Blogs

book and e-bookYou’ve written something, and it’s time to publish! Self-publishing isn’t what it used to be - expensive, and often ignored by booksellers. Now you can bring your writing into physical form relatively cheaply, and it can be as glossy and perfect-bound as you like, or if you prefer, hand-stitched and hand-painted. With print-on-demand (POD) services,  you can have one beautiful book printed for a family member or friend, or you can print many to distribute to bookstores. It can also be an e-book - many authors are finding great success with self-published e-books. The avenues to self-publishing are diverse!

Because there are so many options, you’ll want to inform yourself as best you can. Things to consider include:

  • Do you want your book to have an ISBN?
  • How do you plan to market your book?
  • Who is the intended audience for your book?

Check out our booklist featuring books about self-publishing. Many of the books on this list discuss these questions, among others, that you should consider as you plan your self-publishing project.

What follows are just a few of the many resources available for you to choose from as you consider your self-publishing process.

For print-on-demand (POD) publishing, you can choose from a wide range of printers. Some popular POD printers include LuluBlurbCreateSpace (a division of Amazon.com), Lightning SourceIngram Spark (a division of Ingram, a major book distributor), and Smashwords (which publishes e-books only).

There some local resources that might be relevant to your project, too: 

  • Portland State University’s Ooligan Press is a teaching press staffed by students pursuing master’s degrees in the Department of English at Portland State University (PSU). PSU is also the home of Odin Ink, a print-on-demand publisher.
  • Powell’s Books has print-on-demand self-publishing technology in the form of its Espresso Book Machine.
  • Portland’s Independent Publishing Resource Center (IPRC) is a membership organization with resources and workshops related to printing and book-making. They also have certificate programs in creative nonfiction/fiction, poetry, and comics/graphic novels.

If you’re interested in making contact with a local publisher or association, you might find the following organizations useful:

For advice and news, the Alliance of Independent Authors has an advice blog about self-publishing.

Are you interested in having your e-book available in the library? OverDrive is the service that many libraries, including Multnomah County Library, use to provide access to e-books. Like publishing houses, self-publishers must fill out a Publisher Application found on OverDrive's Content Reserve site. OverDrive has also created a helpful Intro to Digital Distribution pdf for new authors and publishers. OverDrive's public contact info can be found here. If your e-book is added into the OverDrive catalog, you can then suggest that we purchase it.

In your creative work, you may find yourself wondering about copyright law and how it applies to you. We have quite a few books that provide guidance on these subjects - two of these are The Copyright Handbook: What Every Writer Needs to Know by Stephen Fishman and Fair Use, Free Use, and Use by Permission: How to Handle Copyrights in All Media, by Lee Wilson. You’ll find quite a few others under the subject heading Copyright -- United States -- Popular Works.

Have fun, enjoy the process, and feel empowered to get your work into print! As always, please let us know if we can help direct you to books or other resources to help with your project. 

 

 
What is dyslexia?
Dyslexia is an unexpected difficulty mastering literacy skills such as reading, writing, spelling and arithmetic. People with dyslexia have normal or better intelligence.
(Definition courtesy of the Blosser Center.)
 
Identifying dyslexia
“Red flags” to look for – the more you see in yourself or a child, the more likely dyslexia may be present:
Reading: misreads words, avoids reading
Spelling: misspells words
Handwriting: has “sloppy” writing
Math: has trouble with math (such as math facts)
Poor organizational skills
Difficulty telling time
May also have ADD, ADHD
 
Dyslexia Resources in Multnomah County
Provides assessment, tutoring and teacher training.  
 
Advocacy group working to improve public school instruction for children with dyslexia.
 
National organization serving people with dyslexia, their families and communities.
 
Provides assessment and tutoring.
 
Coordinates support groups and family events; provides resources and information.
 
Dyslexia Assessment
Places in the Portland metro area that can evaluate someone for dyslexia:
•Stephanie Verlinden, Children’s Program
•Colleen O’Mahoney, Multnomah Educational Testing
•Cynthia Arnold, New Leaves Clinic, Beaverton

Visiting the Portland Zine Symposium is always exciting - a big room full of zinesters from far and wide, chatting, swapping zines, drawing, and displaying their work. Among the zines on display, there are minicomics, personal zines (aka perzines), works of history, fantasy, art, humor… basically, zines as diverse as the zinesters themselves. This year’s symposium was bursting with exciting new work, and we bought many new titles for the library’s zine collection.

Here are a few of our favorites. Also, check out our blog post about all the food-related zines we found at the Zine Symposium!

That's Not OKThat’s Not Ok: Boundaries for the Conflict-Avoidant by Breanne Boland

A guide to setting boundaries that’s clear, concise, and also fun, interspersed with humor, comics, and drawings.

 

 

Portland Oregon AD 1999Portland Oregon AD 1999 by Jeff W. Hayes

Written in 1913 and beautifully reprinted by Corvus Editions, this speculative story tells of a little old lady who calls upon the narrator to tell him of the vision she’s had of life in Portland in 1999.

 

 

 

Mocha Chocolate Momma: Bessie ColemanMocha Chocolata Momma: Bessie Coleman by Marya Errin Jones

Mocha Chocolata Momma Zine chronicles the lives of black women, real or imagined. It’s part history lesson, part perzine, full of engrossing stories, photos, and illustrations. This issue’s about Bessie Coleman, the first female African American pilot.

 

GrowGrow: How to Take Your DIY Project and Passion to the Next Level and Quit Your Job! by Eleanor Whitney, MPA

From a blurb on the back: “Eleanor Whitney breaks down the daunting process of earning a living as a creative person into chewable, bite-size bits.” With easy-to-digest, step-by-step tips and tangible examples from working artists, Eleanor’s expert advice is some of the most sought-after content on diybusinessassociation.com.” - Amy Cuevas Schroeder, Venus Zine and DIY Business Association

Never Date Dudes from the InternetNever Date Dudes from the Internet: Responses to a Craigslist F4M Ad by Amy

Includes the author’s original posting on Craigslist, as well as all the responses she received. Can you guess which guys she actually went on dates with?

 

PunkPunk by Mimi Thi Nguyen and Golnar Nikpour

A conversation between two lifelong punks about punk and how it’s been defined, studied, and canonized, and the problems and politics therein.

 

Bad Boy Image #1Bad Boy Image #1: Paranormal by Asher Craw, Fiona Avocado, and Moishe

The first comic zine put out by Bad Boy Image, a comics collective consisting of Asher Craw, Fiona Avocado, and Moishe. This issue focuses on stories of the paranormal.

 

Science You ForgotScience You Forgot: An Illustrated Guide to Your Elementary School Science Textbook by Jeannette Langmead

Gorgeous illustrations reminiscent of your childhood science textbooks, including four famous scientists, with facts you may have forgotten. Also includes an experimental cocktail and a pop quiz drinking game because you're a grown up now.

 

Rad Dad #24Rad Dad 24

This issue of the long-running zine about radical parenting focuses on parents sharing hard-earned wisdom with one another.

 

 

Trusty Companion #1Trusty Companion #1 by Katy Ellis O'Brien and Max Karl Key

A charming comic all in blue about a lady space explorer and her robotic trusty companion.

At this year's Portland Zine Symposium, we found that quite a few zinesters were offering new zines about food - from the practical to the poetic to the bizarre. Read, relish, cook, laugh, enjoy!

(Also, check out our other blog post about new zines from the Zine Symposium!)

 

FoodStampFoodie3Food Stamp Foodie #3 by Virginia Paine

This issue of Food Stamp Foodie includes recipes, self-care tips and DIY projects in comics form. Simple vegan recipes, easy sewing projects and more!

 

Carnage

Carnage by Kelly

A zine about cooking and eating meat, from the perspective of an author who was formerly vegetarian.

 

 

KosherKosher

A zine about eating kosher!

 

 

Burgermancer

Burgermancer #1 by Jason “JFish” Fischer

A burger fanzine, full of comics, recipes, reviews and articles - all about burgers. It’s delightfully weird, and features an interview with Hamburger Harry, burger connoisseur and curator at the Hamburger Museum.

 

FlavorFlavor by Sofie Sherman-Burton

Rich prose (or prose poems?) recalling the author’s most prominent food memories.

 

 

Burrito Burrito BurritoBurrito Burrito Burrito: A Zine Created for Burrito Lovers by Serena H.  

Origins of the burrito, recipes, interviews with burrito experts, log of burritos eaten in Portland. Focuses on vegetarian and vegan burritos.

 

Brew Your Own KombuchaMake Your Own Ginger AleBrew Your Own Kombucha

Make Your Own Ginger Ale

both by Kione

These two teeny-tiny 8-page zines feature clear instructions and tips for making your own kombucha and ginger ale!

 

When I was a kid I begged my parents to buy me what was billed as a 'scultping' toy. The ads showed cool kids with berets chipping away at small square blocks of stone and then, voila! - the stone would reveal a figure. Never mind that the sculpture was actually pre-made and your job was just to peel away the outside, no creativity required.

I never did get my longed for toy, but I'm reminded of it now that I'm into the next season of Breaking Bad. Why? Because sometimes art is just about uncovering what's already there. At first blush, Walt seems like a good-natured sort, a sometimes overly moralistic guy affected by bad circumstances, always trying to do the right thing for his family. But as time goes by the real Walt is revealed. I would argue that the pragmatic guy who views the murder of one of his dealers as collateral damage is in fact the real Walt, the one who has always been there and who uses his upright personna as a cloak for his real self.

Is Walt corrupted by his desperate circumstances, or do his circumstances just uncover the true Walt? I think the criminal mastermind was always lurking in the stone. It's an interesting question to ponder, and the fact that Walt inspires that kind of inquiry is a credit to how well-crafted the character is.

I find myself wondering if the character of Piper in Orange is the New Black will follow a similar arc. I'm referring to the series and not the original, non-fiction book - you can hear what Piper Kerman thinks of the liberties the show has taken with her memoir on a recent Fresh Air interview; I wonder if the character will do a 'Walter White' and the softness of her constructed self will be peeled away by prison life. What do you think?

I started reading The Telling Room: A Tale of Love, Betrayal, Revenge, and the World's Greatest Piece of Cheese by Michael Paterniti late last week.
The subtitle says it all. Love, betrayal, revenge, great cheese. If there were room on the cover I would add the words 'Family' and 'Sun-burned Small-town Spain'.
For the first couple days I would think about the book for hours, clock-watching until I could get a few more minutes with it. But it's the kind of book that deserves more than 15 minutes between loads of laundry and emptying the dishwasher. It deserves a quiet space and a steaming cup of coffee. Now one week in I'm getting up extra early to read in bed during that delicious time before the city is awake. Every single page is densely packed with delicious writing and humor. There are on-page footnotes (love them) that make a Siamese twin to the story itself.
I'm not finished yet but I can tell you this book is my favorite of the year. And I know in my heart that Paterniti will find himself receiving accolades and awards for months to come.

Old newspapers are a rich resource for satisfying casual curiosity, finding surprising sources of amusement, broadening knowledge of family history, and academic research. Thanks to an enormous effort taking place in libraries around the country more and more of them are available in full online. 
 
The Library of Congress has brought together work from many states in Chronicling America, an archive of newspapers covering 1836-1922. Chronicling America can be searched by keyword, state, or date. It also includes a selection of Recommended Topics where selected articles on subjects such as the Anarchist Incidents,  Lizzie Borden, and Orchidelirium are gathered together.
 
If your interest is family history, try searching for an ancestor’s name and limit by state. You may find an obituary, an election to minor office, a prize for the best yearling colt, or a host of other tidbits that made up their lives.
 
Report on Battle of Gettysburg. New-York Daily Tribune, July 3, 1863.Occasionally these digitized pages provide a raw reflection of our nation’s most difficult days. For example, on the day after the San Francisco Fire, the three newspapers of San Francisco united to publish a joint issue under the name The Call-chronicle-examiner. It is a heartbreaking read.
 
Many states have separate sites to access their content. In Oregon that is Historic Oregon Newspapers  (maintained by the University of Oregon), which includes some newspapers that have not yet been added to the Chronicling America collection, such as selected years of the Oregon Journal
 
Questions? Ask the Librarian!  We are here to help!
 

 

When genetically-modified wheat was discovered in an Oregon field in the spring of 2013, the long-standing debate over genetically-modified foods intensified. How was Roundup Ready wheat created? And how did it end up in a field in Oregon, years after it was discontinued? What is the government’s role in regulating such technology?

Citizens and scientists have been debating the pros and cons of GMOs for years. Polls have shown the public is skeptical. Environmental and food safety organizations are concerned about the risks GMOs pose for humans and the planet. However, the companies engineering the crops, such as Monsanto, insist they are safe, as do some farming groups. A number of scientists take a middle ground, acknowledging the potential benefits of genetic engineering but criticizing the current use and regulation of GMOs. Some writers have even argued for an open-source” model of food genetics.

For an excellent overview on this issue, check out Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center in Context, which contains articles, statistics, audio files, and images. You’ll need to log in with your library card number and PIN to access this resource from outside the library.

Are you looking for some specific information not covered here? Contact a librarian for help.

A few years ago, I walked the Great Glen Way in Scotland. Ever since, I've been wanting to go back to Britain and do another walk, but I wasn't sure exactly where to go. After reading a review of Simon Armitage's Walking Home: A Poet's Journey, I immediately put a hold on the book.  I had heard of the Pennine Way and thought perhaps I might like to try a portion of it as it is mostly in the northern part of England which I love.

Thankfully, I actually read the book and learned that there is no way in heck that I would ever attempt even a small part of 268 miserably wet and foggy miles that Armitage experienced on his journey. That being said, it was a lot of fun to read about someone else doing the trail! Armitage is a well-known poet, and decided that he would fund his trip by doing poetry readings almost every night of the 19 days he spent on the trail. Sometimes only a few showed up, but other nights the pub or hotel where he was staying was packed, and people gave generously. Armitage mixes in several poems he wrote along the trail with his thoughtful, humorous and self-deprecating journal. While I won't attempt his journey, the narrative has inspired me to seek out his poetry.

Felt Swan from the Hermitage MuseumThe felt swan shown here, on display in the Hermitage Museum, dates from the 4th-5th centuries BC.  An object made of felt and deer hair with the figure supported by wooden stakes, it was part of a burial mound in the Eastern ranges of the Altai region in Russia. This image is from the book Felt, by Willow G. Mullins, an account of the many uses of felt over spans of centuries to contemporary times. It is an example of a type of book in the library that can serve as good starting points for your imagination, beginning with raw materials.

When experimenting with various types of media and processes associated with them, another type of book that is useful to remember about are the books about art hazards. As many people know from studying art, it's easy to forge ahead and forget that some of the properties of materials may be less than benign for health.

 

Summer may be winding down but there's still plenty of time to find a bestseller, discover a new author or explore a brand-new genre.  Need some suggestions?  Take a look at the following lists from selected newspapers and websites and see what appeals.

Lots of holds on a must-read title?  Don't despair!  Library shelves are full of new books to discover.   If you're in the mood for sweeping tales that span centuries and generations, browse the Epic novels and stand-alone sagas reading list.  If you prefer a quick read, try Stories, samplers and short works, engaging writing that can be read in one sitting.  

Be sure and pick up a Read4Life adult summer reading game card to record your books.  Return your card to any library by August 31st - you'll be entered to win an e-book reader.

NPR's Summer books 2013 critics' lists have something for everyone -- historicals, romance, forgotten classics, the urban experience, comics and poetry are some of the categories.  USA Today features booksellers' picks for summer reading; scan their predictions for hot fiction, nonfiction and "sleepers" and see if they're on track.   The LA Times' Summer Reading Guide includes 156 book picks: thrillers and young adult books, history and novels, memoirs and science fiction, pop culture books, kids books and more.

Find out-of-the-mainstream titles on Your mega summer reading list: 200 books recommended by TEDsters (designer Chip Kidd, editor Maria Popova, choreographer Bill T. Jones, to name a few).  More hot, new and undiscovered titles appear on the DailyCandy's 14 New Books That Save Brain Cells This Summer: Essay anthologies, scorching family dramas and more.

Subject-specific lists to consider:  Scientific American's Best Summer Books, recently-published science books worth reading selected by SA editors, bloggers and contributors; Theater Books for Summer Reading on the Broadway & Me blog;  JP Morgan's Summer 2013 Reading List offers "a global exploration of topics including philanthropy, gender equality, business and art"; stretch your mind with some readable philosophy from the hosts and guests of Philosophy Talk.

Librarians love to steer book lovers to Indiebound, the independent booksellers website.  Book groups will enjoy their Summer 2013 Reading Group Indie Next list.  And no reading list would be complete without Oprah's summer picks: best cookbooks, compelling paperbacks, arresting memoirs and much more.

 

 

Not every novel needs to be a great classic of literature -sometimes what you need is a fun read. One popular sub-genre of science fiction these days is urban fantasy.  These stories are set in the real world but with the addition of magic.  Examples range from Charles De Lint's literary works to thinly disguised paranormal romances.
One of the first urban fantasy novels I can remember reading is War for the Oaks by Emma Bull. It won the Locus award for best first novel back in 1987.  It still holds up in spite of the outdated tech. A newer discovery is Stephen Blackmoore.  I turned up my nose at his first book because zombies just don't interest me.  Somehow Dead Things did catch my eye with the blurb "Necromancer is such an ugly word but it's a title Eric Carter is stuck with".  The protagonist isn't a nice guy or a hero but he's not evil either.  He's just trying to muddle through a really bad situation as best he can when he goes back home after his sister's murder.
 
If you're looking for a bit of light weight campy vampire fun, try Jeaniene Frost, starting with Halfway to the Grave. I give this author a thumbs up. The paranormal romance sub-genre isn't usually to my taste, but I devoured all of this author's books in short order.  Make no mistake. These are not technically "good" books.  Parts are even laughably bad, but somehow I just kept picking up the next book.  Think of it as a bag of chips... You know you ought to just pour a few in a bowl and put the bag away and yet... 
If you'd prefer more plot with your monsters try Patricia Briggs' Mercedes Thompson series, starting with Moon Called.  Mercy is a VW mechanic in the Tri-Cities in eastern Washington.  She's also a skinwalker who can transform into a coyote.  However, in a world with vampires, fae and werewolves turning into a 30 odd pound coyote leaves one rather under-powered.  
 
Soon I'll be catching up with is Charles de Lint's Newford series.  Set in a fictional Canadian town that borders a magical otherworld, the series features a number of standalone novels and short stories that are mentioned frequently in awards shortlists.
 
Happy reading!

The books in the Library about the art of Maori people and other groups from the islands of the South Pacific provides us with  "a sense of awe, the admiration for arts that are both beautiful and profound, with a history that commands our respect both for what we can know of it and what we cannot." - Arts of the Pacific Islands by Anne D'Alleva. This summer, the Library added a new book published in 2012, titled Art in Oceania: A New History, that spans art of the Pacific Islanders from the remnants of thousands of years ago to contemporary artists of this decade. Chapters describe by centuries the impact of political and social changes upon art of these islands, with effects of trade, war, and globalization of culture.

Many of the sculpture and other objects of wood, stone, and textiles historically were created for ceremonial uses, with elements of design and representation of human form that far exceed the merely practical. The wood carving shown here on the cover dates from 1896, by Tene Waitere, a master woodcarver and teacher, who during his lifetime created many commissioned works such as this panel. It is an example of the powerful sculpture and other forms of art in this book, interspersed with photographs, poetry, and stories from master craftsmen, artists, tribal leaders, travellers, and historians.

View an excerpt from this book from the publisher, Oxford University Press.

Looking for more books about the art of this region of the world? There is a good selection at Central Library. Find them collectively in the Library catalog with a search by subject heading: Art- Oceania.

Watergate security log

 

This probably won’t come as a surprise but librarians like questions.  And we really like answers.  We like finding them and sharing them.  But there are questions that don’t work that way:  What is right and what is wrong?  When do you keep a secret?  Is it ever OK to break the law?  Where should a person’s loyalties lie?  Complicated in the best of times, when you enter the world of whistleblowers these questions really get messy.  It’s not that they don’t have answers, more that they don’t have only one answer.  And as the stakes get higher, often the answers are harder to pin down.

According to the National Whistleblowers Center, we have laws to protect people who “stop, report, or testify about employer actions that are illegal, unhealthy, or violate specific public policies”.  Seems pretty clear, right?  Well…only sort of.   It’s just that no one seems to agree on what counts as being whistleblower and what is just breaking the rules.  NPR reported a recent study that found that 55% think NSA leaker Edward Snowden is a whistleblower while 34% call him a traitor.  And any of you who are good at math will notice that those numbers don’t come anywhere near 100%.  So while we wait to discover Mr. Snowden’s future, let’s meet some other players in the whistleblowing world.  And whether you prefer to read the Handbook, follow the official paper trail or sneak a look at Hollywood’s take, the library has you covered.

Last year, the U.S. Department of Labor and the Securities and Exchange Commission’s  Whistleblower programs each received around 3000 tips from both private and public employees.  They oversee the laws to protect people when they come forward with information.  For many cases, this might be as far as it goes.  Does the relative anonymity of these cases make them any less complicated or risky?  Or is it true that we are all the stars of our own dramas?   At the other end of things we have some of the country’s best known if not always the best loved whistleblowers who were involved in everything from Watergate, to police corruption, to nuclear power, to farming.  And an entirely different approach to whistleblowing was introduced to the world by Wikileaks, who instead of blowing the whistle on one thing publish any and all secrets.   Even from these few examples it’s obvious that being a whistleblower is a precarious and downright dangerous thing to be, even if they do make a movie about you.

If you want to explore this topic more, or if you have more questions about any of this, you know what to do: Ask a Librarian! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.

Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer  by Siddhartha Mukherjee

There are loads of you out there who love to read a fat book (Hi, Mom!). You're drawn to authors like David McCullough, Robert Jordan and George R.R. Martin. I've always regretted that I'm not one of you. I was not at all looking forward to reading this fat book, but it was for a book club so there was no getting around it. I cajoled myself with thoughts like, 'it won the Pulitzer Prize--it'll be good for you,' like it was a giant vitamin, and 'c'mon, you really like science writing.'

So I did it. I read Emperor of All Maladies  because I had to. And sometimes when you read something you wouldn't normally choose, you stumble on something that will keep you thinking for weeks after. Like the little boys, as young as 4, who were apprenticed or indentured as chimney sweeps in England during the 17 and 1800's, working nearly naked in flues as narrow as nine inches square. If asphyxiation or burns didn't get them as kids, then dying in young adulthood from cancer caused by the soot that stuck to their bodies seemed almost guaranteed. I'm thinking of the sort of 'why don't we try this?' experimentation on cancer patients through history. I'm thinking of the horrifying, radical surgeries, done for decades, with the idea that cancer could be physically removed by surgeons if they just removed enough flesh. I'm thinking of the amazing discoveries of scientists that seemed almost random, like a light bulb suddenly went off over their heads in a very, very dark room.

We've all lost a loved one or friend or neighbor or coworker to cancer. Or maybe you're fighting its spread in your own body right now. Every week it's in the news. A new medication, a gene discovered, a warning about food or chemicals or the environment. Strangely, and I didn't expect this, reading Emperor was a comfort to me. That we really have made progress. That each form of cancer is so specific, working on the big picture is important. And working on the rare, one-in-a-million cancers is just as important, because the science behind a discovery is always connected to something else, even if we don't know what it is right away.

This new book accompanies a recent exhibition of works by Chinese-American artist Hung Liu at the Oakland Museum of California.  Hung Liu and the Rene de Guzman, Curator of Art at the Oakland Museum, have created a set of interviews on YouTube, so that not only can you read the artist's quotes in the book, but listen to her voice as she describes her approaches to paintings and other works. It's an interesting way to experience a book, to hear the voice of the artist along with her paintings, that portray people in China from the time of the Cultural Revolution forward to the present. Often in a political context, the paintings and mixed media works use photographs, some faded, to "make history and memory materialize in the present." - p. 82 Summoning Ghosts: The Art of Hung Liu.

Authors: Liu, Hung, 1948-
Title: Summoning ghosts : the art of Hung Liu
Publisher: Berkeley : University Of California Press, 2013
Notes: Catalog of the exhibition Summoning Ghosts: the Art of Hung Liu, organized by René de Guzman on behalf of the Oakland Museum of California and presented March 16-June 30, 2013

A six year old boy is bereft and lost when his father dies "after visiting friends". He begins to stake out a claim to his father's life. "Death hung over the house...Your absence is greater than your presence," he says. The family is complicit in the silence about this death.
 
I could feel the ache in this boy's heart as he seeks to conjure and reconstruct his father's life and to make him whole again.
 
The father, Bob Hainey was a hard-drinking, hard living newspaperman as was the custom in the newspaper world of 1960s Chicago. Now a deputy editor of GQ, Michael Hainey searches for clues and stories about his father.
 
In short, sharp, pointed sentences, Hainey paints a picture of his determined mother, his extended family and the Chicago world of newsmen and cops.
 
After Visiting Friends: A Son's Story is a quest for the truth. The lessons learned along the way and the discoveries awaiting the journey's end will keep you reading.
 
 

Whether you’re just beginning to work on expressing yourself in writing, Ernest Hemingway writingor have been working at it for a while, there is always room to improve your writing skills. From the basics of grammar and punctuation to the finer points of style and persuasive rhetoric, there’s a lot to learn. Practice helps, of course, and all writers continue learning as they go!

We have many books and other resources (including DVDs!) about developing those writing skills. A selection of resources for beginning and intermediate writers is available here as a booklist, but you might also browse the following subject headings:

There are also some great resources online, many of which are developed by college writing centers to help undergraduate students (and anyone else!) finesse their writing. Purdue’s Online Writing Lab (OWL) is a favorite, and UT Austin’s Undergraduate Writing Center and Colorado State’s Writing@CSU pages are also quite helpful. William Strunk and E.B. White’s classic guide to writing, The Elements of Style, is also freely available online.

Please feel free to stop by any library location or contact us if you have a question about writing, or would like some help finding just the right writing guide or other resources for you!

Library notices sometimes are filtered as spam by email providers and this happens because the library sends out many notices at one time. You can prevent this from happening if you add notices@multcolib.org to your contacts or address book. Sometimes, library notices are bounced by email providers and the notices come back to us as undeliverable so it appears that your email is no longer valid. If this happens, we remove your email from your account and you will begin to receive telephone notifications. You should contact Account Services, if you start receiving telephone notifications instead of email notifications.

 

Search for a job on Craigslist ... really?

Yes, really, because aggregator job boards don’t go there so you should. An aggregator site is one that sends its ‘spiders’ crawling over the web to gather together links to jobs listings (or other things). Among the biggest are Indeed and SimplyHired. One aggregator that pulls job listings directly from company websites is LinkUp, which means they should have fewer duplicate, out-of-date or scam listings. Niche boards are those that focus exclusively on a particular area of employment - a couple of examples are Idealist, which lists both paid and unpaid opportunities in the nonprofit sector, and Madden Industrial Craftsmen for welders, machinists and other industrial positions in the Pacific Northwest. This About.com Job Searching page has links to lists of niche boards covering all different sorts of work.

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