Blogs

 

As summer starts coming to a close, let the library take some of the work out of your Labor Day weekend.

 

Taking a road trip?

 

Spending a few quiet nights in?

 

Staycation?

  • Explore the city with one of these local guide books, maybe by bike?

  • Come on down to the library. We’re closed on Labor Day, but have events going on other days.

  • Check out the beginnings of the annual visit from Vaux’s Swifts.

 

No matter how or where you spend Labor Day, you can always contact us.

 

 

It sometimes  seems to me that an inordinante  amount of books have been  written about the Russian Revolution: its causes, its personalities, its historical importance.

But at  the heart of these discussions are three main figures: Lenin, Trotsky, Stalin.

Stalin, the paranoid psycho-bully smiling while he stabs his friends in the back, Trotsky the crazy intellegent organizer, everywhere at once, his enthusiasm and energy inexhaustible.

But for me Lenin is a mystery figure.  Who was he and why did he decide to take on the whole Russian infrastructure?  Why did he twice leave Russia just at a crucial moment in the revolution? Didn't he realize how easily it could have slipped through his fingers?

Author Phillip Pomper thinks he might have the answer.

In his book Lenin’s Brother: the origins of the October Revolution, Pomper explores the life of Lenin’s oldest brother, Alexsandr, who played a part in an earlier plot to assasinate the Tsar. He failed and was hung despite his mother’s desperate pleas for a repreve.  Alexsandr was the favorite son, the studious, quiet son, the hope of his family.  Lenin was intelligent but a lazy student.  with none of the focus and zeal of his older brother.  But that changed when Alexandr was executed. Suddenly Lenin's personality seemed to change;  he had to fill his brother’s shoes, had to finish what Alexandr began.

Lenin became mysterious and withdrawn.  He began to read revolutionary literature. He set about making his brother’s purpose HIS purpose.

I knew Lenin had a brother who was executed for revolutionary activities, but Pomper’s book made me think and wonder about Lenin’s motivation. Brothers compete with each other- even revolutionary-minded ones.

It also made me wonder what would have happened if Alixsandr’s repreve had come through from the Tsar-

Would Alexander and Lenin have  banded together to overthrow the government or maybe Lenin would have left Russia and never come back at all?

 

I've been overwhelmed and saddened by recent news. It's hard enough talking through it with other adults. I can't imagine having to explain to young children. How do you talk with kids and teens about violence and hatred? Children, even young children, are likely to be aware but not fully understand what has happened. Adults may not be comfortable, but “when it comes to talking to children, experts say diversity and discrimination are subjects that shouldn’t be ignored.” [The American Psychological Association]

Here are a few outside resources that may be helpful for parents and caregivers, along with two booklists.

From the American Psychological Association, Talking to kids about discrimination and Building resilience to manage indirect exposure to terror.

From the Anti-Defamation League, Empowering young people in the aftermath of hate

From Common Sense Media, Explaining the news to our kids

From Fred Rogers Company, Tragic events

Archivist, Librarian, Editor, Writer, Volunteer
Volunteer Kris Ashley

by Donna Childs

One of the first things Kris Ashley did upon moving to Portland was get a library card.  A booklover at heart, she has an MLS (masters degree in library science), as well as experience working in bookstores and in publishing.  While looking for a full-time library position, Kris has taken on two volunteer jobs at Multnomah County Library: on Wednesdays, she is responsible for sorting, pricing, shelving, and organizing the large-print materials at Title Wave Used Bookstore, and on Thursdays, she is one of three volunteers who scan and index items from the library’s Special Collections for The Gallery.

More than 100 years ago, civic leader, merchant, and philanthropist John Wilson bequeathed his collection of more than 8000 books to what would later become the John Wilson Special Collections at the Multnomah County Library.  Although books form the majority of the collection, “Special Collections are more than books,” according to Kris.  Among the items they have scanned are photos, letters, papers, art and craft items, Lewis and Clark Centennial memorabilia, and WPA creations (many of which are at Timberline Lodge). Kris and her fellow volunteers then turn the scans into PDF files to be put on the web.

Kris is well-qualified to do this work: her MLS studies included courses in archival preservation (which she loved), and while living in San Francisco, she created and organized an archive for the Mechanics Institute’s library.  Since moving to Portland, in addition to volunteering at the library, Kris has done editing and photo research for writers, and some freelance grant writing. Fascinated by archives, Kris says her dream job would combine archival and library work with photo research, finding the most appropriate photos for writers to accompany their texts. Although the library may lose an especially knowledgeable, talented, and responsible volunteer when she finds that full-time job, someone will be getting a great employee.


A few facts about Kris

Home library:  Gregory Heights

Currently reading:  War for the Oaks by Emma Bull, An Acceptable Time by Madeleine L’Engle, and The Sin-Eaters Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

Favorite book from childhood:  Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl

A book that made you laugh or cry:  The Story of Owen by E.K. Johnston

Favorite section of the library:  641 - Cookbooks!

E-reader or paper book:  "Paper, definitely. I want the feel and smell of a book."

Favorite place to read:  "In an armchair, with my cat on my lap."

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Gun rights and gun control are topics that come up often these days. It can be hard to find good resources that present multiple viewpoints on issues like this, and provide quotable sources.

An excellent electronic resource is Opposing Viewpoints in Context. It provides links to articles, videos and audio files from multiple viewpoints (you will need a library card # and password in order to access this electronic resource from outside of the library).

 LawBrain covers the legal history of gun control back to the U.S. Constitution. Another good listing is Infoplease’s Milestones in Federal Gun Control Legislation  which covers laws up until 2013.

L.A.R.G.O. Lawful and Responsible Gun Owners and the N.R.A. National Rifle Association both support gun ownership in America. The Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and The Violence Policy Center both work to reduce gun violence. The Violence Policy Center is also a good resource if you’re looking for statistics related to gun violence (including drive by shootings and suicide).

This Guardian article compares gun crime in individual states and About.com lists Oregon Gun Rights. FactCheck looks at statistics in the media after the Newton shootings, and reports on Gun Rhetoric vs. Gun Facts.  Looking towards changes in the law, gun control is supported by more women than men, and that may have an effect on future legislation.  But right now,  despite repeated pleas for change after every mass shooting, nothing seems to change. 

Need some specific gun facts or laws we haven’t covered? Contact a librarian and we’ll be glad to help

Cover of From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler
I have two paperbacks which I read so much as a kid they fell apart. One is A Wrinkle in Time with its spine now duct taped and the other is From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

I wasn't exactly fond of visiting museums as a kid but I loved the idea of hiding in a museum. Now that I'm an adult, I love visiting museums. Sometimes I wonder what it was like to wear a suit of armor or sit for hours for a portrait painting. I definitely relish the idea of having a museum gallery to myself, having time to look, no one blocking my view, maybe being able to touch. Claudia and Jamie had the thrill of exploring the Metropolitan Museum of Art after hours--sleeping in a canopied bed, bathing in the fountain, and going behind roped off areas--and found a mystery and eventually Mrs. Frankweiler's files.

Claudia and Jamie only spent a week in the museum, but their story has captivated readers for 50 years! To think it all began with a piece of popcorn on a chair behind a roped-off area in one of the museum's period rooms. That piece of popcorn and curiousity about how it got there inspired E.L. Konigsburg. What public space would you like to have all to yourself?

Almost 100,000 preschoolers, kids and teens are registered in the Summer Reading Program! We spread prizes out a little this summer and July 30 is the first day for your reader to get a Summer Reading t-shirt, coupons for Oaks Park, Oregon Ballet Theatre and Oregon Children’s Theatre, and enter the grand prize drawing. Don’t worry though if you’re not ready for a t-shirt yet.  Everyone has until August 31 to pick up prizes for any level and finish the game.

Group of Summer Reading Volunteers

If your family has done Summer Reading for a few years, you probably noticed changes this summer. High school students have challenge cards and their own prize options. The high school game offers teens the choice of traditional reading along with opportunities to use reading to accomplish, create, and engage in the world in their own way.

For babies to 8th graders, we introduced a calendar to track reading, to stretch the game out for the ravenous readers as well as help reluctant readers be successful. We also hope this has helped families make reading a daily habit. As in previous years, we want this to work for you so hopefully you’ve adapted the guidelines to fit your family. If your child spends four hours reading voraciously, two calendar days could be marked off. Likewise, if your child is reluctant and is willing to spend only ten minutes with a book, that’s okay too and a day can be marked.

We welcome suggestions and feedback about the Summer Reading Program. Pick up a yellow Summer Reading comment card at your local library, comment below, or send us an email.

Please note: the library is out of free eclipse glasses. 

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. The places where the moon will completely cover the sun — creating a total solar eclipse — are on what's called the path of totality. That path includes a swath of Oregon.

The total solar eclipse will touch down between Lincoln City and Newport at 10:15 am, then cross places like Madras, John Day and Baker City before leaving the state at 10:27 am.   

Outside the path of totality, viewers will see a partial solar eclipse. In Portland, for example, 99 percent of the sun will be covered by the moon. 

We've got everything you need to make the most of the eclipse, including the official live stream, path maps, library events and all the best reads. (Below, click "Eclipse 2017" to see everything.)  

 

 

 

Mayor Charlie Hales at National Night Out - City of Portland photo

In early August for the last 30 years, communities and neighborhoods have been getting together to meet, celebrate and have fun at National Night Out celebrations. These events were started to promote safe neighborhoods and crime prevention initiatives by solidifying partnerships between law enforcement and communities. National Night Out events are generally free and family-friendly. 

The official date of National Night Out is the first Tuesday in August, but there are so many parties happening in Multnomah County, they can't all take place on the same day. The City of Portland compiles a list of parties submitted to them for publicizing. In Gresham, call 503.618.2567 to find out where there's a party near you, and in Troutdale call 503.665.6129. Learn more about Fairview's party on its National Night Out page.

Thinking of planning your own party? The Office of Neighborhood Involvement in Portland has a variety of National Night Out party planning resources to help you plan anything from a small potluck picnic with chalk out for the kids to a big bash with a live band that shuts down the street. There is also a brief National Night Out page for Gresham. The message from the experts is to start early — it's not too early to plan for next year! 

A continuing feature of local celebrations is that groups can request to have police officers and firefighters show up at their party. And who knows, your neighborhood could throw a party and maybe even the mayor will show up!

To get you planning your party, meeting your neighbors and thinking about community, we've compiled a list of reading suggestions.

Below are the parties where you can connect with your neighborhood library this summer. We can't hit all the parties (we'd be so tired!), but where you see us, you can guarantee that we'll be talking about great books, services and resources. Come say hi!

 
North Portland Library
Tuesday, August 1, Peninsula Park, 700 N Roda Parks Ave., Portland
 
Hillsdale Library
Tuesday, August 1, Dewitt Park, 1805 SW Dewitt St., Portland
 
Fairview-Columbia Library
Tuesday, August 1, Fairview Community Park, 21600 NE Park Lane, Fairview
Friday, July 21, Wood Village Baptist Church, 23601 NE Arata Rd., Wood Village
 
Midland Library
Tuesday August 1, Mill Park, SE 117th St. and Stephens Ave., Portland
 
Holgate Library
Tuesday, August 1, Kern Park, SE 67th Ave. and Center St., Portland
 
Capitol Hill Library
Tuesday, August 1, Capitol Hill Library, 10723 SW Capitol Hwy., Portland
 
Kenton Library
Tuesday, August 1, McCoy Park, N Trenton St. & Newman Ave., Portland
 
Central Library
Friday, August 4, Portland State University Park Blocks, between SW Harrison St. and Montgomery St., Portland
 
Gresham Library and Rockwood Library
Friday, August 4, The Rosewood Initiative, 16126 SE Stark St., Portland 
 

 

If you've admired the satisfyingly compact and elegantly designed Field Notes, then you're an Aaron Draplin fan. The author, graphic designer and founder of the Draplin Design Co. has created
Aaron Draplin; photo: Michael Poehlman
 projects for the likes of Timberline Lodge, Woolrich, Patagonia, Nike, and Sasquatch Festival. You can see the range of his work in the eye-candy book, Draplin Design Co.: Pretty much everything.  He is passionate about design and has talked about it on Marc Maron's WTF Podcast. Here's what he has to say about his favorite music for summer:
 
I hide in the summers. I stay out of the sun and avoid the heat as much as I can. Oddly enough, my workload always swells. Each year I say I’m going to take a break in June and July here in Portland. That never happens. And this summer’s been nuts. Like it always is. Up early and down to the shop, watching the sun come up over Mt. Hood. Working late to beat the traffic back up Sandy Blvd to the house. My summer cycle. And there’s always a handful of records that rise to the top of what’s on rotation in the shop. A special category for me: My “Summer Records.” I can look back at each summer and remember the couple records that really got me. And in a lot of ways, helped me get through the warm months. 
 
In my list, I start with “morning records” and work towards "mid-day records” — as things pick up in the shop, the jams get more upbeat. As the day winds down, you get into the darker stuff. Those are the “late night records.”
 
August is still coming up, and I’ll be back home with Mom in Michigan. I’m always adding a couple records a week to my revolving list and am always excited to see what’s coming next to get into the mix. Maybe it’s a gnarly Bob Seger kick, being up in all that Michigan? We’d be down with that!
 
01. Jonathan Wilson, Gentle Spirit
When you look him up, everything talks about some “Laurel Canyon” resurgence. Los Angeles freaks me out, so I’m not tapping too much into any of that. This sounds like something I would’ve heard on the radio in 1979, sitting in the backseat with my little sister, on the way to the beach or something.
 
02. Mark Kozelek, Night Talks EP
As a long-time Red House Painters fan going back to 1993, I have a weird allegiance for Mark Kozelek. Although, he’s a trying artist to keep up with. I just don’t read articles about him, and stick to digging the records.
 
03. Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives, Way Out West
Just country enough to not make you squirm. Dreamy stuff.
 
04. John Moreland, Big Bad Luv
We love John Moreland. Our buddy. He’s come to the shop a for a couple visits and I’ve seen him play 5-6 times. Such a nice guy, with a big, big voice. I love his records so much. Thank you, John. 
 
More songs about drug deals gone bad, leaving cities and coming back to cities. And I love it. I’d like to meet this guy. 
 
06. Thundercat, Drunk
This stuff is weird! In the best ways. And funny. And really fun. Lots of little things to listen for. And laugh with. This is my favorite record cover of the year!
 
07. Son Volt, Notes of Blue
The first song on this one … that classic Son Volt. That one was enough for me. Over and over again. Rolling, warm and soothing.
 
08. Chavez, Cockfighters
Arithmetic! Math! Long division! Calculus! ‘90s math-y, rock-y heavy hitters, still hit as hard as they did in 1995. Turn it up!
 
09. The Afghan Whigs, In Spades
Dark, brooding, sinister and dark again. I used to associate them with Cincinnati. Now it’s New Orleans. I met the band a couple years back at Greg Dulli’s bar in the French Quarter. This record fits the mystery of that place perfectly, in a new way.
 
10. Mount Eerie, A Crow Looked at Me
Tread lightly here. This is a challenging record to listen to. As beautiful as it is, it’s like going to a funeral. Brave, dark, sad … oddly uplifting stuff.

 

He Volunteers Anywhere He Can Find
Volunteer Ruben Arciniega

by Sarah Binns

The first thing that struck me about Ruben Arciniega was a sense of maturity that far exceeds his years. A long-time member of the Troutdale Library Teen Council, the 16-year-old is already enrolled at Mt. Hood Community College through his high school, achieving high school and college credit for his classes. Pair his challenging coursework with an active volunteering schedule and you have a smart, confident, compassionate young man who is destined to go far--both in the Portland community and beyond.

Ruben initially got involved in the Summer Reading program and the teen council to gain volunteer hours for school. But then, he says, “I started doing more volunteering and realized I really liked it. On Troutdale’s teen council one of Ruben’s roles is to “make everyone feel comfortable,” which led him to create a fun icebreaker to put his peers at ease. He helps the council plan monthly youth-centric events that include everything from an annual Batman party to a visiting game truck, which gives kids who don’t have the resources for video games a chance to play to their heart’s content. “We also do a cyber-bullying event to provide awareness and help for people,” he says. “It’s very fun and rewarding to see how many people are positively affected by what we do.”

Ruben also frequently volunteers at Cherry Park Plaza, an elder care facility, and “anywhere else that I can find,” he says. His community is as impressed with Ruben’s service as I am, and in late June he was honored with a 2017 Volunteer Award from Multnomah County for his involvement in the library.

When I ask what Ruben is interested in pursuing as a career he says he’s undecided, but he finds criminal justice “very intriguing.” For the time-being he has his hands full: “It’s a tough schedule,” he says. “School, volunteering, and trying to find a job. When I do find time to myself I just relax. In the summer I have a lot more time to actually be a kid.” As a fantastic “kid” or an adult, I am confident we will see more of Ruben on the Portland community stage in the future.


A few facts about Ruben:

Home library:  Troutdale

Currently reading:  The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka. “I was told it would be a good book for me because it’s kind of weird. It’s definitely interesting.”

Most influential book:  “I’ve read a couple of books for my literature class that were interesting and changed my perspective. The Prince by Machiavelli is one. It definitely changed my perspective on leadership.”  

Favorite book from childhood:  The Hungry Little Caterpillar. “It successfully enhanced my creativity as a kid.”

Favorite browsing section:  “Usually if I’m thinking about a certain subject, I’ll just look for that book in the database. I’ll just go in the library and ask where are the books on cooking.”

E-reader or paper:  “Paper, definitely. It feels right.”

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Manoush Zamorodi explores "essential quandaries for anyone trying to preserve their humanity in the digital age."  Highlights include an examination of the hidden data embedded in that selfie you posted, and how to cope with information overload by spring-cleaning your brain.
 
This podcast gives a fascinating look into the culture and power dynamics around food and restaurants - lots of 'food for thought' (sorry!). They provide a unique local perspective, being based in an air-stream recording trailer here in Portland, and in fact, they've even blogged for us at the library. I learn something new every time I listen.
 
Politically Reactive  with Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu
This podcast takes the listener deep into political and philosophical conversations happening outside the mainstream media, with the understanding that we're not all as 'woke' as the next person -- in fact, they have a segment called "wait a minute" where they break from the conversation to explain allusions and concepts, so you can re-enter the discussion with some context. Oh, and humor, of course.
 
Portland comedy export Ian Karmel and friends 'fantasy draft' anything and everything, including condiments, Taco Bell menu Items, or presidential administrations.  
 
Who better than to settle your disagreements about whether to stay the night on a possibly haunted ship than the hilariously wry John Hodgman and Baliff Jesse Thorn?
 
 
 
Let's Know Things with Colin Wright 
Colin Wright has a smooth voice, a curious mind, and he explores a range of topics. He gives a balanced argument, is a careful connoisseur of sources, and generally just seems like a nice guy. And did I mention I'm a little bit in love with him? I'm a little bit in love with him. 
 
Vanessa Zoltan and Caspar ter Kuile host this podcast with the premise: What if we read the books we love as if they were sacred texts? And so they're on a quest to go through each Harry Potter book chapter by chapter to see what more it has offer us and how we can take this practice into our other reading.
 
 
 
Slate puts out a ton of podcasts, ranging from Dear Prudence's advice column to Lexicon Valley where all things language-related are discussed, but the podcasts that I most try to keep up with are the political ones. Trumpcast, with Jacob Weisberg was created during the election to report on Trump's run for president and it should have ended on election night. Unfortunately, we now have an even greater need to explore and explain all things Trumpian and Trumpcast is still there for us.
 
When I need a break from politics, I listen to 2 Dope Queens. It's a comedy-filled show with Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson telling honest, personal, and completely hilarious stories; interviewing other funny folks; and hosting a wide range of comedians. It's like eavesdropping on two good friends who pretty much have no boundaries on what they'll say to each other. 
 
I am loving Pod Save America, in which former Obama staffers and good friends talk about the politics of the day. They're funny, irreverent and appropriately outraged, and they also bring a lot of knowledge and experience about the way things normally work in Washington. 
 
Things are very, very busy at the New York Times these days. I have a friend who works there, and he says that the news reporters are in "a constant state of barely controlled chaos". The new podcast, The Daily, offers a window into that world, with host Michael Barbaro discussing the news of the day, usually with reporters.
 
I am a longtime fan of Dan Savage's Savage Lovecast, a sex advice show. Callers describe their concerns about love and sex, and Dan addresses these, sometimes with the aid very interesting guests. 
 
 
 
If you like 2 Dope Queens you should also check out Sooo Many White Guys. Comedian and author Phoebe Robinson (of 2 Dope Queen fame) will make you laugh until your sides hurt as she chats with authors, musicians, actors and performers who are for the most part not white guys. In her hilarious and insightful interviews, Phoebe celebrates the work of people of color, women and folks from the LGBTQ+ community. 
 
If you are or were ever a fan of Reading Rainbow, you will love LeVar Burton’s brand new podcast series LeVar Burton Reads. It’s basically Reading Rainbow for adults! With each episode fans have the pleasure of listening to LeVar read one of his favorite short stories for adults. 
 
 

 

A 1975 chart of Yaquina Head to Columbia River
What is a nautical chart?

To someone who has not been at the helm of a vessel, a nautical chart might look like nothing more than an oddly detailed water map.  To a boater, a nautical chart is much more than a “road map” of the water.  Instead of roads it details water areas, ports, and coast lines; it also includes information about depth of the sea floor, obstructions, restricted areas, recommended routes, and aids to navigation such as lights and buoys. The main purpose of a nautical chart is to give boaters up-to-date information to avoid grounding or traveling in restricted waters, and to navigate safely for themselves and the vessels around them. 

Where can I find current navigational charts?

The United States Office of Coast Survey (USCS) has been producing nautical charts for more than 200 years, ever since President Thomas Jefferson asked for a survey of the coast in 1807. The USCS has made and maintains over 1,000 charts at varying levels of detail that cover all of the U.S. and U.S. territory coastal waters and the Great Lakes. These charts are conveniently available online for viewing and downloading. They are free of charge and regularly updated.

To find a particular nautical chart, start at the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Charts for U.S. Waters Online Chart Viewer. From the Online Chart Viewer you can select a region to view or navigate using the Graphical Catalog. Also available are BookletCharts for printing to help recreational boaters locate themselves on the water.

The Graphical Catalog shows the outlines of charts that are available on a basic geographical map. As you click on a chart, information to the right of the map show you the coordinates for the selected point as well as the Chart number, panel number, and scale of the chart selected. When you zoom in on an area, more detailed charts with larger scales become available to select. The name of each nautical chart is listed below the map as a Panel Title, as well as the date of the most current edition. Each nautical chart is available to be viewed online, downloaded as an RNC (Raster Navigational Chart), or ordered as a paper chart. In addition to finding nautical charts by browsing the map, you can also find nautical charts by entering the coordinates of the location you are seeking.

In addition to these current nautical charts you can also find nautical charts to view at the library by searching for cruising atlas in the online catalog.

Chapman Nautical Chart No. 1 by the U.S. Coast Guard
Did you know that nautical charts may have more than one compass rose printed on them?

A compass rose shows both the true North in the outer circle and the magnetic North in the inner circle, and the difference between the two is called the magnetic variation.  It is important to always use the compass rose nearest the area for which you are plotting directions. For detailed guidance on how to read a nautical chart, check out How to Read a Nautical Chart by Nigel Calder or Chapman Nautical Chart No. 1 from the U.S. Coast Guard.

What did nautical charts and maritime maps look like in the past?

In addition to modern nautical charts, the USCS also has beautiful and detailed historical maps and charts available on their website. Other recommended historical resources are The Charting of the Oceans by Peter Whitfield (an overview of Europe’s charting history) and Soundings: The Story of the Remarkable Woman Who Mapped the Ocean Floor by Hali Felt (in the 1950s, Marie Tharp turned her husband’s records of sonar pings measuring the ocean’s depth into illuminating maps of the ocean floor that proved for the first time the theory of continental drift).   

Finding these charts can be complicated! If you have any questions, do not hesitate to Ask a Librarian.

The NOAA website includes this note: Use the official, full scale NOAA nautical chart for real navigation whenever possible. These are available from authorized NOAA nautical chart sales agents. Screen captures of the on-line viewable charts available here [on NOAA's online chart viewer] do NOT fulfill chart carriage requirements for regulated commercial vessels under Titles 33 and 46 of the Code of Federal Regulations. 

photo of Hill Top Farm
This spring I checked off one of my bucket list travel destinations:  Hill Top, Beatrix Potter's farm in the English Lake District.  Before I left, I reread many of Potter's tales and was (pleasantly) surprised by their edginess!  They weren't all sweetness and light and the stories were full of drama.  Of course I had remembered that Peter Rabbit's father had ended up in a pie, but along with parental death, there is also kidnapping, or rather, bunnynapping (Mr. Tod & The Flopsy Bunnies), sassing (Squirrel Nutkin), punishment (Tom Kitten), thievery (Benjamin Bunny), wanton destruction (Two Bad Mice) and general youthful mayhem (take your pick). What's a kid not to like?

I also wanted t

book jacket for Beatrix Potter & the Unfortunate Tale of A Borrowed Guinea Pig
o better understand Potter's life and artistry before I visited the Beatrix Potter Gallery, and so I checked out several biographies including Over the Hills and Far Away and Beatrix Potter:  Artist, Storyteller and Countrywoman. I also came across The Art of Beatrix Potter which contains many full color and sometimes full-page plates of her gorgeous paintings.

Because 2016 was the 150th anniversary of her birth, a number of books about her were published that year including Beatrix Potter & the Unfortunate Tale of a Borrowed Guinea Pig, a fun and mostly true story for children of an incident in Potter's life. If you haven't checked out Beatrix Potter since your youth, consider revisiting her in some of these books for youth and adults.

 

Beach reads

The Story of One Summer Reading Volunteer
Volunteer Atticus Wilson

by Donna Childs

Atticus Wilson is an intelligent, thoughtful, and sincere young man who knows himself and is willing to make the most of his opportunities. A freshman at Jefferson High School, he volunteers with the Albina Library’s Summer Reading program and has since he was old enough to qualify, the summer before he started sixth grade. When asked how he knew about the Summer Reading program, he said a librarian from the Albina Library had visited his classroom to encourage young readers - his kindergarten classroom! She had so inspired Atticus that he signed up to volunteer five years later.

He took her words about reading to heart as well, often reading several books at one time: he is currently in the midst of five books! In addition to Summer Reading, Atticus attends a Dungeons and Dragons camp every summer, and that is only the tip of his D&D iceberg. Despite being a new freshman, he founded a D&D club at Jefferson, and he is creating his own D&D campaign (adventure).  When finished, he plans to test it and then send it to the company that makes the game.  

Atticus chose to attend Jefferson, despite its being three miles away, because the closest school to him, Grant High School, is slated to be remodeled, sending its students even farther away. Furthermore, Jefferson has several appealing programs. For example, he is one of fifty students chosen, in a rigorous process, for a biotech program, through which he will be eligible for internships, other learning experiences, and jobs at OHSU after his sophomore year.  And, thanks to Jefferson, he will also be able to take classes at nearby Portland Community College, for free. This year at Jefferson, Atticus also took a television production class, with both field and studio components. He conducted and produced a three-minute interview with one of his teachers, and the class as a whole produced a student-run Jeopardy-type program. (Some previous student productions are available on YouTube at Jefferson Demos.JTV.)  Although his favorite subject is math, and he is interested in technology, Atticus also likes studying history and literature. He is a well-rounded young man, thanks to all that reading, perhaps?


A few facts about Atticus:

Home library:  Albina

Currently reading: Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfus; Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli; Reality Boy by A.S. King; Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare; Still Life with Tornado by A.S. King

Most influential book:  Unknown; they all influence me in different ways.

Favorite book from childhood:  Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

A book that made you laugh or cry:  Hollow City: The Second Novel of Miss Peregrine's Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

Favorite section of the library:  teen fiction

E-reader or paper:  Paper books are better.

Favorite place to read:  locked in my room, holding my dog

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

“I feel like I'm a better person when I'm at the library.”
Volunteer Heather Reed

by Sarah Binns

Like most of our Spotlight volunteers, Heather Reed is many things: full time worker, full time student, and full time dog mom to her dachshund, Artemis. But unlike other featured volunteers who fit the library around their careers, Heather hopes the library will be her career. She is currently working toward a computer science degree at PCC, but afterward she'll apply to graduate school programs for a Master's in Library and Information Science (MLIS). “I'm hoping to go into archival work,” she says.

Heather has always been a reader. Growing up in Detroit, Michigan, she was taken to the library by her parents read for hours. . “That was the place I felt most at home,” she says. Heather translated her love for reading into a job, working for two years as a page clerk in Arizona before moving to Portland last year. “A hundred and ten degrees was just too hot for me!” she says about the move from the Southwest.

Heather “does a little bit of everything” as a branch assistant at Midland Library. She processes holds, shelves books, and works on the paging list. Best of all is the occasional interaction with patrons: “I like when I'm able to help people find things. I'm not able to help them a lot, but when I do it's really rewarding.” She can only fit in one shift a week between school and work, but wants to do more. “When you enjoy something that much, it doesn't feel like work. I feel like I'm a better person when I'm there.”

When I ask about her hobbies, she laughs like it's a foreign concept, given her busy schedule. She does collect antique teacups, though, and has about thirty, ranging in origin from Imperial Japan to England. “I like hand-painted ones,” she says with a smile, “those are the most unique.”

Getting her MLIS is Heather's goal, all inspired by her childhood at the library. “I feel like the library is the best place on earth. You should go in there and get the resources you need. If I can bring that to other people—what else can I ask for?”


Home Library: Midland

Most influential book: The Vampire Hound by Jim Hunt. “It's the book that got me into reading and it sparked my love for fantasy books.”

Favorite book from childhood: See above!

Currently reading: The Wheel of Time series' second book, The Great Hunt. “I hear everyone talk about Game of Thrones and I'm sure it's good, but I say 'Have you read this?! It came first!'”

Guilty pleasure: Manga.

Book that made her laugh or cry: “Probably the Harry Potter series is one of the most emotional” for her.

Favorite library browsing section: True crime. With her other favorite, fantasy, “Everything is pretty and interesting, but with true crime you find out about something you never knew happened.”

E-reader or paper: Both.

Favorite place to read: Outside. “Sometimes the wind will blow and it will match up to something in a book and it's hard to get that experience inside.”

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

 

 

High schoolers, you can just read for an hour to mark off each spot on your Summer Reading challenge cards. But there are a lot of cool other things you can do, too! Optional challenges are below. If you choose any of the creation challenges from the first list below, share your stuff for a chance to win $100 collage gift certificate! You can email a file to Summer Reading Coordinator Seana Lane or post on Twitter or Instagram and tag with #MultCoLibTeen (if your profile is set to public — if it’s not, just send via email).

Need challenge cards? Stop by any library between June 16 and August 31 to get yours! Just keep track of the hours you read and challenges you complete until you get your cards, then transfer them to the first challenge card.

Cover for Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Create stuff

Share your creation for a chance to win $100 collage certificate (see above)

  • Create an alternative book cover for the last book you read.
  • Write and perform a rap inspired by one of your favorite books.
  • Write fanfiction and share it — think about a book you wish hadn't ended, and create the next chapter.
  • Make a zine or blog post listing resources for at-risk teens in your community facing challenges: homelessness, LGBTQ+, bullying, abusive relationships, eating disorders, immigration, scholarship needs.  
  • Instagram a video book review and share with your friends (and enter in the contest above).
  • Create art inspired by a book — a comic strip or graphic novel version, draw a character as you see them, or paint a landscape described.
  • Find a recipe from a different culture than yours, and make it for your family or friends. Take a picture of your feast. 

Movie making at Rockwood Makerspace
Do stuff

  • Volunteer in your community (maybe even at your library!) Or try VolunteerMatch or Hands On Greater Portland for opportunities.
  • Send a letter or an email to an elected representative about an issue you are passionate about.
  • Spend time with kids younger than you — read to them, play with them, talk with them.
  • Teach a new technology to an adult -- Twitter, Instagram, streaming music 
  • Attend a teen maker program at your library or at Rockwood Makerspace.
  • Use the chat feature on the library's website to ask something you can't find out from Google. 
  • Make a booklist. Create a theme (strong female characters, alternative reality, vampire fiction) and post to GoodReads or the library’s site.
  • Write a book review on the library’s (or any other) site.
  • Take our quick survey.

Explore, try and learn stuff

Read different stuff

Stella Brings the Family
When my kids were younger, I was always on the lookout for children’s books that stood up against stereotypes of all kinds. In King and King, a prince falls in love with another prince, not a princess. In bell hooks' Happy to Be Nappy, a little girl celebrates the beauty of her natural African-American hair. My Princess Boy tells the story of a little boy who loves to dress in pink, sparkly clothes. These titles are all classics of the anti-bias genre, and they still deserve to be read.

New Shoes
But a couple of weeks ago, a library patron asked me to suggest some anti-bias books that have been published more recently, and I discovered some real gems that I wish had existed when my kids were still the right age for picture books. It might not be too late for your kids, though, so check out this list! And let me know if you have more titles that should be included on it.

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