MCL Blogs

burnt toast bnb coverLooking for literary love, but the burning desire to read a romance novel is nowhere to be found?

I was once like you.

Shrugging off the ridiculous covers, improbable plots, and ridiculous characters -- campy melodramatic stories with overwritten sex were a no go. That is, until I read a few of them. Then a few more, including the entertaining, The Burnt Toast B&B.

Derrick Richards is a ruggedly handsome lumberjack and reluctant bed and breakfast owner. He wants nothing more than to leave the hospitality world behind. Ginsberg Sloan is his “city boy” guest looking for respite and recovery at the cheapest place to stay in town. Regardless of the creature discomforts Derrick offers, Ginsberg is determined to make the B&B home.

After peeking in on  their trials, tribulations and um… that too. Derrick and Ginsberg offer a reader their own break from the real world with a few hours of drama, love, and a happy ending.

Go ahead. Give a romance a chance.  

A large pile of library booksOne of the many perks, or pitfalls depending on how you look at it, of working in a library is that you have access to more books than you will ever be able to read. If you are a bit of a pack rat, like myself, you are constantly taking home books and you end up with a "to read" pile that is as tall as a toddler. While cleaning up my room over my weekend, I decided to stack up all of the books in my room (and this isn’t even all of the books that I have checked out) and snap a picture. Will I read all of these books? Probably not, but here are some of the titles that I am most excited to dig into:
 
Why would a lactose intolerant person, like myself, want to read a book about ice cream? Just look at the title! The title itself is delicious, and the pictures inside even more so. Big Gay Ice Cream is a yearbook of ice cream recipes, and while I might not be able to consume delicious frosty goodness myself...I can dream (of ice cream). 
 
This is a complex  graphic novel that is difficult to explain. It is an exploration of visual perception and how words and images work together to create meaning.
 
I can’t wait for the Suicide Squad movie to come out, so in the meantime I plan read up on the Squad’s exploits. 
 
Social justice meets superheroes! In Coral City crime is out of control and a group of young citizens team up to rise up and fight back, sparking a worldwide revolution.
 
World traveler and photojournalist, Elian Black’mor discovers a hidden refuge for all manner of supernatural and mystical creatures. This collection of Black’mor’s fictional observations is so beautifully illustrated that it begged to be taken home.
 
So, I've shown you my book pile. I invite you to show me yours!
 

"Stand By Me (1986) is a great movie because  you can watch it fifty times in a row and never get tired of it. You can connect with the characters and laugh at the jokes. It’s an amazing coming of age movie that everyone can enjoy." - Hazel Spivey, Hollywood Teen Book Council

The Hollywood Teen Book Council got together to think about what books  these unforgettable characters would read if they were growing up today.

Gordie from Stand By Me

Gordie - Okay for Now by Gary D. Schmidt  

Sensitive, nice guy Gordie, much like Okay for Now’s Doug Swieteck, lives in the shadow of an older brother. Both find their support in the communities they create around them. They are both tender and tenacious, smart and strong, and have a writer’s heart.

Chris - Stand By MeGreat Gatsby

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris - The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Who would be most likely to reinvent themselves but Chris? Smarter than he lets other see, and with a worldly understanding, we see him drawn to weightier novels full of symbolism. He would both resonate with the observant Nick Carraway as he does with Gordie, and identify with Jay Gatsby.

 

 

Teddy - Stand By MeA Game of Thrones

Teddy - A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Fantasy is Teddy’s  genre all the way, and he would love the escapism of the Game of Thrones series. Full of abrasive characters, and unexpected resolutions will appeal to the often volatile Teddy.

Whales on StiltsVern  - Stand By Me

Vern - Whales on Stilts by M.T.Anderson

Of the group, Vern still has a foot in childhood, where the others are older than their years. He is often the butt of everyone’s joke, but is still a loyal friend. We think that something with a bit of wackiness and humor would appeal to his comic-loving side. A little fantasy, but still set in the current world.

 

More Than 1000 HoursVolunteer Shirley Bernstein

by Donna Childs

“Volunteer!” That’s Shirley Bernstein’s message for everyone who is able and interested. She believes that volunteering is good for older people because it gives them a way to get out, to interact with others, and to feel useful. For young people, it can be a way to test out a potential career.  

Shirley practices what she preaches: she has accrued more than 1000 hours at the Hillsdale Library. Twice a week, she sorts and alphabetizes children’s picture books and checks in holds for Hillsdale patrons. She sorts the picture books because that’s what needs doing, but she prefers the holds, because she finds out about new books this way.  

Shirley enjoys the freedom of volunteering: she can come in a little earlier or stay a little later, or even come in an extra day if there is a lot to do. But most of all, she likes being appreciated. When asked to name the best part of volunteering at Hillsdale, she replied, “They say ‘thank you’.”

Shirley has three sisters living in the Portland area, one of whom was a director at Store to Door,  a non-profit organization which delivers groceries for those who can’t shop for themselves. They take orders over the phone and deliver groceries, prescription medications, and household items to seniors and people with disabilities, filling more than 7000 orders annually, delivered by volunteers, one of whom is Shirley. She works there on Mondays and at Hillsdale on Tuesdays and Thursdays. She participates in activities at the Multnomah Arts Center on other days.

Shirley came to Portland in 2004 from Philadelphia. She worked at a hospital there for over 40 years in the mailroom and making deliveries to nurses’ stations. But after two of her sisters relocated to Portland for a job, Shirley decided to move here too. Now three of them are here, with another in Seattle, and a brother in Florida.  Shirley is happy with her useful and family-centered life in Portland.


A Few Facts About Shirley

 
Home library: Hillsdale Library
 
Currently reading: Take Six Girls: the Lives of the Mitford Sisters  by Laura Thompson
 
Favorite section to browse: Biographies
 
E-reader or paper books: Paper books
 
Favorite place to read: Living room sofa
 
Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.
 
 
 

Andy Ricker, the James Beard Award–winning chef behind Pok Pok, lets us know his favorite cookbooks, meals and his thoughts on the Portland food scene.

 

1. Do you have any favorite cookbooks, books or cooking blogs that have inspired you?

Picture of Andy Ricker

"Thai Food" by David Thompson; "The Joy of Cooking"; "The Whole Beast: Nose to Tail Eating" by Fergus Henderson; "White Heat" by Marco Pierre White; "Cous Cous and Other Good Food" by Paula Wolfert.

 

2. What do enjoy most about the Portland food scene?

The dedication the chefs, restaurateurs, farmers, food makers and gatherers have to using local products of the highest quality and being in a community that supports this ethos.

 

3. List your top 2 favorite meals (of all time or even this week).

Last week in Phrae, Northern Thailand, I had an amazing meal of expertly made local food at a restaurant called Jin Sot. The owner is a ninja. A Tai Yai/Shan restaurant near my home here in Chiang Mai reopened after a long hiatus, during which time I was jonesing badly, and much to my relief, the food had not changed at all: delicious egg curry called Khai Oop being my favorite dish.

4. Do you have any library memories to share?
When I was a kid growing up in rural Vermont, we had no TV so reading was our entertainment. We would go to the town library (Jeffersonville) and check out as many books as were allowed per person and devour them over the week.

Inspired to try your hand at Thai cooking? Check out our booklist below for our favorite Thai cookbooks that you can check out from the library. If you are feeling particulary adventerous, try your hand at making the egg curry dish that Andy mentioned, Khai Oop.

 

DEQ map of Air Toxicity in Portland, OR

February 3, 2016, The Mercury recently reported findings of high levels of arsenic and cadmium in the air in SE Portland. Days later, the DEQ released a map that showed many areas throughout Portland to be affected.

If you are wondering, “Should I get tested for arsenic or cadmium poisoning?” this Portland Mercury article cites Dr. Gillian Beauchamp, a Toxicology Fellow at the Oregon Poison Center at OHSU, who offers advice.

A timely resource for updates on current action by Portland residents (meetings, information sharing, etc.) is the Facebook Public Group Inner SE Air Quality. Although the focus is SE Portland, there’s much information about air quality in other areas in the city being shared here too. Inner SE Air Quality is also sharing community-generated/created Google maps of cancers and serious illnessesa map for people that have tested for heavy metal exposure, and a map showing results of soil testing for heavy metals.  Check here for updates on community meetings you can attend. Neighbors for Clean Air Facebook page is another good resource.

If you are interested more broadly about air quality in Portland, check the ToxNet map. Use the Beta version and click on "zoom to a location" then enter an address to see emissions near you. If you click on "more" you can see the levels of toxins a facility reports. This doesn’t report these recent SE Portland findings.

There has been concern about a cancer cluster in SE Portland.  The Oregon Health Authority’s Cancer Registry researches possible clusters in communities. 

Questions? Call, text or email a librarian to get personalized help – or ask the librarian on duty the next time you're at the library.  We will do our best to find the right resource or service for you!

Learn a new language with us. Mango Languages.Learning a new language has multiple benefits: you can communicate with people at home and around the world, and at the same time you also exercise your brain.

Although scientific studies vary, there seems to be agreement that learning and speaking multiple languages is good for your gray matter. It may even delay the onset of dementia*. It will certainly improve your je ne sais quoi.

Here are a few of the language learning resources available to you from Multnomah County Library:

  • Mango Connect: This online app is easy to use and full of quick exercises for learning over 50 different languages. You move through lessons at your own pace, and you can spend a lot of time on it or just a little bit each day.
  • Language Exchanges: The library offers in-person language exchange programs in Chinese, French, Spanish, and Vietnamese. These events are intended for both English speakers and English learners. Half of the event is spent practicing in the non-English language, and the other half is spent practicing English. All levels are welcome! These programs are informal, fun, and a great way to meet people in your community.
  • Books: The library has lots of books (and audiobooks) for learning languages! The best way to find these is by asking a librarian - they will guide you to the books and resources that are perfect for you.

For even more language learning ideas, take a look at the library’s Language learning topic page. If someone you know is working on learning or improving their English, be sure to also check out the library’s Learn English webpage.

You’re never too old to learn something new!

*: For more information about the science of languages and the brain, read “Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?” (2014) in the online journal Behavioural Neurology.

Portland is a crafty town, so it may not be surprising to learn that many of the people you interact with every day have a secret DIY identity. The barista you see every morning could have a side business making homemade cheese. Your server at your favorite restaurant might sell hand-drawn pet portraits at Last Thursday. And what about the library paraprofessional who helps you do your trusty research? Let me introduce our new DIY series MCL Makers, which highlights library staff throughout the system who make things in their spare time.

Our first MCL Maker is Programming Librarian Anne Tran. When she's not working at the library, Anne makes homemade soap and sells it at different farmer's markets and craft fairs. We thought we'd ask Anne a few questions about her craft. Picture of Anne's homemade soap

How long have you been making soap?

I've been handcrafting vegan and palm-oil free soap since 2011.

How did you learn to make soap?

I took a cold-process soapmaking class with my mother-in-law and was so intrigued by the process, I borrowed all the soapmaking books I could find.

Have you used any resources from the library to further develop your craft?

Besides the soapmaking books in our MCL collection, I am also an avid Interlibrary Loan user.

Have you taught others how to make soap or shared your skill in any way?

I talk about soap with my friends and family all the time! Maybe a tad too much.

What advice do you have for the new soapmaker just starting out?

My advice to a new soapmaker is to always borrow books from the library before buying them. It will save you money and let you really hone down on the ones you want. 

Find Out What's Available

Trinity collegeIt's never too early to start looking for scholarships. The best time of year to start looking is in the summer or early fall. This lets you find programs before their deadlines have passed, and gives you enough time to complete a well-planned application. Many scholarship programs require an essay and recommendations from teachers or other adults who know you, and these take time to prepare.  

There are many scholarships, grants, fellowships, internships and work-study jobs available. You'll likely encounter some common eligibility criteria. These include which state you live in, if you've performed military service, whether you have minority status or a particular nationality or ethnic background, a religious affliation, or if any of your family members belong to a national or local organization or civic association. If you fit the eligibility criteria, be sure to consider applying! 

Researching

The library is a great place to get started as you research scholarships. Whether you are looking for a scholarship in the humanities, the sciences, the social sciences, or sports, we can help you discover ways to find scholarship awards for higher education. 

Scholarship HandbookThe Scholarship Handbook is organized by common eligibility criteria. It lists scholarships based on which state you live in, whether you have performed military service, if you have minority status or come from a particular nationality or ethnic background, if you have a religious affliation, and whether any of your family members belong to a national or local organization or civic association. Each scholarship program is described by eligibility, basis for selection, application requirements, amount awarded, application deadline, and contact information.

 

"Billions of dollars in scholarships, grants and prizes." The Ultimate Scholarship Book organizes awards into categories such as humanities, social science, science and general. You don't need a perfect GPA or financial need to win a scholarship. There are plenty of awards that have none of these requirements.

 

 

College help for teens: More resources for financial aid, admissions, guides, and Study Abroad.

Saving and paying for college: Additional help with financing college.

An Adventure Every WeekVolunteer Patrick Caplis

by Sarah Binns

Even after four years of Saturdays at the Kenton Library, Patrick Caplis doesn't know what awaits him in the library's classroom, when he comes to facilitate that week's Intercambio. Intercambio, which means “exchange” in Spanish, is a language exchange and experience class that brings together a diverse group to practice Spanish and English. Their dedicated leader, Patrick, has helped them create a community within the Kenton library. Says Lanel, one of the Kenton library staff, “He runs the show!”

While Kenton's Intercambio has been going on for some time, the sessions really took off when Patrick took the helm four years ago. His role is to “include people and give everyone a chance to participate,” he says. “There's an element of stupidity and humility” when stumbling through language learning, he adds, “so it's my job to be supportive of that.” Intercambio emphasizes language exchange, with 45 minutes devoted to Spanish and 45 minutes devoted to English. While the structure may be set, content is not: participants have wide-ranging conversations on topics pertinent to their lives. For example, one man brought in some paintings he liked and discussed them in Spanish. Another person prepared for his American citizenship test by reviewing civics in English with his classmates.

Patrick says he encourages the class to bring their interests to the table to vary the discussion, but he also enjoys an occasional game of Scrabble or Bananagrams, all in the name of learning, of course! “The classes are full of serendipity,” he says. “And it's a wonderful, interesting group of people who come from all over the English and Latin world.”  

Though he grew up in Detroit, Patrick moved to Portland in 1979 to attend the National College of Natural Medicine (NCNM). A naturopathic doctor for years, he no longer practices but now teaches piano. He says he still enjoys facilitating Intercambio sessions, even after all this time. “We have a very simpático or warm-hearted group,” he says. “It's an adventure every week.”


 

A Few Facts About Patrick

 
Home library: Kenton Library
 
Currently reading: Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
 
Favorite Spanish book: Cajas de Carton (Cardboard Boxes) by Francisco Jiménez, a series of semi-autobiographical stories about growing up as a migrant worker in California
 
Favorite book from childhood: Beautiful Joe by Marshall Saunders
 
A book that made you laugh or cry: Right now, Invisible Man, and since music is another passion, the opera La Bohème fits this category.
 
Favorite section to browse: Children's books
 
E-reader or paper books: Paper
 
Favorite place to read: In a rocking chair
 
Favorite opera: Elektra by Richard Strauss
 
Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

 

一年一度的年宵会, 將于二月六日星期六 (上午十时至下午五时), 在俄勒岗会议中心举行。(详情可参阅波特兰新闻)

穆鲁玛县图书馆将有现场摊位,提供有关文化, 饮食, 健康等等的资源及书籍,並有华语职员为大家介绍及解答有关图书馆各类活动的资料。欢迎各位到图书馆的摊位与我们見面!

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a neurological difference often characterized by difficulties with reading, writing and spelling.  It may run in the families and can not be “cured.” Individuals with this condition must learn coping strategies.

Dyslexia has nothing to do with intelligence. With the right instruction, almost all individuals with dyslexia can learn to read.  A multi-sensory, phonics based approach is often the best way to help kids learn to read. The Orton-Gillingham, Barton System and/or Lindamood-Bell programs are well known programs that work.

This great Ted-Ed talk provides an overview of dyslexia.

What should I look for?

Decoding Dyslexia offers these early signs of dyslexia:

  • Late speech (3 years or later)
  • Mixing up sounds in multi-syllable words (e.g. bisghetti, aminal, mazageen)
  • Inability to rhyme by age 4
  • Difficulty with substitutions, omissions and deletions
  • Unusual pencil grip
  • Difficulty remembering rote facts (months of the year, days of the week)
  • Confusion of left vs. right

Several organizations offer online self-assessment tools.  Take a look at the the Uncovering Dyslexia Topic Guide for suggested websites.

Dyslexia and low self-esteem

One of the biggest challenges of dyslexia is counteracting shame caused by teasing and misunderstanding.  Children are often teased because they can’t read as well as others.  Teachers may say things like “she’s a slow reader” in front of the child or parents.  Kids know what “slow” means and they often grow up believing they are “stupid” and/or “lazy.”

Headstrong Nation’s Learn the Facts wants you to know the facts, help your child recognize her/his strengths and weaknesses, learn how to talk about it with trusted friends and family and eventually, be comfortable sharing one’s real self with the world.

How the library can help

There are three valid types of reading: with your eyes (print & video), with your fingers (Braille) and with your ears (audiobooks).  For information about Braille books, contact the Talking Book and Braille Library at the Oregon State Library.  Multnomah County Library will help you find materials for reading with your eyes and ears.  

Audiobooks

Typically easier for someone with dyslexia, the library has thousands of audiobooks on CD and in downloadable formats for people who read with their ears.  Library information staff can help you find and use audiobooks.

DVD/Blu-ray

The library has thousands of DVDs, Blu-ray and downloadable films for people who read with eyes & ears.  Library information staff can help you find and use these media.

Programs

Occasionally, the library offers a Dyslexia 101 program, in cooperation with Decoding Dyslexia Oregon.  Check Events & Classes to find the next class.

Reading list

The topic guide Uncovering Dyslexia is available on the website and My MCL.

Dyslexia Assessment in Multnomah County

Here are a few of the many assessment and intervention providers in the County.

The Blosser Center - Accredited by the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators, the Blosser Center provides assessment, tutoring and teacher training.

Language Skills Therapy - Provides assessment and tutoring

Multnomah Educational Testing - Provides strength-based assessment

New Leaves Clinic - Provides assessment and treatment in Hillsboro, Oregon

Northwest Reading Clinic - Provides assessment and intervention

PDX Reading Specialist, LLC​ - Provides assessment, tutoring, advocacy and professional development

Those of us who work at the library handle thousands of books over the course of a year - and we read. We've put together our picks in this handy, sortable app -- our best books for 2015.

Not finding that perfect book ? Our My Librarian team is standing by to help you find your next great read. We love talking books, and we'd love to hear from you.

magneto cover

 

Graphic novels, how do I love thee?  Let me count the ways…

  • Your length is the perfect match for my commitment issues.
  • There’s so many choices, it’s difficult what to check out first.
  • You never cease to surprise me.

 

After catching up on Cullen Bunn’s Sixth Gun series, I looked for more of his work and discovered Magneto. It’s a short (four collected books) story following him as he explores a world of diminished power amid a strong legacy.

Not an X-Men aficionado?  Don't worry. Bunn successfully explores Magneto's inner workings in a way that doesn’t require a master’s degree from Marvel UniversityIn fact, it may just pull you in...

 

Two women at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel operating tickers and stock exchange boards, December 11, 1918.Tracking down a historical stock price can be really easy... except when it’s really hard. It is a common question that we get at the library during tax season.

Here is an example of an easy stock price search.

1. A stock price is needed for a company for a particular date. (Let’s say Nike on February 13, 2009.)
2. You go to a website with historical stock information (like Yahoo! Finance or Wall St. Journal’s MarketWatch), search for the company name or ticker symbol, and voila! You have the closing price for that day. (Keep in mind that the closing price may or may not already be adjusted.)

But this only works if the company is still in business and hasn’t changed names, hasn’t been involved in a merger or acquisition, and is still trading on the stock exchange under the same ticker symbol. If any of those situations are not the case, the historical price that you need might not be available online.

Take, for example, Macy’s, which went public in 1922 under the name R.H. Macy, and which for many years traded under the symbol MZ. You won’t easily find historical stock prices from before 1992 for this company on Yahoo! Finance or in other online databases because in 1992 Macy’s merged with Federated Department Stores. (Thanks to New York Public Library for this example!)

Steps for trickier stock price searches.

So how does someone get a historical stock price from before 1992 for Macy’s, or for any other company whose historical prices aren’t online? There are two steps: first, researching the company history to find out any information about different names, ticker symbols, and listings on stock exchanges; and second, looking in a newspaper or newspaper database for the date that you need. The library can help you with both of these steps.

Step 1: Research the company history.

This step can require a little detective work. It is where you figure out the name and ticker symbol of the company or security at the time of the historical price and the stock exchange which it was trading on. Here are several sources that the library offers for learning about a company’s history (you may need to look at more than one of them in order to get a full sense of a company’s history):

  • Capital Changes Reporter: Lists capital changes (such as mergers and splits) for companies, by date, and includes information about stock exchanges and ticker symbols that the company traded under. Available in print in the Science & Business room at Central Library, or online through the CCH Intelliconnect database.
  • International Directory of Company Histories: Provides detailed corporate histories for many companies, both U.S. and international. There are currently 156 volumes. Available in print in the Science & Business room at Central Library, or online through the Gale Virtual Reference Library database (note: the most recent volumes are only available in print).
  • Mergent Intellect: Available through the library website. A database with lots of information about companies, including company histories.
  • Directory of Obsolete Securities: Lists and gives brief info for companies and banks whose original identities have been lost to events like changes in name, acquisitions, mergers, or bankruptcy. Available in print in the Science & Business room at Central Library.
  • EDGAR: This is not a library resource, but it is freely available online through the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and we can help you if you have trouble using it! It contains many documents that public companies are required to submit to the SEC, including company reports.

Step 2: Look up the historical price in a newspaper or other source from that historical date.

Once you have done some research about the company whose stock price you are looking for (and hopefully learned their name, ticker symbol, and the stock exchange they were traded on at the time of the historical price), you are ready to find the stock price in a newspaper or other source from that time. Note that you’ll want to look at a newspaper or publication for the day immediately after the date for which you need the price, since the price would not have been published until the next day’s paper. Here are two sources for this, both of which are available electronically through the library website:

  • New York Times Historical (1851-2009): Contains scans of articles from the New York Times, including stock prices. Choose “Advanced Search,” enter the date that you are looking for in the “Publication Date” section, and choose “Stock quote” from the “Document Type” menu. Leave the other search boxes blank, and do your search. You will retrieve a list of articles containing stock prices - to find the major stock exchanges, choose the articles with the most page numbers, then look in them for the company whose stock price you need.
  • The Historical Oregonian (1861-1987): This database will be most useful for stock prices of companies from the Pacific Northwest. Enter the date you are looking for in the “Date(s)” box, and then do a search in the "All Text" box for a word like NYSE or NASDAQ which would appear on the page with stock prices.

In addition to these electronic databases for the New York Times and the Oregonian, the library also has a number of useful resources available in print and on microfilm at Central Library:

So there you have the basic steps for finding historical stock prices. It can indeed be a little bit of a research project sometimes. But don’t despair! Librarians are happy to talk to you about your particular stock price need, and to help you find the information you are looking for. Just get in touch with us using one of the methods on our Contact a librarian webpage. Happy stock price searching!

Have you caught the fan fever for The great British Baking show? We sure have here at the Hollywood Teen Book Council. We have fallen in love with a contestant show that we find relaxing, and so "agressively British." 

 We enjoyed the first season that PBS aired which is actually season 5 across the pond, and we loved the hosts, the judges, and the contestants so much that we wanted to give them all gifts. Since we are "all about the books" here is what we think would make the perfect book gift for each of these fine folks.

 

Mary BerryMary Berry

Jane Austin' s Pride and Prejudice

The book that launched thousands of brooding romantic love heros.

 

Paul HollywoodPaul Hollywood

Paul Hollywood’s British Baking by Paul Hollywood

What would Mr. Hollywood like better to read than his own book, full of traditional British baked goods. It is perfection.

 

Sue PerkinsSue Perkins

Yes Please by Amy Poeler

Sue would enjoy hearing what Amy Poehler has to say about life, her own and other people’s

 

Mel GiedroycMel Giedroyc

Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

We’ve picked out a charming and funny novel of a genetics professor looking for love. Will the awkward Don Tillman’s evidence-based Wife Project succeed?

 

ChetnaChetna Makan

Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood’s dark dystopian tale of a future with women as breeding chattel-a smart book with girl power.

 

Claire GoodwinClaire Goodwin

Sara Dessen' s Just Listen

We want Claire to sit back and enjoy a redemptive story of Annabel, the girl who used to have everything and now has nothing.  Except maybe the attention of Owen will turn her story around.

Diana BeardDiana Beard

Agatha Christie's And Then There Were None.

Ms. Christie’s classic novel of ten strangers invited to a private island will keep Diana turning the pages.

 

Enwezor NzegwuEnwezor Nzegwu

Manhood for Amateurs by Michael Chabon

As a busy father, Enwezor will have time to dive into these short personal essays that are by turns hilarious and heartbreaking.

 

Iain WattersIain Watters

The Portlandia Cookbook by Fred Armisen

Iain Watters will have fun sampling the delicious and amusing recipes in this cookbook based on the hit IFC series. Portland will gladly adopt you Ian; you, and your sweaters!

 

Jordan CoxJordan Cox

Ouran High School Host Club by Bisco Hatori

Romanic mistaken-gender comedy in manga form. Jordan we know you appreciate kawaii and food. 

 

Kate HenryKate DiCamilloKate Henry

Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

A tale of a mouse and some soup will warm Kate's heart, plus we think this Kate and Kate DiCamillo are Kate's separated at birth.

 

 

Luis TroyanoLuis Troyano

Uncle Shelby’s ABZ book—Shel Silverstein

Luis will die laughing reading this hilarious children’s book written for adults.

 

 

Martha CollisonMartha Collison

Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender

Rose Edelstein develops the ability to taste the emotions of the people who cooked the food, making eating difficult as she learns the hidden secrets in her family and others.  Martha will swoon over the story as she thanks her lucky stars she hasn’t suffered the same fate.

 

Nancy BirtwhistleNancy Birtwhistle

Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly

Nancy will be on edge as modern-day Andi Alpers, chock full of rage from a range of losses, finds the diary of a historic actress.

 

Norman CalderNorman Calder

Your Backyard Herb Garden: A Gardener’s Guide to Growing over 50 Herbs, Plus How to Use Them in Cooking, Crafts, Companion Planting and more by Miranda Smith.

Norman would enjoy this illustrated guide to the many uses of many types of herbs.

 

Richard BurrRichard Burr

Gingerbread Architect by Susan Matheson

Perhaps Richard has moved on from the standard gingerbread house and is longing to build a Cape Cod-style abode?  Or maybe a classic Brownstone, Greek Revival or Art Deco creation.  With plans, instructions and pictures, he will have a masterpiece in no time.

 

Who are your favorites from the show? What book would you like to give them?

Teen Book Council as the stars of the Great British Bake Show

Whether you are researching Afghanistan, Zimbabwe, or any country in between, these sources have the facts you need!Photo of a globe

Culturegrams is an encyclopedia in which you can find out about the history of your country, as well the daily lives of its citizens. There are great printable maps and images of the country’s flag and lots of photos. You can even listen to the country’s national anthem or sample recipes! If you aren’t at the Multnomah County Library, you’ll need to log in to the encyclopedia with your library card and PIN. You’ll want to choose the Kids Edition.

Wondering which sights to see in a country? Around the World, from Time for Kids magazine, lists places you won't want to miss. You can also find timelines and learn some words in the country’s language.

At Global Trek, you can learn more about a country and its residents—sometimes from interviews with other students! You can even keep a travel journal.

Looking for a picture of a county’s flag? Just click on the small image at the CIA World Factbook to get a larger printable version of the flag, as well as information about what all its symbols mean.

If you still need help with your research, contact a librarian for more assistance. Bon voyage! 

Need to know the capital of New Jersey? The senators from Hawaii? Or famous people from Oregon? Dig into the sites below to find the answers to those questions and more!United States map

 

If you just need the basic facts about a state, visit State Facts for Students. Here you can find state population, capitals, area, and symbols. 

To dig a little deeper, go to Stately Knowledge, which also lists famous people from each state, professional sports teams, and other fascinating facts. This site also has charts that list the states in order by population, area, and more.

Fact Monster's The Fifty States is similar; it also includes short sections on the history, economy and tourist attractions of each state. Don't miss the links on the first page of this site, which allow you to compare states in a variety of ways and play games or take quizzes to test your knowledge.

Did you know that most states have a website just for kids? Find a list of those sites at Kids.gov's State Websites for Kids

To find articles about a state's history, visit Explore the States. Here you can also find stories about local events and customs.

If you are trying to learn the names of all 50 states, try watching Fifty States That Rhyme, which uses them in a song. Or, if you need to learn the state capitals, watch the States and Capitals Song video.

Finally, if you need a map of a state, visit the National Atlas's list of state maps. You can find several different types of maps for each state; you can either view them online or download a map as a PDF.

Didn't find what you need here? Contact a librarian if you need more help with your research. 

 

 

 

Do you need to know the national holidays of Sri Lanka? Find the agricultural products of Ecuador? Or maybe print an image of the Nigerian flag? You’ve come to the right place!

Culturegrams and Lands and Peoples are encyclopedias in which you can find out about the history and geography of a country, as well the daily lives of its citizens. There are great printable maps and images of the country’s flag and lots of photos. In Culturegrams, you can even listen to the country’s national anthem or sample recipes! If you aren’t at the Multnomah County Library, you’ll need to log in to the encyclopedias with your library card and PIN. 

Image of world mapThe CIA World Factbook has a wealth of information about the geography, people government and economy of countries, most of it in a table format. You can also visit their Flags of the World section to get a printable version of a country’s flag and information about what all its symbols mean.

At Background Notes from the U.S. State Department, you’ll find maps and flags for each country, as well as a history of its relations with the U.S. and links to in-depth country studies from Library of Congress.

The BBC has a page of Country Profiles, which are a good source for current events, as well as fast facts and timelines. And don’t miss National Geographic’s Destinations A-Z, a great source for travel articles, maps and colorful photos.

Not finding what you need here? Contact a librarian for more help.

Most Dangerous bookjacketEvery year, the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) of the American Library Association (ALA) honors the best young adult book for literary excellence with the Michael L. Printz Award. Last year’s winner was Jandy Nelson’s I’ll Give You the Sun.  This year’s winner will be announced January 10, 2016 during ALA’s Youth Media Awards.

As a way of creating awareness for the award, as well as honing our book evaluation skills, teens, adults, and librarians got together at the Hollywood Library for our own Mock Printz Award. We read eligible titles and put each up against the Printz Award criteria. We spent the afternoon discussing a selection of titles, and then we voted and picked our winner. We also had three honor books.

Our winner was Steve Sheinkin’s thrilling nonfiction account of the Vietnam War and the disclosure of the Pentagon Papers, Most Dangerous; Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam WarSteve Sheinkin was Multnomah County Library’s Teen Author Lecturer, and Most Dangerous was shortlisted for this year’s National Book Award finalist for Young People’s Literature.

Our honor books were Kevin Brooks gritty, page-turning tale The Bunker DiaryArden Butterfield, Hollywood Teen Book Council member who participated in the workshop writes, “The ending is so surprising, I just stared at the back of the book for about five minutes. This book is amazing, and shocking, and terrifying, and wonderful.”

Orbiting Jupiter by Gary Schmidt was another honor. A spare novel, about which Arden writes, “This is one of those books that just swells your heart up with love, and then at the last moment throws it on the ground and stabs it with a knife. I would recommend it to everyone.”

We also delighted in the strong characterization of Joan who becomes The Hired Girl in Laura Amy Schlitz’s historical early 20th-century novel.

We will be extending the Mock Printz into a year long excursion. Teens can come and discuss books published in the current year that may be considered examples of literary excellence for readers ages 12–18 and are possible nominees for the ALA’s Printz Award for young adult literature.

Thie Hired Girl bookjacketThe ultimate goal for this group, by year’s end, will be to select the best book written for teens. Group members will choose nominees for a Mock Printz workshop, at which a winner as well as honor books will be voted on and given mock medals. The workshop will be held just before the official Printz Award committee from ALA announces its choice at the YMAs at Midwinter.

Come to the Hollywood Library on February 2 to hear booktalks of upcoming eligible titles, and to learn about award’s criteria through a discussion of American Born Chinese. the 2007 Printz winner. For more information contact Danielle Jones daniellej@multco.us, 503-988-4346.

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