MCL Blogs

The default blog for all Library Blog Posts.

When it seems like the rain is never (ever) going to stop, don’t despair! Multnomah County has a lot of hidden art to see that will get you out of the house and won’t cost you anything.

The area’s colleges and universities are a treasure trove of free art galleries! Here are links to some all over town:

Government buildings are a great place to see rotating exhibits, usually by local artists. Experience interactive and experimental media installations in the Portland Building Installation Space; visit the art gallery in the Gresham City Council Chamber Foyer; and check out the current exhibition at Central Library’s Collins Gallery.

The Regional Arts & Culture Council has a searchable database of public art around the county. (Tip: Click on Advanced Options to search by Collection and Discipline.)

View work by local photographers at Blue Sky Gallery, originally founded as the Oregon Center for the Photographic Arts.

Learn more about contemporary art in the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s Resource Room. It is both an archive and library, housing over 3,500 artist publications, magazines, and audio and video recordings, as well as a video archive of performances and lectures presented by PICA over the span of the organization's history.

But wait, there's more! Check out Rainy Days, Part 2: Free Museums!

dead pic veneta live cover

I never planned to Like the Grateful Dead. 

Shaped by easy punchlines, alarmist tales of parking lot antics via local news outlets and teenage stubbornness,  I used to think of the Dead and their followers as a sea of tie dyed drifters. However, both times and I have changed.

Luckily, no miracles are required to get your Dead fix at Multnomah County Library. A library card is the only ticket required. Hoopla, available with a Library card has 120+ streaming Dead albums including numerous live shows. Looking for the complete studio recordings? The extensive collections The Golden Road and Beyond Description have you covered in two box sets. Additional live sets and exhaustive books are also available. Check them out here.

If that’s not enough, the Grateful Dead Archive at The University of Santa Cruz has what you need.  This growing archive is “a socially constructed collection comprised of over 45,000 digitized items drawn from the UCSC Library’s extensive Grateful Dead Archive (GDA) and from digital content submitted by the community and global network of Grateful Dead fans”.  

 Is there tie dye tinged light at the end of this tunnel?  Perhaps, but I’ll pass for now...

Searching for information online can be a great way to learn more about issues in the news. But trying to follow constant updates on social media can be overwhelming and confusing, and sometimes it's hard to make connections between events elsewhere and what's happening here in Oregon. 
 
Here are a few articles about how people are responding locally to the issues being raised about civil rights and policing in the protests in Ferguson, Missouri and around the country.  
 
Ferguson shooting: Why does it matter to Portlanders? Casey Parks, OregonLive, November 24, 2014.
 
 
 
"For anybody willing to feel uncomfortable." Eliza Kamerling-Brown, Grant Magazine, December 4th, 2014. 
 
For more information and suggestions about how to further research the issues, read "I Can't Breathe."

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

 

 

Lim Ding WenPresident Obama recently called the Internet “one of the greatest gifts our economy — and our society — has ever known.” The Internet allows us to explore and learn, to communicate with our loved ones and collaborate over great distances and to share our thoughts and ideas with an audience wider than has ever been possible before.

Internet access has become increasingly important for finding jobs, for completing schoolwork and for performing many day to day tasks, and phone service also remains vital.

And yet, Internet access and phone service does not fit into everyone’s budget.

Comcast’s Internet Essentials program  provides Internet service for $9.95 a month (plus tax), as well as a computer for $149.99 (plus tax) and free training. You may be eligible if your family qualifies for the National School Lunch program. You might qualify for Comcast Internet Essentials even if you have past debt with that company.

CenturyLink’s Internet Basics program provides Internet service for $9.95 a month (plus tax and fees), as well as a netbook for $150 (plus tax) and free training. The fee for this service increases to $14.95 after 12 months.

Telephone service is also vital for keeping us in touch with the world. Many phone companies and wireless companies will reduce your monthly phone bill, if you qualify. You can see a list of those companies, and the amount by which they will reduce your bill here. Find more information and apply online or print a paper application here. Information and applications are also available in Spanish, Russian and Vietnamese.   

A great place to compare phone and Internet plans and rates is at Cub Connects, a website created by the Citizen's Utility Board of Oregon. In addition to the search and compare feature, Cub Connects provides a list of resources that may be helpful as you look for low cost phone and Internet plans and a page that links to help for understanding different plans

With a checkout limit of 10 items, many people let their 3M Cloud Library e-books expire and get “returned” automatically. However, if you wish to return your e-books early, either to make room on your list or to move it along if there is are holds, below are the instructions for various devices.

 

iPhone, iPad, Nook Tablet or Android device

     1. Open the 3M Cloud Library app, and tap on My Books.

     2. In the upper right, tap on the words “Return Books.” A button that says “RETURN” in red will appear next to each book.

iOS screen shot

     3. Tap the button to check in the item.

 

PC/Mac

Due to publisher restrictions, you can no longer return books early on the PC app. But you can view your account and return ebooks on your PC from your browser.

     1. Go to http://ebook.3m.com/library/multnomahcountylibrary/ and login with your library card number and password (don’t forget to check the box next to “I accept the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy”).

     2. Next, click on My Books.

PC browser screen shot

 

     3. Click on the red “CHECK IN” button next to the book you wish to return.

As always, if you have any questions, please stop by your local library, or contact us at 503-988-5234 or https://multcolib.org/contact-librarian.  

 

Protesters in Ferguson, MO August 2014These three words have entered our consciousness, spoken by Eric Garner as he was choked to death by New York City Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo in July 2014.  In Portland, James Chasse, Jr.  died after an encounter with Portland Police officers in 2006

How many have died?

The journalists at ProPublica have analyzed recent federal crime statistics and report that black male teenagers (age 15 to 19) are 21 times more likely to be killed by police than white male teenagers of the same age. The New York Times reported on the increasing numbers of situations where the “police officers find themselves playing dual roles as law enforcers and psychiatric social workers,” often with deadly consequences.

Portland Copwatch tracks local incidents of deadly force by the police beginning in 1992; however, its reporting by race is spotty.

The public outcry and demonstrations recently have been fueled not only by the deaths themselves but by the decisions by grand juries not to indict the responsible police officers.

How do I find out what happened?

When events like this trend, we hear about it at the library. People come with questions:

  • What exactly happened?
  • Where has it happened before?
  • Who is in charge and what is s/he doing about it?
  • Why does this happen?
  • How can I help change things?

We have a wealth of resources here at the library, along with the skills and experience to help identify which are the most relevant and impartial.

Library resources

If you were searching for a comprehensive list of articles and analysis of the shooting death of Michael Brown and the subsequent decision not to indict Ferguson, Missouri Police Officer Darren Wilson, an excellent place to begin is at the library database, Opposing Viewpoints in Context. Just search for Michael Brown.

Dig deeper into Opposing Viewpoints for a broad range of information addressing police violence, including discussions from many sides of this important topic. While police violence is not yet an official (i.e., listed) issue in this database, I believe it soon will be. In the meantime, search for police misconduct or police brutality.

Check out this booklist for more in-depth research. 

A number of other libraries have created research guides to finding out more about police violence and its unarmed victims.

Kids aren't born knowing how to use a keyboard.  But in today’s keyboard-centric world, kids need to learn to type. Luckily, there are some good free online typing programs aimed at students.

The article  Ed Tech Ideas: Keyboarding Sites for Kids lists many links to other free typing games.

Need more help? Contact a librarian

Photo of Ross in front of some cranes.

Terminal City! Vansterdam!  Saltwater City! No Fun City! Hollywood North!

Aka... Vancouver, British Columbia! I had the privilege to visit this fair metropolis a couple months ago, and it was a ball. It’s similar to Portland in a lot of ways (there’s a Vancouver bar called Portland Craft, “inspired by the Portland food scene”) and different in a lot of ways, too (Vancouver has roughly the same population as Portland, but it’s about three times as dense). I discovered, among many other things, that Vancouverites like to light off fireworks on Halloween, and that combining a video arcade with a retro-XXX peep show is apparently something that can happen and then exist for 40+ years.

Before I went on my trip, I did what I always do whenever starting something new: I check out every single library item that exists on the subject. Here’s my list of some of the best books to learn about that city and its citizens. Did I miss anything? Let me know!

string diaries coverEver wish you could be someone else?

Racing through a dark and stormy night with her daughter and bloodied husband, Hannah Wilde has strong opinions on that question. Their neverending search for refuge is fueled by more than the will to survive. Armed with a stack of diaries passed down through four generations and a few questionable allies, she must put an end to a century long pursuit or forever rest in peace.

The String Diaries is a  page turning, horror tinged thriller. It’s the intriguing tale of one man’s unsettling obsession with the unattainable. 

Check it out!

 

Genealogists will often go pretty far out of their way to track down obituaries and funeral notices.  And with good reason!  An average, non-fancy funeral notice often reveals the names of family members, the place of burial or interment, the deceased’s home address, and other details crucial to family history research.  But they can be a challenge to find.

Despite its name, the Oregonian is a local paper and it focuses on readers in the Portland area.  So for the most part, it does not include obituaries for Oregonians from other parts of our very large state.

Whose obituaries can you expect to find in the Oregonian?

Funeral notice for Sam Nudelman, from the Aug. 17, 1944 OregonianThe vast majority of the funeral notices, death notices, and obituaries in the Oregonian are for people who lived in the Portland area or had some deep Portland connections.  They are usually very, very short!  Sam Nudelman’s funeral notice (at right), from the August 17, 1944 Oregonian, is a good example.  It is brief and to-the-point, listing only Mr. Nudelman's date of death, his address, a short list of his surviving relatives, and information about his funeral services and place of burial.

Front page of the July 23, 1974 Oregonian, with an article about the death of Sen. Wayne MorseSometimes the deaths of prominent figures in Oregon politics, business, or social life were written up in the Oregonian, even if they were from Burns or Salem or Joseph.  A person’s statewide fame might make their obituary of local interest despite the fact that they lived and died far away from the Rose City.  

However, these notices often have the feel of straight news, rather than obituary.  For example, the day after former Oregon senator and long-time Eugenian Wayne Morse died in 1974,  the Oregonian ran a full-page-width headline at the very tippy-top of page one (at left).  

obituary for Mrs. Mary Goodman, of Eugene, from the Jan. 2, 1909 OregonianIn the early years of the 20th century and before, obituaries for Oregon “pioneers” (that is, European-American settlers who travelled west to the Oregon country in the mid-19th century or thereabouts) were a regular feature in the Oregonian.  And the editors regularly featured obituaries for pioneers who lived and died in other parts of Oregon.  An example (at right) is the brief obituary for Mrs. Mary Goodman, of Eugene, from the January 2, 1909 Oregonian.

Are you ready to start searching for an obituary or death notice in the Oregonian?

If you think your ancestor's obituary or death/funeral notice is likely to be in the Oregonian, you can get started by searching for their name in the library's Historical Oregonian (1861-1987).  (To use this resource from outside the library, you'll need to log in with your library card number and PIN/password.)

If this resource is new to you, take a look at my tips for searching, or ask the librarian on duty the next time you're in the library in person.  Remember, if you don't find an obituary, death notice, or funeral notice that you think really ought to have been in the Oregonian, librarians can always help you think of other ways to search.  Get in touch with a librarian for personalized help with your research!

When should you look somewhere other than the Oregonian?

Are you looking for an obituary for a Portland resident, but can’t find it in the Oregonian?  Portland has had many other daily and weekly newspapers that ran obituaries over the years.  Central Library has long archives of many of these papers for your researching pleasure! If you want to begin your research on your own, take a look at Research with historical Portland newspapers, beyond the Oregonian.  If you’d like a hand getting started, ask the librarian on duty in Central Library’s Periodicals room (on the second floor), or contact us to get personalized help from a librarian by phone or email.

Did the person you’re researching reside in St. Johns or Gresham? Try looking for a funeral notice or obituary in their local paper.  The St. Johns Review had really lovely, robust obituaries in its early years, and most issues of the Review from 1904-1922 are fully searchable in the University of Oregon Libraries’ wonderful Historic Oregon Newspapers database.  Multnomah County's own Gresham Library has an archive of the Gresham Outlook going back to 1911; librarians there can help you search, or you can get help from a librarian by phone or email.

If the deceased person you’re looking for lived outside the Portland area (even if they died in Portland or in Multnomah County), look for an obituary or death notice in their hometown paper

If you’re not sure what the name of that newspaper was, or even if there was a newspaper in print at the time, the next step is to ask the public library in the town where the deceased person resided.  Oregon public libraries of all sizes are listed in the Oregon Library Directory.  If you need to find a public library in a town outside Oregon, ask us for help the next time you’re at the library, or ask a librarian by phone or email!

 


Do you want to learn more about family history research with obituaries?  My colleague Kate S. walks you through some of the basics in her post on Obituaries 101.

Or, call or email a librarian to get personalized help with your obituaries-related questions. If you’d rather have face-to-face help, ask the librarian on duty the next time you visit the library.  We're always happy to help!


 

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

 

For sale sign

Craigslist is a popular online tool for job searching. Because it’s open to anyone, be careful to avoid scams!

Here’s how to search, but keep in mind that services like this change all the time, so it might look different when you try these steps.

  1. Start at Craigslist.

  2. Choose Portland for Portland and the Portland metro area (Beaverton, Gresham, Troutdale, etcetera. Vancouver, WA is listed in a separate category.)

  1. Click post to classifieds.

  2. Choose type of posting, category, and location.

 

You have to fill out these fields to continue:

  • Email: CL mail relay is a way to send and receive emails without you or the sender giving out your email address. Learn more here

  • Posting title: The title should describe what you’re selling.

  • Postal code: Your zip code

  • Posting body: Describe what you are selling. Do not include your phone number.

Show on maps

Check this and complete the information you want to share in order to show up in Craigslist’s map based search. You can enter your street and cross street, or just the city and state.

Click      to continue.

 

Images

You can add images to your post. Click edit images, then Add images and choose a photo from your files. The photo has to have been saved on your computer.

Once your photo is uploaded, click done with images to go back to your post.

Need help? Try this.

 

Publish

On the next  page, you can choose to edit anything that needs to be changed, or click the publish button to publish.

Your post is not published yet.

  • Open the email you get from Craigslist and click the publish link.

  • If you notice that something is wrong with your ad, you can choose the edit link.

  • Verify your email address.

  • Keep this email so that you can edit or delete your ad later.


It will take about 15 minutes for your post to appear on Craigslist. 

ObituaryWhat are obituaries?
Obituaries are short biographies written about someone who has died recently. An obituary may also be called a death notice, funeral notice, or may be in a list of names in a column labelled “Deaths.” When an obituary is first published, it is intended to inform friends, family, colleagues, and the community about a death and often include the schedule and location of the funeral service and burial. Long after the death of an individual, obituaries can be a source of biographical details and family information. 
 
Why do people search for obituaries?
People search for obituaries for all sorts of reasons. Obituaries can provide useful information for many kinds of research: genealogy, house history, neighborhood or other local history, research about famous or notable people, and even to look up an old classmate to see if they’ll make it to the next class reunion. 
 
Not everyone has an obituary
Keep in mind that obituaries are optional--not everyone has an obituary. Unless an individual was a well-known community member, written about by newspaper staff, it is up to the family and friends of the deceased to place an obituary or death notice. Most of the time, there is a fee associated with placing an obituary or death notice in a local newspaper, and that may stop some families from submitting one. Also, some families choose privacy and use other methods to notify friends and family of a death. 
 
Where are obituaries published? 
Often, an obituary will be in the local newspaper where the deceased most recently lived, but it may also appear in the newspaper where they previously lived, or a national newspaper if the person was a prominent figure. Since family and friends are in charge of placing an obituary, there may be other places to look for a notice. For example, an alumni association newsletter or a publication related to an organization or hobby that the individual was involved with may publish a remembrance. These days, obituaries may be published on newspaper websites, on a funeral home’s website, or may be found by searching websites that compile obituaries from a variety of online sources. 
 
Finding obituaries at the library
The Multnomah County Library has several resources that include obituaries, both contemporary and historical, most of which require your library card and PIN/password to access.
 
  • America's Obituaries and Death Notices: Includes obituaries and death notices from a selection of newspapers from across the United States. It’s most useful for more recent obituaries and death notices, though some sources go back to the late 1980s, beyond what a web-based search can do. 
  • The Oregonian Historical (1861-1987) and The Oregonian (1987-present): Both sources have local obituaries and death notices that combine to cover the time period 1861 to today. 
  • Historic Oregon Newspapers: Digital scans of newspapers from around Oregon from as early as 1840 through 1922. Many of these newspapers are from small towns and new titles are being added every year. 
  • Chronicling America: An archive of selected newspapers from many states, covering the years 1836-1922. Check out our blog post about this great resource, Chronicling America: Newspapers from 1836-1922.
  • New York Times Historical (1851-2009) and New York Times (1980-present): These two resources cover the dates 1851 to the present and are good sources for obituaries of people of national and international prominence. 
  • Los Angeles Times: Full text of the Los Angeles Times newspaper from 1985 to today’s newspaper. 
  • NewsBank America's News: Like Newspaper Source, this contains selected newspapers from across the country. A good source for regional and small newspapers, though we may only have access to a limited date range. 
  • Newspaper Source: Like NewsBank, this contains a range of newspapers from across the country as well as a handful of international sources. This is a good source for regional and small newspapers, though we may only have access to a limited date range. 
  • Library Press Display: Current international and domestic newspapers and other periodicals from around the world. The dates we have access to vary by title but generally don’t go further back than two months. 
 
Looking for an Oregon obituary?
My colleague Emily-Jane has written a blog post about tracking down Oregon obituaries called Where is that Oregon Obituary? It's chock full of ideas about where to search for an obituary or death notice for Oregon residents. 
 
Obituary research can be challenging, but is almost always fun and rewarding. Even if you don’t find an obituary for an individual, you’ll often learn something valuable along the way. 
 

We love to help with your genealogy, house history, missing person, and all other types of research. If you get stuck or just want some help getting started, please contact us! Come to any branch in person or Ask the Librarian!


 

 

This month Governor Kitzhaber proclaimed December 1, 2014 Rosa Parks Day in Oregon and encourages “all Oregonians to join in this observance.”

rosa parks

Why December 1st? On December 1, 1955 Rosa Parks was arrested for civil disobedience. Contrary to popular lore Parks was not an elderly woman that just happened to be in the right place at the right moment in history. Rosa Parks was a dedicated activist and served as secretary of the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).  When Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat and move to the back of the bus as the driver demanded, and city law required, her refusal sparked a bus boycott that captured the attention of the world and breathed new life into the Civil Rights Movement.

To learn more, take a look at a timeline of the events that followed in the wake of her arrest. Often called the “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement,” read about the event in her wordsThe National Archives has more primary source data on it's website as well, including the police report and Rosa Parks’ fingerprint cards.

The History Channel also has video about Rosa Parks with information you might not already know. 

Need more information? Check out the books below or ask a librarian.

Over thirty men and a woman and baby had to be fed on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Meriwether Lewis extensively planned what he would purchase in advance to supplement the meat they could hunt along the way. The food they packed onto the boats weighed thousands of pounds including the lifesaving portable soup.

Photo

If there was game to be hunted and killed, the Corps could eat a whole buffalo, an elk and a deer, or four deer in one day. Each person consumed between eight and nine pounds of meat per day! Meat was their main food source whenever available.

They also fished and caught salmon, trout, catfish and eulachon (smelt) which Lewis considered to be delicious. Another treat enjoyed by the Corps was beaver tail. Sometimes it was necessary to eat dogs and horses—in order to stay alive. Sacajawea was extremely helpful in identifying edible plants for the Corps.

There are plenty of recipes described in Expedition journals.Want to try your hand at paleocuisineology®? Check out these instructions for making pemmican or apple pudding.

Bon appétit!

Or, how a holiday celebrating friends and family became an exercise in crass commercialism.

Shoppers at Walmart on Thanksgiving Day 2013. Image from Wikimedia Commons.The confluence of Thanksgiving Day and the beginning of the holiday shopping season is pretty much a second-half-of-the-20th-century phenomenon, spurred by the burgeoning consumer economy that took off following the end of World War II. The Friday after Thanksgiving became “Black Friday” originally in 1961, coined by some disgruntled Philadelphia police officers who grew to hate the downtown traffic jams created by shoppers. It was only in the 1980s that the term took on a economic meaning: Success on this day sends retail businesses into the “black.” Big box retailers attract shoppers with deep discounts on popular gift items, discounts only available on Black Friday.

In this century, Black Friday just keeps creeping forward: 6 am on Friday morning, midnight on Friday morning, 8 pm on Thursday night, 5 pm on Thursday, to the absolute nadir (in this writer’s opinion) of 6 am on Thanksgiving morning. Kmart owns this dubious honor for 2013 and is repeating it this year. Of course, there’s a name for this: Brown Thursday or Gray Thursday.

Small Business Saturday

Using an if-you-can’t-beat-‘em-join-‘em philosophy, smaller retailers gave into the Black Friday juggernaut in 2010, redirecting shoppers away from the big box stores by creating their own shopping “event,” Small Business Saturday. Sure, this event says, you’ll probably want to take advantage of those big sales at the big boxes, but -- while you’re still in the shopping zone --  wouldn’t you like to support a local business too? And many of these retailers (not all of them small businesses) can’t resist a poke at those open on Thanksgiving Day: We pride ourselves on letting our employees enjoy a day off with their families.

Portland, being Portland, has created its own version of Small Business Saturday: Little Boxes. Shoppers are gently encouraged to “welcome in the holiday season by discovering the quality and variety of Portland’s indie and local retail shopping scene.” Only in Portland do we have an “indie” shopping scene. Still, there are prizes.

Buy Nothing Day

A countermovement to Black Friday’s unfettered consumerism sprung up in the 1990s with Buy Nothing Day, created in Canada and spreading to the United States and elsewhere in the West over the past 20 years. Its founders encourage waggish bits of civil disobedience such as “whirl-mart” -- a conga line of empty shopping carts making its way through a mall or big box store (see video) -- and the “zombie walk” -- staggering through retail establishments with a blank stare.

For those of you who prefer to spend that Friday enjoying a roast turkey sandwich, some leftover pumpkin pie and a good book, here’s a reading list about shopping (or not) in America. And never fear, the library will be open!
 

Smiley Goat photo by Martin Cathrae on Flickr, license CC BY 2.0.Whether you are excited about having fresh eggs and milk and honey, or looking for a new pet that will also mow your lawn, backyard animals can be a wonderful addition to your home.

It can be tricky to figure out what is allowed in your neighborhood: How many ducks are too many? Can I have a pygmy goat and a peacock? Do my neighbors need to know about my hive? Is that a llama peering over my fence?

If you live in the city of Portland, the rules and regulations for keeping animals are enforced by Multnomah County Vector Control. The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability maintains a site that lets you know which animals you can keep, when you need to apply for a permit, and what the requirements are to keep various animals. If you have questions, you can contact Vector Control at 503-988-3464.

If you live in Gresham, you'll need a permit for keeping chickens; the rules for other poultry and livestock vary. Questions should be directed to the Code Compliance Division at 503-618-2463.

The city of Wood Village has fairly clear rules for keeping chickens; for questions regarding other animals, contact the city at 503-667-6211 or City@ci.Wood-Village.or.us.

Live in Fairview or Troutdale? Both Fairview and Troutdale enforce Multnomah County's Animal Codes;  if you have questions, you can contact the Fairview Department of Planning Services at 503-674-6206 or the Troutdale Planning Division at 503-674-7228.

For Maywood Park, call 503-255-9805 or email cityofmaywoodpark@integra.net.

chicken.jpg by Tom Woodward on Flickr, license CC BY 2.0.The rules for unincorporated Multnomah County are enforced by Multnomah County Vector Control. They can be contacted at 503-988-3464.

Once you know the rules and you’re ready to start planning, the library has a lot of resources available for you! Below is a list of books that can help you prepare for your new additions. You can also search the catalog for “domestic animals,” “urban agriculture,” “bee culture,” or the particular animal you are considering. And you can always contact us for help; librarians are standing by!

P.S. If your chickens seem destined for more than just pecking and laying, perhaps it’s time they learn more advanced skills.

Photo of a cameraYou need a photo or an image for a project you’re working on. You need it fast. You don’t want to pay anything to anybody, or get sued for copyright violation. Luckily, there are a lot of sources on the Web for finding royalty-free images! (Royalty-free = you don’t have to pay any money to use it.) Here is a list of some of the best websites for finding these types of photos and images. Is there a website that you like to use? Add a comment and let us all know!

The creators of many of the images on these websites are giving up some of their copyright protection and allowing you to use their photos and artwork. However, they may have usage rules that they require you to follow: for example, they might ask you to attribute the creator of the image if you use it. (Attribution = including information, on your website or wherever you use the image, saying who made the image and where you found it.) Before you copy or use any image, it’s a good idea to look at the webpage for the image and check for usage or licensing rules. I’ve included links to the general usage rules for many of the websites in this list. Quick disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and cannot provide advice regarding your legal rights. However, I can help find material that might assist you in your research, or help you learn how to contact a lawyer. Questions? Please ask!

Creative Commons logoCreative Commons Search - http://search.creativecommons.org: Creative Commons is an organization that creates standards for sharing content on the Web (photos, videos, writing, anything!) This webpage has buttons to search many different websites for images and other content that are free to use based on Creative Commons standards - choose a website and then type in your search. Searchable websites from this page include Flickr, Google Images, Wikimedia Commons, and more. Usage information is included on the bottom of the page, below the buttons for the different sites.19th century painting of an American schooner

U.S. Government Photos and Images - http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Graphics.shtml: This webpage gives links to many different government websites offering photos and other media like videos. There are links to photo sites for all sorts of topics, from science to space to money to military. The webpage includes this usage statement: “Some of these photos are in the public domain or U.S. government works and may be used without permission or fee. However, some images may be protected by license or copyright. You should read the disclaimers on each site before using these images.”

Children reading a wireless newspaperThe Commons - http://www.flickr.com/commons: The Commons is a section of the photo-sharing website Flickr which provides access to images from public photography archives at museums and libraries around the world. It’s a great place to find historic photos, and everyone (including you!) is encouraged to add comments and tags to the images. The photos on this site have “no known copyright.”

Encyclopedia of Life - http://www.eol.org: this website’s mission is to “increase awareness and understanding of living nature,” and it includes information and images on all kinds of living creatures, from moths to amoebas to mollusks to monkeys. It includes many images, most of which are free to use as long as you attribute the source. Here is a usage statement for the site.

Photo of a flowerMorgue File - http://www.morguefile.com: a morgue file is “a place to keep post production materials for use of reference.” In other words, it is a place to store things. In this particular online morgue file, you can find many high resolution stock photos. Here is a usage statement for the site.

Openclipart - http://openclipart.org/: Unlike many websites which offer photos to use, this site has royalty-free clip art (clip art = little images and drawings ready to use in electronic documents). You can even register and submit your own clip-art for other people to use! Here is a usage policy for the site.Scissors illustration

Are websites not your thing? Do you prefer books? Well, the library still has plenty of those. We have many books of illustrations and prints on all sorts of topics, most of them royalty-free. To find them, just do a subject search in the library catalog for “clip art.” You’ll find books with images of Victorian women’s fashion, birds, children’s book illustrations, fairies, and much more, many of them including CD-ROMs with computer files of all the images in the book. At the end of this blog post is a book list showing examples of the types of clip art books that the library owns.

If you still have trouble finding the images that you want, or if you have more questions about any of this, you know what to do: Ask a Librarian! We’ll be happy to talk more about it.

Images included in this post:

The gift-giving season is a dilemma for many of us. We want to give meaningful gifts that result in exclamations of pleasure when they're opened, but that perfect gift can be elusive.

We're here to help: How about a book? As Neil Gaiman says, “Books make great gifts because they have whole worlds inside of them. And it's much cheaper to buy somebody a book than it is to buy them the whole world!” Yeah, what he said.

Still not sure what book to buy? We've got you covered with our attached gift guide for adults. You'll find suggestions for music fans, fashion aficionados, literature lovers, science geeks and more. Buying for kids and teens? We've got gift guides for them as well. If nothing here looks quite right, check out the My Librarian service -- just describe your loved one's tastes to get a personalized recommendation.

And remember, above all, books are easy to wrap.

 

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