Blogs

1001 Inventions and The Library of Secrets - starring Sir Ben Kingsley as Al-Jazari

The Golden Age of Islam spanned from the mid 8th to the mid 13th century A. D., although recent scholars have extended it into the 15th and 16th centuries. It encompasses the life of the prophet Mohammad and the beginnings of the Islamic religion. Islamic culture in Europe also influenced Western civilization. The Golden Age of Islamic Culture included many innovations in science, medicine, mathematics, astronomy ,Hindu-Arabic numerals, and words. It was a time of inventions and exploration by land and sea. The Golden Age ended with the siege of Baghdad in 1258 A.D. and with the rise of religious dogma, discussed here by Steven Weinberg and Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Summer reading habits

I was in Don Quixote by Cervantes so long, I lost the plot a bit.

 

 Listening to  anti-war protest songs  first  sparked my curiosity about the Vietnam War. As a 12 year old eighth grader, I thought I could learn  the world’s wisdom from the words of a song.  Songs like  The Unknown Soldier by the Doors with its realistic  gunshot sounds and tragic  imagry;  Saigon Bride by Joan Baez, Pete Seeger’s Bring Em Home,and I ain’ Marching Anymore by Phil Ochs.  Songs  about the injustice, insanity and cruelty of the Vietnam War.

 I heard adults talking about protecting Democracy by fighting Communism.  More and more the strange place word 'Vietnam' was spoken.  Then my Uncle Paul was drafted. He went to fight at that place I could hardly find on the map.

 When my Uncle came back he was silent and enclosed as if he’d been to visit the moon.  Once he told me he’d seen some pretty bad  things  there but didn’t tell me what they were.  I didn’t have to use my imagination much- it was all on the CBS news now- real soldiers, real Vietnamese people, real pain, real death.

When the war ended on April 30, 1975, I was working at the Central Library downtown.  Church bells rang and we jumped up and down and cheered.  Later though, we were quiet , remembering... still wondering- was Vietnam a ‘good’ or a ‘bad’ war?

Like myself, Ken Burns grew up wondering about the Vietnam war. He labored  ten long  years to make a documentary that might help to  make sense of the Vietnam War by bringing us “something extrordinarily powerful..”  -the stories, music and experiences of the soldiers and civilians- on both sides of the war.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

THE VIETNAM WAR is a ten-part, 18-hour documentary film series directed by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. Part one airs Sunday September 17 at 9:00 on PBS.                                                                  

After watching, Ken Burn’s The Vietnam War, come to the Multnomah County Library  to learn more about it through special programs,  written material, music and more.

 

Must love books. And dogs.

Photo of Katie Patterson, library volunteer

by Sarah Binns 

Over the years writing for the Volunteer Spotlight I’ve met people who volunteer with the library because they are passionate about reading. I’ve met just as many people who volunteer because they are passionate about giving back to their community. This month, Katie Patterson became my first interviewee who is pursuing a degree in librarianship, in part because of her time volunteering at Hillsdale Library.

Katie grew up reading, but she only recently realized librarianship is in her future. After completing her undergraduate degree at Seattle University, Katie and her partner returned to Portland. Her partner then started an online Master of Library Science (MLS) program through Emporia State University. Intrigued, but wanting to explore her options, Katie decided to volunteer in both a first-grade classroom and at Hillsdale Library as their storytime assistant, facilitating their preschool storytime and book babies. “I got hooked on the library right away,” she says.

Every Monday morning Katie picks books to be read at Hillsdale’s storytime and helps the librarian oversee the event. “I love it,” she says. “It’s the highlight of my week.” She enjoys developing a relationship with the little ones and “watching them be excited about reading, it makes me hopeful.” Katie’s eyes light up when talking about Hillsdale and says she hopes to volunteer there as long as she can.

Another thing that makes her eyes light up? Talking about dogs. When not at the library Katie is a manager at Hair of the Dog, a dog grooming shop on Alberta. “I’ve worked with dogs for 12 years,” she says, “It’s my favorite thing.” She currently has too much on her plate for her own dog but hopes that will change.

As for librarianship, Katie started her MLS degree with Emporia a year ago. She’ll graduate with a youth services certificate with an eye to becoming a youth services librarian in Multnomah County. “That’s the dream,” she says with a smile. Here’s to a future full of books, babies, and dogs!


A few facts about Katie

Home library: Albina

Currently reading: She reads two YA novels a week for her YA literature class. “I’m starting Red Planet today.”

Most influential book: Heart of Darkness changed the way I think about literature. It’s so complex. The more I read, the more interesting it became.”

Favorite book from childhood: Bridge to Terabithia and Harriet the Spy.

Favorite browsing section: Picture books, when she can pick a book for storytime.

Guilty pleasure: Hunger Games.

Book that made her cry: Any book where a dog dies.

Favorite place to read: “On my balcony. The weather doesn’t always cooperate.”

 

Hispanic Heritage month takes place from September 15 - October 15. It is a recognition and celebration of the culture, histories and contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United States.

Initially celebrated as Hispanic Heritage week in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson, it was expanded to a month by President Ronald Reagan. The start date of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for five Latin American countries, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. With Mexico, Belize and Chile celebrating their independence September 16.

Here is a small sample of events that are happening at the library during Hispanic Heritage month to celebrate the rich heritage and cultural impact that Latino Americans have had on the nation and society.

Contact the library, visit the events page or check in with your local library to learn about additional programs and events during Hispanic Heritage month.

Looking for a personalized reading list? Contact Laura B for a recommended reading list. 

 
 

Libby is a new way to read and listen to books from Overdrive, and it's available now. 

Getting started

Libby logo

  1. Go to the app store on your Android or iOS device and search for "Libby, by Overdrive Labs". Or, visit the Libby site and be directed from there;
  2. Once you've installed the app, sign in with your library card;
  3. Search, borrow, read and listen, all from within the app.
  4. Here's a handy how-to guide for Libby.

You can click on "Library" or "Shelf" to move back and forth between the collection and your check outs. Click on a title in the Libby catalog, and you'll be able to read a sample so you can decide if you want to borrow the book.

Logging in

Libby lets you to connect to OverDrive with one easy login. You can also add a library card from another library or from a family member so you can have your loans and holds all in one place.

Prefer reading on a Kindle?

You can set Libby up to default to Kindle for e-books and you can download with few clicks.

Downloading

To download books to your device, tap on the cloud icon after you've checked out, and your e-book or downloadable audiobook will be downloaded. When the download is finished, you will see a check. You don't have to figure out which format you should get—the app knows.

New features

Libby has some great features: you can download titles for offline reading or stream them to save space. Libby will bookmark your place, even if you pick up another device to resume reading. You can choose settings for reading at night, and customize your font -- there's even a font to help readers with dyslexia.  If you're happy with the OverDrive App, don't worry. You can continue to use it, or you can install both apps on your device and see which works better.

 

 

 

Headed to the Oregon Small Business Fair on Saturday, September 15th? Don’t forget to stop by the library table and learn about our wonderful resources for small businesses. There is still time to register for this free event. In addition to the resource fair, where we’ll be, there are also classes on topics from tax tips to social media promotion. You won't want to miss it!

 

Need some more help with your small business? Check out the book lists below or ask a librarian.

 

La siguiente información es un recurso para inmigrantes y refugiados sobre sus derechos como individuos y la aplicación de leyes migratorias. Esta lista es solamente un comienzo; si necesitas más información, por favor contacta a la biblioteca.   

La biblioteca cuenta con listas de libros que podrían ayudarte y en los que se discute la experiencia de inmigrantes para personas de todas las edades y niveles de lectura.   

La siguiente lista será actualizada con frecuencia; por favor revisa constantemente para obtener la información más reciente.

Recursos disponibles para conocer tus derechos

Las personas no ciudadanas que viven en los Estados Unidos — sin importar su situación migratoria — por lo general tienen los mismos derechos constitucionales que los ciudadanos cuando las autoridades policiales las paran, cuestionan, arrestan o buscan en sus hogares. - ACLU

Folletos informativos de ACLU:
Inglés, ruso, español         

Tarjeta informativa sobre Conociendo tus Derechos:
Inglés, somalí, vietnamita, chino, español, ruso, árabe, hmong

Conoce tus derechos – Información sobre discriminación anti-islámica:
Inglés, árabe, urdu, persaespañol

Aplicaciones móviles:
Mobile Justice: aplicación de ACLU que contiene la tarjeta informativa sobre Conociendo tus Derechos y tiene la capacidad para reportar incidentes a ACLU en tiempo real por medio de un video.
MiConsular MEX: aplicación creada por la Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE) del gobierno mexicano que permite a las personas de nacionalidad mexicana encontrar el consulado más cercano a ellas y que llamen o envíen un texto en caso de emergencia.   
Cell 411: aplicación que permite a los usuarios publicar y responder a emergencias provenientes de familiares, amigos y vecinos en tiempo real.  

Aplicación de leyes migratorias:
Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas de los Estados Unidos (ICE, por sus siglas en inglés): encuentra a una persona detenida o un centro de detención, además de información de contacto.

Los testigos de actividades de ICE pueden reportarlas a la línea telefónica sobre inmigración de ACLU de Oregón por medio de un texto o llamada al 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

Para acciones alrededor de Portland, puedes contactar a la línea telefónica de la Coalición para los Derechos de Inmigrantes de Portland (PIRC, por sus siglas en inglés) al 1-888-622-1510.

Plan para Preparación de la Familia:
Inglés español

Recursos legales de bajo costo para inmigrantes provee una lista de organizaciones sin fines de lucro que pueden asistir a las personas con problemas migratorios.

Directorio de Servicios Culturales del Condado Multnomah provee una lista de organizaciones sin fines de lucro, grupos religiosos y programas del gobierno que sirven a los inmigrantes y refugiados en el área metropolitana de Portland.

Información sobre DACA/Soñadores  

ACTUALIZADA 3/6/18: inglésespañol

ACTUALIZADA 9/5/17: inglés, español

Herramientas y Guía de Recursos de DACA: inglés, español

Hoja de información comunitaria actualizada para los beneficiarios de DACA: español, inglés

¿Qué necesitas saber si el programa DACA termina? español, inglés

Organizaciones locales

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR)
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice
1704 NE 43rd Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
503-550-3510

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Oficinas consulares

Consulado Mexicano de Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulado de El Salvador en Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Consulado Honorario Guatemalteco  
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Oficina Consular de Japón en Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

 
In response to the Eagle Creek Fire, Multnomah County Library is staffing the children's room and computer lab at the fire shelter at Mt. Hood Community College. As we mourn the devastation in our beloved Columbia River Gorge, we’re doing our best to help those affected and displaced by the fire. We're working with other helpers to provide a safe place where everyone is welcome. We have computers, books and activities for children, and the shelter offers medical and emergency services, food, emotional support, a place to sleep and space for animals.
 
We've compiled a comprehensive list of information and resources about the Eagle Creek Fire to help. If you have any additional suggestions to be included, please let us know in the comments section below.  
 
 
 
Library outreach staff helping out at the fire shelter.

The following information is a resource for immigrants and refugees on individual rights and immigration enforcement. This list is a start; if you require further information please contact the library.

The library has helpful booklists that discuss the immigrant experience for all ages and reading levels.

The following list will be updated frequently; please check back for the most current information.

Know Your Rights Resources

Non-citizens who are in the United States — no matter what their immigration status — generally have the same constitutional rights as citizens when law enforcement officers stop, question, arrest, or search them or their homes. ACLU

ACLU Information Pamphlets:
EnglishRussianSpanish

Know Your Rights Information Card:
EnglishSomaliVietnameseChineseSpanishRussianArabic, Hmong

Know Your Rights- Anti-Muslim Discrimination Information:
EnglishArabicUrduFarsiSpanish

Mobile Apps:
Mobile Justice: ACLU app with Know Your Rights Information card, ability to report incidents to the ACLU in real time with video capability.
MiConsular MEX: App created by the Mexican Government’s Secretary of Foreign Affairs (SRE) that allows Mexican nationals to locate their nearest consulate and either text or call them in an emergency.
Cell 411: App that allows the user to issue and respond to emergencies from family, friends and neighbors in real time.

Immigration Enforcement:
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): Find a detainee or detention center, and general contact information.

Witnesses to ICE activity can report it to the ACLU of Oregon's immigration hotline via text or call 971-412-ACLU (971-412-2258).

For actions around Portland, you may contact the Portland Immigrant Rights Coalition (PIRC) hotline at
1-888-622-1510.
Information: EnglishSpanish Updated 10/4/17

Family Preparedness Plan: 
English and Spanish

Low-cost legal resources for immigrants provides a list of nonprofit organizations that can assist people with immigration issues.

Multnomah County Cultural Services Directory provides a list of nonprofits, faith groups and government programs that serve immigrants and refugees in the Portland Metro area.

DACA/Dreamers Information

Updated DACA Information 3/6/18: English, Spanish

End of DACA (FAQ's): English

UPDATED Information 9/5/17: SpanishEnglish

DACA Tools and Resource Guide: SpanishEnglish

Updated community information sheet for DACA recipients: SpanishEnglish  

What do you need to know if the DACA program ends? Spanish, English


Local Organizations

Lutheran Community Resources Northwest 
605 SE Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
Portland, OR 97214
503-231-4780

Sponsors Organized to Assist Refugees (SOAR) 
7931 NE Halsey St. #314
Portland, OR 97213
503-284-3002

Interfaith Movement for Immigrant Justice
1704 NE 43rd Ave.
Portland, OR 97213
503-550-3510

Catholic Charities 
2740 SE Powell Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-231-4866

Causa
700 Marion St NE
Salem, OR 97301
503-409-2473

El Programa Hispano
138 NE 3rd St #140
Gresham, OR 97030

Latino Network
410 NE 18th Ave.
Portland, OR 97232
503-283-6881

Coalition of Communities of Color
221 NW 2nd Ave #303
Portland, OR 97209
503-200-5722

APANO
2788 SE 82nd Ave #203
Portland, OR 97266
971-340-4861

IRCO
10301 NE Glisan St.
Portland, OR 97220
503-234-1541

Russian Oregon Social Services
4033 SE Woodstock Blvd.
Portland, OR 97202
503-777-3437

Northwest China Council
221 NW 2nd Ave. Suite 210-J
Portland, OR 97209
Phone: (503) 973-5451

AILA Oregon
888 SW 5th Ave #1600
Portland, OR 97204
503-802-2122

ACLU Oregon
506 SW 6th Ave #700
Portland, OR 97204
503-227-3186

Consular Offices

Mexican Consulate of Portland
1305 SW 12th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-227-1442

Consulate of El Salvador in Seattle
615 2nd Ave. #50
Seattle, WA 98104
206-971-7950

Guatemalan Honorary Consulate
7304 N Campbell Ave.
Portland OR, 97217
503-530-0046

Consular Office of Japan in Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave.
Portland, OR 97201
503-221-1811

 

 

It sometimes  seems to me that an inordinante  amount of books have been  written about the Russian Revolution: its causes, its personalities, its historical importance.

But at  the heart of these discussions are three main figures: Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin.

Stalin, the paranoid psycho-bully smiling while he stabs his friends in the back, Trotsky the crazy intellegent organizer, everywhere at once, his enthusiasm and energy inexhaustible.

But for me Lenin is a mystery figure.  Who was he and why did he decide to take on the whole Russian infrastructure?  Why did he twice leave Russia just at a crucial moment in the revolution? Didn't he realize how easily it could have slipped through his fingers?

Author Phillip Pomper thinks he might have the answer.

In his book Lenin’s Brother: the origins of the October Revolution, Pomper explores the life of Lenin’s oldest brother, Alexsandr, who played a part in an earlier plot to assasinate the Tsar. He failed and was hung despite his mother’s desperate pleas for a repreve.  Alexsandr was the favorite son, the studious, quiet son, the hope of his family.  Lenin was intelligent but a lazy student.  with none of the focus and zeal of his older brother.  But that changed when Alexandr was executed. Suddenly Lenin's personality seemed to change;  he had to fill his brother’s shoes, had to finish what Alexandr began.

Lenin became mysterious and withdrawn.  He began to read revolutionary literature. He set about making his brother’s purpose HIS purpose.

I knew Lenin had a brother who was executed for revolutionary activities, but Pomper’s book made me think and wonder about Lenin’s motivation. Brothers compete with each other- even revolutionary-minded ones.

It also made me wonder what would have happened if Alixsandr’s repreve had come through from the Tsar-

Would Alexander and Lenin have  banded together to overthrow the government or maybe Lenin would have left Russia and never come back at all?

 

I've been overwhelmed and saddened by recent news. It's hard enough talking through it with other adults. I can't imagine having to explain to young children. How do you talk with kids and teens about violence and hatred? Children, even young children, are likely to be aware but not fully understand what has happened. Adults may not be comfortable, but “when it comes to talking to children, experts say diversity and discrimination are subjects that shouldn’t be ignored.” [The American Psychological Association]

Here are a few outside resources that may be helpful for parents and caregivers, along with two booklists.

From the American Psychological Association, Talking to kids about discrimination and Building resilience to manage indirect exposure to terror.

From the Anti-Defamation League, Empowering young people in the aftermath of hate

From Common Sense Media, Explaining the news to our kids

From Fred Rogers Company, Tragic events

Archivist, Librarian, Editor, Writer, Volunteer
Volunteer Kris Ashley

by Donna Childs

One of the first things Kris Ashley did upon moving to Portland was get a library card.  A booklover at heart, she has an MLS (masters degree in library science), as well as experience working in bookstores and in publishing.  While looking for a full-time library position, Kris has taken on two volunteer jobs at Multnomah County Library: on Wednesdays, she is responsible for sorting, pricing, shelving, and organizing the large-print materials at Title Wave Used Bookstore, and on Thursdays, she is one of three volunteers who scan and index items from the library’s Special Collections for The Gallery.

More than 100 years ago, civic leader, merchant, and philanthropist John Wilson bequeathed his collection of more than 8000 books to what would later become the John Wilson Special Collections at the Multnomah County Library.  Although books form the majority of the collection, “Special Collections are more than books,” according to Kris.  Among the items they have scanned are photos, letters, papers, art and craft items, Lewis and Clark Centennial memorabilia, and WPA creations (many of which are at Timberline Lodge). Kris and her fellow volunteers then turn the scans into PDF files to be put on the web.

Kris is well-qualified to do this work: her MLS studies included courses in archival preservation (which she loved), and while living in San Francisco, she created and organized an archive for the Mechanics Institute’s library.  Since moving to Portland, in addition to volunteering at the library, Kris has done editing and photo research for writers, and some freelance grant writing. Fascinated by archives, Kris says her dream job would combine archival and library work with photo research, finding the most appropriate photos for writers to accompany their texts. Although the library may lose an especially knowledgeable, talented, and responsible volunteer when she finds that full-time job, someone will be getting a great employee.


A few facts about Kris

Home library:  Gregory Heights

Currently reading:  War for the Oaks by Emma Bull, An Acceptable Time by Madeleine L’Engle, and The Sin-Eaters Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

Favorite book from childhood:  Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl

A book that made you laugh or cry:  The Story of Owen by E.K. Johnston

Favorite section of the library:  641 - Cookbooks!

E-reader or paper book:  "Paper, definitely. I want the feel and smell of a book."

Favorite place to read:  "In an armchair, with my cat on my lap."

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Gun rights and gun control are topics that come up often these days. It can be hard to find good resources that present multiple viewpoints on issues like this, and provide quotable sources.

An excellent electronic resource is Opposing Viewpoints in Context. It provides links to articles, videos and audio files from multiple viewpoints (you will need a library card # and password in order to access this electronic resource from outside of the library).

 LawBrain covers the legal history of gun control back to the U.S. Constitution. Another good listing is Infoplease’s Milestones in Federal Gun Control Legislation  which covers laws up until 2013.

L.A.R.G.O. Lawful and Responsible Gun Owners and the N.R.A. National Rifle Association both support gun ownership in America. The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and The Violence Policy Center both work to reduce gun violence. The Violence Policy Center is also a good resource if you’re looking for statistics related to gun violence (including drive by shootings and suicide).

This Guardian article compares gun crime in individual states and About.com lists Oregon Gun Rights. FactCheck looks at statistics in the media after the Newton shootings, and reports on Gun Rhetoric vs. Gun Facts.  Looking towards changes in the law, gun control is supported by more women than men, and that may have an effect on future legislation.  But right now,  despite repeated pleas for change after every mass shooting, nothing seems to change. 

Need some specific gun facts or laws we haven’t covered? Contact a librarian and we’ll be glad to help

Cover of From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler
I have two paperbacks which I read so much as a kid they fell apart. One is A Wrinkle in Time with its spine now duct taped and the other is From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

I wasn't exactly fond of visiting museums as a kid but I loved the idea of hiding in a museum. Now that I'm an adult, I love visiting museums. Sometimes I wonder what it was like to wear a suit of armor or sit for hours for a portrait painting. I definitely relish the idea of having a museum gallery to myself, having time to look, no one blocking my view, maybe being able to touch. Claudia and Jamie had the thrill of exploring the Metropolitan Museum of Art after hours--sleeping in a canopied bed, bathing in the fountain, and going behind roped off areas--and found a mystery and eventually Mrs. Frankweiler's files.

Claudia and Jamie only spent a week in the museum, but their story has captivated readers for 50 years! To think it all began with a piece of popcorn on a chair behind a roped-off area in one of the museum's period rooms. That piece of popcorn and curiousity about how it got there inspired E.L. Konigsburg. What public space would you like to have all to yourself?

Almost 100,000 preschoolers, kids and teens are registered in the Summer Reading Program! We spread prizes out a little this summer and July 30 is the first day for your reader to get a Summer Reading t-shirt, coupons for Oaks Park, Oregon Ballet Theatre and Oregon Children’s Theatre, and enter the grand prize drawing. Don’t worry though if you’re not ready for a t-shirt yet.  Everyone has until August 31 to pick up prizes for any level and finish the game.

Group of Summer Reading Volunteers

If your family has done Summer Reading for a few years, you probably noticed changes this summer. High school students have challenge cards and their own prize options. The high school game offers teens the choice of traditional reading along with opportunities to use reading to accomplish, create, and engage in the world in their own way.

For babies to 8th graders, we introduced a calendar to track reading, to stretch the game out for the ravenous readers as well as help reluctant readers be successful. We also hope this has helped families make reading a daily habit. As in previous years, we want this to work for you so hopefully you’ve adapted the guidelines to fit your family. If your child spends four hours reading voraciously, two calendar days could be marked off. Likewise, if your child is reluctant and is willing to spend only ten minutes with a book, that’s okay too and a day can be marked.

We welcome suggestions and feedback about the Summer Reading Program. Pick up a yellow Summer Reading comment card at your local library, comment below, or send us an email.

Please note: the library is out of free eclipse glasses. 

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. The places where the moon will completely cover the sun — creating a total solar eclipse — are on what's called the path of totality. That path includes a swath of Oregon.

The total solar eclipse will touch down between Lincoln City and Newport at 10:15 am, then cross places like Madras, John Day and Baker City before leaving the state at 10:27 am.   

Outside the path of totality, viewers will see a partial solar eclipse. In Portland, for example, 99 percent of the sun will be covered by the moon. 

We've got everything you need to make the most of the eclipse, including the official live stream, path maps, library events and all the best reads. (Below, click "Eclipse 2017" to see everything.)  

 

 

 

If you've admired the satisfyingly compact and elegantly designed Field Notes, then you're an Aaron Draplin fan. The author, graphic designer and founder of the Draplin Design Co. has created
Aaron Draplin; photo: Michael Poehlman
 projects for the likes of Timberline Lodge, Woolrich, Patagonia, Nike, and Sasquatch Festival. You can see the range of his work in the eye-candy book, Draplin Design Co.: Pretty much everything.  He is passionate about design and has talked about it on Marc Maron's WTF Podcast. Here's what he has to say about his favorite music for summer:
 
I hide in the summers. I stay out of the sun and avoid the heat as much as I can. Oddly enough, my workload always swells. Each year I say I’m going to take a break in June and July here in Portland. That never happens. And this summer’s been nuts. Like it always is. Up early and down to the shop, watching the sun come up over Mt. Hood. Working late to beat the traffic back up Sandy Blvd to the house. My summer cycle. And there’s always a handful of records that rise to the top of what’s on rotation in the shop. A special category for me: My “Summer Records.” I can look back at each summer and remember the couple records that really got me. And in a lot of ways, helped me get through the warm months. 
 
In my list, I start with “morning records” and work towards "mid-day records” — as things pick up in the shop, the jams get more upbeat. As the day winds down, you get into the darker stuff. Those are the “late night records.”
 
August is still coming up, and I’ll be back home with Mom in Michigan. I’m always adding a couple records a week to my revolving list and am always excited to see what’s coming next to get into the mix. Maybe it’s a gnarly Bob Seger kick, being up in all that Michigan? We’d be down with that!
 
01. Jonathan Wilson, Gentle Spirit
When you look him up, everything talks about some “Laurel Canyon” resurgence. Los Angeles freaks me out, so I’m not tapping too much into any of that. This sounds like something I would’ve heard on the radio in 1979, sitting in the backseat with my little sister, on the way to the beach or something.
 
02. Mark Kozelek, Night Talks EP
As a long-time Red House Painters fan going back to 1993, I have a weird allegiance for Mark Kozelek. Although, he’s a trying artist to keep up with. I just don’t read articles about him, and stick to digging the records.
 
03. Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives, Way Out West
Just country enough to not make you squirm. Dreamy stuff.
 
04. John Moreland, Big Bad Luv
We love John Moreland. Our buddy. He’s come to the shop a for a couple visits and I’ve seen him play 5-6 times. Such a nice guy, with a big, big voice. I love his records so much. Thank you, John. 
 
More songs about drug deals gone bad, leaving cities and coming back to cities. And I love it. I’d like to meet this guy. 
 
06. Thundercat, Drunk
This stuff is weird! In the best ways. And funny. And really fun. Lots of little things to listen for. And laugh with. This is my favorite record cover of the year!
 
07. Son Volt, Notes of Blue
The first song on this one … that classic Son Volt. That one was enough for me. Over and over again. Rolling, warm and soothing.
 
08. Chavez, Cockfighters
Arithmetic! Math! Long division! Calculus! ‘90s math-y, rock-y heavy hitters, still hit as hard as they did in 1995. Turn it up!
 
09. The Afghan Whigs, In Spades
Dark, brooding, sinister and dark again. I used to associate them with Cincinnati. Now it’s New Orleans. I met the band a couple years back at Greg Dulli’s bar in the French Quarter. This record fits the mystery of that place perfectly, in a new way.
 
10. Mount Eerie, A Crow Looked at Me
Tread lightly here. This is a challenging record to listen to. As beautiful as it is, it’s like going to a funeral. Brave, dark, sad … oddly uplifting stuff.

 

He Volunteers Anywhere He Can Find
Volunteer Ruben Arciniega

by Sarah Binns

The first thing that struck me about Ruben Arciniega was a sense of maturity that far exceeds his years. A long-time member of the Troutdale Library Teen Council, the 16-year-old is already enrolled at Mt. Hood Community College through his high school, achieving high school and college credit for his classes. Pair his challenging coursework with an active volunteering schedule and you have a smart, confident, compassionate young man who is destined to go far--both in the Portland community and beyond.

Ruben initially got involved in the Summer Reading program and the teen council to gain volunteer hours for school. But then, he says, “I started doing more volunteering and realized I really liked it. On Troutdale’s teen council one of Ruben’s roles is to “make everyone feel comfortable,” which led him to create a fun icebreaker to put his peers at ease. He helps the council plan monthly youth-centric events that include everything from an annual Batman party to a visiting game truck, which gives kids who don’t have the resources for video games a chance to play to their heart’s content. “We also do a cyber-bullying event to provide awareness and help for people,” he says. “It’s very fun and rewarding to see how many people are positively affected by what we do.”

Ruben also frequently volunteers at Cherry Park Plaza, an elder care facility, and “anywhere else that I can find,” he says. His community is as impressed with Ruben’s service as I am, and in late June he was honored with a 2017 Volunteer Award from Multnomah County for his involvement in the library.

When I ask what Ruben is interested in pursuing as a career he says he’s undecided, but he finds criminal justice “very intriguing.” For the time-being he has his hands full: “It’s a tough schedule,” he says. “School, volunteering, and trying to find a job. When I do find time to myself I just relax. In the summer I have a lot more time to actually be a kid.” As a fantastic “kid” or an adult, I am confident we will see more of Ruben on the Portland community stage in the future.


A few facts about Ruben:

Home library:  Troutdale

Currently reading:  The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka. “I was told it would be a good book for me because it’s kind of weird. It’s definitely interesting.”

Most influential book:  “I’ve read a couple of books for my literature class that were interesting and changed my perspective. The Prince by Machiavelli is one. It definitely changed my perspective on leadership.”  

Favorite book from childhood:  The Hungry Little Caterpillar. “It successfully enhanced my creativity as a kid.”

Favorite browsing section:  “Usually if I’m thinking about a certain subject, I’ll just look for that book in the database. I’ll just go in the library and ask where are the books on cooking.”

E-reader or paper:  “Paper, definitely. It feels right.”

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Manoush Zamorodi explores "essential quandaries for anyone trying to preserve their humanity in the digital age."  Highlights include an examination of the hidden data embedded in that selfie you posted, and how to cope with information overload by spring-cleaning your brain.
 
This podcast gives a fascinating look into the culture and power dynamics around food and restaurants - lots of 'food for thought' (sorry!). They provide a unique local perspective, being based in an air-stream recording trailer here in Portland, and in fact, they've even blogged for us at the library. I learn something new every time I listen.
 
Politically Reactive  with Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu
This podcast takes the listener deep into political and philosophical conversations happening outside the mainstream media, with the understanding that we're not all as 'woke' as the next person -- in fact, they have a segment called "wait a minute" where they break from the conversation to explain allusions and concepts, so you can re-enter the discussion with some context. Oh, and humor, of course.
 
Portland comedy export Ian Karmel and friends 'fantasy draft' anything and everything, including condiments, Taco Bell menu Items, or presidential administrations.  
 
Who better than to settle your disagreements about whether to stay the night on a possibly haunted ship than the hilariously wry John Hodgman and Baliff Jesse Thorn?
 
 
 
Let's Know Things with Colin Wright 
Colin Wright has a smooth voice, a curious mind, and he explores a range of topics. He gives a balanced argument, is a careful connoisseur of sources, and generally just seems like a nice guy. And did I mention I'm a little bit in love with him? I'm a little bit in love with him. 
 
Vanessa Zoltan and Caspar ter Kuile host this podcast with the premise: What if we read the books we love as if they were sacred texts? And so they're on a quest to go through each Harry Potter book chapter by chapter to see what more it has offer us and how we can take this practice into our other reading.
 
 
 
Slate puts out a ton of podcasts, ranging from Dear Prudence's advice column to Lexicon Valley where all things language-related are discussed, but the podcasts that I most try to keep up with are the political ones. Trumpcast, with Jacob Weisberg was created during the election to report on Trump's run for president and it should have ended on election night. Unfortunately, we now have an even greater need to explore and explain all things Trumpian and Trumpcast is still there for us.
 
When I need a break from politics, I listen to 2 Dope Queens. It's a comedy-filled show with Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson telling honest, personal, and completely hilarious stories; interviewing other funny folks; and hosting a wide range of comedians. It's like eavesdropping on two good friends who pretty much have no boundaries on what they'll say to each other. 
 
I am loving Pod Save America, in which former Obama staffers and good friends talk about the politics of the day. They're funny, irreverent and appropriately outraged, and they also bring a lot of knowledge and experience about the way things normally work in Washington. 
 
Things are very, very busy at the New York Times these days. I have a friend who works there, and he says that the news reporters are in "a constant state of barely controlled chaos". The new podcast, The Daily, offers a window into that world, with host Michael Barbaro discussing the news of the day, usually with reporters.
 
I am a longtime fan of Dan Savage's Savage Lovecast, a sex advice show. Callers describe their concerns about love and sex, and Dan addresses these, sometimes with the aid very interesting guests. 
 
 
 
If you like 2 Dope Queens you should also check out Sooo Many White Guys. Comedian and author Phoebe Robinson (of 2 Dope Queen fame) will make you laugh until your sides hurt as she chats with authors, musicians, actors and performers who are for the most part not white guys. In her hilarious and insightful interviews, Phoebe celebrates the work of people of color, women and folks from the LGBTQ+ community. 
 
If you are or were ever a fan of Reading Rainbow, you will love LeVar Burton’s brand new podcast series LeVar Burton Reads. It’s basically Reading Rainbow for adults! With each episode fans have the pleasure of listening to LeVar read one of his favorite short stories for adults. 
 
 

 

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