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Every week, new books  are added to my ever growing "to be read" pile.  While it’s a pleasant hazard of the library profession, the looming tower of unread tomes has grown a bit too tall for comfort. However, after a recent search through the new titles joining the collection, I think there's some room left. Here are three I'm excited about.

 

 

stiletto cover

 

 

 

Myfanwy Thomas returns in Daniel O'Malley's anticipated sequel to The Rook

 

 

 

 

jon cryer book cover

 

 

 

Duckie's AKA Jon Cryer's story promises to "try a tenderness" and entertain 

 

 

 

 

tricky vic cover

 

 

 

Pssst! wana buy the Eiffel tower?

 

 

 

Bethann Hardison

 

Bethann Hardison Photo: VibeVixen

Where to start, where to start? Bethann Hardison embodies the idea of making things better than how you found them. She shot to fashion/modeling fame during the 60s and 70s. The beautiful and elegant Hardison has worked in every facet of the fashion industry  as a model, booking agent, fashion show producer, in public relations, as a contributing editor for several fashion magazines (she was even Editor-at-Large for Vogue Italia in 2010) and owner of the Bethann Management Agency. She opened her agency with one goal in mind: to change the racial climate of the fashion industry. And, she did! Hardison is a driving force behind the success of some of today’s top models. She states, “Eyes are on an industry that season after season watches design houses consistently use one or no models of color.” Taking it a bit further, Hardison started the Black Girls Coalition, BGC to advocate and support African-American models. As co-founder of BGC, Hardsion authored a series of letters calling fashion houses, councils, federations and more to the carpet. If you’re curious, read Bethann's Letters. One more thing, Hardison is the mother of Dwayne Wayne. Remember? Whitney’s boyfriend from the popular T.V. show "A Different World"?  

Further Exploration: http://www.elle.com/news/fashion-style/bethann-hardison-nyfw

Available at Multnomah County Library: Skin Deep, Inside the World of Black Fashion Models by Summers, Barbara

I like lots of music that’s just plain pretty--I'll admit that I have a weakness for harmonies and a sprightly fiddle line-- but there’s something especially bracing for me about listening to women singing loud, singing honestly with little regard for “just plain pretty.” It makes me feel a little freer myself, like swearing sometimes does, like quitting jobs to take off traveling used to feel.

The latest album to scratch that itch for me is Sleater-Kinney’s No Cities to Love. The songs are catchy, with quirky, inventive guitar. The lyrics are all about power, getting it or fighting it. My favorite song right now is the first single, “Bury Our Friends.”

We speak in circles
We dance in code
Untamed and hungry
On fire and in cold
Exhume our idols and bury our friends
We're wild and weary but we won't give in

My heart gives this little leap when Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein sing that “won’t give in”.  The vocals are howled in No Cities to Love.  I read an article that said Tucker, in particular "sounds like a badly injured opera soprano, or like an enraged mother hyena.” She does, and it’s great. This whole album made me think of the story that Tina Fey told in Bossypants about Amy Poehler saying “I don’t care if you like it” , a story that seems to be resonating with me and a lot of women I’ve talked to lately. We want to be ourselves. Sometimes it isn’t pretty. We don’t care if you don’t like it.

One thing you will like is that this album, as of this writing, is available both on CD and on MCL’s streaming music and video service, Hoopla. So if you have a library card and an Internet connection, you could be listening to it right now. After that, check out this list I made of other loud, honest female voices. Let me know if there are artists I missed who I should have included!

 

Laquan Smith

Laquan Smith Photo: VibeVixen

 

What happens when you’re turned down by two of the top design schools in the country and you have no contacts or experience? Ask Laquan Smith. His grandmother gave him a sewing machine and taught him how to sew at the age of 13. This and ambition were all he needed to turn his dream and ideas into fashion history!

Anne Lowe, Willi Smith and so many, many others may have lit the match, but Laquan Smith is taking the torch and running. He is the new face of contemporary fashion. You may not know Laquan, but no doubt you’ve seen his work. His designs are devoured by today’s pop culture icons: Rhianna, Lady Gaga, Raven Symone, Alicia Keys, Tyra Banks and more. He even designs for the Joffrey Ballet! Vogue Editor-at-Large Andre Leon Talley took Smith under his wings and taught him to fly in the often fickle world of fashion. Smith uses unconventional materials like PVC and scuba material to create breathtaking works of art, we mean ... clothes. Laquan isn’t the only fresh face in fashion; check out David Tlale.

Further Exploration: http://www.laquansmith.com  and http://www.bet.com/video/b-real/2014/style/laquan-smith-spring-summer-2015.html

Available at Multnomah County Library: A.L.T. A Memoir by Talley, Andre’ Leon

Glitched haptics. The klept. Homunculus parties. Disoriented yet? Like that feeling? If so, you should read The Peripheral, the new novel by William Gibson. Known in the past for cyberpunk, near-futurism, and epic,city-destroying battles with Neal Stephenson, here he tries his hand at that most tricky SF device: time travel. Or at least, something close to that.  Fear not - this is no stereotypical yarn: no one becomes his own grandpa, and no attempts to kill Hitler go horribly awry. And it’s even slyly humorous, if you pay attention (I loved the awkwardly romantic telepresence via Wheelie Boy… you’ll see).

The Peripheral book jacketFlynne Fisher lives in the near future, somewhere in the south in a house without running water. She makes a living playing video games for hire or doing shifts down at the 3D printing fab. Wilf Netherton is a publicist in London sometime after a mysterious event known as “The Jackpot” has occurred. In his time, genetic modification is rampant, nanobots scurry everywhere, and you can control live bodies with your mind. When Flynne covers a gaming shift for her brother (a former soldier suffering from the aformentioned glitched haptics) she sees something she shouldn’t have, something that will threaten her life and cause these two worlds to become forever entangled.

We’re talking neutron star density of the new here… It’s heady stuff, bewildering and alien at first, but that’s part of the pleasure. And yet, the more things change… well, you know what they say. Artspeak is just as cipherlike and nonsensical in the future as today, publicists are still hapless and gutless (sorry Wilf!), tattoos are still a thing, and unfortunately for most of us, the rich are still getting richer, a grim reality that even those in future can’t escape.

For more cyber thrillers and biotech chillers, try this list.

 

Training Is Her True CallingVolunteer Andrea Dobson

by Sarah Binns

In a world of constant technology changes and a maze of digital devices, we've all been baffled: Why did my photos disappear? Do I need the latest software update? But really, where are my photos?! For the past ten years Multnomah County Library volunteer Andrea Dobson has heard these kinds of questions on a daily basis in her role as a technology trainer; luckily, she always has the answers.

Based at downtown's Central Library (“My favorite place in the universe,” she says), Andrea teaches technology classes ranging from iPad lessons to resumé workshops, all for free. She also volunteers on Sundays at a new walk-in tech support booth in the Central Library lobby. “There's nothing that people have come in with that we haven't been able to help,” she says. That said, “A lot of [questions] that people have, I'm not familiar with either, but I Google it and we figure it out.” Constantly learning on the job is a perk of Andrea's position.

Teaching others has long been a part of her life. Prior to her volunteer job at the library, Andrea worked as a TriMet bus mechanic for 20 years before moving to its training department, “which was my true calling,” she says. Tri-Met computerized quickly, which led Andrea to learn desktop publishing and other computer skills. Always a book lover, she pursued library volunteering once she retired; ten years ago, she began by staffing computer labs. Andrea sees technology as a critical, though often overlooked, library service: “I think what the library is doing in the technology area is so important. It’s really impossible these days to get a job or really participate in our society in a lot of meaningful ways if you don’t have access to the Internet.”

Andrea also volunteers to support military families through the Red Cross and travels the world over: she's been on 15 adventures, including trips to Turkey, Spain and Iceland. Wherever she goes, though, she knows she'll return to her Central Library spot: “It's one of those places where you feel like nothing bad could ever happen.”  


A Few Facts About Andrea

Home library: Lives halfway between Hollywood and Central, but spends most of her time at Central: “Downtown feels like my neighborhood.”
Currently reading: “I'm always reading three or four things, including a nonfiction book. Right now I'm reading America's Bitter Pill, about how the Affordable Care Act got created.”
Favorite book from childhood: “I read a lot of books later, after high school—Dickens was like that, I read everything by him when I was 30 and I was mad for not paying attention when I was in school.”
A book that made you laugh or cry: “I really loved Kurt Vonnegut and Tom Robbins—his books made me laugh a lot.”
Favorite browsing section of the library: Travel section, history and biography
E-reader or paper? Paper, but an iPad for traveling: “It's nice to get on an airplane without 50 pounds of books on my back.”
Favorite place to read: In bed at night

See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

 

Willi Smith

Willi Smith Photo: Chron

 

He was hailed as one of the most successful men in the fashion industry. It was the late 1970s to the mid-1980s — if you weren’t wearing Williwear, why get dressed, DAHLING? Willi Smith took the fashion world by storm. He believed designing should be fun and unconventional. He’s known for the signature highwaist wrap pants. He was edgy and youthful. He even designed Mary Jane’s dress in the popular comic book Spiderman! Smith designed for men and women. He created innovative clothing that people could afford. Smith was born in Philadelphia and attended the Philadelphia College of Art. He later received two scholarships to attend Parsons. He dropped out at 19 to do his own thing! His fashion house was worth 25million, in the 80s! ”I don’t design clothes for the Queen," he once said, "but for the people who wave at her as she goes by.”

Further Exploration: http://www.complex.com/style/2013/02/the-25-greatest-black-fashion-designers/

Available at Multnomah County Library: Fabric of Dreams, Designing My Own Success by Hankins, Anthony Mark

 

 

Cover of book Three weeks with Lady xThanks to Eloisa James and two professional readers for helping me complete a lot of household chores recently. I could have curled up in a chair with a book. Instead I did chores while they read to me. Rosalyn Landor read me the first book in James’s Desperate Duchesses series and Susan Duerden read me the rest. Then I listened to Eloisa James read me her memoir Paris in Love.

The Desperate Duchesses series is set in the late 1700’s and features characters whose lives are a bit naughtier than those in Regency romances.(Have you seen “Forbidden Fruit” the porcelain exhibit at Portland Art Museum? It’s that sort of naughtiness.)

James creates a world filled with romance, social intrigue, chess competitions and women looking for ways to make their own choices in a world that gives them few legal rights. Landor’s and Duerden’s reading styles made the characters’ witty repartee come alive for me. I enjoyed Duerden's interpretation of the Duke of Villiers with his exquisite fashion sense and disdain of most things romantic, and I laughed with delight at Landor’s voicing of the sentimental poet whose daughter wants to wed Villiers.

Book cover of Desperate Duchesses by Eloisa James

I’ve been able to walk miles with my dogs and finish lots of mundane tasks while enjoying these delicious stories. You can join me in this lovely activity of having someone read to you. I use Overdrive on the MCL website to download audiobooks to my Android phone, but you can choose other options. Not sure how to get started? You can start here if you like to read instructions. If you need more help, you can take a free class or Book a LibrarianWe're happy to help. Just ask.

 

2015年宵一年一度的年宵会, 將于农历大年初三, 二月二十一日, 星期六, 在俄勒岗会议 中心举行。(详情可参阅波特兰新闻)

穆鲁玛县图书馆将有现场摊位,提供有关文化, 饮食, 健康等等的资源及书籍,並有华语职员为大家介绍及解答有关图书馆各类活动的资料。欢迎各位到图书馆的摊位与我们見面!

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

 

Kermit Oliver

Kermit Oliver

This is the type of story books are made of. A quiet Texas postal worker designs for a well known fashion house and until recent years, this was unknown. Now, Kermit Oliver is retired. At one time he was a postal worker minding his business, providing for his family and painting on the side; a form of relaxation, a way to take the load off after a hard day of work. He’s a recluse, almost agoraphobic, actually. As a shy child raised on a ranch near Rufugio, TX and the son of a vaquero, he took comfort in art as a means to communicate without words. His artwork is colorful and calls on nature, children and his experience growing up on a ranch for inspiration. Oliver has a natural need for privacy and aversion to attention. He’s the only American artist to have his paintings printed on the famous and costly Hermes scarves. A former student and teacher of art, Oliver’s work can be found in galleries, museums and on the wall of high art collectors. While Oliver’s work commands five figures, his so called success didn’t come without heartbreak. If you think Oliver’s art is amazing, discover Kehinde Wiley.

Further Exploration:  http://www.npr.org/2012/10/21/163273742/how-a-texas-postman-became-an-herm-s-designer

Available at Multnomah County Library: Wake Up Our Souls. A Celebration of African American Artists by Bolden, Tonya and The History of African American Women Artists by Farington, Lisa E

Donyale Luna

 

Donyal Luna Photo: NYmag

On March 1st, 1966, this image appeared on the cover of British Vogue. Can you guess why her hand covers her face (particularly her nose and lips)? Before Beverly Johnson (yes, Beverly Johnson), Ya-Ya Dacosta, Naomi Campbell, Damaris Lewis, Iman and Tyra Banks; there was Donyale Luna. Born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, Luna rose to fashion fame at a young age. In 1965, she was sketched on the cover of Harper’s Bazaar, dubbed the reincarnated Nefertiti and worked with the top photographers and designers of the time. Luna even had mannequins made in her likeness! She transformed the fashion world and buffed accepted images of beauty. Donyale struggled with her racial identity. Eventually, her life came to a tragic end at a young age. If you think Donyale transformed fashion and images of beauty, wait until you discover, Diandra Forrest

Further Exploration: http://nymag.com/thecut/2013/07/first-black-supermodel-whom-history-forgot.html

Available at Multnomah County Library: Commander in Chic by Taylor, Mikki

Introduction: This week we focus on fashion! From big earrings and mixed prints to fabrics and style, the influence of African American culture on fashion is undeniable. Join us this week as we highlight the contributions of 7 African Americans and their impact on fashion.

Anne Lowe

Photo of Anne Lowe and the wedding dress she designed for Jacqueline Kennedy. Source Women's World

 

She designed the most photographed wedding dress in history, Yet, you probably never heard of her. Anne Lowe is the creative genius behind Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding dress. In fact, she designed dresses for the Duponts, Rockefellers, Roosevelts and many more of New York’s high society. But due to race relations at the time, Lowe did not always receive credit . In fact, it was not uncommon for a white designer to receive credit for her work. In 1946, it was Lowe who designed Olivia de Havilland’s dress for Best Actress at the Academy Awards. However, Sonia Rosenberg received recognition, not Lowe. Despite being New York society’s best kept secret, Lowe did receive due acknowledgement in Vogue, Vanity Fair and Town and Country. Lowe led the way for contemporary designers Tracy Reese, Samantha Black of Project Runway, Azede Jean-Pierre, Laura Smalls and a host of others. If you think Anne Lowe’s story is incredible, discover Elizabeth Keckly.

Further Exploration: http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/?p=11922

Available at Multnomah County Library: Threads of Time: The Fabric of History, Profiles of African American Dressmakers and Designers 1850-2002 by Reed-Miller, Rosemary

 

Come on, admit the title at least piqued your interest.

cover image of the dud avocadoElaine Dundy’s first novel was The Dud Avocado. It is very loosely, a memoir of her time in Paris as a young woman in the 1950s. Her follow up was The Old Man and Me, cover image of the old man and mewith a slightly older narrator, this time based in 1960s London. These have been quietly forgotten while other similar novels of the same period have gone on to fame—Breakfast at Tiffany’s anyone? They are witty and for their time, possibly a little shocking. A very young, very American woman alone in a foreign city, taking strange men indiscriminately to bed with her, drinking, smoking...you get the picture.

Sally Jay and Betsy Lou are our two characters. The first suffers from vague nymphomania and costume dilemmas—Tyrolean peasant or dreaded librarian? And the second sets out to seduce and possibly kill for her rightful inheritance. Poor little rich girls. Thankfully New York Review Books has reprinted these two classics for another generation to discover.

Valentine’s Day: It’s a big day for some people, sometimes, but it can change for each of us through the years.

For a school kid delivering a carefully printed card to each classmate, it can be a sign of friendship.

It could mean special candy or passion and red roses and a romantic French restaurant...maybe a massage… maybe singing karaoke love songs to your sweetheart. 

Maybe it means feeling grumpy and alone and wanting to wallow in Anti-Valentine feelings after a bad break-up. Maybe seeing Fifty Shades of Grey

Or hoping that tonight you’ll dream of your lover because you cannot be together. Texting love notes so fast your fingers are a blur.

Will you hand make a valentine? Send an e-card? Drive miles to surprise someone? Meet the person you will decide to spend your life with after only three days or three weeks?

Whatever you end up doing this Valentine’s Day, you might find something that appeals to you on these lists. I asked other people I work with at the library for their personal favorites, so I could share this list of books or this one of movies and music with you. Most of the suggestions are romantic, but not all are happy. Would you share one of your favorites, too? Thanks! 

Sarah E. Goode

 

Sarah E. Goode Photo:thewright

These days, tiny homes are all the rave. But, actually, this trend is a little old. In 1884, Sarah E. Goode (a Chicago furniture store owner) invented a folding cabinet bed to fit in what is known  today as tiny homes. Goode wanted to make it possible for people living in small homes to have furniture that fit in restricted space. When folded, the cabinet bed looks like a desk. Goode is known as the first African American woman to receive a patent, on July 14, 1885. Today, there’s a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math education (STEM) school in Chicago named after Sarah E. Goode.

Further Exploration: http://www.blackpast.org/aah/goode-sarah-e-c-1855-1905

Available at Multnomah County Library: Women Designers in the U.S.A 1900-2000. Diversity and Difference by Multiple Contributors

Lonnie Johnson

Lonnie Johnson Photo: uspto\.gov

There is no way to list all the accomplishments of Lonnie Johnson, here. In short, he has a master’s degree in nuclear engineering. He was a systems engineer for the Galileo mission to Jupiter and the Cassini mission to Saturn. He worked on the Strategic Air Command helping to develop the Stealth Bomber program. He’s owner of Johnson Research and Development. In all, he has more than 100 patents. But, his most popular invention is the SUPER SOAKER!That’s right; Lonnie Johnson invented the summer time mega watergun enjoyed by millions all over the world!

Further Exploration:  http://www.biography.com/people/lonnie-g-johnson-17112946

Available at Multnomah County Library:  What Color is My World? The Lost History of African-American Inventors by Abdul-Jabbar, Kareem

Percy L. Julian

 

Percy L. Julian Photo:Nytimes

He’s one of the most influential chemists this country has ever known. He’s a self made millionaire and humanitarian.  Yet, many people have never heard of him. Percy Lavon Julian is THE MAN when it comes to the chemical synthesis of plant-based drugs. He was the first to synthesis Physostigmine. He synthesized the human hormones progesterone and testosterone from plant sterols. His work led to the creation of cortisone, even birth control pills! These are just a few of his contributions to the world of medicine. What he does with a yam is incredible! But don’t take our word for it, find out for yourself.

Further Exploration:  http://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/julian.html

Available at Multnomah County Library:  Forgotten Genius (DVD)

Patricia Bath

Patrica Bath Photo:Blackliberalboomer

She’s amazing. She attends Howard University School of Medicine, New York and Columbia universities. She believes everyone has a “Right to Sight.” She invents the Laserphaco Probe and procedure to improve cataract surgery results. She’s the first African American woman doctor to patent a medical invention. She’s the first African American woman surgeon at the UCLA Medical Center. She’s the first woman on faculty at the UCLA Jules Stein Eye Institute. Again, she’s amazing!

Further Exploration: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/changingthefaceofmedicine/physicians/biography_26.html

Available at Multnomah County Library: Black Firsts, 4,000 Groundbreaking and Pioneering Historical Events by Jessie Carney Smith

Gerald A. Lawson

Gerald A Lawson Photo: museumofplay

If you play Playstation or Xbox or any other gaming console and enjoy video games, you have Gerald A. Lawson to thank. A self-taught engineer who never graduates from college, Lawson is the founding father of the modern-day video game. He creates the first home gaming system with interchangeable game cartridges.  Lawson met Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak pre-Apple. In fact, regarding Jobs and Wozniak, Lawson is quoted as saying, “I was not impressed with them—either one of them, actually.” This is one amazing story. Discover more.

Further Exploration: www.aaffmuseum.org

Available at Multnomah County Library: African American Firsts in Science & Technology by Webster, Raymond B.

 

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