you like and how you cook and eat them.

All Around the Kitchen
Soup, soup, put it in the pot,
warm it up, warm it up, eat it while it's hot!

Bagel, bagel, put it in the toaster,
warm it, toast it, eat it with some jelly!

Ice cream, ice cream, put it in my tummy,
I like (flavor), yummy, yummy, yummy!

This post was featured in our monthly Family Newsletter. Sign up for the newsletter here, and email us at learning@multcolib.org if you have any questions.

Family having dinner at the table

I know in my own family, it can be hard convincing my child to drink enough water and eat their veggies. And just saying, “it’s healthy” doesn’t cut it. So how do we convince our kids that eating healthy is important? 

Before we start, the most important thing is to never connect eating well to losing weight, being slim, or being attractive. All bodies are fabulous! It’s just great if they can feel their best, too. And second, healthy eating looks different to different people. Some families are vegetarian or vegan or keep halal or kosher.  What people do or don't eat can be driven by values and culture, as well as health.

Teaching kids to eat well can be tricky. You don’t want to give them more facts than they can handle or turn every meal into a lecture. But you also want them to know that everything they put in their mouths affects their whole body. And the more nutritious the food they put in, the better they will feel, the more energy they will have, and hopefully, the more fun! 

One idea is to talk about the properties, or nutrients, of food and how they can help give our bodies energy for playing our favorite sports, help our brain and mind focus on schoolwork, and make us better with our hobbies, even video gaming! Some of the books in this booklist might help with these conversations.  

Another tip is to avoid calling foods “good” or “bad.” Kids should learn that all foods have a place in their diet. Try labeling foods as “go,” “slow,” or “whoa.” Kids should eat “go” foods, like vegetables, every day. But they might want to go “slow” with less nutritious foods, like pancakes. And say “whoa” to foods like candy bars, and leave those for special occasions. Foods with less nutrition don’t need to be off limits, but the goal is for kids to stop and think twice before they eat them often. 

Another great idea is to have your kid help plan and post menus for the week. Include some favorites and try some new foods, as well. You can even check out a kid’s cookbook from this booklist.

In some cases of extreme pickiness or disordered eating, it's important to remember that doctors and occupational therapists can help and you should talk with your child's pediatrician.  

Perhaps the most important thing is teaching through modeling. Seeing their grownups eat nutritious food, will help kids want to do the same. Talk to them about how eating well is fun, makes you feel good, and gives you energy!

This post is part of our "Talking with kids" series, and was featured in our monthly Family Newsletter. Sign up for the newsletter here, and email us at learning@multcolib.org if you have any questions.  

Child baking with grownup

For many, food is an important part of family life. Gathering together for meals is a way to share warmth, community, and family history. A recipe passed down through generations is a treasure. Exploring different cuisines is an opportunity to learn about other cultures. Homemade food is more nutritious than take-out or convenience foods and youth who learn to cook have healthier eating habits later in life. Beyond that, the kitchen is also an ideal place to teach kids reading, science and math.

Children under five learn about the world by using their senses. By touching, tasting, and smelling they’re being little scientists trying to figure out what the world is about. Using these senses is an integral part of the cooking process. Helping with simple tasks such as stirring, washing vegetables, and tearing lettuce helps these young learners develop their fine motor skills. Following step-by-step instructions teaches children executive functioning and gets them ready for school. 

As children get older and gain confidence, they can take over reading the recipe. There is so much that can be learned by reading a recipe. Recipes are math. Children need to understand fractions and ratios. They need to understand different units of measurement. It also supports literacy by exposing them to vocabulary that they won’t find elsewhere. How often are words like sear, tablespoon, dice, drizzle, or crimp used in daily conversation? Through trial and error children learn problem solving and that failure is just another opportunity to learn.

They say that baking is chemistry and cooking is art. The truth is that each one is both chemistry and art. Both allow for creativity once you understand the basics of a recipe. But it’s important to understand the basics for your recipe to turn out right. This is where science comes in. You probably don’t even realize how much science you use in the kitchen. Foods go through chemical and physical changes as they’re prepared and cooked. Certain elements are necessary in order for the recipe to turn out correctly. Which elements can change and which need to stay the same? Why? What adjustments, if any, do you need to make for any modifications? Why? These are scientific questions. Encourage children to ask questions. Don’t worry if you don’t know the answer. You can search for the answer and learn together. You can even ask the library for help!

Looking for more ideas? Look no further than Oregon State University's Food Hero program. They have lots of learning activities for all ages!

By grounding learning in the real world, kids are more likely to understand why the skills they learn are important and are better able to retain them. They’ll also have the satisfaction of eating the results of their lesson and the pride of sharing it with others.

- Keli Y, Teen Librarian, Rockwood Library

This article was featured in our monthly Family Newsletter, you can sign-up here to receive your copy!

Starting January 1, new digital magazines will be available through OverDrive & the Libby app. Here's what you need to know about this change:

Should I keep the RBdigital app installed on my phone?
No. There will be no new issues added after December 31, 2020.

Can I still read the magazine issues I borrowed from RBdigital?
Yes. To read your borrowed magazine loans, visit zinio.com, or download the free ZINIO app. From the ZINIO app or website, register for a new ZINIO account. You will need to use the same email address you used to access RBdigital. Once you've registered, your RBdigital magazine loans will be available in your account.

Will OverDrive have a magazine reader like the one available on RBdigital?
The Libby app will offer an article and thumbnail view for magazine titles starting in January. The article view will not be available on the OverDrive app and website.

Will there be a checkout period for magazines?
Yes. Magazines will now checkout for 21 days.

Can I renew magazines?
Yes. You will have the option to renew a magazine within 3 days of the end of the lending period. Or you could borrow it again with no waiting. 

Will magazines count against my OverDrive checkout limit?
No. Magazines will not count toward checkout limits.

Will there be an option to automatically borrow new issues of a magazine?
No. OverDrive does not currently have plans to support auto-checkout of magazine titles, but their developers are considering a notification system for when new issues are added.

Somos Familia es una organización que tiene una misión de “desarrollar el liderazgo en nuestras familias y comunidades latinas para crear una cultura donde las personas de géneros y orientaciones sexuales diversas puedan prosperar.” Ha creado infográficos y herramientas de cómo hablar sobre el género y la orientación sexual con su familia y videos sobre la importancia de la aceptación familiar.

Ve el video Tres Gotas de Agua de cómo el amor de tres madres les ayudó a entender a sus hijas e hijos LGBTQ+.

Tres Gotas de Agua


Escrito por Kimberly S.

La situación por la que estamos pasando en la actualidad tal vez no nos permita seguir con algunas de nuestras tradiciones familiares, pero también nos brinda oportunidades para alcanzar nuevos propósitos y empezar nuevas costumbres.

Se puede elegir una actividad simple por mes. La actividad tendrá éxito si todos están de acuerdo y es algo definido. Los niños, pueden jugar a contar los calcetines mientras los doblan y los guardan, ayudar con la preparación de algún postre o ¡hacer una piñata!  Los jóvenes, pueden ser parte de la planeación de cómo distribuir el presupuesto familiar, participar en las compras del mandado y ponerlo donde corresponde al llegar a casa. 

En familia, se puede hablar acerca de las celebraciones tradicionales que se han pasado de generación en generación. Cuando los niños y jóvenes aprenden y participan activamente de estas conversaciones, es más probable que aumenten su confianza, sean optimistas y refuercen su identidad. Jueguen y creen un libro con fotos y algunas historias de esas tradiciones para revivir los recuerdos.

Escrito por Violeta G.

Crayon drawing of a person walking a dog, with the words "Thank you for the walks!"
2020 has been a year with a lot of challenges. We want to give thanks to those who have helped us with things big and small throughout the year. Join us in showing gratitude for those in our lives that have brought us joy!

We've started writing and drawing!

  • Librarian Kimberly is writing to her mom to thank her for making fig jam.
  • Librarian Violeta is writing a note to her cat to thank for the delicious cuddles every day.
  • I drew a picture for my dog to thank her for our daily walks. 

Who do you want to send your note to? 

If you’d like, share with us on social media! Tag @multnomahcountylibrary with your #gratitude notes and drawings. 

Want to learn more about the power of gratitude? See our post and booklists here!

Would you like more tips for things to do that don't involve a screen? Sign up for our Family Newsletter. And we are always available to help support families, especially through Home Learning. Connect with us at learning@multcolib.org

- Jen May, Home Learning Support Librarian

Caring for ourselves helps us to better care for our families, especially during times of extreme stress. This post is being written during the time of the Covid pandemic: children are learning from home, grownups are struggling with work, people are scared, and stress is running high. It is In these times, more than ever, that parents and caregivers need to take care of their needs, to fill themselves up so they have enough care, patience and time to share with their families.  The Child Mind Institute has put together a wonderful article for caregivers on prioritizing their own well-being in order to benefit the whole family. Here are the main takeaways:

  1. Make time for yourself
  2. Prioritize healthy choices
  3. Be realistic (my favorite!)
  4. Set boundaries
  5. Reconnect with things you enjoy

We know it's easy to say, but not always easy to do. The library is here to help:

  1. If it would help to have the kids entertained so you can have quiet time, check out our storytimes and events for kids! These are always changing, so check back often.
  2. If you are looking for healthy recipes or exercises, we have thousands to choose from!
  3. We have books to help you set boundaries, help you set realistic expectations, and to give yourself a break
  4. If one of your favorite activities is sitting down with a good book, or watching a fun show, or listening to some beautiful music, we can help recommend any of those things for you. Check out the My Librarian group for a great suggestion (or 20!).
  5. If you want to learn something new or get back into an old hobby, we have lots of ways to help you get started. Just connect with us.

We are here to help, so please let us know what we can do for you, and for your family! You can leave a comment below, or email us directly at learning@multcolib.org. Also consider signing up for our monthly Family Newsletter. Take care!

sign that says, "my pronouns are ____/ _____"
Youth who identify as LGBTQ+* benefit from a supportive network of family, friends, and peers, especially during times of stress and isolation.  Here are some organizations and resources that can help provide that support.

Local Resources for LGBTQ+ youth

  • Sexual & Gender Minority Youth Resource Center (SMYRC) has served local youth since 1998.  They provide empowerment, community building, education and direct services. 
  • Oregon Youthline is a local 24-hour youth crisis and support service.  Help is available via phone, text, email, or chat.  Youthline is staffed by trained teen volunteers from 4-10 pm daily.
  • GSA Network supports Gender & Sexualities Alliance (GSA)  groups that unite LGBTQ+ youth and their peers.  They also provide tips on how to run virtual GSAs.
  • Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) Oregon chapter of the national organization that supports every student’s right to a safe, supportive education. 
  • Pride Northwest has a mission: to encourage and celebrate the positive diversity of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans communities, and to assist in the education of all people through the development of activities that showcase the history, accomplishments, and talents of these communities.

 

neon rainbow with "Love is Love" signs in the background
Virtual Resources for LGBTQ+ youth and those who support them

  • Gender Spectrum free online support groups for LGBTQ+ youth, parents and caregivers.  Groups also offered for parents/caregivers in Spanish.
  • Q Chat Space a safe space for LGBTQ+ teens to connect
  • Trevor Support Center provides resources and counseling via phone and chat. TrevorSpace is an international community for LGBTQ+ young people. 
  • PFLAG is the nation's largest family and ally organization, founded in 1973 after the simple act of a mother publicly supporting her gay son.
  • It Gets Better Project over 60,000 diverse video stories, all on a single theme.
  • Trans 101: Gender Diversity Crash Course helps people better understand what it means to be trans, and how we make the world a safer and happier place for trans and gender diverse people.  Available as a video series or booklet.
  • An age-by-age guide to talking to your kids about gender from Today's Parent.  No matter your kid's age, it's not too early (or late!) to talk to them about gender. Here's how to start the discussion, and keep it going as they grow.  

 

LGBTQ+ Booklists

Support can also come in the form of reading books and watching media with LGBTQ+ representation.   Your library is full of books for kids and teens that feature LGBTQ+ characters.  Explore the reading lists below, or ask us for a recommendation

*LGBTQ+ stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer or Questioning.  The + is meant to include all gender identities and sexual orientations not covered by the other letters.  Read What Does LGBTQ+ Mean? for more information.

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