Blogs

The library may be closed and people are staying home, but it doesn't mean parents and caregivers are alone in trying to help young children learn and develop.  This collection of resources includes articles, videos, webinars, and activities to help parents and caregivers support their children's healthy development during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

For parents:

How to Support Children (and Yourself) During the COVID-19 Outbreak
The Center on the Developing Child offers three main activities that can help parents promote their young child’s healthy development and manage their own stress during the pandemic. PDFs are provided in both English and Spanish.

How to Talk to Your Kids About Coronavirus
From PBS Kids for Parents website. A parent shares how she talked with her children about the coronavirus. Includes “four ways we can help young kids build germ-busting habits.” The article is also available in Spanish.

A support guide for parents raising babies and toddlers through the coronavirus crisis
This article from Quartz offers reassurance to parents who are concerned that their child is missing out on opportunities for growth and development during these times of uncertainty and isolation. Included are resources to help keep young children engaged and learning, ideas for parental self-care, and links to sources of information about child development.

For childcare providers:

5 ways early care and education providers can support children’s remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
From Child Trends.

Trauma and Resilience: The Role of Child Care Providers
A webinar focused on the effect of trauma on children’s learning.It addresses the role of teachers and providers using resilience building strategies to support children across the age continuum.

For anyone interested in children’s development and well-being:

Being Black Is Not A Risk Factor: A Strengths-Based Look at the State of the Black Child
This report from the National Black Child Development Institute includes articles such as “ The Black Family: Re-Imagining Family Support and Engagement” and highlights successful programs like Great Beginnings for Black Babies, Inc.

How to Teach Children to Stay 6 Feet Apart
Tips on how to teach social distancing to children from No Time for Flashcards.

Resources for Supporting Children’s Emotional Well-being during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Guidance, recommendations, and resources provided by child trauma experts at Child Trends and the Child Trauma Training Center at the University of Massachusetts.

Resilience
A short video and an article about how children build resilience from the Center on the Developing Child.

What Is COVID-19? And How Does It Relate to Child Development?
From the Center on the Developing Child: “An infographic that explains the basics of what COVID-19 is, and what it can mean for stress levels in both children and adults… it explains how all of us can work to ensure the wellbeing of the community now and in the future”. PDFs are available in English and Spanish.

More information:

2 Ways COVID-19 is Creating Even Greater Inequities in Early Childhood Education
A brief article from The Education Trust, a national nonprofit that works to close opportunity gaps that disproportionately affect students of color and students from low-income families.

The Brain Architects Podcast: COVID-19 Special Edition: Creating Communities of Opportunity
Dr. David Williams discusses ways in which the coronavirus pandemic is particularly affecting people of color in the U.S., and what that can mean for early childhood development. 

Thinking About Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Impacts Through a Science-Informed, Early Childhood Lens
An article from the Center for the Developing Child.

The coronavirus pandemic is challenging for everyone. For the community of children experiencing autism, it can be especially confusing. Here are some suggestions for help with navigating the crisis.

For fun

Enjoy the videos in Multnomah County Library's It's Storytime! collection, especially the Sensory Storytime playlist. Mix and match the short videos in this growing collection to create the perfect storytime for your child.

Spectrum Storytime with Ethan - fun books read by a very engaging young man who is on the spectrum.

Inclusive Storytime, Hillsboro Library & PSU - This collaborative storytime,  specifically designed for kids with varying learning styles and abilities, has moved online. Join the Facebook group and gain access to all of the parent guides and videos they have created. 

For information

Disability Rights Oregon - Know Your Rights: Education Rights During COVID-19 outlines a process for assessing and advocating for your child’s educational needs.

COVID-19 Resources for Families of Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs from the Oregon Health Authority provides a similar list of resources to this one.

DIY Ways to Meet a Child's Sensory Needs at Home from Edutopia. Occupational therapists and trauma-informed teachers weigh in on how to create sensory tools and spaces with what you have at home.

FACTOregon.com shares Additional COVID-19 Resources, a compilation of resources relating to COVID-19 and education. They have a series of Distance Learning Webinars (Sample: Special Education and the IEP: Distance Learning Edition) and the “Special Education and Distance Learning: What You Need to Know Toolkit” available in English and Spanish.

Autism Society of Oregon Resources for School Closure has created a page with links to a variety of homeschooling sites, activities, virtual tours, exercise and more.

Understood.com Coronavirus Latest Updates and Tips has a LOT of resources to help parents and atypical children cope with learning and supporting your child at home. Here’s one example: Stuck at Home? 20 Learning Activities to Keep Kids Busy

The National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations (NCPMI) provides Emergencies and National Disasters: Helping Children and Families Cope, a collection of resources for parents of young children that include charts and a number of social stories to help your child understand what’s happening.

Các Thư viện

  • Tất cả thư viện Quận Multnomah đóng cửa do dịch COVID-19 cho đến khi có thông báo thêm. Xin đừng trả lại thư liệu cho thư viện trong thời gian này. Quý vị sẽ không bị tính phí trả muộn.
  • Chúng tôi nhớ quý vị!

Cách Tận Hưởng Thư viện Trực Tuyến của Quý vị

Dịch vụ/Chương trình tạm ngừng

  • Những chương trình, lịch biểu có gặp gỡ trực tiếp tạm ngừng cho đến tháng 8.
  • Các thư viện hủy bỏ hoặc không chấp nhận đơn đặt trước phòng họp cho đến tháng 8.

Khi nào Thư viện sẽ mở cửa lại?

Thư viện Quận Multnomah sẽ mở cửa lại khi có sự chỉ đạo của Chủ tịch Deborah Kafoury và hướng dẫn từ các quan chức y tế cộng đồng. Mặc dù hiện tại chưa có ngày tháng xác định, nhưng thư viện đang theo dõi tình hình chặt chẽ, và đang lập kế hoạch để khôi phục lại dịch vụ thư viện khi thấy an toàn để làm như vậy.

Xin vô trang COVID-19 của Quận Multnomah để biết thêm thông tin mới cập nhật về y tế và nguồn lực cộng đồng.

Cindy and her dog, Maddie
Cindy Hiday is the author of Iditarod Nights, a Library Writers Project book that has recently been published in partnership with Ooligan Press. 


People love dogs! What inspired you to write about the Iditarod Sled Dog Race in particular?

I became hooked on the sport when I read Race Across Alaska: First woman to win the Iditarod tells her story, by Libby Riddles and Tim Jones. I'm drawn to stories about women who are courageous under pressure, as Libby Riddles certainly was when she found herself exhausted and caught in a blizzard during the race. When I read about a local woman who put her career on hold to train and compete in the Iditarod, I had the spark of an idea for my heroine in Iditarod Nights. For a time, the research consumed me. I discovered there is so much more behind the Iditarod – from its early beginnings to its present-day sport – than most people realize. I admire the veteran mushers, their dedication and how they put their dogs' wellbeing ahead of their own. And I fell in love with the dogs! They are amazing athletes; the sheer joy in their expressions when they're hooked up to a sled is thrilling!

Are there common themes you find yourself drawn to in your writing and the books you read?

My author brand is writing in the spirit of adventure and happy endings; that's my promise to my readers. The more challenging and seemingly impossible the adventure, the better. There has to be character growth beyond what the character believes themselves capable of. And even though I put my characters on an emotional rollercoaster, there is always a happy outcome. I want a story, whether one of my own or someone else's, to leave me with a good feeling. I'm not genre-specific in what I write or read. To date, I've published three contemporary romances and a humorous adventure novel. If it's a good story, I don't care if it's a romance or western or sci-fi/fantasy. I just finished reading Nora Roberts' dystopian series Chronicles of the OneI'm a huge Stephen King fan, especially his Dark Tower series and Christine, and Whiskey When We're Dry, by John Larison, knocked my socks off!

What can readers expect from Cindy Hiday next?

My current work-in-progress, Come Snowfall, takes place in 1880's eastern Oregon and is about a twelve-year-old girl who discovers how far she's willing to go to save her family. My husband and I went camping near Baker City last summer to research the area where my story begins, near the Elkhorns and Wallowas, and we visited the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center. It's beautiful country, and it has been fascinating to learn about the history of that era, the pioneering west. I hope to have the book finished by the end of the year.

Who inspires you in your life?

Resilient people. People who find the silver lining or a solution to a challenging situation. People who don't know the meaning of the word "can't"; And kind people. Something as simple as a smile from a stranger can brighten my entire day.

Para ver esta información en inglés, haga clic en Meal resources for families. To see this information in English, click Meal resources for families.

Aquí puede encontrar información de los distritos escolares, agencias y restaurantes que sabemos que están ayudando a la comunidad. Para ver la información de esa página en español u otro idioma en la computadora o un dispositivo móvil, por favor haga clic en la esquina superior derecha donde dice “Select language” y busque su idioma preferido.

Actualizaremos nuevamente según sea necesario, pero por favor confirme la disponibilidad de comidas a través de los enlaces que se comparten a continuación o llame al número de teléfono de la organización.

Distritos escolares del condado de Multnomah

Los distritos escolares del condado de Multnomah siguen proporcionando asistencia alimentaria durante el verano. El Sistema de Servicios SUN también tiene información sobre el acceso a los alimentos.

Hemos hecho todo lo posible para proporcionar información actualizada. Por favor, confirme la disponibilidad de comidas a través de los enlaces compartidos a continuación.

Centennial [actualizado 06/10/2022]

La despensa de alimentos SUN en Parklane Elementary, 15811 SE Main St., Portland, está abierta los viernes desde el mediodía hasta las 13:30 horas. Pase por allí para tener acceso a alimentos frescos y saludables para su familia para 3 a 5 días. Por favor, traiga sus propias bolsas. No se requiere identificación o materiales de verificación de ingresos. ¡Todos son bienvenidos!

La despensa de alimentos en la escuela primaria Patrick Lynch, 1546 SE 169th Pl., está abierta al público los miércoles de 16:30 a 17:30 horas.

Food 4 Families tendrá distribución de alimentos el segundo y cuarto miércoles de cada mes (excepto marzo 2023), durante el año escolar, en Centennial High School, 3505 SE 182nd Ave, Gresham, 97030. De 16:00 a 17:00 horas. Haga clic aquí para ver las fechas de distribución.

 

David Douglas [actualizado 12/01/2023] 

Hay distribución de comida en los siguientes edificios escolares de David Douglas. La comida para las familias pueden recoger comestibles gratis, no son comidas preparadas para llevar. Puede hacer clic en este enlace para ver el calendario que muestra las horas y los cierres.

  • Floyd Light Middle: 10800 SE Washington St. Lunes, de 3:30 P.M. a 4:30 P.M.
  • Escuela primaria Cherry Park: 1930 SE 104th Ave. Lunes, de 3:45 p.m. a 5:15 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Earl Boyles: 10822 SE Bush St. Martes, de 4:00 p.m. a 5:30 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Mill Park: 1900 SE 117th Ave. Martes, de 4:00 p.m. a 5:30 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Gilbert Park: 13132 SE Ramona St. Miércoles, de 4:00 p.m. a 5:30 p.m.
  • Primaria de Menlo Park: 12900 NE Glisan St. Jueves, de 2:00 p.m. a 4:00 p.m.
  • David Douglas High, Campus Sur: 1500 SE 130th Ave. Jueves, de 3:30 p.m. a 5:00 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Gilbert Heights: 12839 SE Holgate Blvd. Viernes, de 9:45 a.m. a 10:45 a.m.

 

Gresham-Barlow [actualizado 12/01/2023]

Haga clic en este enlace para obtener información sobre recursos de comidas.

  • East Gresham Elementary: 900 SE 5th St., Gresham. Martes, desde las 14:30 hasta las 16:30 horas. Cajas de comida.
  • Highland Elementary: 295 NE 24th St., Gresham. Segundo miércoles del mes, desde las 15:00 hasta las 17:00 horas.
     

Puede encontrar más información sobre las cajas de alimentos de la comunidad en The Sunshine Division y Snowcap Community Charities.

Parkrose [actualizado 06/10/2022]

Hay despensas de alimentos en las siguientes escuelas (haga clic en el enlace para ver los cierres):

Portland [actualizado 22/08/22]

Hay despensas de alimentos en las siguientes escuelas. Por favor, haga clic en el enlace para comprobar la información de cierre.

  • Lent K-8: 5105 SE 97th Ave. Primer y tercer lunes, de 15:15 a 16:45 horas.
  • Harrison Park K-8: 2225 SE 87th Ave. Segundo y cuarto lunes, de 13:30 a 15:00 horas.
  • Jefferson High: 5210 N Kerby Ave. Los martes, excepto el último martes del mes, de 15:00 a 16:30 horas.
  • Lane Middle: 7200 SE 60th Ave. Martes, de 15:30 a 17:30 horas.
  • Kelly Elementary: 9015 SE Rural St. Miércoles, de 12:00 a 13:30 horas.
  • Woodlawn K-5: 7200 NE 11th Ave. Miércoles, de 16:30 a 18:00 horas.
  • Escuela primaria Rigler: 5401 NE Prescott St. Tercer miércoles del mes, de 15:30 a 17:00 horas.
  • McDaniel High: 2735 NE 82nd Ave. Viernes, de 14:00 a 16:00 horas.
  • Sitton Elementary: 9930 N Smith St. Primer viernes del mes, de 14:00 a 15:30 horas.
  • Roosevelt High: 6941 N Central St. Segundo y cuarto viernes, de 16:00 a 17:30 horas.
  • Bridger K-5: 7910 SE Market St. Tercer viernes del mes, de 15:00 a 17:00 horas.
     

Reynolds [actualizado 08/09/2022]

Las despensas de alimentos se encuentran en las siguientes escuelas. Haga clic aquí para obtener más información.

  • Escuela primaria Glenfair: 15300 NE Glisan St. Martes, de 12:00 p.m. a 1:30 p.m.
  • Reynolds High: 1698 SW Cherry Park Rd., Troutdale. Último martes del mes, a las 2:30 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Alder: 17200 SE Alder St. Miércoles de 2:30 p.m. a 4:00 p.m.
  • Reynolds Middle: 1200 NE 201st Ave., Fairview. Viernes de 4:00 p.m. a 5:30 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Wilkes: 17020 NE Wilkes Rd. Primer viernes del mes, de 3:00 p.m. a 4:30 p.m.
  • Escuela primaria Davis: 19501 NE Davis St. 2º viernes del mes, de 3:30 p.m. a 5:00 p.m.
  • H.B. Lee Middle: 1121 NE 172nd Ave. Llame al 503-255-5686 para obtener información sobre el acceso a la despensa de alimentos
  • Walt Morey Middle: 2801 SW Lucas Ave., Troutdale. Llame al 503-810-9604 para obtener información sobre el acceso a la despensa de alimentos

 

Agencias y organizaciones [actualizado 08/09/2022]

La información puede cambiar, por lo que le rogamos que compruebe las páginas web si se proporciona un enlace.

Despensa C3 (NE): 6120 NE 57th Ave., Portland. Los martes, las puertas se abren a las 11:30am, las compras son de 12-1pm.

Crossroads Food Bank (NE): 2505 NE 102nd Ave., Portland. Jueves de 9 a.m. a mediodía y sábados de 10 a.m. a mediodía.

Faithful Savior Lutheran Church (NE): 11100 NE Skidmore St., Portland. Despensa de alimentos el sábado 15 de octubre de 13:00 a 15:00 horas.

Despensa de alimentos de Mainspring:  Sugieren seguirlos en las redes sociales para ver las ubicaciones.  Sus actuales despensas de alimentos gratuitas se encuentran en:

  • Dawson Park, 1 N Stanton St. Todos los primeros martes de 10 a 12 horas
  • Victory Outreach, 16022 SE Stark St. Cada tercer martes de 10 a 12 horas
  • East Portland Community Center, 740 SE 106th Ave. Todos los segundos miércoles de 9 a 11 horas
     

Meals 4 Kids: atiende a niños y familias que reúnen los requisitos necesarios dentro de la ciudad de Portland. Visite su sitio web para completar un formulario de solicitud.

Programa de Alimentos de Emergencia del Noreste (NE): 4800 NE 72nd Ave., Portland. Abierto los jueves y sábados, de 10:30 a 13:30. Las cajas de alimentos se preparan con antelación para recogerlas a pie o en coche.

Iglesia Metodista Unida de Parkrose (NE): 11111 NE Knott St., Portland. Despensa de alimentos abierta el segundo y cuarto sábado del mes de 10 a.m. a 1 p.m., y el primer y tercer miércoles del mes de 4:00 p.m. a 6:00 p.m.

Servicios Comunitarios Adventistas de Portland (NE): 11020 NE Halsey St., Portland. Ofrecen cajas de comida preempacadas para recoger, de lunes a viernes de 9am a 11am. También ofrecen un servicio de despensa móvil para algunos barrios.

Despensa de alimentos One Hope (NE): Situado en el 5425 NE 27th Ave., Portland 97211. Abierto para conducir y recoger los sábados, 11 am - 1 pm. Las cajas de alimentos están disponibles cada semana y se sirve una comida caliente los segundos y cuartos sábados.

Sunshine Division (SE): cajas de alimentos de emergencia gratuitas para recoger o entregar. Se encuentran en 12436 SE Stark St, Portland, OR 97233. Para conocer el horario y más información, visite sunshinedivision.org o llame al 503.609.0285.

William Temple House (NW): 2023 NW Hoyt St., Portland. Ofrece una despensa sin cita previa, de martes a jueves, de 11 a 14 horas. Una guía de la despensa se encuentra aquí (en inglés).

Lift Urban Portland (SW):  Situado en 1838 SW Jefferson St., Portland 97201. El horario de funcionamiento de la despensa es los martes, jueves y viernes, de 15:00 a 18:00 horas. Se realiza un sorteo de números al azar 5 minutos antes de la apertura para determinar su lugar en la fila.

Despensa de alimentos de Portland Open Bible (SE):  Ubicada en 3223 SE 92nd Ave., Portland 97266. Recogida de cajas de alimentos, la información se puede encontrar aquí. Los horarios de la despensa son los martes de 5:00 p.m. a 7:00 p.m. y los jueves de 10:00 a.m. a 1:00 p.m. También puede hacer un pedido en línea.

St. Johns Food Share (N): 8100 N Lombard St., Portland 97203. Despensa de alimentos abierta los lunes y viernes, de 10 a 16 h.

Para obtener más información sobre el acceso a los alimentos para las familias, incluido el Banco de Alimentos de Oregón, llame al 211, o envíe un mensaje de texto con las palabras "FOOD" o "COMIDA" al 877-877 para conocer las ubicaciones de Meals. o visite oregonfoodfinder.org.

Self Enhancement Inc también tiene una lista de recursos alimentarios de la comunidad que incluye sitios en los condados de Multnomah, Clackamas, Washingon y Yamhill en Oregón y las escuelas del área de Vancouver, WA. Haga clic en el enlace y desplácese hacia abajo a los recursos alimentarios.

Partners for a Hunger-free Oregon (SE)

Consulte también esta guía de recursos para el acceso a los alimentos elaborada por el congresista Earl Blumenauer (OR-03) y su equipo.

Guía para aprendizaje en casa.

Las escuelas están cerradas, la biblioteca está cerrada y las fechas de juego se cancelan. ¿Cómo mantendrá a sus hijos activos, comprometidos y aprendiendo? ¿Cómo puedes encontrar un camino entre todos los sitios web y las ideas de redes sociales? 

La Biblioteca del Condado de Multnomah ofrece/tiene disponibles libros, bases de datos y transmisión de audio y video.

Recursos de aprendizaje

Conéctese a nuestra lista de recursos de aprendizaje para obtener enlaces para accesar a libros electrónicos, ayuda de tutoría, aprendizaje de idiomas como Mango Languages, revistas digitales y videos educativos disponibles a través de la Biblioteca del Condado de Multnomah.

Ideas de actividades

¿Necesita ideas para actividades? Overdrive Kids tiene libros electrónicos para aprender a cocinar, a tejer, doblar aviones de papel, hacer creaciones de Lego y algunos libros de chistes para que amplíe su repertorio de chistes contados

Películas y espectáculos ilimitados

Visite Kanopy y haga clic en Kanopy Kids a la derecha de la barra superior para ver una selección de películas y programas para niños en edad preescolar hasta secundaria. Kanopy Kids ofrece videos ilimitados para que sus hijos sean libres de explorar contenido educativo y entretenido.

Cómics y novelas gráficas

Para su lector de cómics y novelas gráficas, Hoopla tiene un modo infantil con Garfield, Nate the Great, Phoebe y su unicornio, y una selección de libros por autores Latinoamericanos . Hoopla también tiene música y películas para toda la familia.

Aprendizaje en el hogar

Para obtener enlaces a información sobre educación en el hogar, excursiones virtuales, lectura, arte y ciencias, consulte las sugerencias del sitio web de Aprendizaje y participación en el hogar. 

Los edificios de la biblioteca pueden estar cerrados, pero su biblioteca es mucho más que un edificio y estamos aquí para ayudarlo.

Resources for older adults

Are you looking for resources and activities for older adults? Check out these great ideas from Library Outreach Services:

Scrabble pieces spelling "support"

 

Resources for caregivers of older adults

Are you a caregiver for an older adult? Find support and resources from these organizations:

  • Timeslips.org has free stories, images and audio to spark meaningful engagement with family members who have dementia. 
  • Aging and Disability Resource Connection is providing multilingual local support for caregivers and older adults. You can call or email ADRC at 503.988.3646 or adrc@multco.us  for 24-hour information and assistance to seniors, people with disabilities, and caregivers.
  • The Alzheimer's Association 24/7 help line (800.272.3900) is providing specialists and master’s-level clinicians to give confidential support and information to people living with Alzheimer’s, caregivers, families and the public.

Photo of a camera
You need a photo or an image for a project you’re working on. You need it fast. You don’t want to pay anything or get sued for copyright violation. Luckily, there are lots of sources on the Web for finding free-to-use images!

Some of these websites include images which are in the public domain (public domain = nobody owns the copyright). Others include images where the creator is giving up some of their copyright protection and allowing you to use their photos and artwork. However, the creator or website may have usage rules: for example, they might require you to tell people where the image came from and who made it. Before you copy or use any image, it’s a good idea to check for usage or licensing rules. 

ImageQuest - https://multcolib.org/resource/imagequest: ImageQuest is a library resource created by the Encyclopædia Britannica. It has millions of images that you can use for non-commercial purposes. The collection includes photos and clip art, and it allows you to sort results by shape (horizontal or vertical rectangle, or square). Information about creator and rights is provided for each image.

Creative Commons logo
Creative Commons Search - https://creativecommons.org: Creative Commons is an organization that helps people share content on the Web (photos, videos, writing, anything!) This webpage lets you search for images which have Creative Commons licenses. The licenses are like permission statements: they tell you what you are allowed to do with the image. 

Smithsonian Open Access - https://www.si.edu/openaccess/: The Smithsonian has created this site to provide access to millions of images from their museums, libraries, archives and the National Zoo. Every image is Creative Commons Zero (CC0), meaning that the Smithsonian has waived all of their rights under copyright. There is also a Smithsonian Learning Lab with information about the Open Access collection and ideas for how to use it.

Children reading a wireless newspaper
The Commons - https://www.flickr.com/commons: The Commons is a section of the photo-sharing website Flickr which provides access to images from public photography archives at museums and libraries around the world. It’s a great place to find historic photos, and everyone (including you!) is encouraged to add comments and tags to the images. The photos on this site have “no known copyright restrictions.”

Photo of a flower
Morgue File - https://morguefile.com/: A morgue file is a collection of past materials to use for future projects. In this particular online morgue file, you can find many high resolution stock photos.

Pixabay - https://pixabay.com/en/: Pixabay offers over 1.7 million royalty free stock photos and videos. 

Unsplashhttps://unsplash.com/: Over 1 million free, high-resolution photos shared by a huge online community of photographers. The Unsplash license gives you wide permission to use the images.

Scissors illustration

Are websites not your thing? Do you prefer books? The library has many books of illustrations and prints you can use, on all sorts of topics. To find them, just do a subject search in the library catalog for “clip art.” You’ll find books with images of Victorian women’s fashion, birds, children’s book illustrations, fairies and much more. At the end of this post is a book list showing examples of the types of clip art books that the library owns.

If you have trouble finding the images that you want, or if you have more questions about any of this, ask us for help! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.

Images included in this post:

Voluntaria destacada Gabby Delgado
por Jane Salisbury, voluntaria de MCL

Gaby Delgado ama a los niños. Todo en su vida refleja ese amor, inclusive su servicio durante los últimos tres años como asistente del programa con la Coordinadora de la Biblioteca Delia Palomeque Morales en el programa Listos para el Kínder (“Listos”). Listos es un programa para niños de habla hispana de tres a cinco años y sus padres. Las sesiones se llevan a cabo completamente en español, y los maestros enfatizan las habilidades de aprendizaje temprano, como la alfabetización y matemáticas tempranas, la autorregulación y las habilidades interpersonales. Se anima a los padres a que observen cómo sus hijos aprenden mejor y cómo generar confianza y conexiones con sus hijos a medida que crecen. Las familias de Listos con frecuencia se convierten en usuarios de la biblioteca.

Gaby fue maestra en Perú durante veinticinco años, donde trabajó con padres y niños pequeños, y realizó intervenciones tempranas con bebés. También enseñaba cómo dar masaje a bebés para ayudar a los padres a conectarse más profundamente con sus bebés.

Con su esposo y su hija Ximena, que ahora está en el último año de la escuela secundaria, Gaby fue a la Biblioteca de Gresham una vez a la semana para usar el Internet y hacer conexiones. Cuando vio un volante en la biblioteca sobre el programa Listos, pensó: "Esto es para mí".

Sobre su trabajo, Gaby dice: “Delia es excelente, es un ángel. En el programa Listos, trabajamos directamente con niños de 3 a 5 años, primero juntos y después los niños tienen su propio tiempo. Trabajamos en temas cosas como las letras, formas, colores, números y animamos interacciones positivas entre padres e hijos. Puedo aconsejar a los padres sobre cómo conectarse con sus hijos. Muchas familias son inmigrantes nuevos, quienes sólo hablan español y enfrentan muchos desafíos. Adoro trabajar con ellos”.

Gaby se crió en una familia en donde la lectura es valorada, pero las bibliotecas no eran iguales a como son aquí en Estados Unidos. Explica Gaby, “Las bibliotecas en Perú son muy diferentes; son académicas, silenciosas y solo se puede retirar en préstamo uno o dos libros. Estar en la biblioteca aquí es como estar en casa con la familia de uno”.

Toda la familia de Gaby participa en la biblioteca. Ximena es voluntaria en el program de Lectura de Verano, y el esposo de Gaby ha tomado clases de inglés en la biblioteca y gracias a eso ahora trabaja para Hacienda CDC.

Actualmente Gaby está volviendo a leer libros sobre masaje para bebés, preparándose para hacer algunos talleres sobre masajes y apego. Cuando le pregunté cuál fue su libro favorito de la infancia, Gaby dijo El Principito de Antoine Saint-Exupery. También disfruta de la poesía y los textos de Gabriel García-Márquez. Pero lo más importante para ella es el poema que dijo de memoria mientras estábamos sentadas en la biblioteca, porque refleja su propia experiencia y su profundo amor por los niños. El poema es “Tristitia” del gran poeta peruano de principios del siglo XX, Abraham Valdolemar. Las palabras la acompañaron durante toda su infancia y la ayudaron a cambiar su propia historia.

I’m excited to share Multnomah County Library’s 2018 Equity and Inclusion Report. This report highlights the notable progress the library has made during calendar year 2018 toward its equity and inclusion goals. 

This report includes:

  • Updates from library groups focused on bringing culturally-informed library services and support to Black communities and non-English speaking communities;
  • Highlights of projects and programming that connect and support families, youth and teens;
  • Spotlights on the library’s work to bring library services outside library walls;
  • Expanded efforts to train and support library staff on equity and inclusion; 
  • And so much more! 

We know we have a long way to go, but we are committed to ensuring that this library system represents and serves everyone in our community.

If you have comments or questions about this report, please contact us

Sonja Ervin
Equity and Inclusion Manager
Multnomah County Library
 

Here are some questions to consider when reading Tommy Orange's There There.

1. The prologue provides a historical overview of how Native populations were systematically stripped of their identity, rights, land, etc. by colonialist forces in America. How does the prologue set the tone for the reader? Discuss the use of the Indian head as iconography. How does this relate to the erasure of Native identity in American culture?

2.  "Getting us to cities was supposed to be the final, necessary step in our assimilation, absorption, erasure, the completion of a five-hundred-year-old genocidal campaign. But the city made us new, and we made it ours."

Discuss the development of the “Urban Indian” identity and ownership of that label. How does it relate to the push for assimilation by the United States government? How do the characters navigate this modern form of identity alongside their ancestral roots?

3. Consider the following statement from page 9: “We stayed because the city sounds like a war, and you can’t leave a war once you’ve been, you can only keep it at bay.” In what ways does the historical precedent for violent removal of Native populations filter into the modern era? How does violence—both internal and external—appear throughout the narrative? How has violent removal of Native populations contributed to contemporary white privilege?

4. On page 7, Orange states: “We’ve been defined by everyone else and continue to be slandered despite easy-to-look-up-on-the-internet facts about the realities of our histories and current state as a people.” Discuss this statement in relation to how Native populations have been defined in popular culture. How do the characters resist the simplification and flattening of their cultural identity? Relate the idea of preserving cultural identity to Dene Oxendene’s storytelling mission.

5. The occupation of Alcatraz is often romanticized in history, but for many, the reality was very stressful and traumatic. Describe the resettlement efforts at Alcatraz. What were the goals for inhabiting this land? What vision did Opal and Jacquie’s mother have for her family in moving to Alcatraz? What were the realities they experienced? For background, take a look at the video "We Hold the Rock" about the occupation of Alcatraz.

6. On page 58, Opal’s mother tells her that she needs to honor her people “by living right, by telling our stories. [That] the world was made of stories, nothing else, and stories about stories.” How does this emphasis on storytelling function throughout There There? Consider the relationship between storytelling and power. How does storytelling allow for diverse narratives to emerge? What is the relationship between storytelling and historical memory?

7. On page 77, Edwin Black asserts, “The problem with Indigenous art in general is that it’s stuck in the past.” How does the tension between modernity and tradition emerge throughout the narrative? Which characters seek to find a balance between honoring the past and looking toward the future? When is the attempt to do so successful?

8. How is the city of Oakland characterized in the novel? How does the city’s gentrification affect the novel’s characters and their attitudes toward home and stability?

9. Discuss the Interlude that occurs on pages 134–41. What is the importance of this section? How does it provide key contextual information for the Big Oakland PowWow that occurs at the end of the novel? What is the author trying to say about historical violence, mass shootings and America's relationship with firearms in general?

10. Examine the use of unchecked technology. i.e. 3D printing guns, drones, internet addiction, social media, etc. How does this tie into urban Native identity? How does this tie into larger societal issues?

Bonus Questions: What was the most surprising element of the novel to you? What was its moment of greatest impact?

Library security officer Martin
On a typical day at Rockwood Library, you might find Library Safety Officer (LSO) Martin Clark asking patrons about their day or hanging out with teens in the Rockwood makerspace. While Martin is tasked with ensuring patrons follow library rules, his efforts center on building positive relationships with people and helping everyone use the library safely.

Driven by a desire to serve his community, Martin entered a police cadet program through the Gresham Police Department, prior to joining Multnomah County. He also worked for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). That job helped him learn to talk to many different people every day and to understand complex security procedures.

Martin first worked at library branches while working as a facility security officer (FSO) with the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Department. He welcomed the library’s approach to safety and security and decided to join the library officially as a safety officer at Rockwood Library. Having grown up in the Rockwood community, Martin already felt a close tie to the neighborhood.

In 2016, Multnomah County Library added safety officers at some locations. Martin and the other safety officers are library staff, not police officers or security guards. They help patrons use the library successfully and apply the library rules. They also connect people with outside services and resources. Some safety officers also assist with shelving and other tasks.

With the Rockwood makerspace only a few years old, Rockwood Library has worked hard to find new and better ways to serve youth. Martin sees his position no differently. 

Martin’s approach to safety and security includes finding ways to help patrons use the library without being punitive. 

“I enjoy building relationships with patrons so when they come in the library and see me, they have a positive experience, rather than thinking they’re going to be followed around. I want everyone to feel welcome.” 

Martin works to build relationships with the youth and adult patrons who use the library. Rockwood library is bustling after school, with many teens making use of Multnomah County’s only free makerspace. While the small library can get busy, Martin’s compassionate approach has helped decrease incidents, particularly among youth. 

“For some, the library is a place of safety from other outside pressures or difficult personal situations,” says Martin. “Whatever their reason for being here, I want to help them use and stay at the library, which sometimes means needing to communicate the library’s expectations for conduct in the library.”

Having experienced some of the same challenges as the youth patrons at Rockwood Library, Martin knows firsthand what his life would have been like without a caring adult in it. He sees his position as a way to pay it forward to the community.

“The best ability is your availability,” says Martin.

People notice Martin’s contributions to the library. As one patron commented, 

“. . .Martin is such a great and exceptional asset to "our family library" here at Rockwood. It is great to see someone that is always smiling and he just makes our trips to the library an all-around general excellent experience. Not to mention that he is very, very helpful... Thank you for hiring such an individual as him.”
 

Each year the Portland Book Festival, presented by the Bank of America, brings thousands of readers to the Southwest Park Blocks for a day-long celebration of all things reading. Needless to say, we're big fans.

MK Reed's Wild Weather

To call attention to any one author inevitably leaves out a stellar line-up - who doesn't want to see Malcolm Gladwell and Rainbow Rowell? But there's so many quality events to choose from, so here are top picks.

Would it be too self-centered to say that we're so looking forward to seeing our library moderators in action? Elleona Budd, Natasha Forrester CampbellLanel JacksonEbonee Bell, Eduardo Arizaga and Alicia Tate will be moderating talks on everything from science comics to dark magic in fantasy.

We're looking forward to hearing from Saeed Jones about his new memoir, How We Fight for Our Lives. David Treuer's Heartbeat of Wounded Knee has made it to the top of many of our reading lists.  Mira Jacobs's graphic memoir Good Talk, about interracial families made it to the top of many library staff lists. And we'd like to hear how cartoonist and animator Graham Annable expresses his love for slots and hockey, when he isn't writing. Romance readers among us have been eagerly awaiting more from Jasmine Guillory, “the queen of contemporary romance” (OprahMag.com). Our teen librarians have long been fans of Gabby Rivera's Juliet Takes a Breath. We're looking forward to the pop-up events, among them Theodore Van Alst reading from his linked short stories, Sacred Smokes. 

We're also excited to hear home town heroes, Renée Watson, Carson Ellis, Mitchell S. Jackson, ... drat! Why did we limit ourselves to only 10? 

And that doesn't even take into account Friday night's Lit Crawl -- the Poetry Karaoke looks especially intriguing.

Take a look at the festival event site and go hang out with book lovers all day long. It's the best time, and we hope to see you there.

Multnomah County Library operates on a set of pillars and priorities based on input from the community it serves. This library system is accountable to its taxpayers and patrons, offering programs, services and resources that reflect this community’s values.

The public library is based on the ideal that our collective resources and knowledge should be freely accessible and open to everyone. This library strives to live up to that ideal by lifting up people and communities that have been historically excluded, marginalized and discriminated against.

In representing the diversity of our community, this library will offer materials and viewpoints some people may find offensive. When outside voices seek to shame or pressure Multnomah County Library into conforming to standards other than those in our own community, we will not be cowed.

Multnomah County Library will continue to offer materials, services and programs that acknowledge and celebrate the value of the LGBTQ+ community, immigrants and refugees, people who speak a language other than English, Black and African American people, Native and indigenous people, and all others who have been systematically oppressed. We will evolve and expand that work over time as our community’s values dictate.

La siguiente información es un recurso para inmigrantes y refugiados sobre sus derechos como individuos y la aplicación de leyes migratorias. Esta lista es solamente un comienzo; si necesitas más información, por favor contacta a la biblioteca.   

La biblioteca cuenta con listas de libros que podrían ayudarte y en los que se discute la experiencia de inmigrantes para personas de todas las edades y niveles de lectura.   

La siguiente lista será actualizada con frecuencia; por favor revisa constantemente para obtener la información más reciente.
ACTUALIZADA 11/19

Recursos disponibles para conocer tus derechos

Las personas no ciudadanas que viven en los Estados Unidos — sin importar su situación migratoria — por lo general tienen los mismos derechos constitucionales que los ciudadanos cuando las autoridades policiales las paran, cuestionan, arrestan o buscan en sus hogares. - ACLU

Folletos informativos de ACLU:
Inglés, ruso, español         

Tarjeta informativa sobre Conociendo tus Derechos:
Inglés, somalí, vietnamita, chino, español, ruso, árabe

Conoce tus derechos – Información sobre discriminación anti-islámica:
Inglés, árabe, urdupersaespañol

Aplicaciones móviles:
Mobile Justice: aplicación de ACLU que contiene la tarjeta informativa sobre Conociendo tus Derechos y tiene la capacidad para reportar incidentes a ACLU en tiempo real por medio de un video.
MiConsular MEX: aplicación creada por la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE) del gobierno mexicano que permite a las personas de nacionalidad mexicana encontrar el consulado más cercano a ellas y que llamen o envíen un texto en caso de emergencia.   
Cell 411: aplicación que permite a los usuarios publicar y responder a emergencias provenientes de familiares, amigos y vecinos en tiempo real.  
Notifica: La aplicación que te ayuda a estar preparado contra la deportación. Usa Notifica para prepararte, informarte y actuar si estás en riesgo de ser detenido por agentes migratorios.

Aplicación de leyes migratorias:
Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas de los Estados Unidos (ICE, por sus siglas en inglés): encuentra a una persona detenida o un centro de detención, además de información de contacto.

Los testigos de actividades de ICE pueden reportarlas a la línea telefónica sobre inmigración de ACLU de Oregón por medio de un texto o llamada al 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

Para acciones alrededor de Portland, puedes contactar a la línea telefónica de la Coalición para los Derechos de Inmigrantes de Portland (PIRC, por sus siglas en inglés) al 1-888-622-1510.
Inglés y español

Plan para Preparación de la Familia:
Inglés español

Recursos legales de bajo costo para inmigrantes provee una lista de organizaciones sin fines de lucro que pueden asistir a las personas con problemas migratorios.

Directorio de Servicios Culturales del Condado Multnomah provee una lista de organizaciones sin fines de lucro, grupos religiosos y programas del gobierno que sirven a los inmigrantes y refugiados en el área metropolitana de Portland.

Datos sobre la carga publica

Español, inglés

Seminario web (grabación)

Español, inglés

**Ultimas noticias del 15 de Octubre, 2019: Jueces federales han parado que entre en efecto la nueva Regla de Carga Publica a través del país. Esto significa que la nueva regla no comenzara el 15 de Octubre, 2019 y que las leyes de carga publica no han cambiado en los Estados Unidos.**

Información sobre DACA/Soñadores  

Herramientas y Guía de Recursos de DACA:
Inglés

Organizaciones locales

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR)
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice
1704 NE 43rd Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
503-550-3510

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Oficinas consulares

Consulado Mexicano de Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulado de El Salvador en Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Consulado Honorario Guatemalteco  
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Oficina Consular de Japón en Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

The following information is a resource for immigrants and refugees on individual rights and immigration enforcement. This list is a start; if you require further information please contact the library.

The library has helpful booklists that discuss the immigrant experience for all ages and reading levels.

The following list will be updated frequently; please check back for the most current information.
(List Updated 04/2022)

Know Your Rights Resources

Non-citizens who are in the United States — no matter what their immigration status — generally have the same constitutional rights as citizens when law enforcement officers stop, question, arrest, or search them or their homes. ACLU

ACLU Information Pamphlets:
EnglishRussianSpanish 

Know Your Rights Information Card:
EnglishSomaliVietnameseChineseSpanishRussianArabic

Know Your Rights- Anti-Muslim Discrimination Information:
EnglishArabicUrduFarsiSpanish

Mobile Apps:
Mobile Justice: ACLU app with Know Your Rights Information card, ability to report incidents to the ACLU in real time with video capability.
MiConsular MEX: App created by the Mexican Government’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs (SRE) that allows Mexican nationals to locate their nearest consulate and either text or call them in an emergency.
Cell 411: App that allows the user to issue and respond to emergencies from family, friends and neighbors in real time.
Notifica: App which allows undocumented immigrants to activate a plan if they come in contact with immigration law enforcement authorities or find themselves at risk of being detained.

Immigration Enforcement:
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): Find a detainee or detention center, and general contact information.

Witnesses to ICE activity can report it to the ACLU of Oregon's immigration hotline via text or call 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

For actions around Portland, you may contact the Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition (PIRC) hotline at
1-888-622-1510.
Poster in Spanish (English poster not available)

Family Preparedness Plan: 
English and Spanish

Low-cost legal resources for immigrants provides a list of nonprofit organizations that can assist people with immigration issues.

Multnomah County Cultural Services Directory provides a list of nonprofits, faith groups and government programs that serve immigrants and refugees in the Portland Metro area.


Public Charge

 Public Charge Fact Sheet
ChineseEnglish, Russian, SomaliSpanish, Vietnamese

Public Charge Webinar
English, Spanish

**​Update: As of January 27, 2020, the new Public Charge rule is no longer blocked. The new rule went into effect on February 24th, 2020. Check back here often for on-going updates about public charge.

DACA/Dreamers Information

DACA Toolkit 
This toolkit was created by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) to help inform DACA recipients about their rights as well as how other community members can support DACA recipients during these challenging times.

Local Organizations

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest 
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR) 
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice
1704 NE 43rd Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
503-550-3510

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Consular Offices

Mexican Consulate of Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulate of El Salvador in Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Guatemalan Honorary Consulate
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Consular Office of Japan in Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

Elleona Budd, Library Assistant
“The library is a place where anyone can foster creative ideas,” says Elleona Budd, a Black Cultural Library Advocate and Library Assistant at Central Library.

Elleona, who identifies as non-binary, has been learning various parts of library work — everything from helping regular patrons at the St. Johns Library find titles, to leading outreach work in the Black community — for the past three years.

Elleona joined the library as an access services assistant after graduating from Lincoln High School in downtown Portland. As a student, they gravitated toward history and language courses, including learning Spanish, Korean, Mandarin and Arabic. Elleona’s rigorous academic curriculum continues, as they pursue a degree at Portland State University in International Relations and Conflict Resolution, with a minor in Chinese.

“When I first started my job at the library, I hadn’t been back in eight years! I had so many fines from my youth and had been worried I wouldn’t be able to use anything so I avoided it. I happily learned that the library had waived all youth fines and started a new policy so that no youth would accrue fines going forward.”

Today, Elleona, who says they originally loved the idea of working at a library because of a love for books and working with people, now appreciates it because they have an opportunity to help people feel welcome and to connect patrons with library services and resources

“One experience that was very meaningful for me was connecting with a patron who had recently been incarcerated,” said Elleona. “The library was one of her first stops. She wanted help finding career resources, and I was able to listen and talk with her, but also recommend materials in addition to other services the library offers. She told me the experience was so positive and had helped her feel welcome to come back.”

Now, as a Black Cultural Library Advocate, Elleona is joining other staff from around the library to identify ways to improve collections and services for the Black community. Sometimes, that means creating library displays featuring poetry by queer and trans people of color. Other times, it means organizing large-scale events to provide opportunities for discussion about topics such as the African diaspora.

“I want to help start conversations. I want everyone to walk into a library and think ‘this is a place for me.’” says Elleona.

Elleona’s recommended reading:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Clean Room by Gail Simone

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

Katie Grindeland is the author of The Gifts We Keep, a selection from The Library Writers Project, which highlights local self-published authors. In an innovative partnership, Ooligan Press worked with the library to publish this novel about an Oregon family struggling with past tragedy while caring for a Native Alaskan girl with sorrows of her own.

Reading with friends? Start the conversation with this book summary and discussion guide.

Why did you want to tell this particular story?

I have always been a very character-driven writer, so I was excited at the prospect of diving into first-person emotional exploration with a somewhat diverse group of people. It was really important to me to try and give voice to their internal experience since we don’t always have a platform for that in our put-together grown-up lives. Big feelings, authenticity, connection, these were pillars for me. Not just as words on a page, but as an open-handed gesture to the reader’s experience as well. If someone reads this story and feels emotionally seen or included, I would consider that my biggest success.

Who or what inspires you, writing wise? Who inspires you in your life?

I am always inspired by those really good writers who make you stop in your tracks, by virtue of how purely they can weave a phrase or present an idea. The kind where I have to put the book down to stare at nothing and just think for a few minutes. Yann Martel and Marilynne Robinson and Jonathan Safran Foer and Barbara Kingsolver. But I also really love the writer who just wants to borrow your ear for a minute to tell a cool story they know. Lynda Barry and Stephen King and Cheryl Strayed and Diane Ackerman. These and so many more. Outside of writing, hard workers inspire me. Nose-to-the-grindstoners inspire me. Bad-at-something-but-trying-it-anyway inspires me. I find a lot of bravery in authenticity. And kindness. Kind-hearted people are secret super heroes and they don’t even know it. That inspires me.

Can you recommend a book you've recently enjoyed?

All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. It undid me, in all the best ways. Beautiful, meaningful, incandescent. I read much of this by headlamp on a solo camping trip near The Dalles, listening to trains run by in the dark, simply because I couldn’t put it down. I also love “S”, by Doug Dorst and J.J. Abrams. It's a novel within a novel, filled with miscellanies that fall out of the book into your lap if you aren’t careful, postcards, notes, photos -- all of which may or may not be clues to unraveling the story. Plus, if you’re anything like me, it will have you spouting about the Ship of Theseus paradox to friends and family, whose reception may be lukewarm in comparison to your enthusiasm for the idea!

Liza Dyer

For those interested in volunteering their time and expertise at the library, Volunteer Coordinator Liza Dyer works diligently as a “matchmaker,” pairing people with the volunteer position and library location that best aligns with their interests and skills. 

“Volunteer services is all about the people,” says Liza. “We recruit, onboard and orient people to what we do at the library, a human resources department for library volunteers.”

In her role, Liza supports the library’s 2000 annual volunteers, along with more than 100 library staff across Multnomah County who work directly with volunteers.  

With her colleagues, Liza interviews incoming volunteers to learn about what they like to do, their work styles, and their goals for volunteering. She works hard to ensure that each volunteer is matched with a role that will be meaningful for them. 
“We want to make sure the experience is amazing for both our staff and volunteers. When we have everyone working together towards our shared goals it makes us a stronger library system.”

Library volunteers help with everything from shelving books and fulfilling holds to teaching computer literacy classes and delivering books to homebound patrons. As library services evolve, so does volunteer services. 

“We all are in this together. Whether it’s a staff person who is in every day and getting paid or a volunteer coming in two hours once per week, we’re extending the impact for the greater community,” Liza adds. 

Staying true to her passion for volunteering, Liza also gives of her time to local and national organizations, including the Council for Certification in Volunteer Administration, the Northwest Oregon Volunteer Administrators Association, and the Nonprofit Technology Network. 

Learn more about volunteering with Multnomah County Library.

Multnomah County Library now offers caregiver kits for those caring for people with Alzheimer's or other dementias. Anyone can get a kit by placing a hold online

Caregiver kits contents - cooking tools
In the kits:

Every themed kit contains multisensory items. For example, the gardening kit has seeds, tools and books. The cooking kit has kitchen items and cookbooks from the 1950s. The themes are designed to stimulate conversations and bring back happy memories.

A caregiving resource kit contains books about dementia and self-care resources. It’s available in English and Spanish.

Why caregiver kits for dementia?

  • The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's disease is growing fast. Because of the increasing number of people age 65 and older in the United States, the number of new cases of Alzheimer's dementia and other dementias is projected to soar. 
  • One in 10 people age 65 and older has Alzheimer's dementia.
  • African Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer's or other dementias as older whites.
  • Hispanics are about one and one-half times as likely to have Alzheimer's or other dementias as older whites.

Alzheimer's takes a devastating toll on caregivers. Compared with caregivers of people without dementia, twice as many caregivers of people with dementia indicate substantial emotional, financial and physical difficulties. Additionally, a recent community survey by Multnomah County Aging, Disability and Veterans Services Division revealed high needs for caregiver resources.

Community partners

The library received input on the kits from many community partners including Multnomah County Aging, Disability and Veterans Services, Alzheimer’s Association support groups, PSU Institute on Aging, OHSU Layton Aging and Alzheimer's Disease Center, SAGE Metro Portland (LGBT Elders), Q Center, Friendly House, and the Multicultural Senior Center. 

Caregivers kit bag - exterior shot
For more information

Contact Library Outreach Services at 503.988.5404.

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