MCL Blogs

The default blog for all Library Blog Posts.

picture of the U.S. ConstitutionWhat Is It?

Most Americans know the Constitution is the foundation of American government and law. Many know that James Madison is often recognized as the “Father of the Constitution” and it was written near the end of the 18th century. When it comes to the details, however, Americans are often a bit fuzzy.  Polls consistently show that many—if not most—Americans do not have a firm grasp of the Constitution and the powers of government. For example, surveys from The Annenberg Public Policy Center and The Center for the Constitution both show most Americans lack a firm understanding of the Constitution. Curious about how much you really know? You can test your own Constitutional IQ at Constitution Facts.

Where do I Learn More?

In 2004, Congress set aside September 17th as national Constitution Day, a day in which we, as a nation, can celebrate and learn more about one of our founding documents. There are plenty of resources available to help explain the Constitution and how it shapes the American government, but the trick is finding one that does not have an agenda that may bias the interpretation. In today’s political arena, groups and individuals from across the political spectrum invoke the Constitution as the foundation for their particular point of view. In such a climate, it is important to find authoritative resources that can provide a balanced look at the document, the time and place from which it arose, and its role in government and law through the decades.  

So, where should you start? Of course, reading the Constitution itself is a logical starting point, but some context can be very helpful.  One good resource is the National Constitution Center, a museum chartered by Congress to provide nonpartisan education about the Constitution and the U.S. Congress itself also hosts an annotated version. The National Archives, which houses the original Constitution, has a useful online exhibit dedicated to the Charters of Freedom, which includes the Constitution. Outside of the federal government, Cornell University hosts the Legal Information Institute which provides an explanation for each section. Finally, try one—or more—of the books from the reading list below. After all of this, you will be well equipped to be a responsible citizen for, in the words of James Madison:

 A popular Government without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy, or perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.  –Letter to W. T. Barry (4 August 1822)

In Oregon and many other states, laws can be made directly by the popular vote of citizens. There are two kinds of ballot measures: referendums which are referred from the state legislature to the voters; and initiatives, which are put on the ballot as a result of signature petitions signed by registered voters. These websites can help you learn about the history and future of ballot measures and other methods of direct democracy.

Ballot Initiative Strategy Center

This organization advocates for ballot initiative reform from a progressive perspective, and provides information about ballot measure campaigns nationwide. Find information about current measures on the ballot across the nation, read overviews of election results, find out which states allow voter initiatives (PDF, 10KB), and learn about the rules for how to get an initiative on the ballot in each state.

Ballot Measures Database

Find information about statewide ballot measures from across the U.S., back to Oregon's first referendum authorizing the initiative process in 1902. This database, from the National Conference of State Legislatures, is part of a larger site rich with information about initiatives, referendums, and campaign finance, as well as other information about state elections in the U.S.

Direct Democracy: Initiatives and Referendums

Find answers to your questions about how ballot measures work, and their history in Oregon.

Initiative & Referendum Institute

Are you curious about ballot measures across the US? Find reports about ballot measure results and trends, quick facts about initiatives and referendums, and information about how ballot measures work in the different states.

Do you need information for the current or upcoming elections? Are you looking for your elected officials, campaign headquarters, or county elections divisions? Are you interested in historical information from past elections? The following resources help you find information at the state, city and county levels in Oregon.

League of Women Voters of Oregon

The Oregon chapter of the League of Women Voters publishes non-partisan voters' guides for each election. The League never takes stands on candidates or parties, but they do take stands on issues supported by member agreement and in-depth research. The League also reports on many electoral and political issues of interest to Oregonians.

Multnomah County Elections Division

Oregon Elections Division

Find voter resources and check to see if you're already registered to vote. Track the status of initiatives, find detailed information about candidates and committees, learn about the history of Oregon elections and locate county election offices around the state.

Oregon Follow the Money

Find out who gave money to various political candidates and ballot measure campaigns in Oregon, and see how much money each donor contributed.

Oregonian: Voter Guide

Are you wondering how the candidates in a city, county, or statewide race compare? OregonLive asked candidates from around the state to provide information about themselves and their positions on the issues, and you can compare their answers here.

Portland Elections Division

Find current and historical city election results back to 1905, a list of elected officials from 1913 to the present, and mayors from 1851 to the present. Find out how to become a city candidate, how to file an initiative or referendum petition, or test your knowledge of Portland elections on the trivia page!

Washington Elections Division

Find information about elections, voting, caucuses, candidates and political parties in the state of Washington.

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

Look for the Lucky Day display at each library.  Here are the latest new titles:

Adult Fiction:

Personal / Lee Child

Adultery / Paulo Coelho

Gone Girl / Gillian Flynn

The Monogram Murders / Sophie Hannah

Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good / Jan Karon

The Bone Clocks / David Mitchell

The Paying Guests / Sarah Waters

 

Adult Nonfiction:

The Boys in the Boat / Daniel James Brown

An Empire on the Edge: How Britain Came to Fight America / Nick Bunker

How We Got to Now: Six Innovations that Made the Modern World / Steven Johnson

The Forks over Knives Plan / Alona Pulde

Cool Layer Cakes / Ceri Olofson

Killing Patton / Bill O'Reilly

 

Kids:

Bad Magic / Pseudonymous Bosch

Tales from a Not-So-Happily Ever After: Dork Diaries 8 / Rachel Renee Russell

Emperor Pickletine Rides the Bus / Tom Angleberger

Little Author in the Big Woods: a biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder / Yona Zeldis McDonough

The Whispering Skull: Lockwood & Co., Book 2 / Jonathan Stroud

Percy Jackson's Greek Gods / Rick Riordan

Pete the Cat and the New Guy / Kimberly and James Dean 

Space Case / Stuart Gibbs

Top 10 of Everything 2015 / Paul Terry

Teen:

Afterworlds / Scott Westerfeld

Falling into Place / Amy Zhang

Firebug / Lish McBride

Isla and the Happily Ever After / Stephanie Perkins

The Revenge of Seven / Pittacus Lore

Skink - No Surrender / Carl Hiaasen

The Vault of Dreamers / Caragh M. O'Brien

Virtual Librarian

by Mindy Moreland

Volunteer Amy SchoppertMultnomah County Library's volunteers are a dedicated bunch. But some volunteers, like Amy Schoppert, take their devotion to a new level. As an Answerland volunteer, Amy not only serves library patrons from across Oregon, but she does so from Tacoma, Washington. Answerland, also known as Chat with a librarian, is an online service that uses librarians from across the state and around the world to provide 24-hour reference service for all Oregonians. Amy and her fellow volunteers chat online with patrons seeking help on a wide variety of projects, from homework assignments to research to questions about library resources. Every shift is different, Amy says. "It can be non-stop challenging questions, and it can be perfectly paced and engaging, but pretty manageable, and sometimes, rarely, it is very quiet. I try to prepare myself mentally for anything!"

Amy was inspired to become an Answerland volunteer when her husband, also a librarian, started volunteering with the service. “The first time he did a shift I knew I wanted to volunteer for Answerland,” Amy recalls. “I was in library school at the time and I remember asking how soon I could volunteer.” Even though surgery, a broken computer, and some scheduling issues delayed her start with Answerland, Amy’s dedication was unwavering. Finally, all the stars aligned. “I was so thrilled when I was finally able to volunteer and get my own shifts,” she recalls.

Answerland staffers answer more than 35,000 questions each year, working with patrons by chat, email, and text message. Over 40 Oregon libraries and over 50 MCL volunteers staff the service. Librarians from all over the country cover shifts when Oregon librarians are unavailable, making it possible to serve Oregonians 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Funding for Answerland comes from the Oregon State Library through the Library Services and Technology Act.

Though she helps patrons of all ages, Amy particularly enjoys working with young students seeking homework help. “They are so pleased and so surprised that a service like this exists,” she says, “Being able to tell them that we are here and available to support their learning is really satisfying.”

A Few Facts About Amy

Your home library is: As I live in Tacoma, WA (but I'm from Portland!) and work for King County Library System, my KCLS branch is my home library.

What are you reading now? I'm reading Beautiful Music for Ugly Children by Kirstin Cronn-Mills and To Know As We Are Known by Parker J. Palmer.

What book has most influenced you? Mastering the Art of French Cooking, from which I only cook two recipes -- but we would be eating, I am convinced, nothing but meatloaf and Cheerios if it weren't for Julia Child.

What is your favorite book from childhood? I didn't have any one favorite book. But I certainly remember enjoying Pippi Longstocking and The Borrowers an awful lot.

A book that made you laugh or cry: Beware of God by Shalom Auslander made me laugh AND cry.

What is your favorite section of the library to browse in? Gardening, cooking, fashion.

Which do you prefer: e-reader or paper book? Paper, although I am not allergic to e-readers.

What is your reading guilty pleasure? Books about clothes and fashion.

Where is your favorite place to read? The bathtub!

See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

photo of the Royal Irish Rifles ration partyWorld War I was called the Great War, not because it was so fantastic (it wasn’t - just ask any soldier who fought in the trenches), but because it was huge – bigger than any other war that had happened before.  More than forty million soldiers from over a dozen countries participated, and there were millions and millions of casualties. To find out more about the war in the trenches and on the home front, check out these websites.

From famous battles and statistics to body lice and dysentery, Spartacus Educational gives a vast amount of information on all things WWI. Take a look at the detailed chronology for a sense of what happened when and why.  Click on each event to find out more.

BBC has an excellent collection of WWI information including interactive guides, television episodes and radio shows, and images and information about present day memorials.

For an overview from PBS, take a look at The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century. You’ll find maps, quotations from people involved in the war, commentaries by historians, further reading, and links to other WWI websites.

Need the text of a treaty, personal accounts of soldiers or newspaper stories about a battle? Look no further than The World War I Document Archive.  Here you’ll find documents by year as well as diaries, a biographical dictionary, photographs and links to other WWI websites. 

Britain’s Imperial War Museum has an entire section of its website devoted to WWI.  This is an excellent place to find photographs from the war. Click here for photos from the fighting front. Find photos of the home front here. For more WWI photos, take a look at the World War I Image Archive.

Watch hundreds of films from WWI here including propaganda , films of prisoners of war, the war at sea, retrospectives and documentaries .

 

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot cover

Is that electrical tape on your webcam or are you happy to see me?

One of the more anticipated the books from my stackWhiskey Tango Foxtrotcenters around a too close for comfort techno-conspiracy. Strangers, drawn together by creative happenstance, are forced to make a choice with global implications. The future of information is in their hands.

 

Not into techno-thrillers? Me either, but think again. Shafer’s book is addictive for the plot curious and its ensemble of characters. They find themselves at unique, yet relatable, crossroads of their own making. Then again, maybe someone, something else is calling the shots. As the suspense builds and time to act disappears, there’s no going back .

 

In addition to all the free e-books you can enjoy from the library, there are several web sites that provide access to out of copyright or open source e-books and you can access them any time without your library card.

Project Gutenberg logo

 

Project Gutenberg provides access to over 45,000 free e-books that you can download for offline reading in either ePUB or Kindle formats, or simple read online through any internet browser. They've digitized all the books themselves, including titles from Jane Austen, Mark Twain, William Shakespeare and many many more.

 

 

Internet Archive logo

 

The Internet Archive and Open Library offers over 6,000,000 public domain e-books, including over 500,000 eBooks for users with print disabilities. You first have to register with the Open Library web site, but then you can "borrow" and read as many e-books as you like.  Featured authors include Charles Dickens, F. Scott Fitzgerald and many modern authors, too!

 

Open Culture logo

 

Open Culture features access to 600+ e-books and so much more, including audiobooks, free online courses and movies.

 

 

 

HathiTrust is a partnership of academic and research institutions that offers millions of titles digitized from research libraries around the world.  You can browse through the collection and read e-books in both desktop and mobile browsers.

 

 

Google Books allows for full text searching and browsing through millions of books and magazines that have been digitized by Google.

 

 

 

 

Books Should Be Free has e-books and audiobooks from the public domain in English and many other languages. Titles work on Android, iOS, and Kindle.

 

 

Free e-books in other languages can be found at these sites:

 

The International Children's Digital Library contains nearly 5,000 children's book titles in 59 different languages. It also features a kid-friendly search interface, with facets like book cover color and what type of characters the book features.

 

 

 

For Spanish titles, try El Libro Total, which features Spanish classics and Latin American works.

 

 

 

For free French downloadable audiobooks, look no further than AudioCite.

 

 

VietMessenger features Vietnamese ebooks from many genres. Simply register with the web site and download away.

In my first post, I talked about how to find science information that’s written for scientists to read.  

But sometimes we’re not interested in an intensely technical analysis!  We may want a quick answer to a science-related question.  Or, we may be absolutely ready to read a long article or book -- so long as it’s written for a general audience.  

So, let’s talk about:

The way scientists talk to us non-scientists  

The general public is a very diverse group, so there are a lot of reasons scientists might want to communicate with us, and a lot of reasons we might want to hear from them:

  • Some scientists actively reach out to a wide audience.  There are many ways they might do this, but a few common ones are: giving public lectures, hosting community discussions, or writing newspaper columns or popular science books.  

  • For some scientists, communication with the public is an important part of their formal role. Government researchers, for example, or scientists who work for public-oriented organizations like science museums or environmental nonprofits.  

  • And sometimes, the interest comes straight from the public. We non-scientists want to know about the latest cancer research, about work that's being done to better predict the occurrence of wildfires, about breakthroughs in our understanding of the workings of the other planets in our solar system, and so on.

As you can see, scientists’ communication with the public might take a lot of different forms.  How to navigate them all?  Use your imagination, and always remember to ask the question, “How would scientists communicate about the question I’m exploring?”  This can lead you to a wide array of resources that are designed to be read by regular people like you and me, such as:

Now you should have a good start finding science information that’s designed for us non-scientists to read and use in our lives.  Have fun learning, reading and exploring!

 


Remember, librarians are always happy to help you with your questions and research needs -- whether they’re science-related or not!  So ask the librarian on duty the next time you’re at the library, or call or email us anytime.


 

 

Can you imagine spaghetti without tomato sauce? How about a world without French fries, chocolate bars, or popcorn? If you like any of these foods, you can thank the peoples of the ancient Americas who cultivated tomatoes, potatoes, cocoa and corn before the rest of the world learned about them.

We think of chocolate as a sweet treat. While this wasn't always true, the scientific name of the cacao tree is Cacao Theobroma, meaning "food of the gods," which most people would agree is a good name. Cacao beans were first used to make a bitter, spicy drink for Aztec and Mayan religious ceremonies. The beans were so valued, that at one time, cacao beans were even used as money.

photo of potatoes and other vegetables at a marketBaked potatoes, mashed potatoes, french-fried potatoes, potato pancakes, potato chips, potatoes in stew. Potatoes are grown and eaten all over the world, but were first cultivated by the Incas living in the Andes of current day Peru. Take a look at the article in New Book of Knowledge, searching for "potato" to learn more (you'll need your library card handy if you're outside the library).

Like cacao, corn and popcorn were used for ceremonies. Aztecs included corn in sculptures and popcorn as part of decoration for headdresses and necklaces. The Maya creation story says the first grandparents were made from white and yellow corn, and they based their calendar in part on the growing cycle of corn. The Aztec, Maya and Inca peoples ate popcorn too. The ancestor of modern corn is a grain called teosinte. It has just a few kernels on each stalk. The kernels are too hard to eat or grind into flour, but teosinte can pop! Check out this video to see kernels popping.

Need more information? Check out the books below or ask a librarian.

Maps to check out, in the Literature & History Room, Central Library, 3rd floor.The library, I’m sure you know, is a great place to borrow a book.  Did you know you can also borrow a map?

A fresh array of maps have recently arrived at Central Library, all available for check out.  This lovely shelf of circulating maps (pictured at right) is in the Literature & History room on Central’s third floor -- the same room that houses travel books, hiking guides, atlases, and other geography-related gems.

What’s in the map collection?

Most of the library’s check-out-able maps are of places in Portland, Multnomah County and Oregon, or of places in Washington and California.   And there are lots of different kinds.  For example, you can find:

  • wilderness, park and forest maps

  • street maps of cities and towns

  • maps showing lighthouses

  • regional maps showing areas like the California coast or the Olympic Peninsula

  • bicycling maps

  • and many other kinds of maps!

Would you like a recommendation for a great map?  Take a look at our brand-new list of Librarians' favorite maps -- or ask a librarian for a more personalized recommendation.

If you can’t or don’t want to come to Central Library to get your map fix, you can use the library catalog to place holds on the maps you want -- and then you can pick them up at your neighborhood library.

Finding maps in the library catalog

Searching for Los Angeles maps [click for a bigger version]Here are some tips for different ways to search for maps in the library’s collection:

When you’re looking for a map of a particular place, start with a search for the name of the place -- let’s use Los Angeles as an example. This search gives you lots of library materials about LA; to get to the maps, go to the Format section on the left side of the screen, click Other, and then click the checkbox next to Maps

Now you have a much shorter list showing only maps and books containing lots of maps.  To find maps you can check out,  go back to the Format section on the left, click on Titles I can…, and then click the checkbox next to Borrow and take home.  Now you should see a nice tidy list of maps (of Los Angeles, in this case) that you can borrow with your library card.

 

Searching for the newest maps at the library [click for a bigger version]If you’d like to see a list of the library’s newest maps, go to the Advanced search screen, look for the Format section down at the bottom, and click the checkbox next to Maps.  Now click on the orange Search button.  This gets you a super-duper crazy long list of all the maps and map-filled things in the library’s collection.  

You can see newest maps by going to the Sort by dropdown at the top of the screen, and choosing the Date acquired option.  Now you’ll see the list re-arranged with the newest maps at the top.  Again, if you'd like to limit your search to maps you can check out immediately, click the checkbox next to Borrow and take home, over in the Titles I can... section on the left side of the screen.

 

Searching for the map Northwest Lighthouses [click for a bigger version]If you know the name of the map you need, you can search for it by title just as you would a book or other item.  Here’s an example: one of my favorite maps shows lighthouses in Oregon, Washington and Alaska -- it’s called Northwest Lighthouses.  A search for these words gets a list of results with the map right on top.

 

 

 

 

 


Remember, knowledgeable and friendly librarians are always standing by to help you with your map and research needs!  Ask us your map-related questions (or really, any questions) by email or phone, or talk to the librarian on duty the next time you’re at the library in person.   


 

See something say somethingPortland’s mass transit agency, TriMet, reminds us if we see something, say something; the message is plastered all over its MAX cars and buses, but I saw something on the MAX the other day and said nothing.

Along with about a dozen other people seated in the front area of a MAX car (the part that you climb the stairs to get to) at about 8:15 on a weeknight, I witnessed an incident of racial profiling and didn’t call out the perpetrator. As is often the case in situations where you want to say the right thing perfectly, it was only after the fact that I could figure out what to say and how to say it.

Here’s what happened: A few stops after I got on the MAX headed east, three young African Americans boarded the train. Everyone else in our section of the car was white (and possibly older, but I can’t precisely recall). They were conversing in what I’d call a “teenaged” way – laughing, a little loud, seemingly unaware of others in the car. Someone in the area had music going loud enough so that it leaked out of the earbuds. (Let me parenthetically state that hearing this “half-music” possibly annoys me more than loud phone conversations on public transit, and I don’t recall being bothered by the sound.) While stopped at the Rose Quarter station, a uniformed woman (TriMet, but not law enforcement) boarded our car, walked up the stairs and spoke directly to the Black youths that there had been a complaint about their music.

When they stated that they hadn’t been playing any music, this person glanced around to the rest of us and sort of generally asked whoever was playing their music too loudly to turn it down. She stepped out of the car, walked around its front to (I assume) speak with the driver because she returned to the car and said – again to the Black youths – yes, it was a complaint about your music and it’s time to turn it down.

Here is, of course, the point that I should have spoken up about what I just saw. I know I don’t want to escalate the situation, so I need to craft my words carefully. And that is so hard to do in the moment.

I have the (awkwardly formal) conversation clear in my head now:

Me: Excuse me, but I would like to point out that I have just witnessed an incident of racial profiling in this MAX car. If you’ve received a complaint about loud music, you must ask each of us if we have been playing music and that we must turn it down.

She: Oh, yes, you’re absolutely right, I shouldn’t have assumed it was the African Americans on this train who were listening to loud music. First, let me apologize to these young people right now and explain to the rest of you here in this section that you cannot play your music so loudly that the driver is able to hear it.

Me: Thank you.

I did send an equally careful comment via the TriMet website but it’s really too late. Cynically, I assume they will send that employee to some diversity training, she’ll be resentful and won’t hear what the trainers have to share, and it will happen all over again.

I hope it doesn’t happen all over again for me. Next time, I hope I’ll have the courage to speak up.

Can you share a situation where you witnessed something wrong and did or didn’t speak up?

(And because I’m a librarian, I found some books on the subject.)

Attention middle and high school educators: are you looking for good, new books to use in the classroom? Watch these videosin which librarians from the Multnomah County Library School Corps introduce recently-published titles to use in the curriculum. We've broken them down by subject for convenience in viewing. Feel free to share the videos with other educators, too! Here’s the complete list of titles from this workshop.

If you missed our in-person summer educator workshops, the reading lists are now available in the library catalog!

Gotta Read This: New Books to Connect with Your Curriculum for Grades K-5Learn about new books you might integrate into your language arts, social studies, math, science and art curriculum.

Novel-Ties: New Fiction for Literature CirclesDo you lead book discussion groups or literature circles for students? Here's a list of hot, new, discussable fiction for grades 4-8.

Happy reading!

E-reader popularity has been rapidly increasing over the past few years, which brings the question to mind: are e-readers the technology of the future? I believe that they are. 
 
I understand many people's hesitation to utilize e-reader technology, but comparatively, the pros of e-readers outweigh the cons. Since I'm trying to acknowledge my opposition's reasoning, let's delve into the cons. A common issue is that it can be hard to learn to use an e-reader.This is a problem that won't last long. Many Multnomah County libraries offer hands-on classes on how to use and operate various kinds of e-readers, and as if that isn't enough, the website has a page filled with information to help you better understand your e-reader
 
Many people are opposed to e-readers for cost reasons, but each wave of new e-readers tends to be less costly than the last. Surprisingly, there are many e-readers that market for less than $100, such as the Kindle Keyboard, Nook Touch, Kobo Wi-Fi, Skytex Primer, as well as numerous others. Another factor is the comparative cost of books. E-books cost less in the long run than paper books, due to the fact that they have no printing fees. To give you a better understanding of the pricing differences, in this New York Times #1 Besteller, the hardcover edition is listed as $16.79, while the kindle edition is listed as only $12.95 (and may be discounted further by the time you read this).
 
I've spent all this time trying to convince you that e-readers are vastly superior to books, yet I still see a place for books in the future. I think that books will retain the market of the anti-technological; the people still clinging to the old traditions and ways (which is a surprisingly large accumulation). Even when e-readers are the status quo (just a prediction of mine), books are all but extinct, and e-reader sales continuously grow while book sales decrease, I believe that those anti-technologicals will continue to cherish books. I think that they will hold onto them as 70s and 80s children hold onto records, as mementos of the past.
 
Additional resources:
 
 

Finding science information can be a challenge.  When you want to find research to use in your work, study, or in your daily life -- or when you are just hungry to satisfy your curiosity about science that’s in the news or on your mind -- it can be difficult to know where to start.

One way to get your footing is to ask yourself, “How would scientists communicate about the question I’m exploring?”

Scientists communicate in lots of ways, so I’ve split them into two big categories: the way scientists communicate amongst themselves, and the way they communicate with the rest of us.  In this post, we’ll talk about the first category:   

The way scientists talk to each other

“editing a paper,” by Flickr user Nic McPheeAt minimum, scientists communicate with colleagues in their field by publishing reports or analyses of their work.  A report of this type might appear as an academic paper published in a journal or read at a conference.  Generally speaking, formal communication of this sort goes through a peer-review process -- which means that experts and respected colleagues evaluate the paper and give feedback before it is published.  

Scientists might also engage in peer-to-peer debate about hot issues of the day -- for example, in person at professional meetings, or in the letters section of a widely-read journal.  

Here are some ways to find this type of "by scientists, for scientists" information:

Now you should have a good start finding research, data, and information that scientists share with each other.  Next time, I’ll share some resources you can use to find science information that is published specifically for laypersons -- that’s us non-scientists!

 


In the meantime, don’t forget that librarians are always happy to help you with your questions and research needs -- whether they’re science-related or not!  So ask the librarian on duty the next time you’re at the library, or call or email us anytime.


 

It is that time of year when students don backpacks and grab lunch boxes, jump on buses, and synchronize their schedules to the sound of a bell. Fall signifies a return to the halls of learning, to homework, and studying textbooks.

But what about those of us beyond our backpack years, who consider our formal education complete but still have a thirst for knowledge? What are we, the lifelong learners and the constantly curious to do now that school is in session?

Here is a list of some top adult learning resources available freely online.  They are especially geared toward adult lifelong learners who are looking to explore new fields of knowledge, satisfy curiosity, and continue learning many years after the backpack has been permantly hung up.

  • Open Culture is an online collection of high-quality cultural and education media including language learning, movies, audio books, e-books, MOOCs*, and language learning resources. Take a course in Computer Science, watch Oscar winning films, or learn Italian.
  • Learn Free (or Aprende Libre in Spanish) is a self-paced and comprehensive website geared toward adults learning a new technology, improving English literacy, learning math and money basics, and increasing job skills. A popular course is Facebook 101 perfect for understanding Facebook's privacy settings and policies.
  •  Khan Academy is a not-for-profit with the mission to provide a free online world-class education for anyone anywhere.  It requires that you create an account and then from there you have access to a wide range of subjects including math, science, and computing.  I like this resource because it tracks your progress and allows you to earn digital badges for your hard work. 
  • Academic Earth is a collection of free online college courses from well known universities like Harvard, Stanford, and MIT.  I've been enjoying the TL;DR** video illustrating through illustration summaries of classic works, including Fahrenheit 451
  • Coursera also offers free online college level courses. You choose which courses to sign up for then learn on your own time.  Coursework includes short video lectures, quizes, peer graded assignments, connecting with other students and teachers, and recognition for your achievements. Courses range from Child Nutrition and Cooking to the History of Rock, from Scientific Computing to Exploratory Data Analysis.  

Most importantly your Multnomah County Library has a wealth of online learning resources freely available with your library card.  

You can learn a new language with Mango Connect, listen to political folk songs or medieval music from Music Online from Alexander Street Press, or study for a test and improve job skills with the LearningExpress Library.  Take a look at the library's online research page for many more choices. There are almost unlimited ways to continue learning and developing valuable new skills with your library card! 

Are you making an inquiry into a new subject, doing dedicated research, or just curious about something you heard about? Contact a librarian today and we will be happy to help you continue your search.

Do you have a favorite online resource to recommend?  Let us know in the comments.

 

*MOOC is an acronym for “massive open online course” an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web.   

**TL;DR is an acronym for "too long; didn't read" indicating the video is a summary of the novel.

The Great Library Card Adventure is a library card campaign for K-5 classrooms in Multnomah County, presented by the Multnomah County Library School Corps. We want every student, faculty and staff member in the county to have a Multnomah County Library card. A library card is the key to the fullest use of Multnomah County Library's information resources.

Dates:  October 1 through December 12, 2014

To sign up: Complete this form by September 19. Your school will then receive a packet of informational materials.

Send completed library card applications toMultnomah County Library School Corps, 205 NE Russell, Portland, OR 97212

Applications can also be labeled "School Corps" and dropped off at any Multnomah County Library location. Remember that library card applications must be signed on the back by the student and parent before they are submitted.

Prizes:

For students who are getting a library card for the first time:

  • 2 free game admissions and 60 nickels or 2 fee movie admissions and 1 small popcorn from Wunderland

For teachers/classrooms:

  • All teachers receive a $5 coupon for the Title Wave bookstore when they send in library card applications.
  • All classrooms with 100% of the students signed up for library cards will receive a $5 gift certificate to Collage and will be entered in a drawing to win one of three collections of age-appropriate fiction and non-fiction books for their classroom.

The Great Library Card Adventure is made possible in part by The Library Foundation.

Logo for Wunderland Cinema & Nickel Games

Rough Guide to Men's Health

 

We hear a lot about women’s health issues, but men have specific health concerns, as well. As with all health information, it’s important to find trustworthy, reliable resources. Here are some places you can go to find quality information specific to men’s health.

How much do you know about men’s health? Take this quiz from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to find out how well-informed you are.

MedlinePlus, the National Institute of Health’s consumer website, is a great place to go for health information. The Men’s Health page contains information about h

ealth screening for men, health issues specific to men, news on men’s health issues and more. The MedlinePlus Men’s Health page is also available in Spanish, and you can find information about men’s health in Chinese (traditional), as well.

The National Institute of Mental Health provides information about depression and men, including signs and symptoms, treatment options and more.

Health screening is important; the AHRQ provides screening guidelines for males. Are you 50 or older? These guidelines are for you.

Brown University links out to a number of resources for men to learn more about their health: testicular cancer information, the Center for Disease Control’s Men’s Health Portal, information about nutrition  and eating disorders and more.

Finally, the Men’s Health Resource Center contains a wealth of information on men’s health, including information on topics like cancer, aging, emotional health, fatherhood and much more.

 

 

Two of my favorite things to do around town when I can’t be at the Maker Faire PDX are going out to listen to music and watching movies. While I’m not bad at making music (yay cellos!) and I can take cute videos of my dogs, I can’t really claim to be great at making either. But not to fear! We do live in a great town for making things, from chairs to computers to art and we can all learn together.

Yellow record player

Are you feeling musical? Explore the science of music with your own musical creations, and learn to make your own instruments from maracas to didgeridoos. (This website is set up as lessons for teachers, but there’s no reason for teachers to have all the fun.) Once you have made (or chosen) your instrument it’s time to make some music: Indulge your inner rocker girl or you can check out the Community Music Center for lessons, concerts, workshops and practice space. Or just find some friends and start playing--it’s how all the greats got started.

 

 

strip of film cels

Visual arts more your thing? You can play with your films at the Hollywood Theater with B Movie Bingo and Hecklevison and other series.  The Portland Art Museum’s nwFilm Center has films you won’t find at the mall and classes on how to make your own. If you prefer things to be more non-fiction, head over to Northwest Documentary. They come complete with classes, lab time, opportunities to work with other filmmakers and a great library, all at your creating and making disposal. And if the slow and methodical isn’t your way, maybe The 48 Hour Film Project will be more to your liking.

 

 

Do want to make and learn more? Contact a Librarian!

Hey, We're going to be at the Maker Faire on September 13 and 14 at OMSI. Come see us!

Did you know that September is Food Allergy Awareness Month? If you didn’t, that’s OK, because I didn’t know it either.  With the increase in processed food and additives in our diets, food allergies in the United States are expected to grow in number and severity.  

It’s hard to figure out what to eat when you have food allergies.  It requires careful planning, but don’t let it put a damper on your diet. The library has many amazing recipe cookbooks that are diary, egg and nuts free for you to explore and enjoy.

If you enjoy Sweet Potato Soup, Chicken Tikka Burgers, Beef and Broccoli Stir-Fry, or Thai Green Curry Rice Bowl, then check out Thrive Energy Cookbook, Allergy-free and Easy Cooking, and Simply Allergy-free

If you have a hankering for sweets, then take a peek at One Bowl, The Allergen-free Baker’s Handbook, Allergy-free Desserts, and Enjoy Life’s Cookies for Everyone!

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