MCL Blogs

collageMCL Makers is a DIY series that highlights Multnomah County Library Staff who make things in their spare time. In the past we have featured soapmaking with Anne and handspinning with Donna. Our next featured MCL Maker is Library Assistant Laura Simon.  When she's not using her talents at her branch to create lovely bulletin boards, flyers, and displays, Laura likes to make mixed media collages and handmade books, among other crafty things. Here she shares with us about mixed media collage.

How long have you been making mixed media collages?

I feel like I've been making collages my whole life! My mom taught me to see the creative potential of every tiny scrap, shiny bit and broken shard. She saved these things in a giant cupboard in our garage. That Craft Cupboard was my boredom buster. My sister and I could spend hours slathering glue onto old buttons, tissue paper, sequins and sticks.

How did you learn to collage?

As an adult, art wasn't really a part of my life. I realized how much I missed the process after I celebrated my 40th birthday by taking a mixed media class at Collage on Alberta. I went straight home and started my own Craft Cupboard, now an entire Craft Room, filled with all sorts of inspiring junk.

Have you used any resources from the library to further develop your craft? 

The strongest connection between the library and my artistic endeavors has always been the creative people I work with. There are so many makers in the library community! Of course there are also some amazing books that have passed through my hands over my  years working in libraries. A few of my favorites are 1,000 Artist Journal Pages: Personal Pages and Inspirations by Dawn DeVries Sokol; Pretty Little Things: Collage Jewelry, Trinkets, Keepsakes by Sally Jean Alexander; and Collage Discovery Workshop by Claudine Hellmuth.

Have you taught others how to collage or shared your skill in any way?

I have regular get togethers with a couple of my crafty librarian friends. For me, the process of creating while spending time with close friends is very therapeutic. I am often surprised by the artistic result. 

What advice do you have for the new crafter just starting out?

Don't overthink it! Jump in, get messy, embrace the chaos. 

For more information on mixed media collage and other creative exploration, check out this curated list

 

Feeling creative?  Needing inspiration?  Check out the OMSI Mini Maker Faire this weekend!  

Who are these makers, anyway? As the OMSI website says. "Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers.  They are of all ages and backgrounds.  The aim of the Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community."  

At the library we are big fans of makers!  We have programs, books and other resources to support our maker community.  We even have a Makerspace at our Rockwood Library for teens.  Because we love makers so much, we'll have a booth at the Maker Faire from 10am-5pm on Saturday (9/10) and Sunday (9/11).  And we're bringing a lot of cool stuff with us!  Stop by to sign up for a library card or to make a rubberband helicopter!

Hope to see you there!  If you can't come, make sure to check out the booklists below for some creative inspiration.

 

Polymath

by Donna ChildsVolunteer Greg Frye

Polymath: someone who knows a lot about many different things: that is Greg Frye. A search assistant and e-books volunteer at the Capitol Hill Library, Greg works full time, yet volunteers at Capitol Hill on Sundays. He has earned a law degree, and volunteered as a mediator with Multnomah County Small Claims Court. In addition, he has a Masters in Education and a Masters in Library Science. He is also an accomplished fused-glass artist who sells his creations at the Saturday Market; he was involved in the 2014 Gathering of the Guilds in Portland, which featured artisans from around the country. He does tech support and has taught computing at Catlin Gabel School, as well as at the library. In his words, “I am comfortable with having a lot on my plate.” Since computer science is not among his many degrees, I asked about his path to computer expertise. His answer unveiled more interests: he started with technical theater as a youth, which led him to AV, which then evolved into computing.

Greg’s contributions at Capitol Hill are also varied. In addition to pulling holds from paging lists and helping with e-books, Greg has handled both incoming and outgoing holds and processed them, as well as locating them. He assists with various special library programs; he has worked on training videos for using e-books; he helps library users get set up and learn to borrow digital books and he completed age-friendly certification assessments at both Capitol Hill and another library, rating how useable the libraries are for older patrons.

Having worked in libraries all his adult life, Greg said what he most likes about them is the availability of so much information and different points of view on many subjects. Because he taught children at Catlin Gabel, he is especially concerned with opening young minds to new ideas. And if anyone embodies the love of pursuing information, learning, and ideas in many and varied fields, it is Greg Frye.


A Few Facts About Greg

Home library: Capitol Hill Library

Currently reading: Asking for It: the Alarming Rise of Rape Culture--and What We Can Do About It,  by Kate Harding

Most influential book: works by M.K. Gandhi

Guilty pleasure: Fantasy, e.g. David Eddings

Favorite book from childhood: The Hobbit,  by J.R.R. Tolkien

A book that has made you laugh or cry: So, Anyway… by John Cleese

Favorite section of the library: I’m not sure I can pick just one. I like YA fiction, poetry, historical fiction, fantasy, mysteries.

E-reader or paper books: It depends on what I’m doing. Travelling? Give me the ease of multiple books on one device. At home? On lunch break? Paper any day.

Favorite place to read: Curled up on the couch with a snack and a beverage.

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

 

Kids aren't born knowing how to use a keyboard.  But in today’s keyboard-centric world, kids need to learn to type. Luckily, there are some good free online typing programs aimed at students.

The article  Ed Tech Ideas: Keyboarding Sites for Kids lists many links to other free typing games.

Need more help? Contact a librarian

3 eggs =18 gummi bears =1 glass of milk= 200 calories.This is 200 Calories is a fun video that compares what 200 calories of different foods looks like. It also talks about what a calorie is, and why calories aren’t the only thing to consider in planning a healthy diet.

What Does 200 Calories Look Like? is a poster that compares visually 200 calories of more foods.

Wondering how many calories are in your favorite drink? This look at calories in drinks compares calories in soft drinks, juices and coffee drinks. Don't forget, serving size matters!

The Fast Food Nutrition Calculator lets you calculate the nutrition of meals at fast food restaurants. Select the items you want to eat then see how many total calories, grams of fat, and could it be? - vitamins -  are hiding inside your favorite meal.

Need more help?  Contact a librarian to be sure you get what you need.

Whenever I have to write something, whether it’s a research paper or an article, the first thing I do is keep track of my sources. There’s nothing more frustrating than having a really good fact, but not being able to remember where you found it!

There’s two good online resources, called citation makers, that I use to help me. The great thing is, you can use them to keep track of your resources while you do your research, but they also help you format the citations, and generate your list of sources, or bibliography.

Many students in Oregon use the OSLIS citation maker to generate citations. It allows you to chose between MLA and APA style guides. Be sure to read through all the instructions before you get started. You can’t save a list of citations here, so you’ll have to create your list all in one shot. 

Easybib is a free service that offers you a lot more, and is good for high school and college students. You can save multiple bibliographies here, use their note taking system, generate a bibliography in Word, and generate citations for up to 59 formats of material, in MLA, APA or Chicago/Terabian style manuals. Watch the training video to learn more, and please contact a librarian if you need more help.

“Help! I’ve fallen and I can’t get up!” We’ve all seen and heard that ad on TV. But if you decide to get a medical alert device, or are helping an older friend or relative get one, you might be ready to scream “Help! I need a device but can’t decide which one to get!”

Here’s some tips to make things easier. First, make a list of features you want the medical alert to have. The Federal Trade Commission has some good advice about things to consider. An article called “Personal Emergency Response Systems” from CRS – Adult Health Advisor (June 2012) also gives a checklist of possible concerns [ Note: to read the article, you may have to enter your library card number and PIN]. This blog post from Huffington Post, Post 50 examines three major designs and providers of each kind.

It’s hard to find unbiased reviews. For example, AARPseems to recommend ADT Companion Service, offering a discount to members, but if they are profiting on these sales, their endorsement might not be unbiased. 

Luckily, Consumer Reports did this unbiased online comparison in 2015. And in 2014, Consumer Reports Magazine also published some unbiased information in their articles "Should You Buy a Medical Alert System?" and "How to Pick a Medical Alert System."  [ Note: to read these articles, you may have to enter your library card number and PIN]. 

Also, Lawserver Online RatingLab’s comparison of medical alerts provides product reviews, advice about comparing them and a ratings chart. You can also go to the Better Business Bureau and do a search for “medical alarms” limited to your zip code, to find how they’ve rated local services.

If you are trying to help an older person who lives out of state, you might also want to find out what is available to them locally. You can use this eldercare locator to find agencies where they live, that can help you.

Be wary of phone salespeople, and online ads; there are lots of scams out there. The resources we’ve listed should help you find a reliable device that will work for you.  Need more help? Contact a librarian and we'll be glad to help. 

 

Searching for information on Native American tribes and Native nations? These big web sites may be able to help you.

You can search tribes alphabetically to learn about them, and learn about native languages as well as native culture. Try putting the name of the tribe you are looking for in the search box to see what other information they list, or scroll down to find the names of tribes listed alphabetically.

If you would rather search by location using a map, you can find state-by-state information, covering historic and contemporary information, languages, culture and history.

If you still need more help, contact a librarian to be sure you get what you need.

 

 

Hollywood movies and TV shows are full of stereotypes. To find the truth, you need to do good  research.

When I start my search, I make a list of all the names I know that might be good to search. Many tribes have both their own name and an anglicized name (for example, Diné  and Navajo) and it’s good to search under both. For more general searches, search multiple terms such as: Indian, Native American, First People or First Peoples,or try searching ”culture”  and “indigenous” with the geographical area, for example American indigenous culture.

When doing online research on Native Americans I check not only what the website says, but who is providing the information. Techniques for Evaluating Native American Websites provides good tips on what to look for. Does the website present a view that the people it describes support? Is the information current? Does the information come from Native Americans themselves? Many new age sites and commercial websites that are trying to sell you something take Indian culture and rewrite it for their own needs. If the website is created by an institution like a museum, or government agency, remember that it might represent that institution’s perspective, but not necessarily the perspective of Native peoples.

When looking at historical issues of newspapers, like The Historical Oregonian I have to consider that many of those stories will include racism and one-sided views that were common at the time.”Historic Newspaper Accounts of Oregonian Native Americans” provides some good insight into the slant of these articles over time, both good and bad.

Need more help? Contact a librarian to be sure you get what you need.


 

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This video explores the integral role horses played in Nez Perce history and how they relate to the tribe’s culture today.


When researching Native Americans of Oregon, the Oregon Blue Book provides a good introduction to Oregon tribes, and has information on current tribal leaders and the economy of the tribe, plus an overview of the tribe’s history and culture.

Native Languages of Americas provides information about the original inhabitants of Oregon and includes a map of where they were located.

The Northwest Portland Area Health Board provides history and geographical information for the nine tribes that make up its membership. Click on the "Members" tab on the upper tool bar.

The Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians provides information about Oregon tribes and a list of links to their websites, plus information about natural resources, economic development and tribal government for the Cow Creek Band.

Access Genealogy contains an overview of the history Oregon tribes, and links to many tribes' individual websites.

You can also search the library’s catalog, or do an online search for a tribe’s name. Many tribes have their own websites, which contain current information about tribal affairs, and might also include historical material.

If you still need more help, contact a librarian to be sure you get what you need.

Will Russia compete in the 2016 Summer Olympics?  For years, the largest country in the world has run the largest ever state-sponsored doping program to push its Olympic athletes to win.  Investigations have begun to reveal the extent and now the International Olympic Committee may ban all Russian athletes from the games. 

Should the IOC ban all Russian athletes?  What’s so bad about doping?  Athletes enhance their performance with training, equipment, coaches, and nutrition.  Why not allow athletes to enhance their performance with drugs?  How do officials detect doping and enforce bans?  Is there an acceptable level of doping?  How long has Russia been researching performance enhancing drugs and doping their athletes?  And how can I trace the timeline of the scandal for my summer school research paper?

Students can find news information beyond a Google search in two places: Opposing Viewpoints and Student Resources in Context.  Opposing Viewpoints offers arguments on both sides of many issues such as performance enhancing drugs.  Student Resources in Context offers access to a wide array of sources – articles, podcasts, news broadcasts, videos, reference books, websites, and even academic journals.  As you search, remember good research strategies like trying a variety of key words in your search, narrowing by date or type of resource, and looking for relevant subject headings.

Looking for something fun to do this weekend with your family?  Stop by the Rox n Sox festival this Saturday (7/30)!  Come to the library booth to sign up for a card, pick up a book or just say hello!

The Rox n Sox festival will be held at the King School Park from 10am-3pm.  Rox n Sox is a celebration of literature and music for the whole family.  Just our type of event!

Every Book I Touched I Wanted to Take Home

Volunteer Claudia Coughlin

by Sarah Binns

Claudia Coughlin remembers the year she became a reader. “It was sixth grade. I had poor eyesight but I finally got glasses. My sixth grade teacher made me realize I could find any book in the library and take an adventure.” She has not stopped reading since.

As a five-year-strong volunteer at the Albina Library, Claudia says she's glad she works in the same place where she adventures. Twice a week she serves the community here as a branch assistant and “a Jack of all trades.” She pulls holds for patrons, processes crates of returned books, and shelf reads, the task of ensuring every book in a section is in exact call number order. This way, Claudia sees exactly what the library holds. “When I started volunteering, every book I touched I wanted to take home. But then I started a list,” she says with a smile.

Libraries have long shaped Claudia's experiences. From the age of 9 until she graduated from high school, she worked at her hometown Connecticut library as a page. “It was $.90 an hour, but I was paid,” she says. When she was a young woman, her family “wanted me to be a librarian,” but she went into nursing instead. In adulthood she moved to Maryland and became a Friend of the Library there, working with the last library in the state to be computerized. She says working with the old-fashioned card catalog system was fun but challenging; when she moved to Portland, volunteering at Albina “seemed like a natural progression.”

When not devouring fiction and nonfiction, Claudia gardens and works on jigsaw puzzles that “are never less than 1000 pieces.” She also volunteers for many of her community members as a compassionate caregiver for those in need of support. “There aren't enough hours in the day,” she says.

Over the years Claudia has noticed that the volume of crates and holds at Albina's small library have been getting smaller, but she doesn't plan on leaving her post. “I like libraries and I like coming and hanging out with the library staff. They're good people,” she says, smiling.

 

A Few Facts About Claudia

 
Home library: Albina Library
 
Currently reading: The Divided Mind by John E. Sarno
 
Most influential book: The Poisonwood Bible. “I didn't like it. After that I didn't read Barbara Kingsolver for a long time and it bothered me. Why would people read her? Now, it makes more sense.”
 
Guilty pleasure: Magazines like Vanity Fair.
 
Favorite book from childhood: The Secret Garden. “I loved Nancy Drew.”
 
Favorite section of the library: Biographies and nonfiction.
 
E-reader or paper books: Paper; she doesn't even have a Kindle! “My kids wanted to give me one. I'm being stubborn.”
 
Favorite place to read: “In my chair in the living room, or near a window.”
 
Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! Read last month's Volunteer Spotlight.
 

--by the Hollywood Teen Book Council

We are highly anticipating the release of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child that will be published July 31, and looking forward to the movie release of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them in November. To celebrate, we created a list of our most recent favorite books, and  put them to the Sorting Hat test. Looking at the values of each of the four houses of Hogwarts, this is where we see these main characters most likely getting placed.

Hufflepuff values hard work, dedication, patience, loyalty, and fair play.

Hufflepuff titlesExit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston

Head Cheerleader, Hermione, does a lot to keep the team together and enjoys the athleticism of cheerleading. She has a dedication to the craft.

Dig Too Deep by Amy Allgeyer

Liberty cares about the mining that is destroying and polluting the town. She begins her own investigation seeking fairness and justice.

X: A Novel by Ilyasah Shabazz and Keekla Magoon

Growing up, Malcolm Little is constantly frustrated by the lack of fair play. Trying to leave a past behind him, he knows he can’t run forever and his new found freedom is an illusion.

Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older

Sierra Santiago realizes that something strange is going on, and finds herself to be in a long line of shadowshapers that are currently at war with evil anthropologists and unlikely zombies.

Calvin by Martine Leavitt

Calvin believes that if he can convince Bill Watterson to create one more Calvin and Hobbes comic strip, it will make him better. His dedication to this leads Calvin to go on the journey of the lifetime.

Bone Gap by Laura Ruby

Finn keeps searching for Roza after everyone gives up. He also stands up to the terrible brothers.

Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds

After his mother’s death, Matt values hard work and his job at the funeral home.

Hold Me Closer: The Tiny Cooper Story by David Levithan

Larger than life Tiny Cooper, has written a play about his life. Through his quest for meaningful relationship, Tiny proves to be the most loyal  of friends.

Dumplin' by Julie Murphy

Willowdean wants to prove to everyone in her small Texas town that she is more than just a fat girl, so she prepares to compete in the beauty pageant her mother runs.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Violet is dealing with the loss of her sister, to whom she is extremely loyal. She is dedicated, and follows through on the quest to visit Indiana places.
 

 

Ravenclaw values intelligence, knowledge, and wit.

Ravenclaw picksThe Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

Faith is all about knowledge and solving the mystery of her father’s death through science.

Saving Montgomery Sole by Mariko Tamaki

Monty and the other members of the mystery club are trying to figure out how things work.

The Steep & Thorny Way by Cat Winters

Hannalee values intelligence and wants to be a lawyer.  First she needs to search for the truth about her father's death while avoiding trouble from the Ku Klux Klan

The Hired Girl by Laura Amy Schlitz

Joan values education and studies on her own after the day’s work cooking and cleaning is done.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Mikey thinks a lot, and is very intelligent. He just wants to graduate and go to prom before someone blows up the high school. Again.

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Woodson uses her intelligence to make sense of the Jim Crow South and the Civil Rights Movement.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

Feyre is witty and smart, and she doesn’t want to give that away.  She is a very good problem solver.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Noah, one half of an intense twin rivalry, wants to see how it all works while his sister Jude manipulates their fates.

Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith

Austin uses his knowledge of his own family to write the history of the world - a world that has been overtaken by unstoppable soldiers that come in the form a giant praying mantises.

Jackaby by William Ritter

Abigail has very good attention to detail and is accepting of how things come her way - skills necessary when serving as R.F. Jackaby’s assistant, an investigator who studies the unexplained.

 

Slytherin house values ambition, cunning and resourcefulness
 

Slytherin picksOutrun the Moon by Stacy Lee

Mercy wants into the St. Clare’s School for Girls and she uses her cunning to gain admission.

Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

Lisa is ambitious, resourceful and cunning. She’s also very savvy.

Burn, Baby Burn by Meg Medina

Nora is determined to get out and get on with the next part of her life. She wants to be more than what she is currently seeing that there is.

Wink Poppy Midnight by April Genevieve Tucholke

Both Wink and Poppy use secrets to have power over Midnight and their other friends.

A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro

Charlotte Holmes is quite proud of her heritage and is resourceful enough to solve mysteries.

This Side of Home by Renée Watson

Nikki holds onto her ambition that she and her twin sister Maya have had since they were little - to leave Portland and attend a prestigious college. Gentrification in the traditionally African American neighborhood raises challenges.

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman

After the planet Kerenza is attacked, Kady’s mother is on another ship and Kady is determined to get to her.

Flygirl by Sherri L. Smith

Ida Mae has ambition and knows where she is going.  She wants to be a pilot and in order to do that she must use her cunning and pass as white.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

After she was out as gay and sent to a restrictive church camp, Cameron survives the re-education without being brainwashed.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Jude is very ambitious and does what it takes to get in a prestigious art school, even if it means selling out her twin brother Noah.



Gryffindor values bravery, daring, nerve, and chivalry.

Gryffindor picksUnbecoming by Jenny Downham

Katie uses her nerve to navigate around her mother’s rules so she can discover the details of her grandmother’s story.

Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

While Riley demonstrates bravery by keeping a blog about what it is like to be gender fluid, they also inspire bravery in others.

Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Pérez

Naomi navigates through 1937 East Texas dodging racist policies and discrimination.

The Great American Whatever by Tim Federle

Quinn values bravery, even if he isn’t feeling up to it at the moment.

If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

Amanda shows her bravery and nerve as she navigates her school as a transgender girl.

Under a Painted Sky by Stacy Lee

It takes guts to cross the country while dressed as boys, as Samantha and Annamae demonstrate again and again.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Theodore is brave in trying to fix his problems himself.

The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough

Henry was very polite to Flora, but he also was steady and persistent in his pursuit of her.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

Queenie is loyal to her friendships and displays bravery while standing up to her German captors that are accusing her of being a spy.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer by Joss Whedon

Buffy kills vampires for her job! Is there anything braver? She also cares deeply about her family.

This update to our mobile app is more than an update — you are getting a totally new, separate, app.

When you tap on "Your app is outdated, please update!" on your app, you will go to the store corresponding to your phone or tablet — Google Play, Apple's App Store, etc. — to download the app. 

Here is the twist: The update gives you a new app — it does not replace or overwrite the old app. So you will end up with two icons on your screen.

Two app icons for multcolib

Please delete the icon for the old app, the blue mountain shield (on the left). At some point, it will cease working. Keep the new icon, the one to the right, with our new logo.

How to delete an app varies by the operating system running the mobile device, but here are instructions for iOS (Apple) and Android.

Need help? Tap the Suggestion box on the app's main menu below. We will get back to you promptly. You can let us know what you think of the new look for the app.

Thanks for taking the extra step of deleting the old app and icon. We hope you like the fresh look of the new app.

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

One of the amazing things about science fiction it that it helps us see  a greater possibility imagined: there is more that is possible in our world and in ourselves. Here are two recent reviews of books where our protagonists get creative within the confines of their situation and imagine and create greater possibilities.

The MartianThe Martian by Andy Weir

Review By Hannah Witscher, 8th grade

How do you feel about Mars? What about potatoes? Do you like realistic, thrilling science fiction? If you want to read about people creating inventions to get then out of dangerous situations, then The Martian is the book for you.  In the not-so-distant future, NASA has created a spaceship that can travel to Mars. On the third mission disaster strikes and Mark Watney is stuck on Mars and his team thinks he is dead. I really enjoyed this book. It was full of science, and everything that happened pretty much could happen with technology we will have in the near future. The story is also fast-paced, and I couldn’t put it down. If you like realistic science fiction, this is the book you should read.

 

Archivist WaspArchivist Wasp by Nicole Kornher-Stace

Review by Ella DeMerritt, Freshman

Wasp is the archivist, a ghost slayer chosen by the goddess Catchkeep to protect the people of her land from the ghosts that roam in the realm of the living. She’s forced to kill the “upstarts,” girls who want to take her place as the archivist. Our heroine is tormented by the Catchkeep-priest, her sleazy and cruel superior. Unhappy with her monotonous life, she longs to be free, but can she really be free when she has to die at the hands of an upstart to do so?

So she carries on, harboring hatred for both herself and the priest forcing her to live like this. Until something phenomenal happens. A nameless ghost comes to her for help-- which shouldn’t be possible, considering ghosts can’t speak. The ghost begs her (in an especially harsh way) to help him find his colleague, another ghost named Foster. And thus begins Wasp’s reckless journey to the underworld.

Archivist Wasp is a thrilling adventure story with a strong female character at its core, and even better, with no love interest to center the plot around. As much as I appreciate an original love story every once and a while, it’s  refreshing to read a book that’s not based around a cheesy heterosexual romantic plot. And to conclude, Archivist Wasp is a rousing sci-fi novel that you can’t seem to put down. give it a chance, you won’t be disappointed.

 

Today, the library started using a new logo. The library has had the same logo since becoming part of Multnomah County in 1990.

Old library logo

 

Prior to that, the Library Association of Portland governed library services in Multnomah County,  using the same logo since about 1912.

Illumino logo

In 2014, after Multnomah County residents voted to create a permanent library district to fund library services and hours, the library turned 150 years old. A special logo was created for the occasion.

 

150 logo

It is a time of rapid change and evolution for libraries. Our commitment to free and equal access and advocacy for reading will never change, but today’s libraries are so much more. They are places of learning, creation, technology access, civic participation and more. As the library evolves to meet the changing needs of our community, our visual identity is taking a new form as well. Today, the library begins using a new logo.

 

 

New library logo

 

Multnomah County Library’s updated logo was funded entirely by private dollars from Friends of the Library. The library will continue to use existing materials, like letterhead and so on, until they run out. Modest implementation costs, for things like signage, are covered by existing budgets within the library.

The library’s new logo will help create consistent visual standards for all library services. This simple geometric pattern — an “L,” a book, a portal, a window, a laptop, an arrow — the logo is whatever you want it to be. Anything is possible. Just as it is at your library.

New library banners

We are proud of the library’s 152-year history of service to this community. As the library re-imagines how it can best meet the community’s changing needs, we will always honor the library’s rich heritage.

Thank you for your ongoing support and passion for your public library.

Jeremy Graybill
Marketing + Online Engagement Director
Multnomah County Library 
503.793.0881 

Multnomah County Library loves zines!  And that's why we will be at the Portland Zine Symposium on Saturday (July, 9th).  Come see us at this annual extravaganza celebrating small presses, DIY culture and the wonderful zinsters of Portland and beyond!  Oh, and did we mention it's free?

Stop by to sign-up for a library card, check out a zine or snap a photo with our giant library card.  Can't make it?  You can check out some fabulous zines from the library anytime that we're open.  Take a look at some of the lists below to get started.

--By the Hollywood Teen Book Council

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 2009 TEDTalk is a powerful statement  in how only having one story can perpetuate stereotypes.

We try to read broadly at the Hollywood Teen Book Council and seek out books that will expand our worldview. Whether it is a Chinese immigrant living in Canada, soldiers in an unpopular war, or our preconceptions of cheerleaders, here are three books that surprised us and changed how we saw others.

 

Midnight at the Dragon Cafe Midnight at the Dragon Cafe by Judy Fong Bates

Review by Siena Lesher, sophomore

From clothing to teeth to the food you eat, the cultural differences between China and Canada are one that many don’t even consider unless they’re being made fun of it. Su-Jen, who takes the English name “Annie,” leaves communist China with her mom for a hopefully better life in Canada. As she is very young, she begins to subtly assimilate into Western culture, leaving behind the ideas of her past. I actually read this book twice - the first time focussing on the plot, the second on the pressure for Annie to become “Western.” I thought it was very interesting and well written,  thoughtful and very eye-opening.

 

Sunrise Over Fallujah

Sunrise Over Fallujah by Walter Dean Myers

Review by Noah Pettinari, sophomore

Do you like plot twists to the Iraq War? Then this book is for you. Birdy is a soldier newly deployed into Iraq and Kuwait from Harlem, New York. As he learns the ropes of Civil Affairs operations in Iraq 2003, he encounters the true embodiment of war. This book is written in such a way as to personify the commonly dehumanized military, and lacks the catchy plots commonly found in YA novels. I would recommend it to any teen interested in the mental toll of war and how much war can change a person's life.

 

Exit, Pursued by a Bear Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston

Review by Elsa Hoover, sophomore

When I picked up this book I didn’t have any idea what it was about. Exit, Pursued by a Bear? A cheerleader? I wondered what this could possibly be about, but then I read the inside of the flap and found out it was about sexual assault and stopped short. Did I really want to read something so sad? But I went on and I am really glad I did. This is a book about a cheerleader raped at camp, and the next year of her life as she navigates this new world. My favorite thing about this book was its realism in the face of a hard subject. Not everything turned out great. It wasn’t cheery and that why it felt real. You could understand where all the characters were coming from. I would recommend this book to anyone looking for a short, emotionally charged book.


Here is a list of more books that helped expand our worldview:

Often as I am driving through the countryside passing small villages and towns I wonder, 'who lives here? What do they do for work? What do they do with their time?' You might think I sound like a city-snob, but I actually spent the first 20 years of my life in a place that didn't even merit the title of village, the sign at the edge reading "hamlet with a heart."

Many authors have made their dinner out of small, seemingly sleepy places where, under the surface, the inhabitants are living lives of turmoil, tragedy and passion. Alice Munro is a master of this genre. In Lives of Girls and Women she writes of people who seem to be living upright and staid lives, all the while hiding "deep caves paved over with kitchen linoleum." Other authors place their characters in barren and hard-scrabble places, an ideal stage for pathos and emotional intrigue. Kent Haruf's novels take place in the fictional town of Holt, Colorado and focus on the emotional lives of people struggling to find meaning in their lives. Pulitzer Prize winner, Olive Kitteridge, by Elizabeth Strout recounts the story of a woman living in small-town Maine through a series of short vignettes, each examining a period in her life. 

Lately I'm very much intrigued by the people of Words, Wisconsin, as described by David Rhodes in his novel Driftless. Olivia adheres to the principles of her church and knows the bible backwards and forwards as a result of being wheel-chair bound. She tyrannizes her sister Violet who spends her days in good works and in taking care of her sister. Their pastor, Winnifred, has spent her life trying to overcome the loss of her mother by looking for grace within the church. Graham and Cora Shotwell are in the fight of their lives with a corrupt dairy co-op. And July Montgomery is the glue that holds the community together, though one would never think it from his taciturn and understated manner.

For me, the joy of reading fiction is to indulge my curiosity, or some might say, nosiness. These stories of intersecting lives give us the pleasure of snooping into people's affairs without offending anyone. And the next time I drive through a small town, I'll be looking with fresh eyes.

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