Blogs

After the Revolutionary War, the new country had to decide how to govern itself.  The Continental Congress wrote the Articles of Confederation in 1777. This document gave the new individual states power and put in place a weak central government. The Library of Congress has an easy to read timeline for the Articles of Confederation. This new system created lots of problems, and in 1787 all the states except Rhode Island sent delegates to Philadelphia to fix the Articles. Instead they wrote an entirely new document called the Constitution of the United States.

The Constitutional Convention changed the future of the United States. The delegates decided that their work must remain a secretThey argued and they compromised and they created the three branches of government still in use today.

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If you want to know more contact a librarian.

In the great outdoor laboratory that most of us know as The Planet Earth people are working all the time to determine how mountains and canyons were formed, lakes are made and why volcanoes erupt the way they do.

 They are practicing geology. They also study small and not so small changes that might help to predict the future. The study of the earth doesn’t just involve our planet, it includes other planets, and the activity that human beings are doing on the Earth every day.

The National Geographic Society calls on all of us to recognize the importance of Geo-literacy.

You may love to pick up rocks when you hike or have an assignment to build a volcano. Perhaps you travelled to Crater Lake (put on your 3d glasses for this one) with your family and became fascinated by that very deep, round and blue body of water. You can observe the history of the earth in the small details in your backyard, or the larger than life details of the entire world. Just imagine being able to name any rock formation as your family drives by it on the highway, or rides by it on a bicycle.  

For inspiration take a look at the Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) that will also provide you with links to NASA’s Earth Observatory and Visible Earth

In addition to great books about geology the Multnomah County Library has a couple of electronic encyclopedias that can answer many of your questions about the Earth Sciences. You will need to use your library card number and PIN to login to the New Book of Popular Science or Kids Infobits.

illustration of a geologist

Once you’ve satisfied the Oregon State Standards for elementary, middle and high school students in Earth Science, you can start thinking about career options as a Geoscientist.

 

While you are waiting for a new blog post from me check out the Student's Link on EPOD. It's just for kids.

 

 

 

For centuries, Europeans have explored places unfamiliar to them.  The big push to explore happened from the 1400s to the 1600s and is known as the Age of Discovery or the Age or Exploration.  Here are some sites that will help you learn more about individual explorers, the places they went, and the tools they used to get there.

Santa Maria model

For a broad website on exploration that includes biographies of explorers, information and illustrations ships and navigation tools, plus an interactive map showing voyages of the most ancient explorers through the 1920s, check out Exploration Through the Ages from the Mariners Museum.  Here's another link to exploration info at the museum.

Look at the companion website for the PBS program Conquistadors for more about explorers Cortes, Orellana, Pizarro and Cabeza de Vaca.  See also All the World is Human:  The Conquistadors for the companion videos from the BBC.  Be aware that this site takes a bit of time to load.
 
Learn about longitude, latitude, and navigation tools and see a film on how to use an octant and try it yourself at Marine Navigation in the Age of Exploration.
 
Find out how hard life was for a sailor and explorer in this infographic:  Age of Exploration:  Life on the Open Seas
 
Now you're ready to conquer the world!

Need to know the capital of New Jersey? The senators from Hawaii? Or famous people from Oregon? Dig into the sites below to find the answers to those questions and more!United States map

 

If you just need the basic facts about a state, visit Quick Facts: Learn about Your State. Here you can find state capitals, area, symbols, and U.S. senators and representatives.

To dig a little deeper, go to Stately Knowledge, which also lists famous people from each state, professional sports teams, and other fascinating facts. This site also has charts that list the states in order by population, area, and more.

Fact Monster's The Fifty States is similar; it also includes short sections on the history, economy and tourist attractions of each state. Don't miss the links on the first page of this site, which allow you to compare states in a variety of ways and play games or take quizzes to test your knowledge.

Did you know that most states have a website just for kids? Find a list of those sites at Kids.gov's State Websites for Kids

To find articles about a state's history, visit Explore the States. Here you can also find stories about local events and customs.

If you are trying to learn the names of all 50 states, try watching Fifty States That Rhyme, which uses them in a song. Or, if you need to learn the state capitals, watch the States and Capitals Song video.

Finally, if you need a map of a state, visit the National Atlas's list of state maps. You can find several different types of maps for each state; you can either view them online or download a map as a PDF.

Didn't find what you need here? Contact a librarian if you need more help with your research. 

 

 

 

Whether you are researching Afghanistan, Zimbabwe, or any country in between, these sources have the facts you need!Photo of a globe

Culturegrams is an encyclopedia in which you can find out about the history of your country, as well the daily lives of its citizens. There are great printable maps and images of the country’s flag and lots of photos. You can even listen to the country’s national anthem or sample recipes! If you aren’t at the Multnomah County Library, you’ll need to log in to the encyclopedia with your library card and PIN. You’ll want to choose the Kids Edition.

Wondering which sights to see in a country? Around the World, from Time for Kids magazine, lists places you won't want to miss. You can also find timelines and learn some words in the country’s language.

At Global Trek, you can learn more about a country and its residents—sometimes from interviews with other students! You can even keep a travel journal.

National Geographic Kids has great maps, videos, and lots of photos for some countries.

Looking for a picture of a county’s flag? Just click on the small image at the CIA World Factbook to get a larger printable version of the flag, as well as information about what all its symbols mean.

If you still need help with your research, contact a librarian for more assistance. Bon voyage! 

Trees at Hoyt ArboretumAre you looking for help identifying trees?  A simple scientific method for identifying plants or animals has an impressive name: the dichotomous (dih-kot-uh-muhs) key.  As you use this tool, you make a series of choices based on characteristics of the item you want to identify.  Oregon State University has an excellent dichotomous key for identifying common trees of the Pacific Northwest.

Sometimes it's helpful to have a small handbook that you can take with you when you're outdoors looking at trees.  You can create your own tree identification handbook by printing some of the Pacific Northwest Native Plants Identification Cards.  Learn about the ID plant cards, search by common name of plants, or search by scientific names of plants.   There's even a blank template (Word doc) so you can create additional cards.

If you want more information, contact a librarian through your computer or at your local library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image Caption: Life cycle illustration from Maria Sibylla Merian’s Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium. Amsterdam :Voor den auteur, als ook by G. Valck,[1705]. from the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s image collection on Flickr. The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize and make accessible online the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections.

Quite possibility one of the most recognized names in natural history art is John James Audubon (1785-1851), considered one of the greatest bird artists, namesake of the Audubon Society and famous for his double elephant-folio volumes of the Birds of America. Audubon hunted his subjects and used these freshly killed birds in life-like poses for drawing.  Conservation of nature was not much of a consideration at this time and Audubon might shoot many birds before he found what he considered the perfect representation of the species. Audubon’s life work and act of Creation was also an act of destruction, an unrealized possibility of extinction.

In my youth I often went camping in MacKerricher State Park, on the Northern California coast.  I kept a journal to record aspects of small plants and animals I found along the beach and in the nearby woods.  Each entry was focused on a detailed penciled drawing of the creature.  Little did my young mind know this was a child’s play of natural history illustration. Our species’ interest and fascination in drawing the natural world around us goes back into prehistory long before Audubon when people first drew charcoaled animals on cave walls.  

This was a life’s work held by some women long before it was acceptable for them to be scientists and naturalists, women like Maria Sibylla Merian who in 1699 traveled from Amsterdam to South America to study metamorphosis and is known for her beautifully accurate drawings of the life cycles of butterflies.  This exceptional naturalist’s story is brought to life in Chrysalis: Maria Sibylla Merian and the Secrets of Metamorphosis.  It was a profession held by women like Genevieve Jones who went out into the field with her father an amateur ornithologist to find bird nests and eggs to collect, identify, and draw. She noted that Audubon had not included eggs or nests in his drawings in any detail.  Jones’ life work and posthumously her family’s became the  Illustrations of the Nests and Eggs of Birds of Ohio (1879). Virginia, Genevieve Jones’ mother stated that the family finished the drawings and created the book in memory of their daughter. “She had just begun the work when she died. So for her sake I made it as perfect as possible.” The story of the book’s creation and the Jones family’s colorful illustrations are on display in America’s Other Audubon by Joy Kiser.

Natural history illustration is a practice which was not quashed by the advent of the camera; neither captured light on film nor the instantaneousness and abundance of today’s digital images can completely achieve what can be expressed with the process and art of natural history illustration. Unlike a digital image which captures perfectly one particular individual at one particular moment in time, a drawing or painting of a heron or a moth can be the perfect hypothetical representation of its species.

Art and science converge in natural history illustration.  Katrina van Grouw aptly demonstrates this convergence in The Unfeathered Bird, a richly illustrated book showing birds painstakingly drawn without their feathers. This recent (2013) book combines “the visual beauty and attention to detail of the best historical illustrations with an up-to-date knowledge of field ornithology.”  It is is a book that shows how the birds’ outward “appearance, posture, and behavior influence, and are influenced by, their internal structure.”  The Unfeathered Bird bridges art, science, and history and is an unique offering in the continued practice of natural history illustration.  

For more comprehensive collections of natural history art check out the oversized Cabinet of Natural Curiosities which illustrates Albertus Seba 's unusual collection of natural specimens from the 18th century, dig into David Attenborough’s Amazing Rare Things for a history of natural history illustration in the age of discovery, or browse through an overview of three centuries of natural history art from around the world in Art & Nature by Judith Magee.  Anyone interested in the beauty of the natural world will be drawn to the interlocking fields of art and science that natural history illustration creates.


Image: Life cycle illustration from Maria Sibylla Merian’s Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium
Amsterdam :Voor den auteur, als ook by G. Valck,[1705]. from the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s image collection on Flickr. The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize and make accessible online the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections.

http://multcolib.tumblr.com/image/60866198248“City of the Book” is a poem that Kim Stafford wrote for the Multnomah County Library, to mark the formation of a new library district on July 1st, 2013. At a celebration that day on the steps of the Central Library, he led the crowd in a reading of the poem.

Kim Stafford reading in front of Central Library

When asked about the experience of writing this poem, Stafford said:

I understand the library as a force of nature--more like a river or an orchard or a lagoon teeming with fish than a box of silent books. The place is alive, bountiful, brimming, spilling treasure of ideas and stories, facts and films, songs and tales for children in all directions. It's a watershed, harvesting rain and feeding everyone. So, to write a poem about such a place is more like turning on the tap than struggling for words. Words flow from libraries, for libraries, for people in libraries. I was just a small part of this bountiful storm of words.

Kim Stafford’s father, William Stafford (1914-1993), spoke at a different library event 30 years ago at the Lake Oswego Library. Lewis & Clark University is currently celebrating the 100th anniversary of William Stafford’s birth, and the 2014 statewide Oregon Reads community reading project will focus on his work.

 

There’s lots of ways to measure yourself, and this video tells you some ways to do it.

If you are paying attention to calories, concerned about your weight, planning to exercise, or just want to check how healthy your are, check out these online tools. Your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) measures the number of calories you burn even if you’re sleeping.  Your Body Mass Index is a measurement of body fat based on height and weight that will help you know if you are under, over or average weight.

You can look up how many calories you burn doing your favorite activities, or how long you should do an activity to lose weight, plus figure out the best exercise to lose weight. If you’re a runner and use a pedometer, you’ll need to measure your step length to figure out how far you run.

Your target heart rate can help you know how hard you should exercise so you can get the most aerobic benefit from your workout.

There are other health calculators you can use, and one that will help you assess your health, exercise, and vulnerability to disease as well. If you need more help, feel free to contact a librarian.

Searching for information on Native American tribes and Native nations? These big web sites may be able to help you.

You can search tribes alphabetically to learn about them, and learn about native languages as well as native culture. Try putting the name of the tribe you are looking for in the search box to see what other information they list, or scroll down to find the names of tribes listed alphabetically.

If you would rather search by location using a map, you can find state-by-state information, covering historic and contemporary information, languages, culture and history.

If you still need more help, contact a librarian to be sure you get what you need.

500 Nations is an eight-part documentary that looks back at life in North America before the arrival of the Europeans, then follows the epic struggles of Indian Nations as the continent is reshaped by colonialism and settlers. For older students.

 

Looking for consumer reviews for cars and household products? Try checking Consumer Reports - to get reviews and articles from Consumer Reports for free through the library, follow these steps:
graphic showing how to search MasterFILE Premier for Consumer Reports articles

 

  1. Go to MasterFILE Premier
  2. Click Begin Using This Resource, then enter your full library card number & PIN.
  3. Type your topic in the Search box, for example dishwashers.
  4. Type Consumer Reports in the Publications box.
  5. Click Search.
  6. Click on the PDF Full Text link to view your article.

It’s awards season again!  

What's that you say?   The Grammys aren’t for another 90 or so days and the Oscars aren’t until March? That they haven’t actually announced the winners for the National Book Awards yet?  And the MTV Music Awards have already gone down in infamy for the year?  I say that you aren’t thinking big enough.  It’s Nobel Prize season!  Winners have been announced and the big fancy ceremony isn’t until December, so we still have time to prepare for our Nobel Prize Parties.  

Photo: Graffiti about the Nobel Prize by Quinn DombrowskiFirst awarded in 1901, there were prizes for Peace, Physics, Chemistry, Medicine, Literature.  Added to the list in 1968 was The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel which is a bit more of a mouthful. All in all there have been 561 prizes given out to 875 people.  Which seems like a lot until you remember that there are over 7 billion people on the planet right now.

This year’s Economics prize went to three American economists: Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller "for their empirical analysis of asset prices”.  My first two thoughts reading this were “Congrats!” and “Huh?”  I had this vision of scientist working side by side wearing matching lab coats.  As it turns out, it’s all about how markets price things, like stocks and bonds.  And that the scariest thing an economics will probably spill on themselves is coffee, so no lab coats.

Stocks which are explained by a nice video from Investopedia are basically little parts of a company that you buy into. The Stock Market are where people (traders), and computers (big ones!!) buy and sell stocks.   There’s actually a bunch of markets. Wall Street in New York is the one most people hear about, but the idea of everyone getting together and trading actually started in London coffee houses.  The stock market lets you buy little pieces of a company, which gives the company the money to grow their business. This sounds like a really great plan: They get your money, so the company get bigger which means your piece of the company is worth more!  But...   What company?  And what if something goes wrong?  Markets crash when prices people think something is worth gets too far off from reality. What if you pick a company and they don’t make more money?  When to buy? Sell?  Yeah.  I don’t have any answers here.  But Fama, Hansen, and Shiller do!  Sort of, well… Of course, it might have been nice if the answers were the same.

Fama says that you can’t use the past to predict the future.  What happened to a stock last week will not tell you what the price will be next week and that the markets take in and react to new information so quickly it doesn’t really change much for very long.  This isn’t a bad thing and when markets are working well, they look really random because everything is swept along so fast prices bounce around.    And then Shiller came along to say that you can predict the future: but only from a distance.  Because people aren’t as cool and reasonable as economists want us to be it takes a while for things to work out. If you look at what a stock is doing- the price vs. the dividend (the payout you get on the stock), you can tell where it is heading 3 to 5 years from now.  

Photo Ticker board by Frank GruberAnd where does Hansen fit in? He created a model (as in a math not fashion) called the Generalized Method of Moments that actually make both Fama and Shiller make sense at the same time.  

So why is this such a big deal?  Because it changed how people think about economics and markets.  It opened new ways to research and gave real human emotions and actions a place.  It changed how people actually buy and sell things in the stock market.  They changed how we see the world.  And that, sooner or later, will change your life.

Do you want to more than we covered here?  Contact a librarian!

In 2011, the  United States Department of Agriculture replaced the idea of the Food Pyramid with My Plate ,which gives you a plan to figure out what you need to eat to be healthy. But not everyone agreed that My Plate represented healthy eating habits. Healthy Eating Plate vs. USDA Eating Plate argues that the USDA plan was influenced by political and commercial pressures from food industry lobbyists. They said that their plan, created by experts at Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, is better because it’s based on science.

 

There are also food pyramids created to represent Latino, Asian, African Heritage and Mediterranean Diet food cultures. Which ones match the way you eat? If you need more help researching diet and nutrition, feel free to contact a librarian.

 

Photo of pills and bottle (by Sponge, via Wikimedia Commons)Have you noticed that you’re paying different prices for the same medication, depending on where you buy it? Drug prices are not consistent from store to store and it can be really hard to find information on pricing. One resource you can use to find prescription drug prices is called GoodRx.

GoodRx is free to use; the site is funded by advertisements and fees from pharmacies and discount providers. Enter the name of your medication and your city or zip code, and click the Find the Lowest Price button. From the next screen, you can choose whether you’d like to see generic or name-brand prices and you can choose the dosage and the quantity. You can also limit your results by type of pharmacy; do you need a pharmacy that’s open 24 hours? That delivers by mail?

Consumer Reports “Best Buy Drugs” project (a tool that allows you to search by drug or condition, and recommends “best buy” drugs based on their effectiveness, safety, side effects, and cost) tested the GoodRx mobile app (which is available for iPhone and Android devices) and found that it did retrieve the lowest price (of two tested apps) for the cholesterol-lowering drug, Lipitor.

If you need more information about a drug or supplement, have a look at MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine’s consumer health information site. You can find information on drug and food interactions with your medication, generic/brand names for a drug, side effects and more.

Information from these sites can help you stay informed, but you should include your health care professional in any medication decisions.

Questions? We are always happy to help!  Just Ask the Librarian.

Breaking Chains book jacketGuest blogger Rae Richen’s short stories, poetry and articles have appeared in anthologies of Northwest authors, in Pacific Northwest newspapers and in Writers’ Northwest Handbook. She has taught junior high, high school students and adults since the ice age, and has always been impressed with the wide-ranging curiosity and the persistent search for answers among her students. Her newest book, Uncharted Territory is written for young adults and adults who enjoy a triumph of life over fear.

Breaking Chains: Slavery on trial in the Oregon Territory, by R. Gregory Nokes is an important addition to Oregon’s history. For three generations, my mixed-race family has known that Oregon’s legal relationship with its African American citizens was rocky, but details were elusive. Much of Oregon supported an apartheid-like atmosphere well into the 1960s. When my children and my students ask for specifics, I can now give a more complete answer. I can offer them Breaking Chains.

This untold part of Oregon’s history came to Nokes’s attention because a former slave was mentioned in his family genealogy. Nokes soon learned that Oregon, though admitted to the union as a free state, also tolerated slaveholding and had a constitution that supported a ban on African Americans. Its citizens voted for pro-slavery politicians, including the first territorial governor. Even when slavery was opposed by white Oregonians, it was often for reasons more self-preserving than selfless.

Nokes’s deep research, his interviews of slave’s descendants and his incisive story-telling style delves into the history of Robin Holmes who, with great perseverance, successfully sued his owner for his freedom, and of Reuben Shipley who was forced to choose between remaining near his enslaved family in Missouri and his tenuous hope of freedom in Oregon. There is a wealth of information about the life of Oregon’s early African Americans in Breaking Chains.

Welcome to the world of banned books.  Use this guide to learn about censorship, the First Amendment, and challenged or banned books. 

Censored StampWhat is Censorship?  According to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), censorship is when words, images, or ideas are blocked or removed because someone finds them offensive.  When an item is removed, we say it's been "banned".  Banned Books On-Line is an exhibit of books that have been the objects of censorship or censorship attempts.  It includes the classics Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn.  A "challenge" is an attempt to remove or restrict access to books and other materials.

Why do we care if a book is banned?  The American Library Association (ALA) views a challenge or ban as a "threat to freedom of speech and choice", freedoms that are guaranteed under the Bill of Rights.  Watch the video below for a short description of the First Amendment.  To see more short videos about Congress, the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights, check out the Facts of Congress youtube channel or read the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and more at the government archives: The Charters of Freedom.

How does a book get removed?  When a person or group decides that a book is not appropriate, a request is made to the library to remove the book or restrict access to it.  The leaders of the library review the challenge and decide how to respond.  Although many books are challenged, very few are actually removed.  Find lists of challenged books at the ALA's Frequently Challenged Books.

Why does a book get challenged or banned?  The National Coalition Against Censorship says books are challenged, censored and banned for many different reasons.  Some of the most common include:

  • Profanity:  Books are often challenged for the language they contain.  A good example is Captain Underpants and its sequels by Dav Pilkey.
  • Sex:  Parents and schools have challenged books for certain sexual passages.  Works such as It’s Perfectly Normal by Robie Harris and Heather Has Two Mommies by Leslea Newman have frequently been challenged.
  • Violence:  Objections to violent content are often based on the idea that these books make violence okay.  Books challenged as too violent include Scary Stories to tell in the Dark and its sequels by Alvin Schwartz.
  • Religion:  Today, parents and ministers often object to works which discuss topics such as sex, evolution, or witchcraft or occult themes.  An example of this is The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins.

Did this get you started?  If you need more help, just ask a librarian!

On October 28, 2013, the governors of Oregon, Washington, California, and the premier of British Columbia announced they had agreed to a set of shared goals for the region to reduce carbon emissions and address climate change, called the Pacific Coast Action Plan on Climate and Energy.

Although the plan is not legally binding, it says that Oregon will, among other things, set a price on carbon emissionsestablish a target for reducing carbon emissions, encourage the use of zero-emission vehicles and the design of "net-zero" buildings. 

In 2012, the Union of Concerned Scientists produced Cooler Smarter: practical steps for low-carbon living, which "shows you how to cut your own global warming emissions by twenty percent or more."

Hank Green of the popular Crash Course and Vlogbrothers series explains five human impacts on the environment:

 

 

MLA Handbook coverDoes your writing assignment require that you follow a particular style of citation, such as MLA, APA, or Chicago? Or are you writing for a particular discipline, industry or audience? Perhaps you are wondering: why are there so many different forms of citations?!?

A style guide (also known as a stylebook or handbook) is a set of standards for writing and document organization. These are used for different kinds of writing - academic, journalism, business, and so on. Each style guide sets out guidelines for writing and documentation of research in the discipline in question, and (perhaps most famously) they tend to be chock-full of really specific rules for formatting and punctuating citations.

Where to turn for authoritative advice on writing style and citation? Try these guides for writing for specific disciplines:

 

Academic writing tends to be guided by either the MLA, Chicago (or Turabian), or APA styles.

The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers is often used for high school and undergraduate students, while the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing is geared toward graduate students, writers and researchers in the humanities.

The Chicago Manual of Style, created by the University of Chicago Press, is used in editing and publishing as well as academia. A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers by Kate L. Turabian (sometimes you'll hear people refer to “Turabian style”) guides undergraduate and graduate student writing, but perhaps more for coursework than for publication. Turabian style is based on Chicago style, and almost identical to it.

The Concise Rules of APA Style is the go-to guide for students and researchers in the social and behavioral sciences, particularly above the undergraduate level and for published work.

 

There are also style guides for different professional writing disciplines.

The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law is the standard used by newspapers and the news industry in the United States.

The Gregg Reference Manual is the style guide for business, both for professionals and students.  

The Elements of Legal Style is a handy guide to legal writing, based somewhat on Strunk and White’s classic text on writing style (see below). Citation in legal writing is complicated, because different courts have different requirements for citation. Most of the various forms of legal citations are based on the Bluebook system, which is described in the book Legal Writing Citation in a Nutshell, by Larry L. Teply.

The Yahoo Style Guide for the Web is a great resource if you’re writing for the web.  

 

Not sure what you need, or perhaps your classes require that you use different citation formats… a guide that covers the different styles might be useful to you:

A Writer’s Reference by Diana Hacker contains extensive advice about grammar and academic writing style, in addition to citation guides for MLA, APA, and Chicago style.

Cite Right: A Quick Guide to Citation Styles--MLA, APA, Chicago, the Sciences, Professions, and More by Charles Lipson focuses on citations, including many different styles.

Last but definitely not least, try out the OWL - Online Writing Lab from Purdue University. It’s a free online resource that covers academic citations formats (MLA, APA, Chicago) as well as a wealth of information about general writing, grammar, research, job search writing, ESL, and more. In short, it’s rather amazing.

 

Above I mentioned Strunk and White's classic guide to writing, The Elements of Style,​ which is a guide to language usage and form (not citations). It continues to be a great resource, and is freely available online via Bartleby. For other guides to writing, grammar, and composition, see our blog post about improving your writing skills.


As always, please feel free to ask a librarian if you have questions - we’re always happy to help with research, citations, and writing projects!

The City of Portland's Bureau of Planning and Sustainability is developing the Comprehensive Plan, a long-range plan for the growth and development of Portland through 2035. The public review draft of the Comprehensive Plan is being published in two parts. Working Draft Part 1 was published in January 2013 and contained the draft goals and policies. Working Draft Part 2 is now available for public review and consists of two products:

  1. The online Map App, an interactive series of maps showing the geography and location of various policy proposals. For example, the “storm water areas of concern” mapshows areas that have both a potential for new development and significant stormwater management constraints.

  1. The Citywide Systems Plan, a 20-year, coordinated infrastructure plan for the City of Portland. It updates the City of Portland’s Public Facilities Plan, which was last done 24 years ago in 1989.

All Multnomah County Library locations, except for Gresham, Troutdale and Fairview, have been given a binder which contains a one-page overview of this Map App and a copy of the Citywide Systems Plan. This binder is available for public review and the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability are accepting comments until December 31, 2013.

More information on the Comprehensive Plan, as well as how and where to give feedback, can be found on the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability website.

Have you ever wanted to be invisible? What if you didn’t want to be invisible and you were? That’s what happens to Clover Hobart. One morning she wakes up and she is invisible.

It doesn’t help that she is 55-plus woman and already invisible in society’s eyes. Even her family is oblivious to the fact that she is invisible. The only one who notices is her best friend, who tries to help Clover in her non-visible adventures.

Calling Invisible Women is a clever and hilarious new book by Jeanne Ray. It’s a thought-provoking look at women of a certain age in our society and one of my favorite novels.  

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