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Is simplifying and spring cleaning in full swing at your house? Have you accumulated quite a collection of unnecessary belongings that need to go? In my house the answer to both is, yes! Luckily there are many resources to help you find where to donate or recycle these items.
 
Oregon Metro is my go to site for information on where to donate, recycle, or as a last resort dispose of as garbage. They have a database where you enter what you want to get rid of and it finds places to either donate, recycle, or dispose of it. There is also information on where to bring hazardous wastes, neighborhood collection programs, and tips on reducing waste in the first place.
 
211 Info is a clearinghouse of resources. Simply put in your zip code and "donation" in the search bar and it brings up a list of organizations that accept items ranging from glasses to camping gear. If you like more of a list format this is the website for you.
 
If you have questions about recycling check our Earth911. They have a recycling guide as well as a search feature to find local places to recycle. 
 
What about that growing collection of old electronics? Free Geek accepts donations of computers, phones, and other electronics. If able to be reused your device will be refurbished and donated back to the community, how cool is that! If it can't be reused your device can be recycled through Oregon E-Cycles. If you aren't able to make it to Free Geek, Oregon E-Cycles has many other collection sites
 
If you aren't able to go to donation sites the good news is there organizations that can come to you. The Vietnam Veterans of America and The Arc of Multnomah-Clackamas both offer pick up services. 
 
Finally here are my my personal favorites:
  • Have you noticed those green boxes popping up all around Portland? They are part of the Gaia Movement USA. They are an easy way to recycle your clothes and shoes. Use their map to find a drop off box nearest you. 
  • SCRAP accepts a wide range of art and office supplies. Just be careful not to leave with more than you donated!
  • The Rebuilding Center accepts building supplies and it's a fun place to wander around for hours. They also offer a pick up service.
What library blog would be complete without mentioning the Multnomah County Library can accept your book and DVD donations? If you have a small donation your local library will be happy to accept your donation.

 

arctic tern

I always thought that bird watching would be boring until I actually did it!  I can't recall exactly how many birds I saw on my first official try, but I do remember being impressed by the beauty and variety of shorebirds on view in winter down around Tillamook Bay.  I was so completely charmed by the sweet little buffleheads as they bobbed around that I almost forgot the freezing temperatures!  Then there was the visit in and around the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in spring where I was blown away by the beautiful American White Pelicans and got a close-up look at a rough-legged hawk making a meal of a duck.  On another visit to the same area, I got a rare and long look at some juvenile golden eagles as they were snacking on something. 

My latest avian adventure happened last spring in Britain when I went to the Farne Islands and was dive-bombed by an Arctic tern!  Fortunately, I had a hat on and had been warned that this might happen. I wish I had started my bird-watching ventures when I was a lot younger. if I actually kept a life list, it certainly would have been more complete had I started observing birds when I was five.  Fortunately for today's youth, there are lots of fun, fact-filled books to help get them excited about birds.  Check out this list for some ideas!

H is for Hawk, by Helen Macdonald

heading from an early page of the Ledger Index to City of Portland Deaths

Have you ever had trouble finding an obituary for a Portland ancestor who died around the turn of the last century?  You’re not alone!

In the 19th century and even in the early 20th, newspapers often put obituaries in with the regular news, making them hard to find.  This was also before it was common for Portland newspapers to include a "Daily city statistics" section listing the names of people who had died in the city recently.  So it’s no wonder that it can be a big challenge to find Portland obituaries from before about 1910.  

But I have good news for you: if your ancestor was a Portlander, and if they died within city limits 1881-1917, their death was probably recorded in the Ledger Index to City of Portland Deaths.

A page from the Ledger Index, showing December 1913 deaths.  Click for a bigger version.

What is the Ledger Index?

The Ledger Index to City of Portland Deaths is a long list of people who died in the city of Portland 1881-1917.  It’s quite a bit more robust than most modern death indexes -- in addition to the name and death date of each person included, it includes details like the address or name of the place where the person died, their cause of death, and (in some years) the name of the cemetery where they were buried.  This additional information makes the Ledger Index a pretty decent substitute for obituaries.  

Here’s what the Ledger Index actually looks like.  The library has a microfilmed copy, which is why it’s white text on a black background.

Finding your ancestor

The Ledger Index is arranged by date of death -- because of this, it’s sometimes referred to as the “Chronologic Index.”  If you know the date your ancestor died, simply go to that date and hopefully you’ll find them!

If you don’t know your ancestor’s date of death, try looking for their name in the Oregon State Archives’ Oregon Historical Records Index.  This index includes most records from the Ledger Index to City of Portland Deaths.  If your ancestor is listed, their date of death should lead you to the correct page of the Ledger Index.

Detail of a January 1882 Ledger Index page showing racial classification.  Click for a bigger version.

Racial classification in the Ledger Index

There are some challenges to using the Ledger Index.  The information in the Index is a primary source, created a full century ago, and it is a government record reflecting the mainstream standards and ideas of its time.  There is no context or commentary to interpret the index for you -- you will have to provide your own analysis.  

One thing these records show us is the unexamined racism of the past.  The Ledger Index states the race of each person listed, often using terms that are decidedly not used in polite speech today: “Chinese,” “Colored,” “Half-Breed,” “Mulatto,” “White,” and possibly others.  Some of these terms appear on detail from January 1882 at left.  In later years, single-letter abbreviations are used.  There is no key showing what the abbreviations meant, but I’ve guessed that “C” stands for “colored” (meaning Black or African-American); “W” for “white;” and “Y” for “yellow” (meaning Asian or Asian-American).   

Detail of a January 1882 Ledger Index page showing causes of death.  Click for a bigger version.

Causes of death in the Ledger Index

This detail from a January 1882 Ledger Index page shows some familiar-sounding causes of death: “still born,” "consumption," “scarlet fever.”  But read if you read through a few pages worth of deaths, you'll also find unexpected causes like “softening of spinal marrow.”  If you find your ancestor’s death has officially been recorded due to something that doesn’t sound like it would kill a person, be prepared to draw gentle, careful conclusions.  And remember, you may need to do some research to discover what a cause-of-death term meant in the past. 

Portland deaths only

Another thing to beware of when using the Ledger Index to City of Portland Deaths is that it only includes people who died within the city limits of Portland.  And the city was quite a bit smaller 100 years ago than it is now! 

Map of historical annexations to the City of Portland (pdf, from Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability)Fortunately, the Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability has a very helpful map showing historical annexations to the city of Portland (pdf), which you can look at to get a sense for where city limits were during your ancestor’s lifetime.  

Of course, people are mobile.  The Ledger Index lists people who died in Portland, not people who lived there.  Your ancestor who lived in Linnton or East Portland or St. Johns could well have died within Portland city limits, particularly if they died in an accident or in a hospital.

Using the Ledger Index, and getting help with it

You can consult the Ledger Index to City of Portland Deaths at Central Library.  Ask at any reference desk, and the librarian on duty will help you get the volumes you need.  To read it, you’ll need to use one of Central Library’s microfilm machines -- read more about that in my colleague Ross B.’s post Microfilm at the library.

But you don’t have to visit the library to tap the riches of this great resource --  librarians are always happy help.  Just get in touch with us by phone or email via Ask the Librarian, and we’ll do our best to answer your questions or help you plan your research. 

In the meantime, happy researching!

Outline of the U.S. and image of a camera lens, with the words "CHOOSE PRIVACY" beneath them.What does privacy mean to you? Is it a place where no one is watching you or listening to what you say? Thanks to our ever-connected gadgets (our phones, computers, televisions, e-readers) such places are becoming more and more scarce. Every digital breath we take is noted, collected, and recorded for future marketing or security purposes.

Should we care? After all, we get many benefits by giving up our privacy: we receive recognition from others, we can easily share and communicate with groups of friends, we get free email. But a world without privacy is also a world where you are not free to ask questions or seek information without being monitored.

Libraries care about privacy, and the American Library Association has declared the first week of May to be Choose Privacy Week. Why? “Because the freedom to read and receive ideas anonymously is at the heart of individual liberty in a democracy” (from ALA's "Why libraries?" webpage). 

To learn more about online privacy, attend one of the library's upcoming Privacy and Safety Online classes. You can also take a look at Portland Community College’s Privacy Online guide: it includes videos and links about the ways that privacy is compromised online, and tips for how you can protect it.

Book cover for Intellectual Privacy by Neil RichardsIf, like me, you’re more of a book person, I’ve made a reading list called “Privacy? What’s privacy?” - it includes current books that will help you start to answer that question. If you’d rather get your dystopia in a make-believe format, another reading list, “Surveillance stories and privacy parables,” includes books and DVDs about the privacy-less society that we just might be headed toward.

Are you taking steps to protect your privacy? Or have you already given up on the notion of privacy? Leave your comments below (and please feel free to do so anonymously).

Sometimes I get tired of the boys’ club that is our pop culture. I think “Give me some women’s voices.” You certainly won’t find women’s voices on Portland radio, so I have to start spinning my own musical choices. And find the books for women's voices. And I’ve been lucky lately.  

I found the Slits’ guitarist Viv Albertine’s memoir Clothes Clothes Clothes Music Music Music Boys Boys Boys. I was transported to 1970s London where punk rock was just taking hold and young Viv was just learning to hold a guitar, and her own on the stage. I was floored by the two prominent men in her life: her father and her husband, who sneered and put down her music career. Viv triumphs though! This is a memoir about creativity, aging and empowerment. I found her determination inspiring.

Then I heard that Kim Gordon had a memoir coming out. I got goosebumps. I was more of a pop music lover or local music lover most of my life. My favorite bands in the 80s and 90s were local bands but that’s another story. But I knew of Kim Gordon at that time. She was a beacon of hope for women in rock. Yes, there were others. But hearing that she sang about Karen Carpenter in the song “Tunic” sealed the deal for me. Reading her memoir really fleshes out the story how she began with visual arts and dance in California. Her musical career with Sonic Youth starts in New York City with her relationship with Thurston Moore. This is a wonderful memoir about reinventing oneself, and finding truth and creativity.  

Both women portray the healing power and strength of music and creativity.Their storytelling skills really drew me in as a reader. The musical settings and characters were very interesting for a music fan. Perhaps you will find their memoirs as inspiring as I did.

 

The last few weeks here in Portland have been heavenly! Nights so cold and clear that  the star-scattered sky seems close enough to touch.  Days washed with sunshine and the goodwill of people who can’t wait until summer. But I know this is an illusion.  Summer  isn’t here yet and soon we  will be back to the rain and overcast skies that Oregonians know and love.

 So what will  do I then?  Maybe  a book, movie or music  will bring some of  that warmth and goodwill back to my soul.  First on my list is a good mystery.  Nothing cheers me up like a puzzle well solved.  Or  a detective who, despite personal problems, can’t stop until justice is done.  Dr. Siuri is one such detective.  His story takes place in Laos during the time of the Vietnam War. Although 70 years old and hoping to retire into obscurity, Dr. Siri is appointed by the Laotian Government as their head (and only) forensic doctor.  In Coroners Lunch, first book in the series by Colin Cotterill, Dr. Siri knows nothing about forensics, but luckily with his two talented and resourceful assistants, Mr. Geung, (a mentally challenged man the government wanted to fire for incompetency) and a young nurse Dtiu  ( who is considered too plain and overweight to nurse in the hospital), he is able to solve political crimes without causing an international disaster.  

Along with a good mystery and a steaming  cup of golden hot tea, I am sure to be listening to the Moody Blues- the mellow spirit of their music belies the introspective  lyrics of songs that can  still make me ponder the meaning of  life. 

From Days of Future Past :"Cold-hearted orb, that rules the night, removes the colors from our sight, red is grey and yellow white, but WE decide which is right and which IS an illusion".

From A Question of Balance: "Why do we never get an answer, when we're knocking at the door with a thousand million questions about  hate and death and war?"     

If  black clouds and pouring rain put me in the  the mood for for a movie, I might pick the Secret Garden -I love  the version that features  Maggie Smith as the bitter Mrs. Medlock, Linda Ronstadt's airy song Winter Light  and a beautiful sleeping garden just waiting for the innocence and stubborness  of Mary, Dickon and Colin to wake it up. The beauty of the ending that shows them dancing on the sunlit meadow always restores my faith in life again.

It's almost enough to make me hope I will wake up tomorrow  to clouds and the sound of rain falling.

Well, almost.

Earthquakes are sudden and have lasting, devastating impact. The tragedy in Nepal resulting from an initial 7.8 magnitude earthquake on April 25, 2015 is ongoing and will be a main focal point in the news for many days and weeks to come. There are other resources besides the news to learn more about earthquakes and Nepal.

The United States Geological Survey is a reliable source for scientific information; its Earthquake Hazards Program monitors and reports earthquakes, assesses earthquake impacts and hazards, and researches the causes and effects of earthquakes.

 

Organizations such as the American Red Cross travel around the world to assist with food, water, shelter and health care needs of those affected.

Learn more about the history, people and customs of Nepal by using CultureGrams, a database Multnomah County Library subscribes to and you can use for free with your library card.

You may also hear more people talking about the potential for earthquakes in Oregon and the greater Pacific Northwest. The Department of Geology and Mineral Industries for the State of Oregon details local plans to address geologic hazards and has information on how you can prepare for potential emergencies at home.

 

Our guest reader is Steve Sheinkin, an award-winning nonfiction author and this year's speaker at our Teen Author Lecture.

I started out writing screenplays and comics, and then, because I wasn’t actually making any money, I got a job writing history textbooks. Now I’m trying to make amends for that particular crime by writing nonfiction books for teens that are actually fun to read. When I visit schools and describe my job, there’s usually one kid who raises his hand and says something like, “Oh, so you do homework for a living?” It’s not true, though I guess I do spend a lot of days just sitting at my desk, reading and taking notes. I happen to love it. I think of the research process as a sort of nerdy detective work.

In my free time, or while traveling, I love to read crime and detective novels. Everything from the original stuff, like James M. Cain’s Double Indemnity and the short stories of Dashiell Hammett, to Patricia Highsmith’s Mr. Ripley books and Richard Stark’s Parker novels. Right now my absolute favorite is the incredible Martin Beck mystery series, a set of Swedish police procedurals written by a wife-and-husband team in the late 1960s and early 70s. I’m also tearing through Shigeru Mizuki’s History of Japan, a series of four 500-plus page graphic novels (last volume due in July) combining the artist’s own lifestory with that of the last 80 years of Japanese history. Not too ambitious, in other words.

In terms of movies, these days I mostly go with my kids, 8 and 5. When I get a chance to watch a movie that doesn’t have Spongebob (don’t get me wrong, he’s cool) I go for 1940s noirs, like Out of the Past.

Though I like comedies too, and actually just the other night my wife and I decided to show our kids one of my all-time favorites, the Marx Brothers’ Duck Soup. My five year old declared the opening scene “boring,” and marched off to bed. Then he came back ten minutes later, just to see how things were going, and he watched Harpo rolling up his pant legs and jumping into the obnoxious vender’s vat of lemonade, and he laughed so hard he literally fell off the couch. So I consider that a success.

I won’t try to list styles or music or bands, it’s too hard, but I’ll tell you a story about one of my favorites, Elliott Smith. I know he had Portland connections, but he also used to live in Brooklyn, where I was born, and lived for years as an adult. Once, after a move to a new place, I started getting mail addressed to Elliott Smith. Couldn’t be that Elliott Smith, I figured; this was the late 1990s, so he was fairly well known. But it turned out it was him. He’d just moved out, the women on the top floor told me, and the crazy landlady downstairs, this fake-orange-haired troll who’d come out of her room to shout “You’re nothing but a couple of waiters!” to the aspiring filmmakers on the second floor, used to berate Elliott too, and eventually drove him out of the building. I’ve always wondered if she shows up in any of his songs. Wish I’d gotten the chance to ask.

For more great recommendations, customized just for you, try My Librarian.

The winners of the Oregon Book Awards were recently announced! From a number of excellent finalists, Portland’s own Emily Kendal Frey was awarded the Stafford/Hall Award for Poetry. I’ve been reading the award winning book, Sorrow Arrow, and it’s a real treat - a wild emotional ride between poignant sadness and some rather hilarious moments, and memorable lines such as “You sit in your body, quietly making blood.” The book transpires in brief lyric lines, sometimes disjunctive and sometimes tenacious, in a series of untitled poems that build upon one another in a wonderful wall of feeling.

Are you interested in reading books by Emily Kendal Frey and other Oregon poets? Here’s a booklist for you.

National Poetry Month is not yet over! April 30th is Poem in Your Pocket Day, when you are encouraged to carry a poem around. In your pocket. At Central Library we will have a selection of poems for you to choose from, including some new work by local poets! Look for our display in the 1st floor lobby. 

 

Sistine Chapel ceilingAfter the dreadful Dark Ages and the morbid Middle Ages where death and ignorance reigned, something had to give.  All work and warfare made Giovanni a dull boy, and people were tired of being stuck at home on a flat world. A movement began in Italy to enhance people’s quality of life and up the cultural IQ in Europe. Art, literature and education flourished.  To find out more about this heady period in European history, read on!

For an overview of the Renaissance, check out this website.  You’ll learn about printing and thinking during the era; architecture, painting and music; exploration and trade plus movement out of the Middle Ages.

Here you’ll find articles from the Open University’s Renaissance Secrets team on topics such as fashion in Renaissance Venice, medical knowledge and beliefs in Renaissance Italy, and the printing revolution.

Florence was the most important city of the Renaissance.  Get up close and personal with Michelangelo’s David when you take the virtual tour of that city.  Here you can watch videos and read about all of the places important in Renaissance Florence.statue of Leonardo Da Vinci

In Italy during this time, you wouldn’t want to get on the wrong side of the Medici family. This website, produced by PBS, is all about the specific contributions and historical legacy of the Medici dynasty during the extraordinary Renaissance period.  There is also general information about the Renaissance and links to books and websites about that era.

Check out the Boston’s Museum of Science’s Exploring Leonardo site for information on the amazing artist, scientist and inventor, Leonardo Da Vinci.  There’s an interactive map of Italy where you can find out where Leonardo did what, along with lots of other activities that will help you understand Leonardo and his world.

No Renaissance page would be complete without a tribute to one of the world’s greatest artists, Michelangelo.  For biographical information and photos of his work, see this site. Take a look at Artcyclopedia’s High Renaissance page for information about and links to collections of works by other artists of that period. 

Now go forth now and get some culture!

If my husband were to send me flowers at work (please don’t), I’d likely hide them away in a closet.  Not one for overt romantic gestures, it’s unlikely that I’d ever pick up a romance book for the romance.  Yet occasionally I do find myself enjoying a love story, especially if it has an international setting and an unusual narrative.  Here are three surprising, globe-trotting love stories that I’ve enjoyed recently.  But should you read them?  I’ll leave that for you to decide.

 

Book jacket: Signal to Noise by Silvia Moreno GarciaSignal to Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: Three misfit teens in Mexico City explore the magical power of music and unintentionally alter the course of their lives.

Should you read it?

Absolutely: Your own life carries a mixtape soundtrack. You enjoy stories where reality is suspended only momentarily to make room for a bit of magic. You love YA books, remember being a surly misfit teenager yourself or maybe still are a surly misfit teenager.

Maybe not: You have little patience for adolescent struggles and need your fiction believable. What you’re really looking for is a book that evokes a sense of place.

 

Book jacket: A Bad Character by Deepti Kapoor

A Bad Character by Deepti Kapoor: An ill-suited lover opens up the world and enlivens the city of Delhi for a restless young woman none too keen on having an arranged marriage.

Should you read it?

Absolutely: You like your characters a little dark, reckless and unpredictable.  You take delight in beautiful writing and vivid descriptions of foreign cities. You enjoy psychological stories and pondering women’s roles around the world. You just want to hold this gorgeous, compact and gold-flecked book in your hands.

Maybe not: Unhealthy relationships that play with power balance leave you cold. You need a more cohesive plot and less psychological (and ahem sexual) exploring.

 

Book jacket: I Am China by Xiaolu GuoI Am China by Xiaolu Guo: A London translator takes an unusual assignment translating the journal and letters of a punk rock musician and soon finds herself immersed in the story of two Chinese lovers.

Should you read it?

Absolutely: Chinese punk rockers alone is intrigue enough. You love a slow-to-unravel mystery and a novel in letters. Language and the complexities of translation intrigue you. You like a little revolution with your romance.

Maybe not:  You can’t forgive an underdeveloped character and need a faster pace to keep you interested.

For a long time, I read nonfiction almost exclusively. Much of it was academic so occasionally I needed to find something light and fun to mentally recharge myself. The problem was if I read fiction, then I’d feel guilty about “wasting time” with books that didn’t further my professional development. My work-around was the humorous travelogue. Certain authors have a great talent for both telling a great story about themselves and their adventures while including colorful tales about the history of their destination.

Confederates in the Attic book jacketWhat often makes these so appealing is the emphasis on the colorful, whether it be the place or the people our intrepid travelers encounter. A great example is Robert Lee Hodge, a Civil War reenactor who specializes in imitating a bloated corpse in Tony Horwitz’s Confederates in the Attic. Another is Bill Bryson’s friend, Stephen Katz, as the two attempt to traverse the Appalachian Trail in A Walk in the Woods. Katz had spent the previous two decades as Des Moines, Iowa’s “drug culture” selling pot, partying, and getting drunk.  You can imagine how well he took to life on the trail. . .
Lost on Planet China book jacket
What kept my guilt at bay, however, was the fact all of them incorporate some history into the story. For example, Sarah Vowell is not only very funny, but tells us a lot about the 19th century as she travels to the locations associated with Presidential assassinations in Assassination Vacation, and  J. Maarten Troost provides us with a great primer on post-Mao China in Lost on Planet China.

If this kind of story sounds appealing, please take a look at the accompanying reading list. These are all great fun, and you’ll probably learn a thing or two. If you know of another author with a similar emphasis I’d love to hear about them in the comments section below.

The Rocks

by Peter Nichols

A romantic love story set on the Mediterranean coast about a mysterious sixty year secret that shaped the lives and loves of two families.

The Wright Brothers

by David McCullough

Master historian David McCullough tells us the inspiring story of the Wright brothers drawing from the Wright papers, diaries and letters to portray the men behind the myth. For history buffs everywhere.

Empire of Deception

by Dean Jobb

The story of a charming and charasmatic con man in 1920's Chicago who pulls off an unscrupulous scam and is then relentlessly pursued by a Chicago lawman. An entertaining read of a little known story from the jazz era.

I Regret Nothing

by Jen Lancaster

Jen is back with another hilarious memoir about self-improvement and re-invention. Get ready to laugh out loud.

The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789

by Joseph Ellis

Ellis, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, now tells about the years after the Revolution when the colonies agreed to submit to a federal government. He focuses on four key players: George Washington, James Madison, John Jay, and Alexander Hamilton.

The Upright Thinkers: The Human Journey from Living in Trees to Understanding the Cosmos

by Leonard Mlodinow

From the author of The Drunkard's Walk, Mlodinow takes us through the eras and  events of the development of science, and how the simple questions of "why" and "how" have led to scientific discovery.

The Great Fire: Two Americans' Heroic Mission to Rescue Victims fo the 20th Century's First Genocide

by Lou Ureneck

The harrowing story of two Americans who helped to save 250,000 refugees from the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians in 1915. Published to coincide with the centennial of the event.

Elon Musk: Tesla, Spacex, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future

by Ashlee Vance

Vance portrays the vision and genius of Elon Musk who is recognized as being one of today's most renowned entrepreneurs. For high tech and outer space fans.

Born Survivors

by Wendy Holden

A remarkable story of three pregnant mothers who were sent to concentration camps in eastern Europe during the later years of World War II and how they mananged to survive to give life to their children. 

 

 

 

I loved the 2013 novel Life After Life, which told the story-- stories-- of Ursula Todd and all the lives she might have had, many of which involved surviving the London Blitz. I was delighted this year to find that author Kate Atkinson has written A God in Ruins, a companion piece to Life After Life, which expands on the story of Teddy, Ursula's brother. I love this character, a man who survives real horror, and who, as the pilot of an RAF bomber plane, drops horror on countless others. After surviving when so many pilots have not, he decides that after the war, he must be kind. And he mostly succeeds in being kind to the people around him for the rest of his long life.

Author Kate Atkinson writes so beautifully that she makes me want to stop the endless stream of books flying at me and have myself a little Kate Atkinson festival. It's always so delicious to discover an author you love who's already written tons of books. Maybe I’ll do it. A God in Ruins is glorious, a book about flight, about the terrible cost of war in terms of lost lives, about the value of one single life, about time itself. The narrative skips backward and forward in time and tells stories from Teddy's life and from the lives of the people he loves. But then, within each story, you find yourself shooting backward in time and sometimes forward into the future, so all of that past and future informs the present. I kept thinking about time, how it changes us-- and sometimes can't change us one bit-- about how every moment can be affected by all the moments before-- and how, in our memory, those moments can be colored by everything that comes after, too.

I've read and watched a number of things lately in which time has been used to allow you to get to know the characters in deep and interesting ways. I loved Richard Linklater’s wonderful movie Boyhood, shot in twelve consecutive summers. And then I happened to come across Here, a fascinating new graphic novel set entirely in a corner of a single living room over years and years. It became apparent that I needed to make a list of books and movies in which time plays its very important part, and you can find that list right here. And you just might need this list to keep you entertained until May 5 or so, when A God in Ruins is going to be officially released. (I was lucky enough to get my hands on an Advance Reading Copy, but most readers have to wait.)

​This is a tale of two Patti(e)s.

The Patti(e)s I’m referring to are Pattie Boyd and Patti Smith, authors of ​Wonderful Tonight and ​Just Kids. Recently I listened to both books on cd and discovered that one of these things is not like the other.

Both have musical ties, both of the audiobooks are read by the author, and both authors are named Patti(e). That is where the similarities end however.  Wonderful Tonight has been on my list for years because who doesn’t want to read about the woman who inspired songs by both George Harrison and Eric Clapton? I thought she must be pretty great, a woman of mystery and substance (and if you would like to keep thinking that, you may want to stop reading now). 

cover image of wonderful tonightWonderful Tonight (co-written by Penny Junor) is a retelling of events and it reads as a boring list of dear diary entries. Very British Empire as in: I grew up in Kenya, my mommy and daddy didn’t get along, after my parents divorced we were very impoverished (read—no maid), 1960s England was very revolutionary and I began modeling, then I met and married George Harrison of the Beatles, then his friend Eric Clapton fell in love with me and I left George for Eric. Both marriages ended, we did a lot of drugs, I didn’t have children, the end. 

​Yawn and stretch. cover image of just kids

Just Kids in comparison, is like reading poetry (or listening to it rather). Patti is able to paint a vivid, yet gritty picture of New York City in the 60s and 70s. She too, runs into many famous characters of the day (artists, musicians, poets), but hers is a story of the underdog. She created herself and she is able to retell what she endured, how she grew as a person, and how her friendships formed her in such a way that doesn’t romanticize and is quite beautiful. 

​I choose punk poet laureate over muse everytime.  

 

off to be the wizard coverHey Mister Fantasy. Keep it light okay?

Reading fantasy can be a daunting task. Epic series, characters with hard to pronounce names, and sprawling universes add up to a challenging read for those with less than the average attention span.  However, these things shouldn’t stop anyone from entering the realm of the imagined unreal. Fantasy has a lighter side.

Scott Meyer’s Off to be the Wizard continues the tradition of Douglas Adams, Terry Brooks, and echoes themes of Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One.

Martin Banks is an average fellow, who happens upon a computer file that literally changes everything.  As he embraces his new found “magic”, the authorities discover a few things askew forcing him to flee. His landing pad? The middle ages. However, he quickly finds that life as a fledgling wizard isn’t so easy in the big hamlet…

 

cover image of world hotels and white elephants

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

 
Ready for a good cry?  The film version of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl comes out June 12, and it's already getting some great buzz.  If you're looking for more smart, tragic fare (and maybe you've already devoured The Fault in Our Stars), here are some great options.  We affectionately call them Downers.
 

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