MCL Blogs

The default blog for all Library Blog Posts.

Earthquakes are sudden and have lasting, devastating impact. The tragedy in Nepal resulting from an initial 7.8 magnitude earthquake on April 25, 2015 is ongoing and will be a main focal point in the news for many days and weeks to come. There are other resources besides the news to learn more about earthquakes and Nepal.

The United States Geological Survey is a reliable source for scientific information; its Earthquake Hazards Program monitors and reports earthquakes, assesses earthquake impacts and hazards, and researches the causes and effects of earthquakes.

 

Organizations such as the American Red Cross travel around the world to assist with food, water, shelter and health care needs of those affected.

Learn more about the history, people and customs of Nepal by using CultureGrams, a database Multnomah County Library subscribes to and you can use for free with your library card.

You may also hear more people talking about the potential for earthquakes in Oregon and the greater Pacific Northwest. The Department of Geology and Mineral Industries for the State of Oregon details local plans to address geologic hazards and has information on how you can prepare for potential emergencies at home.

 

The winners of the Oregon Book Awards were recently announced! From a number of excellent finalists, Portland’s own Emily Kendal Frey was awarded the Stafford/Hall Award for Poetry. I’ve been reading the award winning book, Sorrow Arrow, and it’s a real treat - a wild emotional ride between poignant sadness and some rather hilarious moments, and memorable lines such as “You sit in your body, quietly making blood.” The book transpires in brief lyric lines, sometimes disjunctive and sometimes tenacious, in a series of untitled poems that build upon one another in a wonderful wall of feeling.

Are you interested in reading books by Emily Kendal Frey and other Oregon poets? Here’s a booklist for you.

National Poetry Month is not yet over! April 30th is Poem in Your Pocket Day, when you are encouraged to carry a poem around. In your pocket. At Central Library we will have a selection of poems for you to choose from, including some new work by local poets! Look for our display in the 1st floor lobby. 

 

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

 
Ready for a good cry?  The film version of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl comes out June 12, and it's already getting some great buzz.  If you're looking for more smart, tragic fare (and maybe you've already devoured The Fault in Our Stars), here are some great options.  We affectionately call them Downers.
 
Five years old by September? Sign up for school by June 1!
 
If your child will be five years old by September 1, he or she is ready to start school. Register at your school by June 1 to give your child a good start, connect to summer activities and get access to free resources. School offices close for the summer, so don’t wait! When you register by June 1, you have time to get to know your school and your teacher, and your teacher has time to prepare the classroom for your child. To identify your school or get help with other childhood issues call 211 or email children@211info.org. Interpretation is available.
 
How can the library help you and your child get ready for kindergarten? Bring them to storytime!  By the time your child is 5 years old, you may have heard many messages — on TV, in magazines, from other parents — about the importance of learning letters and numbers.
 
But kindergarten teachers care much more about having children who are ready and excited to learn. Kindergarten readiness includes things such as playing well with others, following simple instructions and talking about feelings and thoughts. There are lots of fun ways to develop these skills, and the library is here to help you!
 
At storytime we read stories and sing songs. We talk about the things we’ve read. We work on following directions with shakers and scarves and simple group games. Storytimes are a great opportunity for your child to learn to socialize with other children and adults. In storytime children also learn to ask questions and function well in a group; develop language and problem-solving skills; and perhaps most importantly, discover that books and learning are fun!
 
What else can you do?  Read, talk, sing, write and play!  

 

 

"Something just clicked."

by Sarah Binns

From her youth in Minnesota, Kathy Parkin distinctly remembers the stories that molded her as a lifelong reader: “My favorite childhood books were Beverly Cleary's. Even now I can see myself in the elementary school library, picking up her books. They sparked my love of reading.” Kathy couldn't know that several decades later she'd start post-retirement life in the same city that Oregon-born Cleary once called home: our beloved Portland.

In 2011, after 30 years as a lab technician in Minnesota, Kathy decided she wanted a change. That's when she saw an AARP magazine article describing Portland, Oregon, as a perfect place to retire. “Something just clicked,” she said, when she read about the city. “The very first thing I did when I moved here was get a library card—even before I got a driver's license!” In May 2012, Kathy began her Multnomah County Library volunteer work helping with weeding, traveling to different neighborhood libraries to ferret out damaged, dilapidated and outdated books. “I got around and saw more of Portland,” she explains. “And I love Portland.”

Kathy harnessed this love of Portland to write the short story “Summer of Love,” which is featured in the 2013 book Our Portland Story Volume 2, a compilation of stories about the city. Kathy has also explored calligraphy and collage and has worked in many other volunteer positions, with Store to Door, a grocery shopping service for seniors and people with disabilities, and Friendly House, where Kathy worked with older adults.

In addition to her love of Portland, Kathy is one of those MCL volunteers who has always loved libraries. Between working and raising a family she volunteered for libraries in her native Minnesota. “At one point I worked at one library system and volunteered at another. That's right,” she adds, “I worked in a library and they paid me!” Let the record show that Kathy has lived the dream of many an MCL volunteer, including this one. This doesn't mean she'll stop volunteering for MCL, though: “I'll keep on until I can't,” she says with a smile.


A Few Facts About Kathy

Home library: Central Library for the books but she volunteers at the Northwest Library. “I really like working at the smaller libraries.”

Currently reading: “I like chick lit and I just finished Walking Back to Happiness by Lucy Dillon.” Also reading The Way of the Woods, by Linda Underhill. 

Most influential book: Jane Eyre. “I like books with strong female characters. I always come back to Jane Eyre.”

A book that made you laugh or cry: Lisette's List by Susan Vreeland made me both laugh and cry; a good book about how life is just that so often, sometimes a comedy and sometimes a tragedy.”

Favorite book from childhood: Beverly Cleary's books. “It's also nice to know she has an Oregon connection.” (Cleary's birthday is April 12th and is celebrated by publisher Harper Collins as Drop Everything and Read (DEAR) Day.)

E-reader or paper? Paper

Favorite place to read: "In my recliner."

Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Waterfalls plunge through darkness, glowing white, blue, neon against the void. Mist rises from hidden pools, its tendrils reaching into nothingness. A wash of thundering infrasound, felt as much as heard, seems to be just at the edge of perception. You could get lost here, immersed deep within these cold curtains of light.

This is what it feels like when I look at the  mysterious and atmospheric paintings of Hiroshi Senju, one of Japan’s foremost contemporary artists. Besides waterfalls, he’s painted glaciers, lava, rock faces, and forests, all possessed of the same quiet radiance. I love the powerful delicacy of his images, how they hover between abstract and figurative, traditional and contemporary.

While at a distance his paintings may appear to be works of modern abstraction, a closer examination reveals that they are also representations of the natural world, created with pigment and mulberry paper. As such, they are a continuation of the long lineage of nihonga, or traditional Japanese painting, though not without some new twists, including paint that fluoresces in UV light! It’s really worth a look, at both the book Hiroshi Senju, and at his website.

Hiroshi Senju, by Rachel Baum, Michaël Amy.
Milan : Skira ; New York : Distributed in North America by Rizzoli, 2009

Central Library: 759.952 B3473h 2009

 

Happy National Poetry Month! Probably because "April is the cruellest month, breeding / Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing / Memory and desire, stirring / Dull roots with spring rain" we celebrate poetry in April. There are many ways to do this, but one of my favorite ways to have a poetry experience recently is to listen to readings and discussions on PennSound, a project of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at University of Pennsylvania. This online resource is an archive of both new and historical recordings, an excellent podcast, and many other things as well. It's pretty amazing to be able to listen to a recent reading by one of my favorite poets, or listen to scholars and poets discussing a close reading of a poem, all while I'm doing the dishes or sweeping the floor at the end of the day. Just take a look at PennSound's authors page, and scan this enormous list for a poet you'd like to hear.

The library also has quite a few collections of poetry that you can listen to, either in audiobook CD form or downloadable or streaming audio! I recently discovered the Voice of the Poet series of audiobooks on CD, featuring poets reading their work; it includes a number of great American 20th century poets.

Happy listening!

There was no doctor in the Corps of Discovery. Instead, Meriwether Lewis trained under the most famous of 18th century physicians, Benjamin Rush. He then created a list and purchased his supply of medical drugs and surgical instruments for the journey.

Photo of 18th Century Medical Chest

The accidents and ailments recorded in members' journals are extensive and varied.

It is astonishing to think that only one person died on the Expedition—most likely of peritonitis from a ruptured appendix. 

Sergeant Floyd

 

 

Cover of Game of Thrones: The Complete Fourth Season DVDYou may have heard of a television series called Game of Thrones. You may know that it is an adaptation of a fantasy series by George R. R. Martin. But what you might not know is that one of the show’s executive producers and writers, David Benioff, is a fantastic writer in his own right.

Cover of City of ThievesI first learned of Benioff when I read his 2008 novel, City of Thieves. It is set in the Russian city of Leningrad, under siege during World War II. The residents of that city are struggling for their survival and their sanity as they undergo bombing, crime and starvation. Young Lev Beniov (purportedly the author’s grandfather) is thrown in jail for looting, at which point he and his cellmate get pressed into service for a powerful colonel in the military. Their mission, in this city where a stale crust of bread is a prize? Find a dozen eggs for the colonel to use in his daughter’s wedding cake. The book is shocking and horrific, and it’s funny, and it’s even sweet in a very rough-around-the-edges kind of way. It’s really just fantastic.

Before that book, there was Benioff’s When the Nines Roll Over & Other Stories and his first book, The 25th Hour. That debut novel was notable enough to get turned into a film directed by Spike Lee and starring Edward Norton.

I sure do love Game of Thrones, and I feel sad to think that the show will finally, someday (probably) come to an end. But on the other hand, maybe it will mean more time for Mr. Benioff to write us some more fabulous books. Who knows, maybe his next one will be a fantasy...

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

You face a lot of challenges when you are transitioning back into the community. The library can help you find resources to help you deal with those challenges and get back on your feet. Londer Learning Center teacher shares a poster; link to Londer Learning Center.

You are not alone.

MercyCorps Northwest’s Reentry Transition Center provides a variety of services, including helping with immediate needs like clothing, meals, and access to phones and Internet. The center also helps ex-offenders work towards long term goals of education, employment and driver’s license reinstatement.

Londer Learning Center is the only adult education program in Oregon working exclusively with adults in transition from jail, prison and treatment programs. They offer GED classes, job search assistance, and apprenticeship preparation for construction trades and connections to apprentice training programs like Constructing Hope. SE Works also has several programs for community members leaving jail or prison who are looking to re-enter the workforce or improve their job skills.

Pathfinders of Oregon program Parenting Inside Out has been specifically designed to provide support for parents who are on parole and probation.

For other social services, contact 211info.org by dialing 211 or texting your zip code to 898211 to start a live conversation.

Your library card gives you access to so much.

Take advantage of free computer classes, assistance for job seekers, personal finance information, and resources for parents, not to mention books, ebooks, movies, and audio on any subject you can imagine. And you can always contact a helpful librarian with any question -- even if you don't have a library card, we're glad to help you!
 

Photograph of a young boy arranging fabric in preparation to sew.I love making anything with my hands. So when my six-year-old son asks, “Can we make me an Ant-Man costume?”, my answer is always going to be an enthusiastic, “Yeah we can!”

There was a time when I would take control of these projects.  I’d Google images of Ant-Man, obsess about the right fabric and approach, until I found myself sitting at the sewing machine alone, while my son had long since moved on to his Legos.

Now I understand that my job is to dump a bag of fabric out on the table and as my son says, “Just stop freaking out so much about it.”  Sure, I help with the sewing machine.  He drives the pedal and I keep my fingers out of the way and try not to sweat the fact that the bobbin tension is completely out of whack.  

Our new laissez-faire family craft time doesn’t mean I’ve stopped seeking out fresh ideas and inspiration for projects.  Martha Stewart’s Favorite Crafts for Kids offers a bonanza of ideas for kids and parents.  I just make sure to check my inner Martha when it’s time to get gluing.

Side by Side by Tsia Carson is a great resource for matching projects that parents and kids can do separately but together.  One particularly endearing kid-project involves embroidering a leaf.  This is a woman who knows about managing expectations!

And when I just want to be inspired, blogger and illustrator Merrilee Liddiard’s Playful is so Anthropologie-beautiful I could weep.  But then I’ll get over it, enjoy watching my son dart about in what only started out as an Ant-Man costume, and “just stop freaking out so much about it.”

Close-up image of microfilm in a microfilm reader.Microfilm & microfilm readers

Microfilm is photographic film used to record miniaturized images on sheets or reels. Often these are images of pages from newspapers and magazines. The reels of film use less space than the original items (for example, 50 years of Sports Illustrated on film takes up the same space as 1 year of the paper magazine, and the boxes of microfilm can fit in one small drawer). To read the microscopic images on film, you use a microfilm reader which enlarges them for you.

Central Library has recently added two brand-new digital microfilm readers. These readers offer many new options for editing and saving images from microfilm, including the ability to crop, enhance images and add notes. The two new readers are located in the Periodicals room at Central Library, and older microfilm readers are available in the Literature & History room. 

Digital microfilm machines at Central Library.So, what kinds of magazines and newspapers does the library have on microfilm?

All sorts! Here is a selection of historic gems that we have available at Central Library for your micro-perusing:

  • The Black Panther, 1968 to 1980
  • Harper’s, 1963-2013
  • Macworld, 1984 to 2005
  • Reader’s Digest, 1922 to 2013
  • TV Guide, 1953 to 1994
  • and many, many more!

In addition to national publications like the ones listed above, Central Library also has a large collection of local newspapers on microfilm, including the Oregon Journal, The Oregonian, The Portland Telegram and the Willamette Week. For more information about searching in local newspapers, take a look at the blog post “Research with historical Portland newspapers, beyond the Oregonian.”

Microfilm readers are also located at the Gresham, North Portland, and Sellwood libraries. These locations have smaller collections of microfilm materials which are specific to their communities: The Gresham Outlook, The Sellwood Bee and (at North Portland Library) many local African-American periodicals like The Skanner, The Portland Observer and The Newspaper.

Newspaper article about the Grateful DeadA couple of notes before you begin your micro-searching:

  1. When you use microfilm, it is like browsing through a big stack of newspapers or magazines arranged by date. If you don’t know the exact date for the article that you are seeking, you might need to use an index (usually this index is a book or an online resource) to look it up.
  2. Some magazines and newspapers are only available on microfilm at the library, but many are also available through the library’s online databases. These databases can sometimes be a better choice for your searching.

Remember, you can always Ask a Librarian and we will be happy to help you find the information or articles that you need!

Diabetes is a disease that people have known about for thousands of years, even if they didn't call it by that name.  Wonderopolis has a simple, helpful overview of diabetes and a quick interview with a young diabetic about how he test his blood.  There are actually two types of diabetes with similar symptoms and treatments but different causes.  The American Diabetes Association website has information about Type 1 Diabetes, and they also have a free, dowloadable booklet about living with Type 2 diabetes.  You can even find statistics about the frequency of diabetes in the United States from the Center for Disease Control.  

 

Symptoms of the disease can be scary, but it helps to know more about what is happening inside the body.  Some people take medicine to help control their diabetes, and other people can control it through their diet, choosing recipes and foods that help control their blood sugar levels.

Once you've learned about the disease, you can test your knowledge with this crossword puzzle or one of these online games about making smart food choices.  

And as always you can contact a librarian for more information!

 

What’s your favorite rock and roll movie?

Real or fictional, capturing the live concert experience is challenging. Movie logistics and bands not familiar with the filmmaking process can strip away the magic.  However, some films get it right.

Enter the Stains.  They’re an inexperienced all female punk/proto riot Grrrl band added to a conflict ridden concert bill. Without warning, the trio, two of whom played by Laura Dern and Diane Lane, are thrust into the media spotlight. Their tourmates, the Looters, featuring members of The Clash and Sex Pistols, resent their instant notoriety. Tensions quickly erupt and questions of sincerity and integrity and the accusation of “selling out” signals the end of the Stains.   

Is Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains my favorite rock and roll movie? No, but it's up there. My top honor goes to Purple Rain.

Check out this list for more rock and roll movies that do it right.

"You’re born naked and the rest is drag." - RuPaul
 
Without fail, at the start of a new season, I find myself in a fashion rut. Every morning is a battle with my closet. I’ll stand in front of my full closet thinking the ridiculous thought, “I have nothing to wear”. I pull a couple of things off their hangers, put them on, check myself in the mirror, sigh, disrobe, throw those clothes on my bed and start over again. If I can get out the door without covering my bed with discarded clothing choices, than I have accomplished something. It’s not that I need new or more clothes (okay, a few new things to freshen up my closet would be nice), what I really need is fashion inspiration. I know I’m not alone in this. Sometimes you just need a little style motivation. 
 
Sartorialist book jacketSince 2005, photographer Scott Schuman  has chronicled the fashion world from street style to the catwalks through the blog Sartorialist. If you haven’t already experienced Sartorialist, I highly recommend that you check it out. The Sartorialist blog has long been a favorite of mine, so I couldn’t wait to get my hands on the Sartorialist anthologies, Sartorialist and Sartorialist: Closer. Both books highlight some of Schuman’s favorite photographs, from all over the world, and will give you major fashion inspiration (as well as a healthy does of travel envy).
 
 
 
Advanced Style book coverAdvanced Style is another blog that led to a gorgeous fashion anthology. Photographer Ari Seth Cohen shows that style gets better with age. Advanced Style (the book, the blog, and the documentary of the same name) highlight the creative and unique personal style of some of New York's most inspiring older folks.  
 
 
I'll admit that I have fantasies of walk-in closets with an ever rotating supply of clothing options, but the truth is that style isn't so much about what you wear, as how you wear it. 
 
 
 
 

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

WOWVolunteer Maureen Flynn

by Donna Childs

Most people have heard of Meals on Wheels, for whom volunteers deliver food to people who are homebound, but few know that Multnomah County Library has a program called Words on Wheels, through which volunteers deliver books, food for the mind and soul. One of those volunteers is Maureen Flynn, who brings library materials to two women who can’t get to a library.

Her “fantastic” women live in the same assisted living facility, but have different needs and ways of choosing books. One of them talks with Maureen about the kinds of books she likes—and those she does not—but seldom requests specific titles. Knowing her tastes, Maureen reads reviews and scans library shelves for titles she might like. The other woman does her own research and often gives Maureen lists of specific books she wants to read.  In both cases, Maureen talks with the women about the books and about their own interests and histories, and picks up and returns books to the Hollywood library for them.

Maureen goes to the assisted living facility almost weekly to be sure each woman has a good supply of books. She enjoys getting to know these women and has learned a lot from them.  In return, she is able to enhance their library experience, to pass on what she has learned about using the library.  

In addition to Words on Wheels, Maureen also volunteers at the Hollywood Library. She began four years ago, as an expired holds clerk, pulling and processing books people had requested, but did not ever pick up. She found it a great way to learn about good books and laughed that her pants pockets were usually full of scraps of paper with book titles. Now, she pulls holds on Mondays before the library opens, finding books, CDs and DVDs that patrons have requested. That way, she can search shelves without intruding on other patrons’ browsing.

An inveterate helper, Maureen also volunteers at her church, preferring behind the scenes tasks, such as sacristy and altar guild work.  Her helping has paid off in other ways: a former volunteer job at Providence Medical Center led her to a position there until she retired and began volunteering with the library.


A Few Facts About Maureen

Home library: Hollywood

Currently reading: Maya Lin’s "Boundaries"

Most influential book: Lately, it is "Mycelium Running" by Paul Stamets.

A book that made you laugh or cry: All the PG Wodehouse books

Favorite reading guilty pleasure: Murder mysteries

E-reader or paper? Paper, because it is tactile - it’s a life-long preference.

Favorite place to read: In summer, outside and in winter, indoors by a window

See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Curious about censorship in Oregon?  Need to know what's been published in the local news?  The Intellectual Freedom Issues in Oregon: A News Database, may have what you need.  The database is the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse's news clipping files, and is updated twice a year. The database includes news articles and editorials about intellectual freedom issues printed in Oregon newspapers over the past 65 years. The database can be searched by article title, newspaper name, date, city/location, name of challenged book or material, and organizations or individuals involved. After you have found what you want to read, contact the coordinator of the Oregon Intellectual Freedom Clearinghouse, Katie Anderson, 503-378-2528 to request a complete text of the articles or editorials.  And if you have any trouble, don't forget to Ask a Librarian!

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