MCL Blogs

Celebrate your freedom to read on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015 from 2:00 to 3:30 at Midland Library by attending Censorship by Omission: The Diversity Deficit.  Moderated by author Swati Avasthi , three amazing local teen authors Stacey LeeIsabel Quintero, and Tess Sharpe will discuss why books with characters and stories outside the dominant culture are often the most challenged and least published.  They'll talk about getting published, why diverse books matter, and their current books. 

Made possible by The National Endowment for the Humanities Fund of The Library Foundation.

 

Want to know more about the books most often challenged in 2014 (the most current information available)?  Take a look at this cool chart created by the American Library Association: 2014 Book Challenges Infographic.

2014 Book Challenges Infographic describing the books on the 2014 most challenged list from the ALA.

It's Banned Books Week from Sept. 27 - Oct. 3rd!  Celebrate your freedom to read by reading a book that's been challenged.  Take a look at one of the ALA Challenged Books lists.  Pick one of the books and read it...because you can!  Each of the books on these lists have been "challenged" several times for being inappropriate in some way.  Remember that a challenge is the first step in having a book banned or removed from a library.  So when you read a challenged book, you are supporting your right to choose what you want to read!

Statue of Roman godGreek and Roman mythology share many of the same gods and goddesses in their stories, but most often the names are different. It can be difficult to keep straight who is who when referring to them with either their Greek or Roman name. Is it Zues or Jupiter? Is it Hera or Juno? Is Aphrodite or Venus? Encyclopedia Mythica has a great list of major Greek deities and their Roman counterparts. When we are reading Percy Jackson we are working with the Greek names, but our planets are named for the Roman Gods and Goddesses.

When studying Greek and Roman mythology consider using some of the library’s databases. Using the “Reference Center” in World Book Encyclopedia can expand your study on the subject. Search for “Greek and Roman divinities,’ and you will get another chart matching up Greek and Roman counterparts with links to learn more about the individual deities. Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL) is another online resource that will lead you to a variety of online e-books full of mythological information.

If you are trying to keep track of who is related to who in the Pantheon (all the gods of a people or religion collectively), Greek Myhtological Link has great geneology charts as well as maps. Kidipede also has brief descriptions on the differient gods as well as book suggestions for further reading, many that you will find here at the library. Check out some of our reading suggestions too.

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

Multnomah County Library provides books to a number of community led literacy programs. On such program is Street Books. We had an awesome opportunity to sit down with Street Books founder Laura Moulton. Here is what she had to say.

Hello Laura, for those who may not know, please describe what Street Books is all about.

Street Librarian Diana Rempe shows off new bike library donated by Splendid Cycle

Street Books is a bicycle-powered mobile library serving people who live outside in Portland. We serve people who might not access Multnomah County’s library system, for a variety of reasons. We serve different parts of the city, 3 times a week, and have a regular group of faithful patrons.

How/why did you start Street Books?

We got a grant from the Regional Arts & Culture Council, and the first shifts launched in June of 2011. That initial funding was so important to making the project happen. I think the reason behind starting it was that I am a lover of books and good stories, and I saw a group of people at the margins who weren’t accessing books. I think one original inspiration for the project comes from an encounter I had with a man named Joe in the late 90s. He lived outside, and frequented the neighborhood where I lived. We had a long talk about books, and discovered a shared affinity for books about the west, particularly books like The Big Sky by A.B. Guthrie. I wound up getting him a sack of paperbacks from Powells, and I think that might have been an early gesture that planted the seed for Street Books. 

Describe a typical Street Books patron...does that even exist?

What our patrons have in common is that they live outside or are in vulnerable places (living in a car, shelter, etc.). Beyond that, it would be impossible to define a “typical” patron. There is an enormous diversity of readers, and every summer their requests help illustrate this point. This summer I have filled requests at the Workers’ Center on MLK Blvd. for Spanish-speaking authors ranging from Gabriel Garcia Marquez to Eduardo Galeano to a manual on fixing computers (still searching for the last one). James Patterson is a perennial favorite at our other shifts, but so is Ray Bradbury, Ursula LeGuin and Barbara Kingsolver. Another commonality is the appreciation for a good conversation about books and reading. So many of our patrons linger to talk about their experience growing up (with or often without) books, their favorite authors, whether the film was better than the book, etc. And the fact that this sometimes occurs between our patrons and people who have houses, who have stopped to admire the bike library, is all the better.

How long has Street Books been around?

It was founded in 2011, so this summer marks our 5th anniversary!

Street Books relies on community donations including books from Multnomah County Library. Explain what these donations mean to the existence of Street Books.

Street Books exists because the citizens of Portland said YES to a street library for our city. They supported the Kickstarter campaign in the fall of 2011, and they have continued this support in different ways ever since. I am proud of the fact that we are scrappy and don’t have to fundraise for a brick and mortar to hold us. The Ecotrust building donates downstairs space for our library, and Ryan Hashagan with Portland Pedicabs has given us extremely reduced rent to store our bike library in his China Town garage. Multnomah County’s Outreach Services department donates 2 boxes of books every month. So we have formed important partnerships over time that help sustain us. But we need donations to operate. All money that we are able to raise from tax-deductible donations goes directly to providing services to our patrons, to supporting street librarians and to maintaining our bike library. We don’t have fancy letterhead or soirees, but we are steady and after 5 years, still going strong.  

For more information feel free to contact Laura and her team at librarian@streetbooks.org .

Artist's drawing of D.B. Cooper.It was a hot day in Central Library. The air conditioner was busted, the doors were propped wide open, and, thanks to the latest forest fire out on the eastside, the air was about as smoky as the Virginia Cafe circa 1975. I thought about lighting up myself since it couldn’t make things much worse in here, but then I remembered that I quit smoking 20 years ago. Something bad was going to happen, I could feel it.

Mercifully, this is not the actual condition in the library at the moment! Everything is just fine. But if this scene appeals to you for some reason, maybe you should be reading more Portland crime fiction.

Did I leave something important off this list? Let me know!

small weaving loomsThis summer I am trying my hand at weaving. I found a vintage Weave-it loom online last year, but never tried using it until I noticed the book 100 Pin Loom Squares at the library a few weeks ago. I checked out the book, followed the instructions, and started weaving four-inch squares. The squares can be joined to create bags, coasters, scarves, or articles of clothing. I hope to make a small purse with the squares I’ve made.

 

Weaving may seem intimidating since it often requires some type of loom, but in reality weaving can be simple enough that children can do it; some basic weaving projects do not even require a loom. I decided to use a pin loom for my project since it is small, and I thought it would be simple enough to figure out on my own.

Interested in learning how to use a loom? A basic internet search for “DIY loom weaving plans” will bring up results for many different kinds of looms. You can also check out the accompanying book list for more help with your project.

A Committed Reader and TeacherVolunteer Ivy Wong

by Sarah Binns

Multnomah County Library volunteer Ivy Wong loves to talk about books, which means our interview for this article derailed several times as we discussed Harry Potter (the books of which she gradually collected as she grew up), The Hunger Games, and Sherlock Holmes mysteries (some of her favorites). Interestingly for someone as committed to reading as Ivy, her library volunteer work focuses on its people, not on its books. As an English as a second language (ESL) teaching assistant, Ivy provides an invaluable resource to many of Portland's immigrants and others who want to improve their communication skills.

Ivy grew up in Portland with Midland as her home library, though she recalls being awed on occasional visits to Central. While currently working on her bachelor's degree in business through a dual PCC/PSU program, she also volunteers two nights a week at Midland, organizing her college classes around the ESL classes. When I marvel at her commitment, she smiles. “Summer is easier” to balance, she says, “class ends an hour or two before I teach,” so she can go home and eat dinner; during the school year, however, she often eats in the car to make it to her students on time.

In the classroom, Ivy helps patrons with speaking and writing on a theme to get them familiar with English. She enjoys “being able to interact with those who come in for the classes and hear their different experiences.” She says she's met people from all over the world and through her students has picked up some Spanish and Ukrainian words, in addition to brushing up on her Chinese, which she also speaks.

In her spare time -- not that she has much of it -- Ivy reads, of course, with a preference for autobiographies and mysteries. She remembers checking out as many as 25 books at a time when younger. Now, however, she focuses more on her textbooks, but still tries to find time to read in the evenings. It's a lovely testament to her commitment that she says she'll keep teaching at Midland as long as the classes are offered and the students keep coming back.


A Few Facts About Ivy

Home Library: Midland Library

Currently reading: Textbooks for school, mostly business and writing books

Favorite book from childhood: The Boxcar Children series. “I always checked out one of the books when I went to the library.”

A book that made you laugh or cry: In high school, she read the last book in the Princess Diaries series and it struck a chord. “I was having some issues in school and the book made me look at [the situation] differently than I did before.”

Favorite section of the library: Fiction, for the variety

E-reader or paper?  Both. “Whatever way I can get access to a book, that's the way I'll read it.”

Favorite place to read: The library or a bookstore

 
Thanks for reading the MCL Volunteer Spotlight. Stay tuned for our next edition coming soon! See last month's Volunteer Spotlight.

Photo of My Librarian Darcee meditating with running child in backgroundIf I’ve learned nothing else from my twenty-five years as a perpetual beginning yoga student, it’s to honor where I’m at in the moment. And in this moment I’m a total mess.

School started yesterday and with it, the slow begrudging shift back into scheduled living. I have a hard enough time just getting myself out the door in the morning, so trying to corral a free-spirited and easily distracted kid in addition, is easily my least favorite part of parenting.

The one thing that helps quiet my mind and find focus in the eye of the storm that is the morning ritual, is a regular yoga practice. Like many, I don’t have the time nor money to get to a yoga studio as often as I’d like and I lack the focus to go solo at home. That’s why, in anticipation of amped up school mornings, I’ve been turning to Hoopla.

Did you know that there is a treasure trove of wide-ranging yoga instruction videos available to stream right now on Hoopla? I didn’t until recently. So I tried a few out.

I started out bold with a Vinyasa class with Clara Roberts-Oss, jumping in at Episode 3, Twist it out Yoga.  The mountain setting was lovely but the Vinyasa flows were too fast and unfamiliar for me. Then Clara said “booty” and “awesome” one too many times and I went into child pose and didn’t come out.

Humbled by Clara, I next visited Rodney Yee Complete Yoga for Beginners -Season 1, starting with his morning workout. There’s something extraordinarily calming about Rodney Yee and this was a gentle and meditative workout.  And yes, for twenty glorious minutes and a few thereafter, the morning was all tranquil waters and clear skies. Then I got whacked in the face with a foam Thor hammer and realized I’m going to need something with a bit more vigor to reach a deeper calm.

I think I found my go-to class in Hatha Yoga with Cameron Gilley. Yoga videos can veer towards cheesy and over-produced, but Cameron comes off as just a straight-forward tattooed guy on a pink mat in front of what looks like a drizzly Northwest marina. Flow with Grace & Slow Burn Hatha feel a lot like the average yoga class you’d attend at any number of Portland studios and for me, that’s a good thing.

With a limit of eight checkouts per month, I can’t rely on Hoopla workouts entirely to keep me calm this school year. But maybe it can provide the bridge I need to finally inch towards a regular home yoga practice. And when I do lose my cool (because I will), perhaps I can return back to center just a little bit faster.

Check out my list for more online resources and books to help build your physical yoga practice at home. Are you loving an online yoga class that I've overlooked? Share your favorites in the comments!

Challenger Deep book coverThe National Alliance on Mental Illness reports that 1 in 25 Americans live with a serious mental health condition. Teens that are  facing these challenges--mental and physical--or caring for someone that is, know that they are very real and intense.

Teens want to understand, and to be understood.

The Hollywood Teen Council focused a month of reading on books that explored both mental health conditions and physical disabilities. One book that stood out was Challenger Deep by Neal Shusterman, illustrated by his son Brendan Shusterman.

Sienna Lesher, Grant High School student and Hollywood Teen Book Council member, wrote this review:

“The bottom of the trench is only scratching the surface of the earth.”

Caden Bosch suffers from severe mental illness, causing him to live most of his life in a false reality, he sees himself on a boat sailing for the deepest point on earth: Challenger Deep in the Marianas Trench. His life on the boat is hard, but really, life outside was no better. Though hard to understand at first, this book is beautiful and surreal, and I would definitely recommend this to another teen.”

Everybody Sees the Ants book cover

In A.S. King’s, Everybody Sees the Ants, Lucky has been having dreams where he visits his grandfather in a POW camp in Vietnam. Soon he starts to have daily visions of a Greek-Chorus-like group of ants that start to weigh in on the events of his life where he is dealing with severe bullying and his parents potential break-up.  

Alisa Folen, Grant High School student and Hollywood Teen Book Council Chair, created this playlist inspired by “The Ants.”

 

 

Hiding Tonight by Alex Turner

Hero by Family of The Year

Take A Walk by Passion Pit

Cigarette Daydreams by Cage the Elephant

Getting to Know You by Spazzkid

Oblivion by Grimes

The Hunt by Youth Lagoon

Silhouettes by Colony House

 

What is gentrification?

Gentrification is the process by which neighborhoods undergo a rapid increase in value as properties are purchased and renovated by wealthier people than those currently living in the community. This most often occurs in poor and working-class urban neighborhoods resulting in the displacement of those residents. In recent years the signs of gentrification in Portland are easily identifiable and abundant. New owners purchase properties then either improved or tear down and replace what was there. This leads to rents going up dramatically, wealthier people moving into the neighborhood, and area businesses becoming more upscale. All this means that less wealthy, long-time residents can no longer afford to stay.  In fact, a 2015 study by Governing Magazine found that Portland, Oregon has experienced this gentrification process more severely than any other U.S. city since 2000. This has had a profound impact on many Portland neighborhoods as housing costs continue to rise.  More and more people are unable to remain in the neighborhoods where they have long resided and some are unable to find affordable housing within the city limits at all.

What causes gentrification?

Gentrification can happen in any neighborhood where property values suddenly rise as newer, wealthier residents move in, invest in improvements and/or new construction then displace those who have previously lived there. Often, gentrification is a legacy of past policies that restricted people of color to certain neighborhoods and denied them access to financing. This process occurred through redlining. This excerpt from the documentary Race: The Power of an Illusion illustrates how redlining worked:

 

 

In Portland, African Americans were largely restricted to North and Northeast Portland, so it is no surprise that those are two parts of the city undergoing the most rapid gentrification. The Oregonian’s “Roots of Gentrification” series provides an excellent overview of the changes in the city that have greatly contributed to the gentrification of North and Northeast Portland.  Also, the city’s State of Housing in Portland report provides a good overview of the scope of the problem.

 

What has been the result?

While gentrification has affected areas across the city, among the most impacted has been North and Northeast Portland, the long-time center of the city’s African American population. The impact on that community has been profound. Largely priced out of their homes, the city’s black residents are increasingly moving into east Multnomah County where housing is less expensive. This has meant there is far less diversity in traditionally black neighborhoods. A clear example of gentrification in an historically African American community is the Alberta neighborhood. Studies done in 1992 and 2015 show just how much the area has changed. Gentrification also contributes to the rapid increase in rent. A recent study showed Portland's rents rose at  the nation's sixth-fastest rate over the last five years.

 

What is the solution?

That all depends on who you ask, but because gentrification is not the result of a single, simple cause, there is likely no single, simple solution. It is an issue intimately tied to other challenging social problems surrounding race, class, and economic opportunity. The City of Portland has prepared a study of gentrification risk that identifies different strategies to address the issue. Recently, the Portland Housing Advisory Commission recommended a significant increase in the amount of public money spent on affordable housing. In August 2015, city leaders announced new projects in Northeast Portland to provide jobs and subsidized housing. A coalition of community groups has recommended a comprehensive 11-point plan to combat gentrification but still recognize that there is “no silver bullet” that will solve the problem. To address the issue of high rent, the Portland Renters Assembly organizes meetings across the city and would like to take direct action against the rising cost of rent. Clearly, a variety of tactics are needed to ease the most damaging effects of gentrification. It is impossible to know now what will ultimately be the result.

Multnomah County Library's Lucky Day service includes books for kids, teens and adults.  Lucky Day copies are available for spontaneous use and are not subject to hold queues.  Nobody can place holds on these items; it's first come, first served.  That means you might not have to wait at all for the most popular new titles!  You never know what you might find at your neighborhood library - it just might be your Lucky Day!

Medicine is one thing people use to help them feel better when they are ill.  Some medicines are taken once, some for a few days, and some for longer. For medicines that can't be swallowed, other methods like shots can help you stay healthy. 

Another common reason for getting a shot is vaccination. Vaccination, also called immunization, is one way that some people choose to prevent diseases and viruses and to stay healthy.  For more vaccination related information, you can:

More questions? You can always contact a librarian for all your library and information needs!

International breastfeeding symbolWhen I came back to work six months after having my daughter, as a breastfeeding mama, the first thing I had to figure out was how to pump at work. Where would I do it? When would I do it? I pictured a cluttered janitor’s closet or a bathroom (places I have both pumped in a pinch, by the way!). Luckily my workplace is very accommodating toward breastfeeding moms, and I was able to use a discreet office during my pumping times. In fact, at one time there were three women from one department all actively pumping, and there are five of us who are currently still nursing! Wow!

 

But not all new moms are so lucky to have such workplace support. Even though it is Oregon and federal law for a workplace “to provide a break time and space requirement for breastfeeding mothers,” some workplaces may be reluctant to accommodate, or not accommodate at all. In fact, before working at MCL, one of our mamas told a story about being forced to pump away from her workplace because her employer misinterpreted the law, and refused to provide her a space at work. So she literally had to go down the street to a cold, empty building with her own heat source in tow where she fought to keep the lights on. Yikes.

 

If this situation sounds familiar (and hopefully it doesn’t), the important thing to know is requesting a safe, discreet place to pump during your work day is within your rights. If your employer is giving you the run around, you can report them to the Bureau of Labor and Industries, as well as request help to receive a workplace accommodation. It is also within your rights to breastfeed anywhere in public (that includes the library!). So never fear, the law is on your side!

 

My baby is now a two-year-old (sniff), and I love the special bond we have been able to cultivate through breastfeeding. But I couldn’t have done it alone. There are some great organizations out there that support breastfeeding families like KellyMom and La Leche League. Interested in joining a group? The local chapter of La Leche League, La Leche League of Oregon, has meetups and support groups by neighborhood. And if you are looking for some additional breastfeeding resources, be sure to check out what the library has to offer.

Did Aztecs practice human sacrifice? Yes, and so did the Incan and Mayan people. These three Mesoamerican cultures all practiced different forms of human sacrifice for religious reasons.

The Aztec religion included the belief that the sun god, Huitzilopochtli, needed human blood so that the sun would continue its journey in the sky. Both volunteers and prisoners of war found themselves sacrificed for the god.Aztec ceremonial knife

Both the Aztec and Mayan played a ball game that differed a little between the cultures but was a religious ritual for both. And for both the Aztec and Mayan, you didn't want to lose--losers lost a lot more than just the game. Learn about the game at http://chichenitzaruins.org/mayan-ball-game/

Incan priests practiced divination, a ritual to answer questions or to tell the future. Incan divination involved offerings of food and drink to the gods, but also animals and people. The young members of society were valued as sacrifices, which happened in sacred places high in the mountains, closer to the sky gods. One young woman who died hundreds of years ago was found in 1995. She was named Juanita and also is known as the Ice Maiden Mummy.

You can find out more about sacrifices and the ties to religion by going to Student Resources in Context or UXL Encyclopedia of Mythology. Search for "inca mythology," "aztec mythology," or "maya mythology" to learn about the gods, myths and ceremonies. You'll need your Multnomah County Library card if you are outside the library.

Need help finding more information?  Ask a librarian!

 

Sexual orientation, sexual identity, and gender identity have been getting more attention in the news lately, with the Supreme Court decision about same-sex marriage and Caitlyn Jenner's public transition.

Confused? Curious? Concerned? All of the above? The library is a great place to learn more. Teen Health and Wellness has informative articles and also offers teens the opportunity to submit your own stories and videos.  

If you're in or close to Portland, the services of the Sexual Minority Youth Resource Center and TransActive Gender Center may be helpful.

No matter where you are, you can call, text, or chat YouthLine.

And the video below, LGBTQ: Understanding Sexual Orientation and Gender Identities, is a good brief overview of these topics that includes stories from several youth.

Chinese staff波特兰华人服务中心将于八月二十二日举行一年一度的亜裔社区义诊活动,你会到场吗?穆鲁玛郡图书馆将会在场参与,提供有关促进身心健康的资源及书籍,並有华语职员为大家解答有关图书馆各类活动的资料。欢迎各位到图书馆的摊位与我们見面,让我们为你介绍最热门的健康食疗、运动新书及影带。亜裔社区义诊活动在8/22 上午十一时至下午四时于3430 SE Powell 街华人服务中心举行。

World War Two posterSecond World War- Spitfire - cut out viewAt the end of the Great War (as World War One was called at the time), people thought that such a large-scale conflict could never happen again.  Treaties were signed, the League of Nations was formed, new countries were created and Germany was heavily punished for its part in the war.  These measures did nothing to prevent a war from erupting twenty years later and, in fact, caused resentment in Germany that led to new German aggression.  In 1939, another conflict began in Europe that became World War Two.

For summary information and timelines, check out these two websites:
The History Place provides a timeline of World War II events. Many of the events have links to more detailed information and photographs. In its WWII section, BBC Education online explores secret service, presents radio reports the days before Britain declared war and sound clip memories of evacuees, and various photos from the war. The BBC also features a site for primary school students about children’s experiences during the war.  For a visually interesting site, see The Imperial War Museum’s page on WWII. It includes short essays, photos and film clips on everything from “How Alan Turing Cracked the Enigma Code” and “How Radar Changed The Second World War” to “11 Amazing Home Front Posters from the Second World War”.

For primary sources, take a look at Yale University’s World War II documents. This site provides the text of major documents including armistice agreements, Nuremberg War Crimes Trial sources, German and Japanese surrender documents, and more. The University of Washington also has links to primary sources from WWII and the era including photos of ration cards and posters, diaries, films and a WWII image bank with photos from the Netherlands, and much more.

photo of raising the flag on Iwo JimaFor resources about the involvement of the United States in the war, check out some of these sites:
A People at War highlights the contributions of thousands of Americans, both military and civilian, who served their country during WWII. The Pictures of World War II site from the National Archives includes about 200 photographs divided into a wide variety of categories; everything from "Japan Attacks" to "Rest & Relaxation". The National Archives website also includes links to World War II records including sections on America on the Homefront, Japanese American Internment and Relocation Records, and photographs of African Americans during World War II.  The National WWII Museum has a great collection of images and oral history interviews.  The U.S. Navy has a website devoted to WWII including information on Pacific battles, Pearl Harbor and the invasion of Normandy. PBS and Ken Burns created a televsion series entitled The War that is "the story of the Second World War through personal accounts of a handful of men and women from four American towns." You'll find lots of information from the series and links to other media and sources on this website

Hello, library blog reader! I’m typing this post to you from the air-conditioned confines of my carpeted library cube, quiet save for the [•hum•] of the computer and the sounds of other librarians at their other computers: [clickity-click], [clickity-click], and the occasional sniffle or private exclamation. 

Photo of Ross holding a copy of Horrorstor\\ Why am I typing this? \\ Sending this digital blog bottle out into the big Internet ocean? (That is an excellent question.) There is a type of book that I want you to know about. It doesn’t have an official name™, at least none that I know of, but I’ll call it the book as thing, or BAT*.

Most of the world’s books take their book-ness for granted. They line up their letters and words in comfortably normal columns on perfectly(1) numbered(2) pages(3), and you read them and say to yourself “Oh what a fine story.” But the BATs don’t conform to such literature societies' niceties. They chop up their sentences and paragraphs and strew them about, they dye their letters in garish colors, they go up-side down. They’re the punks and iconophiles of the book world, and they shout in your face:

- I AM MY OWN BOOK! -

Photo of Ross holding a copy of Ship of Theseus.And you, my dear computer-screen confidante, are forced to acknowledge:

I am this book’s reader.

Suddenly the act of reading has become a little more intimate, a little more personal. The walls between fictional world and your world have gotten a little more not-there. Creepy books become creepier. Weird books become weirder. Real books become real-er.

Where can you find a BAT in the wild? It's not easy. They might be hiding under the subject heading "experimental fiction" or "marginalia -- specimens." Helpful, I hope, will be a list that I have made for you called "Multcolib My Librarian Ross: The book, the thing," which will provide you with some specimens for your consideration.

Photo of portion of Ross's foot and The Familiar.When you’ve finished a BAT, you can close it up and put it back on your bookshelf, or back through the steel door of the library book drop. [•clank•] But unlike other books where the story is more tidily stored between the covers, it won’t be easily forgotten. Because this book isn't just a container for the story, it’s the story itself. It’s got your fingerprints all over it.

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{*: Inspiration for this appellation - book as thing - should probably be credited to the wonderful, the amusing, The Thing The Book.}

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